Martin Blank

did such a person exist and if so who was it

27 posts in this topic

Ensuring that the Warren Report, as printed, supported the lone nut theory was a big job that took the talents of an eye in the sky so to speak.

For example, someone had to know which witnesses to interview and which to leave out; when to cut off or redirect witnesses’ testimony; which questions to ask and which questions to avoid; which evidence had to be suppressed, altered, falsified, or fabricated out of whole cloth.

Obviously this person or persons would have to have intimate knowledge of the plot to take such a comprehensive view. They would know who jack ruby really was and why he acted. They also would know of the existence of two oswalds and the need to meld two biographies into one flawed life story. This individual also would have supervised/edited the report.

I think you get the picture.

My question is who was this master managing editor who knew how to assemble a report that pointed in the wrong and predetermined direction so convincingly that it duped a lot of unknowing people for such a long time. 

Thanks

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4 hours ago, Martin Blank said:

My question is who was this master managing editor who knew how to assemble a report that pointed in the wrong and predetermined direction so convincingly that it duped a lot of unknowing people for such a long time. 

 

 

Thanks

 

Martin,

 

I can't answer your question, but I ran across one person recently that I had never heard of before. His name is Dr. Alfred Goldberg. He sat in on Earlene Roberts' Warren Commission testimony. This article says that "he served as the Chief Historian for the Office of the Secretary of Defense for 34 years. Justice Earl Warren brought him onto the Warren Commission staff, where Dr. Goldberg served as a historical advisor and as co-author and co-editor of the Warren Commission Report." "From 1946 to 1965, Dr. Goldberg worked for the U.S. Air Force Historical Division as a senior historian." 

http://history.defense.gov/Multimedia/Biographies/Article-View/Article/571273/alfred-goldberg/

 

Why he's be sitting in on Earlene Roberts' testimony, and whether he attended any others, I don't know.

 

Steve Thomas

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5 hours ago, Martin Blank said:

My question is who was this master managing editor who knew how to assemble a report that pointed in the wrong and predetermined direction so convincingly that it duped a lot of unknowing people for such a long time. 

 

 

Thanks

 

Martin,

 

If he doesn't respond, you might be interested in reading what Bill Kelly posted on his Countercoup2 blog back in 2015. It looks like he is quoting Philip Shenon - from "A Cruel and Shocking Act" (2013): “Goldberg took on several writing assignments. He wrote the special chapter that listed – and rebutted – every major rumor and conspiracy theory."

 

Steve Thomas

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Martin, good question and good insight on your post.

I think it just gradually happened once the K memo came out.  They all had their marching orders.  Even late in the game, when Ford scribbled in "neck" in the almost final report, they knew what it needed to say.  Did someone on high tell Ford to scribble it in?  I doubt it.  Ford was playing along like the rest of them and being a lawyer like he was - knowing the game of subterfuge they were all playing - he scribbled it in to just give it that final touche.

And then of course it's so very easy to stand up in front of a bank of microphones, look earnest, and state, "My adding the word 'neck' in the final report was earnest and I did it with entirely pure intentions.  Thank you."  Then he meets a big-wig from France years later and reveals in private it was a conspiracy. 

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The reason Goldberg was hired per Shenon:

Goldberg had assumed Warren wanted him to write a history of the commission and that his job would be to document the work of the investigation as it went along. No, Warren said. He wanted Goldberg to bring a historian’s eye to the events of the assassination itself and to be a writer and editor of the commission’s final report. The chief justice, he said, wanted a report that read like something other than a cold legal brief.

 
 

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I think the person ultimately responsible, though, would have had to have had a global view of the assassination plot; these others that are mentioned seem like they would have been directed.

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Martin...

