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John Simkin

Aliens and the Death of JFK

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This article appeared in the lastest edition of the Canadian:

http://www.agoracosmopolitan.com/home/Fron...5/22/01585.html

Author claims he knows reasons for former U.S. President John F. Kennedy's assassination

by Anthony James

"Citizens of this Earth, we are not alone."

With those dramatic words, President John F. Kennedy intended to inform the American public and the world at large that the U.S. government had made contact with aliens from deep space. But before he could deliver the speech on November 22, 1963, the beloved leader was cut down by an assassin's bullets. That is the astonishing claim of JFK researcher Professor Lawrence Merrick, author of a blockbuster book entitled Killing the Messenger: The Death of JFK.

"We now know the real reason why President Kennedy was assassinated," declared Prof. Merrick of Cambridge, Mass. "It appears that some individuals within our government were determined to maintain the secrecy surrounding captured UFOs and decided to silence the President before he could speak." Prof. Merrick says he began a search for the undelivered speech after learning the President's original hand-written notes had fallen into the hands of Texas Governor John Connally, who was riding in JFK's death car that fateful day in Dallas. "I was surprised to find that Kennedy handed Connally the speech, which was on note cards, to look at, shortly before the motorcade set off at 12:55 p.m.," said Prof. Merrick. The governor was badly wounded in the gun attack. "Connally was terrified for his own life," said the historian. "He placed the bloodstained index cards in a safety deposit box with orders to a trusted aide that the contents not be revealed until after his death."

When Gov. Connally died in 1993, the aide removed the cards and held on to them. Last year, Prof. Merrick tracked down the aide, who passed the speech on with a guarantee of anonymity. Prof. Merrick was flabbergasted when he read the cards. He took them to five handwriting analysts, who agreed the speech was "95 percent certain" to be Kennedy's. Research reveals that just days before his trip to Dallas, JFK met with his predecessor Dwight D. Eisenhower, notes Prof. Merrick. "I believe he was seeking advice on whether to go public with the facts about UFOs," Prof. Merrick said. "But other government insiders apparently felt the truth about UFOs would cause widespread panic. And they were willing to kill to keep the information secret.

http://www.agoracosmopolitan.com/home/Fron...5/22/01585.html

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I find this rather unsubstantiated.

I believe in UFOs (expansion required) and that we may have been visited by extraterrestrials, but find these sort of statements (so far) unsubstantiated.

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This story has been around for some time so I'm not sure why it has just appeared in the Canadian....It was around in 2001 which I think might be when the book was published ?

http://www.ratical.org/ratville/JFK/JohnJu...JFKwasShot.html

"Here is what the President would have said:

My fellow Americans, people of the world, today we set forth on a journey into a new era. One age, the childhood of mankind, is ending and another age is about to begin.

The journey of which I speak is full of unknowable challenges, but I believe that all our yesterdays, all the struggles of the past, have uniquely prepared our generation to prevail.

Citizens of this Earth, we are not alone. God, in His infinite wisdom, has seen fit to populate His universe with other beings -- intelligent creatures such as ourselves. How can I state this with such authority? In the year 1947 our military forces recovered from the dry New Mexico desert the remains of an aircraft of unknown origin. Science soon determined that this vehicle came from the far reaches of outer space. Since that time our government has made contact with the creators of that spacecraft.

Though this news may sound fantastic -- and indeed, terrifying -- I ask that you not greet it with undue fear or pessimism. I assure you, as your President, that these beings mean us no harm.

Rather, they promise to help our nation overcome the common enemies of all mankind -- tyranny, poverty, disease, war. We have determined that they are not foes, but friends. Together with them we can create a better world. I cannot tell you that there will be no stumbling or missteps on the road ahead.

But I believe that we have found the true destiny of the people of this great land: To lead the world into a glorious future. In the coming days, weeks and months, you will learn more about these visitors, why they are here and why our leaders have kept their presence a secret from you for so long.

I ask you to look to the future not with timidity but with courage. Because we can achieve in our time the ancient vision of peace on Earth and prosperity for all humankind.

God bless you."

A post on Rense.com from 2001 claims to have tracked the source to the Weekly World News newspaper (Canada) Date: April 30th, 1996

http://www.rense.com/general10/jfkufo.htm

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Anyone with half a brain knows that JFK shot

himself. Bobby's brother was having an affair

with Jackie who (Jackie) was in fact an alien from the planet Glokk.

JFK couldn't handle Jackie because he caught her talking

Glokk ( the language of planet Glokk) behind his back.

JFK didn't understand Glokk although he had taken a

degree in intergalactic languages in his first incarnation as

Marilyn Monroe's [Deleted]. His fellow [Deleted]

graduands voted JFK the most likely [Deleted] to succeed at the end

of term gala. Anyway.....and this is where it almost gets interesting.

After he was reincarnated ( his 22nd reincarnation ....note the number 22)

as Julius Caesar JFK decided that assassination wasn't for him - he found out about the assassination plot

before hand and was quickly reincarnated on the Planet Glokk as Abraham Blinkon ( The then President of Glokk)

It was on Planet Glokk where JFK amazingly met Jackie who was working as Joan River's

face (Joan is a former President of Planet Glokk).

Again and this is extraordinary JFK switched on the courtesy

light in his Glokk Lincoln Incontravertible ( a sort of early

flying bean bag) which was being driven by Lee Harbey Oswoold

and who did JFK see sitting on the hoffenklinker pan but

....yes you guessed Albert Einstein!

No not that Albert Einstein!

Albert Einstein who was a Mafia don and local large intestine polisher for the

Capo Di Tutti Frutti of all Assassinated Presidents of Planet Glokk's

Dominoe Spoongfers ( A Glokk boardgame using [Deleted] as chips).

Now this is where it gets really interesting Albert decided

that JFK and Jackie should be sent to earth to take part in the

Great American Kill the President Open.JFK thought

he was going to be taking part but did not realise he was to be the

target.He should have known better!!!

