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William O'Neil

New Book!

1,531 posts in this topic

Coming soon!

General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical-Right Conspiracy

The new book by Dr. Jeffery Caufield, on Edwin Walker and the plot to kill John F. Kennedy.

It is a story we’re all pretty sure we know. On a fateful day in Dallas, Lee Harvey Oswald—working aloneshot President John F. Kennedy. End of story. Or is it?

In General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical-Right Conspiracy, author Jeffrey H. Caufield explores the forces which led Oswald to be in Dallas that day. Unlike many theorists, however, Dr. Caufield applies acquired academic methodology in rigorously researching the story through public records, private correspondence, and a number of sources not available to the general public until the Freedom of Information Act released them.

Caufield explains that when President Kennedy relieved Major General Edwin A. Walker of his command in Germany in 1961, he (Kennedy) started the chain of events that would lead to his own death. In June 1963, President Kennedy proposed his sweeping Civil Rights Act bill that would abolish the sacred Southern institution of segregation. In response, the segregationists threatened a second Civil War that culminated in the murder of JFK. Working with a who’s who of fellow right wing radicals (including some of the most powerful military and political leaders of the time), Walker was in the forefront of a plot to assassinate a large number of people in power positions in both government and industry. This plot, masterminded by Walker, evolved into a plan to assassinate President Kennedy and made Oswald an unwitting pawn in one of our country’s greatest historical mysteries.

Meticulously researched over 25 years using documents from the National Archives, the FBI, and other archival sources—along with extensive personal interviews—this book presents a massive amount of new evidence (900+ pages). Never before has there been such compelling proof of the involvement of the radical right and General Walker in the murder of the president.

This book is in the printing stages, stay tuned for further information regarding availability and pricing.

Edited by William O'Neil

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Caufield and O'Neil are both excellent researchers. I look forward to seeing what they've found!

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"Southern intuition of segregation"...?

this Gen Walker angle is new to me, and frankly quite unique, but i keep an open mind. i look forward to something besides energetic conjecture...

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Oh my! I'm VERY excited to hear about this as I have a chapter in my new book about General Walker and how I too felt he was a compass point for the assassination. I would love to talk to you Mr. O'Niel about my findings and to make sure I'm not repeating information you and Dr. Caufield have uncovered. Congratulations and please let us know when its available for purchase.

Gayle

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I don't believe the author's theory is correct. It does not account for the ongoing cover-up.

There has always been a far-right in this country, comprised of elected officials, citizen groups, and unorganized citizenry. The far-right always has harbored grievances against government actions and officers. When I was a kid growing up in rural N.E. Illinois, I saw many a barn side bearing the words, "Impeach Earl Warren", an allusion to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

There has also always been a far-left in the U.S. The far-left waxed in the 1930s, 1950s, and 1960s and has mostly waned since.

There always have been outlets, lawful outlets, for far-right and far-left expressions. For example, in 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court held a KKK leader could not be prosecuted by Ohio for burning a cross in a ceremony held on a rural Ohio farmer's property with the consent of the farm owner (Brandenburg v. Ohio).

I have little doubt Edwin Walker despised JFK. He had lots of company. But that does not explain the behavior of J. Edgar Hoover, LBJ, James Angleton, and other high government officials in the wake of the assassination.

I have an open mind, but I'm skeptical of this book based on what is said of it here.

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Jon, It's good to be skeptical. I would reserve too much judgement till you can see the whole work.

I don't have time to engage in a long discussion about the "cover - up". However, I would suggest that (IMO) it was the result of multipal entities and Institutions and their various self interests, mostly having to do with pre- knowledge of certain people and events. Hoover and LBJ fit into that category...again just my opinion.

Bill

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Coming soon!

General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical-Right Conspiracy

The new book by Dr. Jeffery Caufield, on Edwin Walker and the plot to kill John F. Kennedy.

It is a story we’re all pretty sure we know. On a fateful day in Dallas, Lee Harvey Oswald—working aloneshot President John F. Kennedy. End of story. Or is it?