 

How about the obvious?  J Lee Rankin with the help of Dulles and Ford.  I don't think one needed to have far reaching vision to see which direction the wind was blowing.  Rankin had to have been involved in the picking and choosing of evidence for presentation...  he oversaw the lawyers and as Spartacus puts it, he worked with the FBI and CIA...  Ford and Dulles...  just sayin'

"Following President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Rankin was the unanimous choice of the Warren Commission to serve as general counsel in the inquiry that concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in killing President Kennedy. He was credited with redrafting and editing the commission’s voluminous report into a work of polished prose. Subsequently, Rankin practiced law in New York City until the 1970s, working seven years as the New York City Corporation Counsel (1966-1972). " -wiki

"In 1963 he became chief counsel for the Warren Commission. Apparently this was against the wishes of Earl Warren who wanted Warren Olney as chief counsel. Rankin's main role was to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Central Intelligence Agency. Rankin appointed Norman Redlich as his special assistant. "  http://spartacus-educational.com/JFKrankin.htm 

...and it's our man Redlich who realizes that FBI WCD1 and SS WCD298 and ce585 are not telling the story that needed telling and so informs Rankin at the end of April.  As a result, the misleading ce884 and ce875 are born while "the shot that missed" becomes one of the great charades of history.

 

Edited by David Josephs

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One more thought on this is about three men hardly ever mentioned yet seemingly very important to the FBI and the ultimate report:  

Supervisors Rogge and Thompson and Mr. Malley of the General Investigative Division

Mr. MALLEY. Mr. Belmont was in the same position that everyone else was in. He knew, I knew, that we had no actual jurisdiction. He did indicate to me that he had been in touch with Mr. Shanklin, who was the Special Agent in charge of Dallas, and that he would be back in touch with me as soon as there was more definite information available. That was about it for the time being. 
Later in the day, and I presume it must have been close to 3 o'clock, I was either told be(sic: by) telephone or asked to come down to Belmont's office, I cannot recall which, at which time he informed me that the General Investigative Division would be handling the assassination case of President Kennedy. 
Following that, and still not having many details to go on, I started lining up personnel that would be available on a round-the clock basis to handle whatever might develop. 

------

Mr. MALLEY. In the General Investigative Division, I happened to be the No. 1 man, and as you heard, I was assigned to handle liaison with the, oh, you haven't heard yet, I was assigned to handle liaison with the Warren Commission. 
There was also a criminal section, whose section chief was James Hanley. An individual by the name of Henry Schutz was a unit chief, under which was bank robberies and a number of other rather important criminal investigations, and there were two individuals that did work quite a bit on this particular case, by the name of Richard Rogge and Fletcher Thompson*(see Appendix). 
Mr. MCDONALD. Mr. Malley, regarding Rogge and Thompson, you just said that they worked closely with you on the case. 
Mr. MALLEY. They did in the early stages. They were the two individuals who were sent to Dallas to write the first two memorandums that I told you about, and we also had a civil rights section, which was under a section chief by the name of Clement McGowan. Does that cover what you have? 
Mr. MCDONALD. That is fine, thank you. 
Mr. Malley, in the investigation of the assassination how did the various divisions participate in the case? 
First of all, which was the primary division to run the case, the assassination case, and who was in charge of that investigation? 
Mr. MALLEY. As far as the actual assassination is concerned, it was definitely in the General Investigative Division. When you say who is responsible, are you referring to what section it was being handled and what supervisor was primarily responsible? 
Mr. MCDONALD. Which person was primarily responsible at the top to begin with? 
Mr. MALLEY. Well, because of what happened when I got back from Dallas I would say that I had to be. 



 

Belmont tells Tolson he is sending 2 agents to gather all the evidence and present to AG how Oswald is guilty - on Nov 24 1693 within hours of his death - SMALLER.jpg

Edited by David Josephs

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3 hours ago, Michael Walton said:

Martin, good question and good insight on your post.

I think it just gradually happened once the K memo came out.  They all had their marching orders.  Even late in the game, when Ford scribbled in "neck" in the almost final report, they knew what it needed to say.  Did someone on high tell Ford to scribble it in?  I doubt it.  Ford was playing along like the rest of them and being a lawyer like he was - knowing the game of subterfuge they were all playing - he scribbled it in to just give it that final touche.