In a state of panic JFK chickened out and shot himself.

It is highly significant that after his death $10 Billion dollars' (North Vietnamese) worth of

newly printed Bank of Glokk bills were found in JFK's shoe although this fact was

quickly covered up by the local Cosukeen (pronounced [deleted]) aliens who were running the

Great American Kill the President Open.

And the rest is history.

Edited by Eugene B. Connolly

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I find this rather unsubstantiated.

I believe in UFOs (expansion required) and that we may have been visited by extraterrestrials, but find these sort of statements (so far) unsubstantiated.

You are being too kind. It is nonsense. I just thought I would give you a laugh.

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John,

Please let me explain.

I believe that there are UFOs and that we have possibly been visited by ETs.

I have never seen any evidence of this though I have had experience of it myself (none provable).

I await definitive evidence, but have not seen anything so far - despite ourhaving cameraphones, etc. I'll still believe, but I won't believe so called "evidence" that is unsubstantiated. Everything I have seen so far is explainable or simply faked. I really hope that one day solid evidence will come about. Until then, I'll cling to my belief though I cannot offer a shred of evidence for it.

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John:

I have a video segment, in which a private investigator named Milo Spiriglio claimed to have received from a reliable source a CIA transcript of telephone wiretaps on Marilyn Monroe's phone that indicates that Monroe was talking about some of the state secrets that she had been told by the Kennedys. Among those were the CIA's attempts on the life of Fidel Castro using mob connections and the killing of Dominican Leader Rafael Trujillo.

It alleges that Robert Kennedy told her about the President's trip to a "secret airbase" to inspect "things from outer space". It references to "crashed space crafts" "alien bodies" and "New Mexico". It also said that, "subject (Monroe) threatened to hold a press confernce and tell all". The document is dated August 3, 1962, the day before Monroe was found dead from an apparent suicide.

That's about as much as I know about the subject. There is some info on the internet about JFK and MJ-12 or Majestic-12 Project if anyone is interested in studying it.

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John:

I have a video segment, in which a private investigator named Milo Spiriglio claimed to have received from a reliable source a CIA transcript of telephone wiretaps on Marilyn Monroe's phone that indicates that Monroe was talking about some of the state secrets that she had been told by the Kennedys. Among those were the CIA's attempts on the life of Fidel Castro using mob connections and the killing of Dominican Leader Rafael Trujillo.

It alleges that Robert Kennedy told her about the President's trip to a "secret airbase" to inspect "things from outer space". It references to "crashed space crafts" "alien bodies" and "New Mexico". It also said that, "subject (Monroe) threatened to hold a press confernce and tell all". The document is dated August 3, 1962, the day before Monroe was found dead from an apparent suicide.

That's about as much as I know about the subject. There is some info on the internet about JFK and MJ-12 or Majestic-12 Project if anyone is interested in studying it.

You might be thinking of this Central Intelligence Agency report on Dorothy Kilgallen and Marilyn Monroe dated 3rd August, 1962. It is believed that this document is a forgery and is an attempt to discredit JFK researchers who used it to argue that there was a connection between the assassination and UFOs.

Wiretap of telephone conversation between reporter Dorothy Kilgallen and her close friend, Howard Rothberg; from wiretap of telephone conversation of Marilyn Monroe and Attorney General Robert Kennedy. Appraisal of Content: (Blacked Out).

1. Rothberg discussed the apparent comeback of subject with Kilgallen and the break up with the Kennedys. Rothberg told Kilgallen that she was attending Hollywood parties hosted by the "inner circle" among Hollywood's elite and was becoming the talk of the town again. Rothberg indicated in so many words, that she had secrets to tell, no doubt arising from her trists (sic) with the President and the Attorney General. One such (illegible) mentions the visit by the President at a secret air base for the purpose of inspecting things from outer space. Kilgallen replied that she knew what might be the source of the visit. In the mid-fifties Kilgallen learned of secret effort by US and UK governments to identify the origins of crashed spacecraft and dead bodies, from a British government official. Kilgallen believed the story may have come from the (illegible) in the late forties. Kilgallen said that if the story is true, it could cause terrible embarrassment to Jack and his plans to have NASA put men on the moon.

2. Subject repeatedly called the Attorney General and complained about the way she was being ignored by the President and his brother.

3. Subject threatened to hold a press conference and would tell all.

4. Subject made references to "bases" in Cuba and knew of the President's plan to kill Castro.

5. Subject made reference to her "diary of secrets" and what the newspapers would do with such disclosures.

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I found this on the Internet so it must be true:

http://uforeview.tripod.com/gleason.html

Jackie Gleason & The Little "Men From Mars"

From the book: UFOs Among the Stars By Tim Beckley

by Timothy Green Beckley

Way back in the mid-1960s, I got a letter in the mail from Jackie Gleason Productions, Hollywood, Florida, ordering a copy of a mimeographed booklet I had put together relating to UFOs. This, to me, was confirmation of what I had heard rumors about for a long time ... that "the Great One" was personally involved in researching UFOs. Supposedly - and I've since found out that this is true - Gleason had one of the greatest UFO book collections in the world. This is where the tale gets a bit wilder. A story circulated by Gleason's ex-wife, Beverly, has Jackie actually viewing the bodies of several aliens who died when their craft crashed in the Southwest.

The story was carried originally in the National Enquirer, and though Beverly Gleason later confirmed it to members of the press who were able to track her down, independent confirmation of Gleason's supposed experience could - for the longest time - not be certified.

Now with the striking revelations of a young man who knew Gleason personally, it can safely be said that such an event did take place...

Larry Warren was an Airman First Class stationed at Bentwaters Air Force Base in England (a NATO installation staffed mainly by US. servicemen) when an incredible series of events took place over Christmas week of 1980. A UFO was picked up on radar and subsequently came down just outside the perimeter of the base in a dense forest.

