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JFK's teen mistress addresses relationship

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Teen mistress addresses relationship, pol's Cold War fears in memoir

New York Post

By CYNTHIA R. FAGEN

Last Updated: 12:08 PM, February 5, 2012

Posted: 1:49 AM, February 5, 2012

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/inside_my_teen_affair_with_jfk_FGF4aS7OdoQozP4tyySsmK#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

She always called him “Mr. President” — not Jack. He refused to kiss her on the lips when they made love. But Mimi Alford, a White House intern from New Jersey, was smitten nonetheless.

She was in the midst of an 18-month affair with the most powerful man in the world, sharing not only John F. Kennedy’s bed but also some of his darkest and most intimate moments.

In her explosive new tell-all, “Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy and Its Aftermath,” Alford, now a 69-year-old grandmother and retired New York City church administrator, sets the record straight in searingly candid detail. The book, out Wednesday was bought by The Post at a Manhattan bookstore.

In the summer of 1962, Alford was a slender, golden-haired 19-year-old debutante whose finishing-school polish and blueblood connections had landed her a job in the White House press office.

Four days into her internship, she was invited by an aide to go for a midday swim in the White House pool, where the handsome, 45-year-old president swam daily to ease chronic back pain. JFK slid into the pool and floated up to her.

“It’s Mimi, isn’t it?” he asked.

“Yes, sir,” she said.

“And you’re in the press office this summer, right?”

“Yes, sir, I am,” she replied.

Lightning had struck. Later that day, Mimi was invited by Dave Powers, the president’s “first friend” and later the longtime curator of the Kennedy Library in Boston, to an after-work party. When she arrived at the White House residence, Powers and two other young female staffers were waiting. Powers poured, and frequently refilled, her glass with daiquiris until the commander-in-chief arrived.

The president invited her for a personal tour. She got up, expecting the rest of the group to follow. They didn’t. He took her to “Mrs. Kennedy’s room.”

“I noticed he was moving closer and closer. I could feel his breath on my neck. He put his hand on my shoulder,” she recounts.

The next thing she knew, he was standing above her, looking directly into her eyes and guiding her to the edge of the bed.

“Slowly, he unbuttoned the top of my shirtdress and touched my breasts.

“Then he reached up between my legs and started to pull off my underwear.

“I finished unbuttoning my shirtdress and let it fall off my shoulders.”

Kennedy pulled down his pants but, with his shirt still on, hovered above her on the bed.

He smelled of his cologne, 4711. He paused when he noticed her resisting.

“Haven’t you done this before?” he asked.

“No,” she said.

“Are you OK?” he asked.

“Yes,” she said.

So he kept going, this time a little more gently.

“After he finished, he hitched up his pants and smiled at me” and pointed her to the bathroom.

When she was finished, he was outside in the West Sitting Hall, where their evening had begun.

“I was in shock,” she writes. “He, on the other hand, was matter-of-fact, and acted as if what had just occurred was the most natural thing in the world.”

“Would you like something to eat?” he asked. “The kitchen’s right here.”

“No, thank you, Mr. President.”

He called a car to come pick her up and take her home.

On the ride home, it “kept echoing in my head: I’m not a virgin anymore.”

The next week, she was again invited to go swimming.

“He barely acknowledged my arrival, betraying no hint of what had happened between us just a few days before. I couldn’t bring myself to look at him in the eye,” she writes.

Later, he led her into a different bedroom. “This was the beginning of our affair,” she writes.

In a moment of reflection, Alford wonders “if I could have resisted him.

“The fact that I was being desired by the most famous and powerful man in America only amplified my feelings to the point where resistance was out of the question. That’s why I didn’t say no to the president. It’s the best answer I can give.”

She would swim with the president at noon or at the end of the workday, race back to her desk and wait for a call to visit him upstairs.

“The governing factor behind these calls, of course, was the presence — or, more accurately, the absence — of Mrs. Kennedy.”

They never returned to Jackie’s bedroom but stayed in his, which was cluttered with piles of books, magazines and newspapers.

Kennedy could be playful and tried to extract naughty things that she did as a schoolgirl. “What did all you girls do locked up in that boarding school?” he would ask. Ironically, she had attended Miss Porter’s, Jacqueline’s alma mater.

Their sex was “varied and fun.” He could be seductive and playful and sometimes “acted like he had all the time in the world. Other times, he was in no mood to linger.”

They spent an “inordinate amount of time taking baths.” Kennedy changed his shirt six times a day because he hated feeling “sweaty or grimy.”

They lined the bathtub with rubber ducks given to him as a gag gift; they named the ducks after his family members, made up back stories for them and raced them in the tub.

He taught her how to scramble eggs.

He loved popular music, especially Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra. They shared a love for the musical “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” and would sing along to it together.

Sometimes, she would spend the night with him, and he would outfit her with his own soft-blue cotton nightshirts.

But there was also distance. “There was always a layer of reserve between us, which may explain why we never kissed,” she writes. “The wide gulf between us — the age, the power, the experience — guaranteed that our affair wouldn’t evolve into anything more serious.”

She never once ran into Jackie during these flings and admits to not feeling guilty.

He sometimes invited her aboard the Sequoia, the presidential yacht, for a Potomac cruise.

On a trip to Yosemite National Park, she noticed a pattern, which she called “the Waiting Game.” She was told to stay put in her hotel until the president called for her, which meant sitting around for hours. Often, he would only call her at night

On one excursion, she met Vice President Lyndon Johnson. When she told the president about the introduction, he lost his composure.