And then of course it's so very easy to stand up in front of a bank of microphones, look earnest, and state, "My adding the word 'neck' in the final report was earnest and I did it with entirely pure intentions.  Thank you."  Then he meets a big-wig from France years later and reveals in private it was a conspiracy. 

 

2 hours ago, David Josephs said:

Martin...

 

How about the obvious?  J Lee Rankin with the help of Dulles and Ford.  I don't think one needed to have far reaching vision to see which direction the wind was blowing.  Rankin had to have been involved in the picking and choosing of evidence for presentation...  he oversaw the lawyers and as Spartacus puts it, he worked with the FBI and CIA...  Ford and Dulles...  just sayin'

"Following President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Rankin was the unanimous choice of the Warren Commission to serve as general counsel in the inquiry that concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in killing President Kennedy. He was credited with redrafting and editing the commission’s voluminous report into a work of polished prose. Subsequently, Rankin practiced law in New York City until the 1970s, working seven years as the New York City Corporation Counsel (1966-1972). " -wiki

"In 1963 he became chief counsel for the Warren Commission. Apparently this was against the wishes of Earl Warren who wanted Warren Olney as chief counsel. Rankin's main role was to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Central Intelligence Agency. Rankin appointed Norman Redlich as his special assistant. "  http://spartacus-educational.com/JFKrankin.htm 

...and it's our man Redlich who realizes that FBI WCD1 and SS WCD298 and ce585 are not telling the story that needed telling and so informs Rankin at the end of April.  As a result, the misleading ce884 and ce875 are born while "the shot that missed" becomes one of the great charades of history.

 

sorry  but put response here in the wrong place.my apologies

Edited by Martin Blank
wrong location

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1 hour ago, David Josephs said:

One more thought on this is about three men hardly ever mentioned yet seemingly very important to the FBI and the ultimate report:  

Supervisors Rogge and Thompson and Mr. Malley of the General Investigative Division

Mr. MALLEY. Mr. Belmont was in the same position that everyone else was in. He knew, I knew, that we had no actual jurisdiction. He did indicate to me that he had been in touch with Mr. Shanklin, who was the Special Agent in charge of Dallas, and that he would be back in touch with me as soon as there was more definite information available. That was about it for the time being. 
Later in the day, and I presume it must have been close to 3 o'clock, I was either told be(sic: by) telephone or asked to come down to Belmont's office, I cannot recall which, at which time he informed me that the General Investigative Division would be handling the assassination case of President Kennedy. 
Following that, and still not having many details to go on, I started lining up personnel that would be available on a round-the clock basis to handle whatever might develop. 

------

Mr. MALLEY. In the General Investigative Division, I happened to be the No. 1 man, and as you heard, I was assigned to handle liaison with the, oh, you haven't heard yet, I was assigned to handle liaison with the Warren Commission. 
There was also a criminal section, whose section chief was James Hanley. An individual by the name of Henry Schutz was a unit chief, under which was bank robberies and a number of other rather important criminal investigations, and there were two individuals that did work quite a bit on this particular case, by the name of Richard Rogge and Fletcher Thompson*(see Appendix). 
Mr. MCDONALD. Mr. Malley, regarding Rogge and Thompson, you just said that they worked closely with you on the case. 
Mr. MALLEY. They did in the early stages. They were the two individuals who were sent to Dallas to write the first two memorandums that I told you about, and we also had a civil rights section, which was under a section chief by the name of Clement McGowan. Does that cover what you have? 
Mr. MCDONALD. That is fine, thank you. 
Mr. Malley, in the investigation of the assassination how did the various divisions participate in the case? 
First of all, which was the primary division to run the case, the assassination case, and who was in charge of that investigation? 
Mr. MALLEY. As far as the actual assassination is concerned, it was definitely in the General Investigative Division. When you say who is responsible, are you referring to what section it was being handled and what supervisor was primarily responsible? 
Mr. MCDONALD. Which person was primarily responsible at the top to begin with? 
Mr. MALLEY. Well, because of what happened when I got back from Dallas I would say that I had to be. 