On the first of several nights of confrontation with the Unknown, three security police ventured into the area across an eerie-looking object hovering just above the ground. One of the MPs was mesmerized by the UFO and was unable to move for nearly an hour. While in this mental state, he received some sort of telepathic message that the craft would return. For the next few nights, up to 80 US. servicemen, British bobbies, as well as civilians from some nearby farms, witnessed an historic event. According to Larry Warrenwho stood within feet of this craft from another world-three occupants came out of the ship and actually communicated with a high ranking member of the U.S. Air Force.

This close encounter at Bentwaters has become the subject of several books (see "From Out Of The Blue", Jenny Randles, Inner Light Publications) and has been given wide publicity on CNN, Home Box Office and more recently "Unsolved Mysteries." Warren has, in a sense, become somewhat of a celebrity himself as he remains in the public eye, willing to talk about what he observed.

"Jackie Gleason was interested in hearing my story first hand," Warren offers as a means of explaining how he met the famous comic in May, 1986. "At the time I was living in Connecticut and both CNN and HBO had run pieces on the Bentwaters case. Through mutual friends who knew members of his family, I was told that Gleason would like to talk with me privately in his home in Westchester County, and so the meeting was set for a Saturday when we would both have some time to relax'".

After being formally introduced, the two men ventured into Gleason's recreation room complete with pool table and full-size bar. "There were hundreds of UFO books all over the place," Warren explains, "but Jackie was quick to tell me that this was only a tiny portion of his entire collection, which was housed in his home in Florida." For the rest of the day, UFO researcher and UFO witness exchanged information.

"Gleason seemed to be very well informed on the subject," Larry says, "as he knew the smallest detail about most cases and showed me copies of the book "Clear Intent" that had just been published, as well as a copy of "Sky Crash", a British book about Bentwaters that was published, actually, before all the details of this case were made public. I remember Gleason telling me about his own sightings of several discs in Florida and how he thought there were undersea UFOs bases out in the Bermuda Triangle."

But it wasn't till after Warren had downed a few beers and Gleason had had a number of drinks-"his favorite, Rob Roys"-that conversation really got down to brass tacks. "At some point, Gleason turned to me and said, 'I want to tell you something very amazing that will probably come out some day anyway. We've got em!' 'Got what', I wanted to know? 'Aliens!' Gleason sputtered, catching his breath."

According to Warren, Jackie proceeded to tell him the intriguing set of circumstances that led him to the stunning conclusion that extraterrestrials have arrived on our cosmic shores. "It was back when Nixon was in office that something truly amazing happened to me," Gleason explained. "We were close golfing buddies and had been out on the golf course all day when somewhere around the 15th hole, the subject of UFOs came up. Not many people know this," Gleason told Warren, "but the President shares my interest in this matter and has a large collection of books in his home on UFOs just like I do. For some reason, however, he never really took me into his confidence about what he personally knew to be true... one of the reasons being that he was usually sur- rounded by so many aids and advisers."

Later that night, matters changed radically, when Richard Nixon showed up at Gleason's house around midnight. "He was all alone for a change. There were no secret service agents with him or anyone else. I said, 'Mr. President, what are you doing here?' and he said he wanted to take me someplace and show me something." Gleason got into the President's private car and they sped off into the darkness - their destination being Homestead Air Force Base.

"I remember we got to the gate and this young MP came up to the car to look to see inside and his jaw seemed to drop a foot when he saw who was behind the wheel. He just sort of pointed and we headed off." Warren says that later Gleason found out that the secret service was going absolutely crazy trying to find out where Nixon was. "We drove to the very far end of the base in a segregated area," Gleason went on, "finally stopping near a well-guarded building. The security police saw us coming and just sort of moved back as we passed them and entered the structure.

There were a number of labs we passed through first before we entered a section where Nixon pointed out what he said was the wreckage from a flying saucer, enclosed in several large cases." Gleason noted his initial reaction was that this was all a joke brought on by their earlier conversation on the golf course. But it wasn't, as Gleason soon learned. "Next, we went into an inner chamber and there were six or eight of what looked like glass-topped Coke freezers. Inside them were the mangled remains of what I took to be children. Then - upon closer examination - I saw that some of the other figures looked quite old. Most of them were terribly mangled as if they had been in an accident."

According to Larry Warren's testimony (regarding Gleason's lengthy conversation about UFOs and space visitors), "I forget whether he said they had three or four fingers on each hand, but they definitely were not human...of this he was most certain!" For three weeks following his trip with Nixon to Homestead Air Force Base, the world famous entertainer couldn't sleep and couldn't eat. "Jackie told me that he was very traumatized by all of this.

He just couldn't understand why our government wouldn't tell the public all they knew about UFOs and space visitors. He said he even drank more heavily than usual until he could regain some of his composure and come back down to everyday reality." Larry Warren is convinced that Gleason wasn't lying to him. "You could tell that he was very sincere - he took the whole affair very seriously, and I could tell that he wanted to get the matter off his chest, and this was why he was telling me all of this." And as far as Larry Warren was concerned, the Great One's personal testimony only added extra credibility to his own first hand experience with aliens while he was in the service.

"Jackie felt just like I do that the government needs to 'come clean,' and tell us all it knows about space visitors. It time they stopped lying to the public and release all the evidence they have. When they do, then we'll all be able to see the same things the late Jackie Gleason did!"

Hopefully this day may arrive soon.

NOTE!

The book UFOs Among the Stars can be purchased directly from the Conspiracy Journal Bookshop.

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John,

It would be interesting if they did a DNA analysis on the "bloodstained notes"

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I find this rather unsubstantiated.

I believe in UFOs (expansion required) and that we may have been visited by extraterrestrials, but find these sort of statements (so far) unsubstantiated.

You are being too kind. It is nonsense. I just thought I would give you a laugh.

spent 8 weeks in the NV desert a few yrs ago in a classified area on the other side of the Mountain from Area 51-saw alot of unusual things in the air at night but remain convinced they were CFO's-classified flying objects.