“Stay away from him,” he commanded, likely worried that Johnson could use knowledge of the affair against him.

At the end of the summer, she told the president that she had to return to college, at Wheaton, an all-girls school in Massachusetts.

He promised that he would call under the pseudonym “Michael Carter.” And then he played a recording of Nat King Cole’s “Autumn Leaves.” He made her concentrate on the lyrics, “But I miss you most of all, my darling, when autumn leaves start to fall.”

As a parting gift, she gave him a copy of the record and trimmed the cover with leaves she had collected.

“You’re trying to make me cry,” he told her.

“I’m not trying to make you cry, Mr. President,” she said. “I’m trying to make sure you remember me.”

Within a week of her return to college, she got a call from Michael Carter.

He asked her dozens of questions: What courses was she taking? Did she like the teachers? Were the girls interesting? What did she have for dinner? He then invited her to Washington when Jackie was away.

A car service would pick her up and drive her to the airport, where a paid ticket to DC would be waiting for her.

Upon arrival, a chauffeur holding up a sign for Michael Carter would take her to the White House.

On one visit, Kennedy was embroiled in one of the most defining moments of his presidency, the Cuban Missile Crisis. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the Soviets were at a nuclear standoff.

Although historians have dissected Kennedy’s actions, none was privy to what he confided to Mimi.

“I’d rather my children red than dead,” he told her.

It was a chilling insight.

When the president wasn’t keeping the world from descending into war, there was plenty of wild partying. One instance was a raucous Hollywood bash at Bing Crosby’s desert ranch.

“I was sitting next to him in the living room when a handful of yellow capsules — most likely amyl nitrate, commonly known as poppers — was offered up by one of the guests. The president asked me if I wanted to try the drug, which stimulated the heart but also purportedly enhanced sex. I said no, but he just went ahead and popped the capsule and held it under my nose.”

He didn’t try it himself.

“This was a new sensation, and it frightened me,” Mimi recalls. “I panicked and ran crying from the room.”

It wasn’t her first glimpse of Kennedy’s dark side.

“He had been guilty of an even more callous and unforgivable episode at the White House” during a noon swim. Powers had rolled up his pants to cool his feet in the water. “The president swam over and whispered in my ear. ‘Mr. Powers looks a little tense,’ he said. ‘Would you take care of it?’

“It was a dare, but I knew exactly what he meant. This was a challenge to give Dave Powers oral sex. I don’t think the president thought I’d do it, but I’m ashamed to say that I did . . . The president silently watched.”

Alford, then Mimi Beardsley, says that later the president apologized to them both.

Another time, she writes, while back at Wheaton, she thought she was pregnant and told Powers. Obviously, this could explode into scandal. Abortion was illegal in 1962. Powers put her in touch with a woman who had a contact for a doctor. In the end, it was a false alarm.

There were tender moments, too.

Kennedy, alone and grieving the death of his infant child, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, reached out for his young confidante.

“I had never seen real grief in my relatively short life,” she writes.

While Jackie was still recovering in Cape Cod, Kennedy was back at the White House.

“He invited me upstairs, and we sat outside on the balcony in the soft summer evening air. There was a stack of condolence letters on the floor next to his chair, and he picked each one up and read it aloud to me. Some were from friends and others from strangers, but they were all heartfelt and deeply moving. Occasionally, tears rolling down his cheeks, he would write something on one of the letters, probably notes for a reply. But mostly he just read them and cried. I did, too.”

One of their last times together was at a Boston Democratic fund-raiser. Ted Kennedy, the president’s baby brother, was in the room with them.

“I could see that mischievous look come into his eye. ‘Mimi, why don’t you take care of my baby brother? He could stand a little relaxation.’

“You’ve got to be kidding me,” she replied firmly. “Absolutely not, Mr. President.”

About to be married to her college sweetheart, Tony Fahnestock, she met Kennedy for the last time at The Carlyle hotel in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 1963, just seven days before his assassination in Dallas.

“He took me in his arms for a long embrace and said, ‘I wish you were coming with me to Texas.’ And then he added, ‘I’ll call you when I get back.’ I was overcome with sudden sadness. ‘Remember, Mr. President, I’m getting married.’

“ ‘I know that,’ he said, and shrugged. ‘But I’ll call you anyway.’ ”

cynthia.fagen@nypost.com

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/inside_my_teen_affair_with_jfk_FGF4aS7OdoQozP4tyySsmK#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

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In my opinion MiMi Alford is telling the 100% truth. Both John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson were highly promiscuous.

Also, note that the publisher of this book is Random House that likes to publish dirt on John Kennedy. Random House (editor Bob Loomis then) published Gerald Posner's epic fail "Case Closed" in response to the movie "JFK" by Oliver Stone.

Funny thing, Random House published MacBird in 1967!

Here are some other JFK related books published by Random House.

Molehunt: The Secret Search for Traitors that Shattered the CIA David Wise 1992 Random House

Invisible Government: the CIA and US Intelligence David Wise & Thomas Ross 1964 Random House

Harlot's Ghost: A Novel Norman Mailer 1992 Random House

Oswald's Tale: An American Mystery Norman Mailer 2007 Random House

Secret Agenda: Watergate, Deep Throat, and the CIA Jim Hougan 1984 Random House

The American Police State David Wise 1988 Random House

Scandals, Scamps, and Scoundrels: The Casebook of an Investigative Reporter James Phelan 1982 Random House

A Day in the Life of President Kennedy Jim Bishop 1964 Random House

Case Closed CIA Stooge 1993 Random House

Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy and It's Aftermath MiMi Alford 2012 Random House

Man of the House: The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill with William Novak Thomas P. O'Neill 1987 Random House

MacBird Barbara Gibson 1967 Random House Trade Paperbacks

Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House Sally Bedell Smith 2005 Random House Trade Paperbacks

Our Assassinated Presidents: The True Medical Stories Stewart Brooks 1986 Random House Value

Edited by Robert Morrow

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Some people ask me why I focus so much on mistresses of these political figures. Because if you want to know what a man is up to, just ask his mistress or his long time secretary. They often know more than the wife or his closest advisors.