 

Belmont tells Tolson he is sending 2 agents to gather all the evidence and present to AG how Oswald is guilty - on Nov 24 1693 within hours of his death - SMALLER.jpg

i still think they were still errand boys following orders or whose work was ground down in some respect to make it fit holes.

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2 hours ago, David Josephs said:

Martin...

 

How about the obvious?  J Lee Rankin with the help of Dulles and Ford.  I don't think one needed to have far reaching vision to see which direction the wind was blowing.  Rankin had to have been involved in the picking and choosing of evidence for presentation...  he oversaw the lawyers and as Spartacus puts it, he worked with the FBI and CIA...  Ford and Dulles...  just sayin'

"Following President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Rankin was the unanimous choice of the Warren Commission to serve as general counsel in the inquiry that concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone in killing President Kennedy. He was credited with redrafting and editing the commission’s voluminous report into a work of polished prose. Subsequently, Rankin practiced law in New York City until the 1970s, working seven years as the New York City Corporation Counsel (1966-1972). " -wiki

"In 1963 he became chief counsel for the Warren Commission. Apparently this was against the wishes of Earl Warren who wanted Warren Olney as chief counsel. Rankin's main role was to work with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Central Intelligence Agency. Rankin appointed Norman Redlich as his special assistant. "  http://spartacus-educational.com/JFKrankin.htm 

...and it's our man Redlich who realizes that FBI WCD1 and SS WCD298 and ce585 are not telling the story that needed telling and so informs Rankin at the end of April.  As a result, the misleading ce884 and ce875 are born while "the shot that missed" becomes one of the great charades of history.

 

Dulles has crossed my mind one or twice but i wanted to get input from those here. rankin, i think, was just an errand boy and wouldn't have had the comprehensive knowledge of the plot necessary to do the task; ford was in hoover's pocket and probably was told what to write or add. he certainly wouldn't have had the overall vision this person would have needed. i was an editor for 40 years and buffed many a project into polished prose. moving commas around was one thing, substance was an entirely different matter and those for whom i was doing the work for always did the final reading of the piece. i may or may not have seen the piece after that.

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6 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Martin,

 

If he doesn't respond, you might be interested in reading what Bill Kelly posted on his Countercoup2 blog back in 2015. It looks like he is quoting Philip Shenon - from "A Cruel and Shocking Act" (2013): “Goldberg took on several writing assignments. He wrote the special chapter that listed – and rebutted – every major rumor and conspiracy theory."

 

Steve Thomas

i could have done that with no overall or comprehensive knowledge of the plot

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5 hours ago, W. Tracy Parnell said:

The reason Goldberg was hired per Shenon:

Goldberg had assumed Warren wanted him to write a history of the commission and that his job would be to document the work of the investigation as it went along. No, Warren said. He wanted Goldberg to bring a historian’s eye to the events of the assassination itself and to be a writer and editor of the commission’s final report. The chief justice, he said, wanted a report that read like something other than a cold legal brief.

 
 

Goldberg is one of the good guys, in my opinion. One of Shenon's discoveries was that Warren wanted to have all the Warren Commission's working papers destroyed, so that they couldn't be second-guessed. But Goldberg argued against this, and prevailed.

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I must have forgot about that.

What was the reason he gave for wanting to do that, do you recall?

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I think Alan Dulles and John McCloy (who was also CIA and also on the Warren Commission).  I think Gerald Ford was there for show and Lee Rankin a competent follower.  I also believe DAP worked very closely with Alan Dulles before and after the JFK assassination.  Lastly, General Charles Cabell, who worked for Alan Dulles in the CIA and was also fired for the Bay of Pigs by JFK. General Cabell got a big assist from the Mayor of Dallas (who controlled the Dallas Police), who was Charles's brother-Earle Cabell.  Helping Earle was the Jack Crichton. Finally, Alan Dulles got advice from R.  Gehlen.  Helms probably continued the cover up after Dulles died.

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