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I found this on the Internet so it must be true:

http://uforeview.tripod.com/gleason.html

Jackie Gleason & The Little "Men From Mars"

From the book: UFOs Among the Stars By Tim Beckley

by Timothy Green Beckley

Way back in the mid-1960s, I got a letter in the mail from Jackie Gleason Productions, Hollywood, Florida, ordering a copy of a mimeographed booklet I had put together relating to UFOs. This, to me, was confirmation of what I had heard rumors about for a long time ... that "the Great One" was personally involved in researching UFOs. Supposedly - and I've since found out that this is true - Gleason had one of the greatest UFO book collections in the world. This is where the tale gets a bit wilder. A story circulated by Gleason's ex-wife, Beverly, has Jackie actually viewing the bodies of several aliens who died when their craft crashed in the Southwest.

The story was carried originally in the National Enquirer, and though Beverly Gleason later confirmed it to members of the press who were able to track her down, independent confirmation of Gleason's supposed experience could - for the longest time - not be certified.

Now with the striking revelations of a young man who knew Gleason personally, it can safely be said that such an event did take place...

Larry Warren was an Airman First Class stationed at Bentwaters Air Force Base in England (a NATO installation staffed mainly by US. servicemen) when an incredible series of events took place over Christmas week of 1980. A UFO was picked up on radar and subsequently came down just outside the perimeter of the base in a dense forest.

On the first of several nights of confrontation with the Unknown, three security police ventured into the area across an eerie-looking object hovering just above the ground. One of the MPs was mesmerized by the UFO and was unable to move for nearly an hour. While in this mental state, he received some sort of telepathic message that the craft would return. For the next few nights, up to 80 US. servicemen, British bobbies, as well as civilians from some nearby farms, witnessed an historic event. According to Larry Warrenwho stood within feet of this craft from another world-three occupants came out of the ship and actually communicated with a high ranking member of the U.S. Air Force.

This close encounter at Bentwaters has become the subject of several books (see "From Out Of The Blue", Jenny Randles, Inner Light Publications) and has been given wide publicity on CNN, Home Box Office and more recently "Unsolved Mysteries." Warren has, in a sense, become somewhat of a celebrity himself as he remains in the public eye, willing to talk about what he observed.

"Jackie Gleason was interested in hearing my story first hand," Warren offers as a means of explaining how he met the famous comic in May, 1986. "At the time I was living in Connecticut and both CNN and HBO had run pieces on the Bentwaters case. Through mutual friends who knew members of his family, I was told that Gleason would like to talk with me privately in his home in Westchester County, and so the meeting was set for a Saturday when we would both have some time to relax'".

After being formally introduced, the two men ventured into Gleason's recreation room complete with pool table and full-size bar. "There were hundreds of UFO books all over the place," Warren explains, "but Jackie was quick to tell me that this was only a tiny portion of his entire collection, which was housed in his home in Florida." For the rest of the day, UFO researcher and UFO witness exchanged information.

"Gleason seemed to be very well informed on the subject," Larry says, "as he knew the smallest detail about most cases and showed me copies of the book "Clear Intent" that had just been published, as well as a copy of "Sky Crash", a British book about Bentwaters that was published, actually, before all the details of this case were made public. I remember Gleason telling me about his own sightings of several discs in Florida and how he thought there were undersea UFOs bases out in the Bermuda Triangle."

But it wasn't till after Warren had downed a few beers and Gleason had had a number of drinks-"his favorite, Rob Roys"-that conversation really got down to brass tacks. "At some point, Gleason turned to me and said, 'I want to tell you something very amazing that will probably come out some day anyway. We've got em!' 'Got what', I wanted to know? 'Aliens!' Gleason sputtered, catching his breath."

According to Warren, Jackie proceeded to tell him the intriguing set of circumstances that led him to the stunning conclusion that extraterrestrials have arrived on our cosmic shores. "It was back when Nixon was in office that something truly amazing happened to me," Gleason explained. "We were close golfing buddies and had been out on the golf course all day when somewhere around the 15th hole, the subject of UFOs came up. Not many people know this," Gleason told Warren, "but the President shares my interest in this matter and has a large collection of books in his home on UFOs just like I do. For some reason, however, he never really took me into his confidence about what he personally knew to be true... one of the reasons being that he was usually sur- rounded by so many aids and advisers."

Later that night, matters changed radically, when Richard Nixon showed up at Gleason's house around midnight. "He was all alone for a change. There were no secret service agents with him or anyone else. I said, 'Mr. President, what are you doing here?' and he said he wanted to take me someplace and show me something." Gleason got into the President's private car and they sped off into the darkness - their destination being Homestead Air Force Base.

"I remember we got to the gate and this young MP came up to the car to look to see inside and his jaw seemed to drop a foot when he saw who was behind the wheel. He just sort of pointed and we headed off." Warren says that later Gleason found out that the secret service was going absolutely crazy trying to find out where Nixon was. "We drove to the very far end of the base in a segregated area," Gleason went on, "finally stopping near a well-guarded building. The security police saw us coming and just sort of moved back as we passed them and entered the structure.

There were a number of labs we passed through first before we entered a section where Nixon pointed out what he said was the wreckage from a flying saucer, enclosed in several large cases." Gleason noted his initial reaction was that this was all a joke brought on by their earlier conversation on the golf course. But it wasn't, as Gleason soon learned. "Next, we went into an inner chamber and there were six or eight of what looked like glass-topped Coke freezers. Inside them were the mangled remains of what I took to be children. Then - upon closer examination - I saw that some of the other figures looked quite old. Most of them were terribly mangled as if they had been in an accident."