That is because often these women and secretaries ARE the closet advisors and sounding boards for these men.

That is why for historical reasons people like Madeleine Duncan Brown (LBJ mistress), Mary Margaret Valenti (LBJ mistress), Evelyn Lincoln (JFK longtime secretary), Mary Meyer (JFK mistress), and MiMi Alford (JFK mistress) are SO important.

These women have historical knowledge that you simply can not find anywhere else. They often have insider knowledge of what a man was doing/thinking/saying that no one else does. They know what trials, tribulations and (often secret) conflicts these men were having.

The women close to LBJ and the Kennedy men can tell you in very clear terms to such a high degree LBJ and the Kennedys hated each other. Stuff that gets papered over in the media and establishment academia.

Read the following quote, which I think is critical, especially when taken in context with what we know about JFK's foreign policy and his battles with CIA, JCS, and hawks in his own cabinet.

“I’d rather my children red than dead,” he [John Kennedy] told her [MiMi Alford].

Ok, now can you imagine Lyndon Johnson or Curtis LeMay saying that?? or CIA? or Nelson Rockefeller? Or the anti-Castro Cubans?

Edited by Robert Morrow

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Clint Hill has a new book out - due April 2012 - about his close relationship with Jackie Kennedy.

http://www.amazon.com/Mrs-Kennedy-Me-Intimate-Memoir/dp/1451648448/ref=pd_vtp_b_2

HE CALLED HER MRS. KENNEDY. SHE CALLED HIM MR. HILL.

For four years, from the election of John Fitzgerald Kennedy in November 1960 until after the election of Lyndon Johnson in 1964, Clint Hill was the Secret Service agent assigned to guard the glamorous and intensely private Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. During those four years, he went from being a reluctant guardian to a fiercely loyal watchdog and, in many ways, her closest friend.

Now, looking back fifty years, Clint Hill tells his story for the first time, offering a tender, enthralling, and tragic portrayal of how a Secret Service agent who started life in a North Dakota orphanage became the most trusted man in the life of the First Lady who captivated first the nation and then the world.

When he was initially assigned to the new First Lady, Agent Hill envisioned tea parties and gray-haired matrons. But as soon as he met her, he was swept up in the whirlwind of her beauty, her grace, her intelligence, her coy humor, her magnificent composure, and her extraordinary spirit.

From the start, the job was like no other, and Clint was by her side through the early days of JFK's presidency; the birth of sons John and Patrick and Patrick's sudden death; Kennedy-family holidays in Hyannis Port and Palm Beach; Jackie's trips to Europe, Asia, and South America; Jackie's intriguing meetings with men like Aristotle Onassis, Gianni Agnelli, and André Malraux; the dark days of the year that followed the assassination to the farewell party she threw for Clint when he left her protective detail after four years. All she wanted was the one thing he could not give her: a private life for her and her children.

Filled with unforgettable details, startling revelations, and sparkling, intimate moments, this is the once-in-a-lifetime story of a man doing the most exciting job in the world, with a woman all the world loved, and the tragedy that ended it all too soon— a tragedy that haunted him for fifty years.

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This news article brings to mind the story of my law client, Jack Worthington, who said that his mother told him as his putative father lay dying that his real father was JFK and that LBJ had arranged her one-time affair with JFK.

http://www.vanityfai...8/04/jack200804

Whatever happened to Jack Worthington?

Kathy C

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In my opinion MiMi Alford is telling the 100% truth. Both John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson were highly promiscuous.

Also, note that the publisher of this book is Random House that likes to publish dirt on John Kennedy. Random House (editor Bob Loomis then) published Gerald Posner's epic fail "Case Closed" in response to the movie "JFK" by Oliver Stone.

Funny thing, Random House published MacBird in 1967!

Here are some other JFK related books published by Random House.

Molehunt: The Secret Search for Traitors that Shattered the CIA David Wise 1992 Random House

Invisible Government: the CIA and US Intelligence David Wise & Thomas Ross 1964 Random House

Harlot's Ghost: A Novel Norman Mailer 1992 Random House

Oswald's Tale: An American Mystery Norman Mailer 2007 Random House

Secret Agenda: Watergate, Deep Throat, and the CIA Jim Hougan 1984 Random House

The American Police State David Wise 1988 Random House

Scandals, Scamps, and Scoundrels: The Casebook of an Investigative Reporter James Phelan 1982 Random House

A Day in the Life of President Kennedy Jim Bishop 1964 Random House

Case Closed CIA Stooge 1993 Random House

Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy and It's Aftermath MiMi Alford 2012 Random House

Man of the House: The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill with William Novak Thomas P. O'Neill 1987 Random House

MacBird Barbara Gibson 1967 Random House Trade Paperbacks

Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House Sally Bedell Smith 2005 Random House Trade Paperbacks

Our Assassinated Presidents: The True Medical Stories Stewart Brooks 1986 Random House Value

A late researcher told me that Random House was CIA-controlled, a media asset.

