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Chris Newton

Where's Ruth's couch?

99 posts in this topic

Sorry Chris, maybe I’m confused. You wrote, “What I'm trying to get at here and this garage doorway would seem to confirm is that there was no door from the living room to the kitchen, that it was just a "doorless" passage from one room to the next.”

I guess I don’t understand how the photo of the kitchen to garage door confirms there was no door between the kitchen and living room.The photo that I posted above was taken in the kitchen and shows the door to the garage being open. The link below is to a photo of the same kitchen after having been remodeled.

 
In the remodeled kitchen there is a short section of wall to the right of the door leading to the garage, this is what I was calling a partition. 

On the right side of the newer photo linked above we see the door leading to the living room. My take is that is a sliding pocket door. While it’s certainly possible that the pocket door was added later, it sounds like a heroic retrofit.

Somebody claimed that one could see from the front door all the way into the kitchen, that there was no door in the doorway from the living room into the kitchen. But pocket doors can easily go unnoticed because they are a pain to open and close and are usually left in the open position - in the wall. 

I think you’re trying to prove that the living room photo of the three women, a baby, and a man shows the door in the background closed, and if so, that can’t be the door to the kitchen, it must be the hallway door. 

I think that both openings could have had doors, and I think that your best argument for the closed door in the three women photo being the hallway door is that that door is in the very corner of the room, and the kitchen door is not. In the three women photo the door-molding is extra wide on the left side, a compromise that carpenters sometimes make because it’s the simplest fudge when a doorway butts up against a wall. 

Or maybe I’m still confused.

Tom

 

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39 minutes ago, Tom Hume said:

Or maybe I’m still confused.

Nope. You are right on point.

 

41 minutes ago, Tom Hume said:

I guess I don’t understand how the photo of the kitchen to garage door confirms there was no door between the kitchen and living room.

I was making a conjecture that having two doors almost side by side, (separated I think by a 1 ft. partition), would be an awkward design with the garage door opening inward into the kitchen and two the left. I agree about the sliding partition door possibility and I'm working on that supposition as well, although I have no evidence of it yet.

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3 hours ago, Chris Newton said:

Nope. You are right on point.

 

I was making a conjecture that having two doors almost side by side, (separated I think by a 1 ft. partition), would be an awkward design with the garage door opening inward into the kitchen and two the left. I agree about the sliding partition door possibility and I'm working on that supposition as well, although I have no evidence of it yet.

Point can be a bad place to be when your in a hot lz...or on patrol, so I infer from what I've read, thankfully not experienced.  Thanks to those who have.

Tom, facing the garage door entry from the kitchen looking South on the diagram the entryway (not door) to the living room is immediately to the left.  In Chris latest picture the door to the garage is opened to the left obscuring the entryway to the living room. In an earlier picture it is evident there is no door on the entryway opening to the left from this view.   One opening to the right from this perspective would interfere with the opening of the garage door to the left.  They would bump unless both were closed when one was opened.  An architect wouldn't design it that way.  Pocket doors are not common in the single story tract houses like the Paines built in the 50's in the FW/D area.  At least not the several I've been in.

It's been nearly 24 years since I spent the evening in the kitchen.  The one time I went into the garage to see where the rifle had supposedly been stored I don't remember a living room door having to be pulled back to at least half way open to open the garage entry door from the kitchen.    

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Thanks Chris and Ron, I was confused after all - got my doors mixed up. Please disregard most of what I said.

Now that I'm possibly on the same page with you, it seems important to know the actual distance between the door leading to the garage and the doorway leading to the living room. If this distance is less than the width of the garage entry door it would be stupid (and possibly dangerous) construction, and certainly not to code. 

By the way, in the Pacific Northwest, where I live, there are many tract type homes with sliding pocket doors. 

Edited by Tom Hume

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22 minutes ago, Chris Newton said:

Agent Howlett: It would be 1 foot 2 inches from outside jam to outside jam.

And after some searching "outside jam" becomes a misnomer. Should have been "inside jam".

Ruth-Paine-4.jpg

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5 hours ago, Tom Hume said:

By the way, in the Pacific Northwest, where I live, there are many tract type homes with sliding pocket doors. 

I now have have conclusive photographic evidence that there is no sliding pocket door. I'll post an image soon.

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Good going, Chris. That's the same garage doorway - the same knot pattern in the vertical paneling, but the door-swing in your photo above has been changed, and obviously for sound reasons. I look forward to your living room/kitchen pocket door debunking.

ce435_zps83oxbdxs.jpg

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12 hours ago, Tom Hume said:

I look forward to your living room/kitchen pocket door debunking.

Thanks Tom.

I'm told that the molding is original and without visible hinge mark scars or screw holes.

rp_kitchen_jam.jpg

Edited by Chris Newton
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