According to Larry Warren's testimony (regarding Gleason's lengthy conversation about UFOs and space visitors), "I forget whether he said they had three or four fingers on each hand, but they definitely were not human...of this he was most certain!" For three weeks following his trip with Nixon to Homestead Air Force Base, the world famous entertainer couldn't sleep and couldn't eat. "Jackie told me that he was very traumatized by all of this.

He just couldn't understand why our government wouldn't tell the public all they knew about UFOs and space visitors. He said he even drank more heavily than usual until he could regain some of his composure and come back down to everyday reality." Larry Warren is convinced that Gleason wasn't lying to him. "You could tell that he was very sincere - he took the whole affair very seriously, and I could tell that he wanted to get the matter off his chest, and this was why he was telling me all of this." And as far as Larry Warren was concerned, the Great One's personal testimony only added extra credibility to his own first hand experience with aliens while he was in the service.

"Jackie felt just like I do that the government needs to 'come clean,' and tell us all it knows about space visitors. It time they stopped lying to the public and release all the evidence they have. When they do, then we'll all be able to see the same things the late Jackie Gleason did!"

Hopefully this day may arrive soon.

NOTE!

The book UFOs Among the Stars can be purchased directly from the Conspiracy Journal Bookshop.

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I myself believe that JFK was far too canny a politician to spill all that in a speech that no-one in the world was truly prepped for. Going up against the Fed, big steel, big oil, anti-Communism, was quite a set of earthly endeavours - dropping aliens into that mix would have been enormously discrediting, and would have denied him a second term for his reforms. LeMay at Air Force and the JCS would have covered up the evidence and closed the coffin on JFK's career in a way that would have cost no bullets.

Add the dangers of JFK's scandalous love life, and it would have been all over. If Marilyn Monroe knew anything, it may have been BS pillow talk to tease her gullibility. And I'm not prepared to slander Monroe without evidence that she was that gullible, beyond romantic desperation.

JFK may have been more activist than Truman or Eisenhower, and thus more reckless - but he was no less resourceful and deliberate a politician. Nor were his advisors and speechwriters idiots.

Edited by David Andrews

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FOREWORD to Peter Lavinda’s Sinister Forces

By JIM HOUGAN

Just when the 20th Century went amok, and why, is difficult to say,

but the creation of the CIA would seem to have been, at the very least,

a contributing factor.

Born in the septic afterglow of World War II, and in keen anticipation of

its successor, WW III (a/k/a “the Big One”), the Agency was shaped, in part,

by transformative events that had taken place earlier in the century. These

were the efflorescence of psychiatry as an important medical practice, and a

turn-of-the-century occult revival that reached a crescendo in the 1920s.

Taken together, these events conspired toward unforeseen ends, not the

least of which was the conversion of the American heartland into a laboratory

experiment in “psychological warfare.”

As Peter Levenda, the author of this extraordinary and deeply scary book,

pointsout,thetermisatranslationofaGermanword,Weltansschauungskrieg

(literally, “world-view warfare”). By way of example, one battle in this war

got under way in 1953, when the Central Intelligence Agency convened “a

prestigious group of scientists” (watch out, dear Reader, whenever you see that

phrase) to discuss the problem of UFOs. There were waves of sightings at

the time, and people, in and out of government, were getting nervous about

them. Meeting behind closed doors, with CIA security guards at the ready,

the so-called “Robertson Panel” (named for Dr. H.P. Robertson, a physicist

and weapons expert at Caltech) studied the Tremonton sightings and other

films of lights in the sky, and listened patiently to the reports of experts from

the private sector, the Air Force and Navy.

Soon, it became apparent that the experts were in disagreement. Some

claimed that the lights could be explained in terms of natural phenomena

(e.g., sunlight on the wings of sea-gulls). Others, such as the Navy’s Photo-

Laboratory, insisted that, on careful study, the same objects

appeared to be “self-luminous,” and therefore intelligently guided.

So it was a question of seagulls or rockets or spaceships. Or something.

No matter. Since the experts could not agree on the meaning of the

evidence in front of them, the scientific problem was redefined in political

terms. Whatever was zipping around in the skies over America, it hadn’t

killed anyone (at least not yet, at least not directly). So there didn’t appear

to be a military threat.

Or was there?

The question arose as to what might happen if the Soviets tried to exploit

the phenomenon, preying on the superstitions and weaknesses of the man in

the street. A “War of the Worlds” panic might easily result. “Mass hysteria”

would set in, and emergency reporting channels would be overloaded. Air-

defense intelligence sources would be compromised.

The Reds could walk right in! If not to Washington, then West Berlin.

Something had to be done.

It was decided, therefore, that the subject had to be “debunked.” That is

to say, UFOs needed to be made intellectually disreputable in the hope that

they would eventually become unthinkable. In this way, the problem (if not

the lights themselves) would be made to disappear.

So it was that a covert operation was mounted, with the Ozzie & Harriet

world of Middle America as its target. Celebrities such as Arthur Godfrey

were enlisted to make fun of the subject and ridicule those who were in-

terested in it. UFO watchdog groups, such as Wisconsin’s Aerial Phenom-

ena Research Organization (APRO), were placed under surveillance and

infiltrated. The Jam Handy Organization, which produced World War II

films for the American Army, was retained, along with the Walt Disney

organization. Journalists working for Life and the Saturday Evening Post

were dragged into the fray, as was the Navy’s Special Devices Center on

Long Island.

It took a while, but UFOs eventually became a kind of in-joke among those

who hoped to be taken seriously. To raise the issue in public was to invite

ridicule and trigger snickers. By 1960, curiosity about mysterious lights in

the sky was regarded by many as evidence of mental “instability.” While an

expression of interest in the subject would not be enough to get you com-

mitted, neither would it enhance your resume.

Other psy-ops followed, at home and abroad. Levenda discusses many

of them, including Gen. Edward Lansdale’s manipulation of the vampire

myth in the Philippines, and the CIA’s scheme to eliminate Fidel Castro by

persuading his constituents that he was, in fact, el Anticristo.