Kathy C

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Teen mistress addresses relationship, pol's Cold War fears in memoir

New York Post

By CYNTHIA R. FAGEN

Last Updated: 12:08 PM, February 5, 2012

Posted: 1:49 AM, February 5, 2012

http://www.nypost.co...K#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

She always called him "Mr. President" — not Jack. He refused to kiss her on the lips when they made love. But Mimi Alford, a White House intern from New Jersey, was smitten nonetheless.

She was in the midst of an 18-month affair with the most powerful man in the world, sharing not only John F. Kennedy's bed but also some of his darkest and most intimate moments.

In her explosive new tell-all, "Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy and Its Aftermath," Alford, now a 69-year-old grandmother and retired New York City church administrator, sets the record straight in searingly candid detail. The book, out Wednesday was bought by The Post at a Manhattan bookstore.

In the summer of 1962, Alford was a slender, golden-haired 19-year-old debutante whose finishing-school polish and blueblood connections had landed her a job in the White House press office.

Four days into her internship, she was invited by an aide to go for a midday swim in the White House pool, where the handsome, 45-year-old president swam daily to ease chronic back pain. JFK slid into the pool and floated up to her.

"It's Mimi, isn't it?" he asked.

"Yes, sir," she said.

"And you're in the press office this summer, right?"

"Yes, sir, I am," she replied.

Lightning had struck. Later that day, Mimi was invited by Dave Powers, the president's "first friend" and later the longtime curator of the Kennedy Library in Boston, to an after-work party. When she arrived at the White House residence, Powers and two other young female staffers were waiting. Powers poured, and frequently refilled, her glass with daiquiris until the commander-in-chief arrived.

The president invited her for a personal tour. She got up, expecting the rest of the group to follow. They didn't. He took her to "Mrs. Kennedy's room."

"I noticed he was moving closer and closer. I could feel his breath on my neck. He put his hand on my shoulder," she recounts.

The next thing she knew, he was standing above her, looking directly into her eyes and guiding her to the edge of the bed.

"Slowly, he unbuttoned the top of my shirtdress and touched my breasts.

"Then he reached up between my legs and started to pull off my underwear.

"I finished unbuttoning my shirtdress and let it fall off my shoulders."

Kennedy pulled down his pants but, with his shirt still on, hovered above her on the bed.

He smelled of his cologne, 4711. He paused when he noticed her resisting.

"Haven't you done this before?" he asked.

"No," she said.

"Are you OK?" he asked.

"Yes," she said.

So he kept going, this time a little more gently.

"After he finished, he hitched up his pants and smiled at me" and pointed her to the bathroom.

When she was finished, he was outside in the West Sitting Hall, where their evening had begun.

"I was in shock," she writes. "He, on the other hand, was matter-of-fact, and acted as if what had just occurred was the most natural thing in the world."

"Would you like something to eat?" he asked. "The kitchen's right here."

"No, thank you, Mr. President."

He called a car to come pick her up and take her home.

On the ride home, it "kept echoing in my head: I'm not a virgin anymore."

The next week, she was again invited to go swimming.

"He barely acknowledged my arrival, betraying no hint of what had happened between us just a few days before. I couldn't bring myself to look at him in the eye," she writes.

Later, he led her into a different bedroom. "This was the beginning of our affair," she writes.

In a moment of reflection, Alford wonders "if I could have resisted him.

"The fact that I was being desired by the most famous and powerful man in America only amplified my feelings to the point where resistance was out of the question. That's why I didn't say no to the president. It's the best answer I can give."

She would swim with the president at noon or at the end of the workday, race back to her desk and wait for a call to visit him upstairs.

"The governing factor behind these calls, of course, was the presence — or, more accurately, the absence — of Mrs. Kennedy."

They never returned to Jackie's bedroom but stayed in his, which was cluttered with piles of books, magazines and newspapers.

Kennedy could be playful and tried to extract naughty things that she did as a schoolgirl. "What did all you girls do locked up in that boarding school?" he would ask. Ironically, she had attended Miss Porter's, Jacqueline's alma mater.

Their sex was "varied and fun." He could be seductive and playful and sometimes "acted like he had all the time in the world. Other times, he was in no mood to linger."

They spent an "inordinate amount of time taking baths." Kennedy changed his shirt six times a day because he hated feeling "sweaty or grimy."

They lined the bathtub with rubber ducks given to him as a gag gift; they named the ducks after his family members, made up back stories for them and raced them in the tub.

He taught her how to scramble eggs.

He loved popular music, especially Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra. They shared a love for the musical "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" and would sing along to it together.

Sometimes, she would spend the night with him, and he would outfit her with his own soft-blue cotton nightshirts.

But there was also distance. "There was always a layer of reserve between us, which may explain why we never kissed," she writes. "The wide gulf between us — the age, the power, the experience — guaranteed that our affair wouldn't evolve into anything more serious."

She never once ran into Jackie during these flings and admits to not feeling guilty.

He sometimes invited her aboard the Sequoia, the presidential yacht, for a Potomac cruise.

On a trip to Yosemite National Park, she noticed a pattern, which she called "the Waiting Game." She was told to stay put in her hotel until the president called for her, which meant sitting around for hours. Often, he would only call her at night

On one excursion, she met Vice President Lyndon Johnson. When she told the president about the introduction, he lost his composure.

"Stay away from him," he commanded, likely worried that Johnson could use knowledge of the affair against him.

At the end of the summer, she told the president that she had to return to college, at Wheaton, an all-girls school in Massachusetts.