In General Walker and the Murder of President Kennedy: The Extensive New Evidence of a Radical-Right Conspiracy, author Jeffrey H. Caufield explores the forces which led Oswald to be in Dallas that day. Unlike many theorists, however, Dr. Caufield applies acquired academic methodology in rigorously researching the story through public records, private correspondence, and a number of sources not available to the general public until the Freedom of Information Act released them.

Caufield explains that when President Kennedy relieved Major General Edwin A. Walker of his command in Germany in 1961, he (Kennedy) started the chain of events that would lead to his own death. In June 1963, President Kennedy proposed his sweeping Civil Rights Act bill that would abolish the sacred Southern institution of segregation. In response, the segregationists threatened a second Civil War that culminated in the murder of JFK. Working with a who’s who of fellow right wing radicals (including some of the most powerful military and political leaders of the time), Walker was in the forefront of a plot to assassinate a large number of people in power positions in both government and industry. This plot, masterminded by Walker, evolved into a plan to assassinate President Kennedy and made Oswald an unwitting pawn in one of our country’s greatest historical mysteries.

Meticulously researched over 25 years using documents from the National Archives, the FBI, and other archival sources—along with extensive personal interviews—this book presents a massive amount of new evidence (900+ pages). Never before has there been such compelling proof of the involvement of the radical right and General Walker in the murder of the president.

This book is in the printing stages, stay tuned for further information regarding availability and pricing.

Nobody who actually knew Edwin Walker would conclude that he had the level of intelligence or the people skills and organizational ability required to implement or facilitate (undetected) any complex event such as the assassination of the President of the United States.

Furthermore, Walker was not a unique thinker. None of his writings reveal any serious scholarship or analytical ability. At best, he was a mediocre propagandist for one particular political and ideological viewpoint which was informed, primarily, by literature recommended or published by the John Birch Society and similar right-wing conspiracy sources.

Walker's friends and admirers often remarked that he was incoherent during his speeches and when Walker was given the opportunity to convince the voters of Texas that he deserved their serious consideration for political office -- the voters of Texas summarily rejected him (he placed 6th in a field of 6 candidates).

Consequently, unless Dr. Caufield has discovered some verifiable earth-shaking new factual information which has never previously been discovered by anybody -- then merely speculating about Walker will add nothing significant to what we already know. By definition, to speculate means to provide conjecture -- i.e. a guess or hypothesis without significant fact-based evidence to support it. Anybody can speculate. But real historical scholarship requires verifiable evidence---particularly newly discovered and previously unknown data. Significantly, nobody has (up to now) found anything in Walker's personal papers (at University of Texas-Austin) which links him to planning any illegal activity much less the assassination of JFK. And I don't think anyone has ever found any documentation in personal papers of anybody else to support the Walker-as-Co-Conspirator paradigm.

Also, FYI: the National Archives is currently processing for me the FBI-Dallas main field file on Walker. If NARA is correct, I am the first person to ever request the FBI-Dallas field file (157-218) which consists of 515 pages in the main file and an additional 68 pages of a sub-A file. NARA has stated that they anticipate finishing the processing of my request by May 2016. After I get it -- I will arrange to have it posted online on the Internet Archive website -- along with the other Walker-related files which I already have on the Archive -- here:

https://archive.org/details/ernie1241_jbs?&sort=titleSorter∧[]=FOIA:%20Walker,%20Edwin

Edited by Ernie Lazar

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"The people skills ... required to ... facilitate ... the assassination of the President of the United States."

:)

while i agree with you that Walker "didn't do it," I have to admit I haven't thought of it in those terms before...

i do, however, think that it's very likely that LBJ was one of "them," and i surely don't see his people skills helping him much, either.

i realize my editing the sentence blows the context - i was just really enjoying that phrase...

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Sounds great! Best of luck :)

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I don't believe the author's theory is correct. It does not account for the ongoing cover-up.

There has always been a far-right in this country, comprised of elected officials, citizen groups, and unorganized citizenry. The far-right always has harbored grievances against government actions and officers. When I was a kid growing up in rural N.E. Illinois, I saw many a barn side bearing the words, "Impeach Earl Warren", an allusion to the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

There has also always been a far-left in the U.S. The far-left waxed in the 1930s, 1950s, and 1960s and has mostly waned since.