The JFK assassination was, of course, a focal-point in the world-view war

wagedbytheCIA.JustastheAgencyconspiredtomakecuriosityabout“flying

saucers” a litmus test for an addled mind, excessive interest in the President’s

murder was made to seem “ghoulish” and trivial. For a journalist or historian

to write critically about either subject was professional suicide.

Eventually, psy-ops like these combined to redefine the parameters of ac-

ceptable discourse in America. Principal among the notions placed beyond

the Pale was the practice and theory of “conspiracism”—which soon came

to include criticism of mainstream reportage. More than a matter of seeing

cabals behind every murder, it was a way of thinking, a stance toward the

networks, the press and the feds. Anyone who looked too deeply into events,

or who asked too many questions, was dismissed as “a conspiracy-theorist.”

(This, after MK-ULTRA, Iran-Contra, BCCI and the destruction of the

World Trade Centers.)

In some ways, it is as if the century itself has been encrypted, so that if

an historian would be honest, he must also become an investigator reporter.

Failing that, we are left at the mercy of ambitious academicians and journal-

ists, stenographers to power who are themselves complicit in an astonishing

string of cover-ups and atrocities that stretch from Dealey Plaza to Watergate,

Waco to 9-11.

Pier Paolo Pasolini, the Italian poet and film director who was stomped

to death by a street-hustler in 1975 (unless, as some insist, he was beaten to

death by a gang of fascists) understood. Fascinated by the 20th Century vec-

tors of politics and violence, Pasolini despaired of the way in which the age

has been encrypted. Writing in Corriere della Sera, a left-wing newspaper,

he declared,

I know the names of those responsible for the slaughters...

I know the names of the powerful group...

I know the names of those who, between one mass and the next, made

provision and guaranteed political protection...

I know the names of the important and serious figures who are behind the

ridiculous figures...

I know the names of the important and serious figures behind the tragic

kids...

I know all these names and all the acts (the slaughters, the attacks on insti-

tutions) they have been guilty of...

I know. But I don’t have the proof. I don’t even have clues.

Well, here they are: the clues, seething in the evidentiary equivalent of what

the French call “a basket of crabs,” in the first volume of what promises to be

a virtual encyclopedia of clues. Levenda calls Sinister Forces “a grimoire,” or

manual for invoking demons.

Certainly, there are demons enough in its pages: Charles Manson and

Richard Helms, Aleister Crowley and David Ferrie, Jack Parsons and the Son

of Sam. The “usual suspects,” you say? Well, yes, of course. But the suspects

are served up with an entourage of angels and demons you may never have

heard of: Arthur Young and C.D. Jackson, Andrija Puharich and The Nine,

not to mention a claque of “Wandering Bishops” and the proprietors of Music

World in Wilder, Kentucky (surely the model for the nightmare-cantina in

Quentin Tarantino’s “From Dusk Til Dawn”).

But that’s just for openers. Levenda’s study is broad and deep, a life’s

work that runs to volumes. What distinguishes it from other efforts, such

as those of Pasolini, is not merely its comprehensiveness. Rather, it is

Levenda’s realization that a matrix of politics and violence is incapable of

explaining the demented century that shuddered to an end in Manhattan,

not so long ago. What’s needed is a third dimension, and that dimension,

he tells us, is “the occult.”

By this, Levenda means something broader than a mix of magic and

religion. When he writes of the occult, he means to include whatever is

secret, hidden, or unknown. Add this dimension to those of politics and

violence, and the century shivers into focus. Sinister Forces is about evil in

what is now the digital age: Evil 2.0.

Time magazine long ago, and famously, posed the question: “Is God

Dead?” Implicit in Levenda’s study is a related inquiry: Did the Devil

survive Him? If he did not, then how are we to explain a century of rec-

reational homicide and political mayhem?

Perhaps with reference to what seems to be a Fortean element: the pattern

of coincidence that enfolds these highly strange events, adding a distinct

“woo-woo factor” to Levenda’s study. Whether it is Lee Harvey Oswald’s

habit of hanging out at the Bluebird Cafe in Atsugi, Japan (“Bluebird” was

the code-name of a CIA mind control program to produce “programmed

assassins”), or the famous chain of coincidences surrounding the Kennedy

and Lincoln assassinations, (eg., Lincoln’s secretary named Kennedy and

Kennedy’s secretary named Lincoln each warned the President not to make

his fatal sojourn). It seems almost as if an early warning system is embedded

in the passage of time itself, or in what Carl Jung called the Collective Un-

conscious. And that system would seem to be sending a stream of warning

signals, enciphered as synchronicities.

Exploring topics like this is what makes Sinister Forces: The Nine one

of the darkest and most provocative books that you are ever likely to

read (pending publication of Book II). That said, it also one of the most

enjoyable, easy to pick up (start reading on any page), and hard to put

down. Levenda’s intuitions are a delight, and his choice of subject-matter

unerring. Both a compendium of 20th century evil and an investigation

of it, Levenda’s study is deep, intuitive (and, often, droll).

It is, in other words, parapolitics at their most bizarre and, I suspect,

their most illuminating. Like UFOs, conspiracies and assassination, serial

killers, mind control and the occult, “evil” isn’t something that serious

people are supposed to think about. If they did, the emergency reporting

system would soon be overloaded. And you know what happens when

that occurs.

All hell breaks loose.

Both Michael Paine's stepfather Arthur Young and Karl Gunther Russbacher are mentioned in Lavinda's book.

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http://www.cufon.org/cufon/tp_3items.htm

Three Items Provided by Dr. Thornton Page

To: Bill Pitts

506 N. Second St. The Inn of the Ozarks

Fort Smith, AR 72901 PO Box 431

Eureka Springs, AR 72632

from: Thornton Page

18639 Point Lookout, Houston, Texas 77058

The following is part of my talk for the Society for Scientific Exploration in Austin Tx on 30 May '87 entitled "The CIA-Robertson Panel on the UFO Problem."