He promised that he would call under the pseudonym "Michael Carter." And then he played a recording of Nat King Cole's "Autumn Leaves." He made her concentrate on the lyrics, "But I miss you most of all, my darling, when autumn leaves start to fall."

As a parting gift, she gave him a copy of the record and trimmed the cover with leaves she had collected.

"You're trying to make me cry," he told her.

"I'm not trying to make you cry, Mr. President," she said. "I'm trying to make sure you remember me."

Within a week of her return to college, she got a call from Michael Carter.

He asked her dozens of questions: What courses was she taking? Did she like the teachers? Were the girls interesting? What did she have for dinner? He then invited her to Washington when Jackie was away.

A car service would pick her up and drive her to the airport, where a paid ticket to DC would be waiting for her.

Upon arrival, a chauffeur holding up a sign for Michael Carter would take her to the White House.

On one visit, Kennedy was embroiled in one of the most defining moments of his presidency, the Cuban Missile Crisis. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the Soviets were at a nuclear standoff.

Although historians have dissected Kennedy's actions, none was privy to what he confided to Mimi.

"I'd rather my children red than dead," he told her.

It was a chilling insight.

When the president wasn't keeping the world from descending into war, there was plenty of wild partying. One instance was a raucous Hollywood bash at Bing Crosby's desert ranch.

"I was sitting next to him in the living room when a handful of yellow capsules — most likely amyl nitrate, commonly known as poppers — was offered up by one of the guests. The president asked me if I wanted to try the drug, which stimulated the heart but also purportedly enhanced sex. I said no, but he just went ahead and popped the capsule and held it under my nose."

He didn't try it himself.

"This was a new sensation, and it frightened me," Mimi recalls. "I panicked and ran crying from the room."

It wasn't her first glimpse of Kennedy's dark side.

"He had been guilty of an even more callous and unforgivable episode at the White House" during a noon swim. Powers had rolled up his pants to cool his feet in the water. "The president swam over and whispered in my ear. 'Mr. Powers looks a little tense,' he said. 'Would you take care of it?'

"It was a dare, but I knew exactly what he meant. This was a challenge to give Dave Powers oral sex. I don't think the president thought I'd do it, but I'm ashamed to say that I did . . . The president silently watched."

Alford, then Mimi Beardsley, says that later the president apologized to them both.

Another time, she writes, while back at Wheaton, she thought she was pregnant and told Powers. Obviously, this could explode into scandal. Abortion was illegal in 1962. Powers put her in touch with a woman who had a contact for a doctor. In the end, it was a false alarm.

There were tender moments, too.

Kennedy, alone and grieving the death of his infant child, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, reached out for his young confidante.

"I had never seen real grief in my relatively short life," she writes.

While Jackie was still recovering in Cape Cod, Kennedy was back at the White House.

"He invited me upstairs, and we sat outside on the balcony in the soft summer evening air. There was a stack of condolence letters on the floor next to his chair, and he picked each one up and read it aloud to me. Some were from friends and others from strangers, but they were all heartfelt and deeply moving. Occasionally, tears rolling down his cheeks, he would write something on one of the letters, probably notes for a reply. But mostly he just read them and cried. I did, too."

One of their last times together was at a Boston Democratic fund-raiser. Ted Kennedy, the president's baby brother, was in the room with them.

"I could see that mischievous look come into his eye. 'Mimi, why don't you take care of my baby brother? He could stand a little relaxation.'

"You've got to be kidding me," she replied firmly. "Absolutely not, Mr. President."

About to be married to her college sweetheart, Tony Fahnestock, she met Kennedy for the last time at The Carlyle hotel in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 1963, just seven days before his assassination in Dallas.

"He took me in his arms for a long embrace and said, 'I wish you were coming with me to Texas.' And then he added, 'I'll call you when I get back.' I was overcome with sudden sadness. 'Remember, Mr. President, I'm getting married.'

" 'I know that,' he said, and shrugged. 'But I'll call you anyway.' "

cynthia.fagen@nypost.com

Read more: http://www.nypost.co...K#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

Just reading this piece makes me sick to my stomach. And this is the problem of the JFK Researchers Community. It's one thing to have an affair with Marilyn Monroe, but a young woman about to be married? It paints a very nasty picture. And this is their weapon, the right-wingers use to counteract the Assassination stories. I think Judy Campbell Exner suffered for having known him. Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead in an unsolved crime. And the rumors of Monroe's death. This is the stuff they throw at us. More so than his policies -- the eyes glaze over. How do we fix this? Not by lies, not by retaliation. Who knows if any of this stuff is true?

I mean, even myself. When I read how often they had sex and then he tells her to service Johnson and Dave Powers while he watched, it turns me off. So it must be doing a similar thing to people who don't remember him or who believe these stories. It's not like the man can defend himself. This kind of Journalism hurts the cause.

And when the film JFK came out, many columnists condemned the movie. Especially Chicago's Irv Kupcinet, whose daughter was almost a character in the movie until they went with Rose Cheramie.

Kathy C

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http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/inside_my_teen_affair_with_jfk_FGF4aS7OdoQozP4tyySsmK#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

On one visit, Kennedy was embroiled in one of the most defining moments of his presidency, the Cuban Missile Crisis. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the Soviets were at a nuclear standoff.

Although historians have dissected Kennedy’s actions, none was privy to what he confided to Mimi.

“I’d rather my children red than dead,” he told her.

I don't buy it.

Even if those were JFK's thoughts and the general outlines of the affair are true, this bit sets off my B.S. meter. I doubt President would confide that sort of thing to someone he was apparently using just for physical sex, without enough emotional intimacy to kiss.