There always have been outlets, lawful outlets, for far-right and far-left expressions. For example, in 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court held a KKK leader could not be prosecuted by Ohio for burning a cross in a ceremony held on a rural Ohio farmer's property with the consent of the farm owner (Brandenburg v. Ohio).

I have little doubt Edwin Walker despised JFK. He had lots of company. But that does not explain the behavior of J. Edgar Hoover, LBJ, James Angleton, and other high government officials in the wake of the assassination.

I have an open mind, but I'm skeptical of this book based on what is said of it here.

Indeed, we had a twentieth-century assassination, under the most politically charged circumstances since Lincoln's...for which no one was blamed! This was an improvement on Lincoln's assassination, in which the knowledge of attempts on others' lives necessitated that the presidential assassin be abetted by a crew of southern sympathizers, whose connection to southern government and southern money it was deemed unnecessary to pursue.

But no one, left or right, assisted Oswald, encouraged him, even influenced him politically to kill Kennedy. Kennedy was killed by a generalized malcontent willing to shoot him, Walker, Nixon and Connally indiscriminately.

The importance of having a lone, dead patsy is that no others would be blamed, so that those others would never be later defended and exonerated, and no more accurate depiction of the conspiracy established. Because no conspiracy was established.

Edited by David Andrews

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"The people skills ... required to ... facilitate ... the assassination of the President of the United States."

:)

while i agree with you that Walker "didn't do it," I have to admit I haven't thought of it in those terms before...

i do, however, think that it's very likely that LBJ was one of "them," and i surely don't see his people skills helping him much, either.

i realize my editing the sentence blows the context - i was just really enjoying that phrase...

I'm not sure I understand your comment. LBJ was famous for his people skills -- which involved cajoling, reasoning, pressuring, and threatening in various measures to accomplish his purposes.

However, let me be clear about what I meant:

1. For his entire adult life, Walker functioned in a top-down authoritarian environment. In other words, his people skills were limited to giving orders to subordinates whom operated in a clear hierarchical system with explicit (and often severe) penalties for disobedience.

2. When somebody contemplates planning, organizing, and facilitating a complex crime (particularly one that requires the acquiescence and support and participation of numerous individuals in a non-hierarchical system --- i.e. where everyone has their own opinions and judgments about what should be done and on what schedule and whom should be given specific responsibilities) --- that requires an entirely different set of people skills. The temperament required to assure the success of the proposed objective is much different because so many different stakeholders are involved and they all have egos which must be taken into account.

3. My point about Walker is that he was not accustomed to using normal people skills - i.e. instead he was used to merely giving orders and having them obeyed. That is probably why (in 1959) he was attracted to, and joined, the John Birch Society because Robert Welch explicitly created it as "a monolithic body" to eliminate what he contemptuously described as follows:

"A republican form of government or of organization has many attractions and advantages under certain favorable conditions. But under less happy circumstances it lends itself too readily to infiltration, distortion, and disruption."
Because, (according to Welch), the "certain favorable conditions" were NOT in existence in December 1958 when the JBS came into existence, he proposed to create the JBS as a "monolithic" organization which "will operate under completely authoritative control at all levels" -- because, again quoting Welch, "democracy, of course, in government or organization, as the Greeks and Romans both found out, as I believe every man in this room clearly recognizes -- democracy is merely a deceptive phrase, a weapon of demagoguery and a perennial fraud."
Welch also explained how he would eliminate "parliamentary procedures" and what he described as the "two-sides-to-every question" problem.
It is this contempt for democratic processes which also explains why, in 1965, Walker assisted in the formation of the American Royal Rangers (Bossier City LA). The Rangers group was designed to take the place of the Klan and it was to be organized along military lines. Members were going to wear uniforms and be assigned ranks. Walker was to become a "five star general having jurisdiction over the entire organization" but he wanted to "remain in the background". So, again, you see Walker's pre-disposition for authoritarian top-down decision making where HE gave orders and subordinates obeyed them.

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