H.P. Robertson, a mathematical physicist, was an old friend of mine. (We worked together in France just after WWII) He was asked by the CIA to gather a panel of distinguished scientists in Washington, 14-18 Jan, 1953, to be briefed on the UFO problem, which had just broken out in D.C. He invited me because of our friendship and because I lived in D.C., requiring no travel expenses. Other, more distinguished members were Luis Alvarez, expert on radar, cosmic rays, nuclear physics and later Nobel Laureate, Sam Goudsmit of Brookhaven Lab, expert on electron spin and leader of the ALSOS mission to sneak German scientists to the US after WWII, Lloyd Berkner of Brookhaven Lab and Carnagie Inst., and two other physicists who prefer to remain anonymous.

This was the only time I was paid ($50) by the CIA. At the start I thought it was a lot of nonsense and said so. Robertson said "Shut up, page" and proceeded to read the Terms of reference for the Panel - - a serious report to the US government about the possible threat of UFOs. I shut up, but I still think the news reports of UFO sightings stimulated more misinterpretations. In fact, my major contribution to our SECRET Report was the hazard of UFO reports clogging military communications during a true national emergency. (At the time, I was working in the Operations Research Office of the U.S. Army.) The only record of our meetings is a declassified version of the Panel report published as Appendix U of the Condon report published in 1970.

The Panel was presented with 22 documents covering many UFO reports and USAF analyses. We were briefed by Capt. E. J. Ruppelt and Dr. J. Allen Hynek, and shown movies of the Trementon, Utah, incident, after which I suggested that someone visit that site with field glasses. This took place later on, and the Trementon UFOs were found to be seagulls. It was clear to us the Air Force Technical Intelligence center had spent a great deal of effort analyzing UFO reports and had succeeded in explaining many of them.

Chairman Robertson prepared a draft report and had little difficulty in getting the Panel members to sign under their statements:

"There is no evidence of a direct threat to national security."

"low grade reports tend to overload channels of communication."

"All Panel members agree that extraterrestrial intelligent beings may someday visit the Earth."

"AFTIC analyses cannot be undertaken for every UFO report."

Conclusion: "Need more education of the public."

We named US astronomical observatories that might spend a little extra effort to photograph

UFOs, but urged that this not be given publicity.

The Panel explained radar UFOs as radio interference and urged the USAF to seek publicity "debunking" UFOs. Apparently the CIA was satisfied, although it convened another Scientist Panel on UFOs in 1966, or thereabouts. But the UFO reports continued. I went back to teaching astronomy at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, where I had difficulty attracting students to my courses. So in 1967, I offered a course in Flying Saucers, which attracted 50 students (astronomy got 10 to 15). They had to learn some astronomy to identify UFOs as planets or bright stars. The kids loved it, each one wrote a term paper citing the evidence for or against UFOs as extraterrestrial visitors, and we published the three best papers in a pamphlet, printed by the University, which sold well at 25 cents an the Univ. bookstore.

[Example Booklet 1][Example Booklet 2] We even had a debate on a Hartford radio station between two pro and two con students. I was naïve enough to tell the students to call me at home if they saw a UFO. One night there was a Moon dog (ring around the Moon caused by ice crystals in the upper atmosphere) and 40 students phoned me!

My idea that astronomical observatories might photograph a UFO turned out to be wrong; the sky coverage by all the telescopes in the world is much too small. However the Smithsonian Astrophysical Obs. in Cambridge, Mass., set out a network of wide-angle cameras in the mid-West (The Prairie Network) to photograph meteors. I got several nights' worth of their photos - whole sky coverage from almost 20 locations - and set the students to search for UFOs. They quickly tired of the job, after finding no UFOs.

In 1968 I proposed an AAAS Symposium on UFOs which was hotly opposed by several scientists but supported by Walter Orr Roberts, then President of the AAAS, (American Association for the Advancement of Science). Carl Sagan, a friend of mine at Cornell, leapt in to help organize the Symposium, picked most of the speakers, and got the proceedings published by Cornell Univ. Press in 1972: "UFOs, A Scientific Debate. "We invited E.U. Condon to speak (he refused) but got James McDonald (pro) and Donald Menzel (con), Allen Hynek and Phillip Morrison (middling). Carl and I worried about violent demonstrations at the Symposium, which took place in Boston 26-27 Dec 1967, but the large audience was well behaved. It was an interesting debate, in which the psychologists did well. We were careful in our book not to conclude that UFOs are real or not real. The UFO reports certainly are real, and a large fraction of US citizens believe UFOs are extraterrestrial. "More study is needed."

As a result of all this, I became the UFO expert at the NASA Johnson Space Center where I moved in 1968. Also, I was asked to write the entry on UFOs in the Encyclopedia Britannica (4 pages in the 1975 edition). I phoned Condon to check what I had written, but when I said I was writing up UFOs in the Britannica, there was a crash, and the line went dead. I phoned back, got his secretary who said "Dr. Condon was so angry he threw the phone on the floor and broke it."

This more-or-less ended my association with UFOs

Society for Scientific Exploration, Sheraton Crest Hotel

Austin

Sat, 30 May '87 3 pm

The CIA Robertson Panel on the UFO problem Jan 14-18, 1953

I have last word on UFOs

34 years ago

Dedicate to 3 UFO greats: H.P. Robertson, an old friend - explainer of the Poynting-Robertson effect that cleans dust out of our solar system, who chaired this panel and took its terms seriously (when I did not), the late J. Allen Hynek, who knew more about UFOs than anyone else and James Moseley, editor of an irregular publication Saucer Smear [give] who knows more about UFOlogists than I ever will, who was member of SSE briefly until someone discovered he never completed his degree at Columbia. I regret his expulsion.

The Robertson panel = 7 prominent scientists called together by CIA for SECRET meetings in Washington (only time I've been paid [$50] by CIA) Looking back, I am proud, was picked because friend of HPR, lived in D.C. (no travel expenses), had TOP SECRET+Q clearance.