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Teen mistress addresses relationship, pol's Cold War fears in memoir

New York Post

By CYNTHIA R. FAGEN

Last Updated: 12:08 PM, February 5, 2012

Posted: 1:49 AM, February 5, 2012

http://www.nypost.co...K#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

She always called him "Mr. President" — not Jack. He refused to kiss her on the lips when they made love. But Mimi Alford, a White House intern from New Jersey, was smitten nonetheless.

She was in the midst of an 18-month affair with the most powerful man in the world, sharing not only John F. Kennedy's bed but also some of his darkest and most intimate moments.

In her explosive new tell-all, "Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy and Its Aftermath," Alford, now a 69-year-old grandmother and retired New York City church administrator, sets the record straight in searingly candid detail. The book, out Wednesday was bought by The Post at a Manhattan bookstore.

In the summer of 1962, Alford was a slender, golden-haired 19-year-old debutante whose finishing-school polish and blueblood connections had landed her a job in the White House press office.

Four days into her internship, she was invited by an aide to go for a midday swim in the White House pool, where the handsome, 45-year-old president swam daily to ease chronic back pain. JFK slid into the pool and floated up to her.

"It's Mimi, isn't it?" he asked.

"Yes, sir," she said.

"And you're in the press office this summer, right?"

"Yes, sir, I am," she replied.

Lightning had struck. Later that day, Mimi was invited by Dave Powers, the president's "first friend" and later the longtime curator of the Kennedy Library in Boston, to an after-work party. When she arrived at the White House residence, Powers and two other young female staffers were waiting. Powers poured, and frequently refilled, her glass with daiquiris until the commander-in-chief arrived.

The president invited her for a personal tour. She got up, expecting the rest of the group to follow. They didn't. He took her to "Mrs. Kennedy's room."

"I noticed he was moving closer and closer. I could feel his breath on my neck. He put his hand on my shoulder," she recounts.

The next thing she knew, he was standing above her, looking directly into her eyes and guiding her to the edge of the bed.

"Slowly, he unbuttoned the top of my shirtdress and touched my breasts.

"Then he reached up between my legs and started to pull off my underwear.

"I finished unbuttoning my shirtdress and let it fall off my shoulders."

Kennedy pulled down his pants but, with his shirt still on, hovered above her on the bed.

He smelled of his cologne, 4711. He paused when he noticed her resisting.

"Haven't you done this before?" he asked.

"No," she said.

"Are you OK?" he asked.

"Yes," she said.

So he kept going, this time a little more gently.

"After he finished, he hitched up his pants and smiled at me" and pointed her to the bathroom.

When she was finished, he was outside in the West Sitting Hall, where their evening had begun.

"I was in shock," she writes. "He, on the other hand, was matter-of-fact, and acted as if what had just occurred was the most natural thing in the world."

"Would you like something to eat?" he asked. "The kitchen's right here."

"No, thank you, Mr. President."

He called a car to come pick her up and take her home.

On the ride home, it "kept echoing in my head: I'm not a virgin anymore."

The next week, she was again invited to go swimming.

"He barely acknowledged my arrival, betraying no hint of what had happened between us just a few days before. I couldn't bring myself to look at him in the eye," she writes.

Later, he led her into a different bedroom. "This was the beginning of our affair," she writes.

In a moment of reflection, Alford wonders "if I could have resisted him.

"The fact that I was being desired by the most famous and powerful man in America only amplified my feelings to the point where resistance was out of the question. That's why I didn't say no to the president. It's the best answer I can give."

She would swim with the president at noon or at the end of the workday, race back to her desk and wait for a call to visit him upstairs.

"The governing factor behind these calls, of course, was the presence — or, more accurately, the absence — of Mrs. Kennedy."

They never returned to Jackie's bedroom but stayed in his, which was cluttered with piles of books, magazines and newspapers.

Kennedy could be playful and tried to extract naughty things that she did as a schoolgirl. "What did all you girls do locked up in that boarding school?" he would ask. Ironically, she had attended Miss Porter's, Jacqueline's alma mater.

Their sex was "varied and fun." He could be seductive and playful and sometimes "acted like he had all the time in the world. Other times, he was in no mood to linger."

They spent an "inordinate amount of time taking baths." Kennedy changed his shirt six times a day because he hated feeling "sweaty or grimy."

They lined the bathtub with rubber ducks given to him as a gag gift; they named the ducks after his family members, made up back stories for them and raced them in the tub.

He taught her how to scramble eggs.

He loved popular music, especially Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra. They shared a love for the musical "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" and would sing along to it together.

Sometimes, she would spend the night with him, and he would outfit her with his own soft-blue cotton nightshirts.

But there was also distance. "There was always a layer of reserve between us, which may explain why we never kissed," she writes. "The wide gulf between us — the age, the power, the experience — guaranteed that our affair wouldn't evolve into anything more serious."

She never once ran into Jackie during these flings and admits to not feeling guilty.

He sometimes invited her aboard the Sequoia, the presidential yacht, for a Potomac cruise.

On a trip to Yosemite National Park, she noticed a pattern, which she called "the Waiting Game." She was told to stay put in her hotel until the president called for her, which meant sitting around for hours. Often, he would only call her at night

On one excursion, she met Vice President Lyndon Johnson. When she told the president about the introduction, he lost his composure.

"Stay away from him," he commanded, likely worried that Johnson could use knowledge of the affair against him.

At the end of the summer, she told the president that she had to return to college, at Wheaton, an all-girls school in Massachusetts.

He promised that he would call under the pseudonym "Michael Carter." And then he played a recording of Nat King Cole's "Autumn Leaves." He made her concentrate on the lyrics, "But I miss you most of all, my darling, when autumn leaves start to fall."

As a parting gift, she gave him a copy of the record and trimmed the cover with leaves she had collected.

"You're trying to make me cry," he told her.

"I'm not trying to make you cry, Mr. President," she said. "I'm trying to make sure you remember me."

Within a week of her return to college, she got a call from Michael Carter.

He asked her dozens of questions: What courses was she taking? Did she like the teachers? Were the girls interesting? What did she have for dinner? He then invited her to Washington when Jackie was away.

A car service would pick her up and drive her to the airport, where a paid ticket to DC would be waiting for her.

Upon arrival, a chauffeur holding up a sign for Michael Carter would take her to the White House.

On one visit, Kennedy was embroiled in one of the most defining moments of his presidency, the Cuban Missile Crisis. For 13 days in October 1962, the United States and the Soviets were at a nuclear standoff.

Although historians have dissected Kennedy's actions, none was privy to what he confided to Mimi.

"I'd rather my children red than dead," he told her.

It was a chilling insight.

When the president wasn't keeping the world from descending into war, there was plenty of wild partying. One instance was a raucous Hollywood bash at Bing Crosby's desert ranch.

"I was sitting next to him in the living room when a handful of yellow capsules — most likely amyl nitrate, commonly known as poppers — was offered up by one of the guests. The president asked me if I wanted to try the drug, which stimulated the heart but also purportedly enhanced sex. I said no, but he just went ahead and popped the capsule and held it under my nose."

He didn't try it himself.

"This was a new sensation, and it frightened me," Mimi recalls. "I panicked and ran crying from the room."

It wasn't her first glimpse of Kennedy's dark side.

"He had been guilty of an even more callous and unforgivable episode at the White House" during a noon swim. Powers had rolled up his pants to cool his feet in the water. "The president swam over and whispered in my ear. 'Mr. Powers looks a little tense,' he said. 'Would you take care of it?'

"It was a dare, but I knew exactly what he meant. This was a challenge to give Dave Powers oral sex. I don't think the president thought I'd do it, but I'm ashamed to say that I did . . . The president silently watched."

Alford, then Mimi Beardsley, says that later the president apologized to them both.

Another time, she writes, while back at Wheaton, she thought she was pregnant and told Powers. Obviously, this could explode into scandal. Abortion was illegal in 1962. Powers put her in touch with a woman who had a contact for a doctor. In the end, it was a false alarm.

There were tender moments, too.

Kennedy, alone and grieving the death of his infant child, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, reached out for his young confidante.

"I had never seen real grief in my relatively short life," she writes.

While Jackie was still recovering in Cape Cod, Kennedy was back at the White House.

"He invited me upstairs, and we sat outside on the balcony in the soft summer evening air. There was a stack of condolence letters on the floor next to his chair, and he picked each one up and read it aloud to me. Some were from friends and others from strangers, but they were all heartfelt and deeply moving. Occasionally, tears rolling down his cheeks, he would write something on one of the letters, probably notes for a reply. But mostly he just read them and cried. I did, too."

One of their last times together was at a Boston Democratic fund-raiser. Ted Kennedy, the president's baby brother, was in the room with them.

"I could see that mischievous look come into his eye. 'Mimi, why don't you take care of my baby brother? He could stand a little relaxation.'

"You've got to be kidding me," she replied firmly. "Absolutely not, Mr. President."

About to be married to her college sweetheart, Tony Fahnestock, she met Kennedy for the last time at The Carlyle hotel in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 1963, just seven days before his assassination in Dallas.

"He took me in his arms for a long embrace and said, 'I wish you were coming with me to Texas.' And then he added, 'I'll call you when I get back.' I was overcome with sudden sadness. 'Remember, Mr. President, I'm getting married.'

" 'I know that,' he said, and shrugged. 'But I'll call you anyway.' "

cynthia.fagen@nypost.com

Read more: http://www.nypost.co...K#ixzz1lX1xaVNY

Just reading this piece makes me sick to my stomach. And this is the problem of the JFK Researchers Community. It's one thing to have an affair with Marilyn Monroe, but a young woman about to be married? It paints a very nasty picture. And this is their weapon, the right-wingers use to counteract the Assassination stories. I think Judy Campbell Exner suffered for having known him. Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead in an unsolved crime. And the rumors of Monroe's death. This is the stuff they throw at us. More so than his policies -- the eyes glaze over. How do we fix this? Not by lies, not by retaliation. Who knows if any of this stuff is true?

I mean, even myself. When I read how often they had sex and then he tells her to service Johnson and Dave Powers while he watched, it turns me off. So it must be doing a similar thing to people who don't remember him or who believe these stories. It's not like the man can defend himself. This kind of Journalism hurts the cause.

And when the film JFK came out, many columnists condemned the movie. Especially Chicago's Irv Kupcinet, whose daughter was almost a character in the movie until they went with Rose Cheramie.

Kathy C

Well, Kathy, do you care about the truth about your political leaders or do you want to hear stories that make you feel good? What do you like: the truth or a comfortable, soothing lie?

I like the truth even if it is the ugly truth. And the truth is John Kennedy, like Lyndon Johnson and Bill Clinton, was rampantly promiscuous. This is well documented. And it is important because it gives us insight into who JFK was, what his character was like, what his weaknesses were. And how Lyndon Johnson and Sam Rayburn were able to blackmail/strongarm and intimidate John Kennedy into putting LBJ on the ticket as VP at the 1960 Democratic convention.