-got to meet: Luis Alvarez, WWII radar expert, nuclear physicist, cosmic-ray, analysis of pyramids in Egypt, explained dinosaur deaths, Nobel

Sam Goudsmit, of electron-spin fame, who led ALSOS mission to sneak out German scientists at end of WWII, Brookhaven Lab

Lloyd Berkner, DTM Carnegie Inst., State Dept in WWII, Brookhaven Lab

(two others preferred to remain anonymous) (I can't remember)

Only record -App. U of Condon Report "Sci Study of UFOs," declassified with gaps

By 1952 craze of UFO reports hit DC - several in every days papers - excitement over Natn'l Airport radar sightings -> CIA action

Clearest memory = first mtg Wed 14 Jan read

TLP "news stories cause more people to look up -> more misinterpretations

HPR "shut up: Terms of Reference for panel = serious report to US Govt

but my point got into final report "UFO reports clog military communications"

The Panel was presented with 22 documents covering many UFO reports and USAF analyses

We were shown movies of UFOs at Trementon, Utah by reliable Navy non-com

(earlier I suggested a repeat, with field glasses -> seagulls nearby, not A/C 10 mi.)

Other cases presented by Capt. E. J. Ruppelt USAF from BLUEBOOK Files

-by Allen Hynek, then just starting as USAF Consultant

It was clear that the Air Force Technical Intelligence Center had spent a lot of effort on analyses of UFO reports - succeeded in explaining many

Chairman Robertson prepared Draft report

- little difficulty in getting panel members to agree & sign

"no evidence of a direct threat to national security."

"low grade reports tend to overload channels of communication."

"All Panel members agreed that extraterrestrial intelligent beings may someday visit"

We went into great detail explaining the Trementon case as seagulls and agreed that such effort could not be given all UFO reports

Concluded - "Need more education of the public" (same as AIDS today!)

We (g) named US observatories where a little extra effort might yield photos of UFOs

from Harvard thru Yerkes & McDonald to Palomar and Lick Wrong

but this should not be given publicity and re-start public fears of UFOs

We explained radar UFOs as radio interference

We made detailed recommendations for USAF organization to educate public and debunk UFOs

Apparently CIA satisfied; another panel convened in 1966? - when UFO reports high

My story goes on - returned to Wesleyan Univ (Conn.) to teach astronomy

difficulty attracting students - started Flying Saucer course 1967

Course title attracted 50 students - learned some astronomy, wrote term papers - pamphlet [give]

debate on Hartford radio station - 40 phone calls on moon dog!

To finish my story:

1968 - proposed AAAS Symposium on UFOs

Hotly opposed by several scientists, supported by Walter Orr Roberts

postponed to [boston] Dec 26-27, 1969 after completion of Condon report

because of political implications, Carl Sagan leapt in (and took over!)

from the beginning emotions strong - e.g. Donald Menzel heart attack (Roberts read)

Condon refused, James McDonald committed suicide after

Hynek & others accused USAF hiding BLUEBOOK data

We seriously discussed probability of UFOlogists holding hostile demonstrations

16 speakers carefully selected

Tape recorded proceedings; All but 1 author (PLC Morrison) provided M/S

Menzel (anti-UFO) insisted his paper be longer than McDonald (pro-UFO) - App.

9 edited papers, transcribed Morrison's

Sagan persuaded Cornell Univ Press -> "UFOs; A Scientific Debate" Sagan & Page 1972 [Give] [hold out]

Careful not to conclude UFOs are "real" or not real

UFO phenomenon complex (many components) - not understood by psychologists

MORE study needed

Robertson Panel led to T-P- becoming "UFO expert"

(NASA JSC routed all UFO papers & letters to me!) [Read 2]

Highest honor = Encyclopedia Britannica asked me to write UFOs (4 pp in 1975 Ed)

After draft - I phoned E.U. Condon at U of Colo

{Third item)

Abstract for SSE

The CIA Robertson Panel on the UFO Problem

Thornton page

NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston

Anecdotes about the Panel meetings in 1953, when Page was teamed by good luck with such luminaries as the late H.P. Robertson (an old friend) and Luis Alverez (a new friend). At first, I could not take Flying Saucers seriously, and was chastised by Robertson for the irreverent observation that the more people looked up at the sky, the more misperceptions they would see make have (or report). Our meetings were top secret, and the fact that we were paid by the CIA was itself classified. We were briefed by the late J. Allen Hynek (he of co-eds and marsh-gas fame) and by US Air Force officers involved with project Bluebook (the list of UFO reports). At the time, I was working for the Army in Washington, and voiced the one military hazard of UFOs (later recognized by the Panel): the possible jamming of communications lines by UFO reports. I also take credit for "solving" the Trementon, Utah, case, where movies taken by a Navy officer showed flying saucers darting around at supersonic speeds. We asked that a similar camera be taken to the same site. This was done, similar objects were again photographed, but field glasses showed them to be seagulls less than a mile away rather than saucers ten miles away.

Later in 1969, I came to the conclusion that the "UFO Phenomenon" was worthy of study, and organized, with Carl Sagan, an AAAS Symposium in Boston, proceedings of which were published as "UFOs, A Scientific Debate" (Cornell Univ. Press, 1972), a reply to the late E.U. Condon's "Scientific Study of UFOs" (Bantam Books, 1969) We avoided any conclusion on the reality of UFOs themselves, but came up with a number of unanswered questions in education, sociology, and psychology. The final anecdote has to do with my being invited to write the article on UFO for the Encyclopedia Britannica. I thought it only right to check my text with Condon, so I phoned him at the University of Colorado. When I explained the situation, there was a loud crash, and the phone went dead. When I called back, the secretary explained that Dr. Condon was so angry that he had not been approached by the Britannica that he dashed the phone to the floor.

I hope this will do!

T- P-

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