They did not use the "MiMi affair," they handle plenty of other material to work with as well as threatening to kill all of JFK's legislation.

I suggest reading the "Dark Side of Camelot" by Seymour Hersh and you will learn a lot more about JFK, his weaknesses and his rivalry with Lyndon Johnson:

http://www.amazon.com/Dark-Side-Camelot-Seymour-Hersh/dp/0316360678/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1328511461&sr=1-1

Edited by Robert Morrow

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This news article brings to mind the story of my law client, Jack Worthington, who said that his mother told him as his putative father lay dying that his real father was JFK and that LBJ had arranged her one-time affair with JFK.

http://www.vanityfai...8/04/jack200804

Whatever happened to Jack Worthington?

Kathy C

Jack in residing in New York City, still doing corporate mergers and acquisitions. About a week ago for the first time he visited his father's gravesite with its eternal flame in Arlngton Cemetery.

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I doubt President would confide that sort of thing to someone he was apparently using just for physical sex, without enough emotional intimacy to kiss.

But there was also distance. “There was always a layer of reserve between us, which may explain why we never kissed,” she writes. “The wide gulf between us — the age, the power, the experience — guaranteed that our affair wouldn’t evolve into anything more serious.”

It is this passage that makes me believe the story. All the evidence suggests that he had a very unhealthy attitude towards sex. This is reflected in his unwillingness to become emotionally involved with his girlfriends. Why would she make up the fact that he did not kiss her? I once heard a prostitute say that she never kissed her clients because she did not want to become emotionally involved with them. It is the same attitude that JFK had. He probably told himself that he was not being unfaithful as long as he did not kiss the women. He might have been an above average president but he was a lousy human being.

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http://rockcenter.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/06/10323677-former-white-house-intern-mimi-alford-reveals-details-of-kennedy-affair

Ms. Alford will be interviewed at length on NBC's Rock Center show this Wednesday at 9 PM Eastern 8 PM Central time.

"Alford was first publicly outed in 2003 when historian Robert Dallek wrote 37 words about an unnamed intern who had an affair with Kennedy in his biography of Kennedy called An Unfinished Life. The New York Daily News identified her and Alford issued a simple written statement confirming her secret relationship. She faded into obscurity, but said that the secret eventually became too much to hold inside."

Edited by Douglas Caddy

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Just reading this piece makes me sick to my stomach. And this is the problem of the JFK Researchers Community. It's one thing to have an affair with Marilyn Monroe, but a young woman about to be married? It paints a very nasty picture. And this is their weapon, the right-wingers use to counteract the Assassination stories. I think Judy Campbell Exner suffered for having known him. Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead in an unsolved crime. And the rumors of Monroe's death. This is the stuff they throw at us. More so than his policies -- the eyes glaze over. How do we fix this? Not by lies, not by retaliation. Who knows if any of this stuff is true?

I mean, even myself. When I read how often they had sex and then he tells her to service Johnson and Dave Powers while he watched, it turns me off. So it must be doing a similar thing to people who don't remember him or who believe these stories. It's not like the man can defend himself. This kind of Journalism hurts the cause.

And when the film JFK came out, many columnists condemned the movie. Especially Chicago's Irv Kupcinet, whose daughter was almost a character in the movie until they went with Rose Cheramie.

Kathy C

Well, Kathy, do you care about the truth about your political leaders or do you want to hear stories that make you feel good? What do you like: the truth or a comfortable, soothing lie?

I like the truth even if it is the ugly truth. And the truth is John Kennedy, like Lyndon Johnson and Bill Clinton, was rampantly promiscuous. This is well documented. And it is important because it gives us insight into who JFK was, what his character was like, what his weaknesses were. And how Lyndon Johnson and Sam Rayburn were able to blackmail/strongarm and intimidate John Kennedy into putting LBJ on the ticket as VP at the 1960 Democratic convention.

They did not use the "MiMi affair," they handle plenty of other material to work with as well as threatenting to kill all of JFK's legislation.

I suggest reading the "Dark Side of Camelot" by Seymour Hersh and you will learn a lot mroe about JFK, his weaknesses and his rivalry with Lyndon Johnson:

http://www.amazon.co...28511461&sr=1-1

I read the book already. It's on a shelf in my hallway closet. I have no plans to sell it, as I do on Amazon [Paper and Pen] and eBay [idyllic Books].

Kathy C

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I doubt President would confide that sort of thing to someone he was apparently using just for physical sex, without enough emotional intimacy to kiss.

But there was also distance. “There was always a layer of reserve between us, which may explain why we never kissed,” she writes. “The wide gulf between us — the age, the power, the experience — guaranteed that our affair wouldn’t evolve into anything more serious.”

It is this passage that makes me believe the story. All the evidence suggests that he had a very unhealthy attitude towards sex. This is reflected in his unwillingness to become emotionally involved with his girlfriends. Why would she make up the fact that he did not kiss her? I once heard a prostitute say that she never kissed her clients because she did not want to become emotionally involved with them. It is the same attitude that JFK had. He probably told himself that he was not being unfaithful as long as he did not kiss the women. He might have been an above average president but he was a lousy human being.

I believe MiMi Alford. This is one of those rare witnesses where you can probably believe everything she says from the sex stuff to the JFK quote "I had rather my children red than dead."

Could you EVER imagine Lyndon Johnson saying something like that? Or Allen Dulles? Or Curtis LeMay? or the Texas oil men? or Nelson Rockefeller? Nope.

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