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John Simkin

Che Guevara and the CIA

23 posts in this topic

In the revised edition of Ultimate Sacrifice, it is argued that in 1963 Juan Almeida and Che Guevara were involved in a CIA plot to overthrow Fidel Castro.

Eighteen years ago, Thom Hartmann and I (Lamar Waldron) began writing a book about the battles of President Kennedy and his brother, Attorney General Robert F Kennedy, against the Mafia and Fidel Castro. In 2005, using new information from almost two dozen people who worked with John and Robert Kennedy-backed up by thousands of files at the National Archives-we exposed for the first time JFK's top-secret plan to overthrow Castro and invade Cuba on December 1, 1963. "The Plan for a Coup in Cuba" (as it was titled in a memo for the joint Chiefs of Staff) would include a "palace coup" to eliminate Castro, allowing a new Cuban "Provisional Government" to step into the power vacuum. The coup would be supported by a "full-scale invasion" of Cuba by the US military, if necessary.

However, even as JFK's secret plan was nearing its final stage, he had two emissaries making last-ditch attempts to avoid a potentially bloody coup and invasion by trying to jump-start secret negotiations with Fidel Castro. One long-secret November 1963 memo about those negotiations states that "there was a rift between Castro and the (Che) Guevara ... Almeida group on the question of Cuba's future course." Che Guevara is still widely known today, perhaps even more than in 1963. But most people in the United States have never heard of Che's ally against Castro, Juan Almeida, even though in 1963 he wielded more power inside Cuba than Che himself. In some ways, Almeida was the third most powerful official in Cuba in 1963, after Fidel and his brother Raul - and even today, in 2006, the CIA lists Juan Almeida as the third-highest official in the current Cuban government.

In this new edition, we can now reveal for the first time that Almeida wasn't just allied with Che against Castro in November of 1963: Almeida was also allied with President Kennedy. In 1963, Juan Almeida was the powerful Commander of the Cuban Army, one of the most famous heroes of the Revolution - and he was going to lead JFK's "palace coup" against Fidel. Commander Almeida had been in direct contact with John and Robert Kennedy's top Cuban exile aide since May of 1963, and both men would be part of Cuba's new, post-coup Provisional Government. By the morning of November 22, 1963, Almeida had even received a large cash payment authorized by the Kennedys, and the CIA had placed his family under US protection in a foreign country.

The "Plan for a Coup in Cuba" was fully authorized by JFK and personally run by Robert Kennedy. Only about a dozen people in the US government knew the full scope of the plan, all of whom worked for the military or the CIA, or reported directly to Robert. The Kennedys' plan was prepared primarily by the US military, with the CIA playing a major supporting role. Input was also obtained from key officials in a few other agencies, but most of those who worked on the plan knew only about carefully compartmentalized aspects, believing it to be a theoretical exercise in case a Cuban official volunteered to depose Fidel.

The declassified documents provided in the revised edition of Ultimate Sacrifice do not prove that Che Guevara and Juan Almeida Bosch were involved in a CIA plot to overthrow Fidel Castro. All they do is to confirm that the CIA was aware that the two men were critical of some of Castro’s policies. Guevara and Almeida might have been willing to take part in a plot against Castro. However, the available evidence does not prove this was the case. Even if the CIA does declassify documents that show that they were in direct contact with Guevara and Almeida, it does not prove they were involved in a plot against Castro. In fact, it would be just as valid to argue that Castro was using the two men to monitor the CIA plots against him.

The main document provided in Ultimate Sacrifice concerning Guevara’s involvement is a CIA memo that Che was placed under house arrest on 30th November, 1963. As this was the day before the coup was originally scheduled to start, Lamar Waldron argues that this is evidence that Castro had discovered details of the CIA plot. That is a large leap of faith. In fact, the evidence that he was placed under house arrest is dubious in itself. It is based on a rumour picked by one diplomat in Havana at the time.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/COLDguevara.htm

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For some reason it suits the authors to misinterpret a failed attempt to 'break' the revolution. That is what has been declassified. And that is just more of what we expect from the CIA. It's an interesting insight into just how far off the mark the CIA has been/are when it comes to Cuba. BOP, this and all the assassination attempts highlights poor judgement based on a world view that is faulty because if they did correctly analyse and represent the Cuban revolution they would KNOW they would fail and would thus negate themselves. It's a beast that makes its own waste to feed on.

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(image) Che (meaning: friend) Guevara and his CIA backed executioners (incl. Bruce Jones' (contra) pal), and Che and friends.

Edited by John Dolva

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Here is Felix I. Rodriguez's account of the death of Che Guevara (Shadow Warrior, 1989):

Escape was impossible. The room had but one barred window in the rear. There were troops all around the schoolhouse. No, the soldier was only complying with his orders. The Bolivians didn't want any prisoners. They wanted the guerrillas dead. I turned without saying anything and went back into the room where Che lay, his arms and legs trussed together.

The place was small-about eight feet long and ten feet wide with mud walls and earthen floor. The tiny window was the sole source of light. There was a single, narrow door also facing the front. Che lay next to an old wooden bench. In the rear of the room, just across from him were the bodies of Antonio and Arturo.

I examined him more closely than I had before. He was a wreck. His clothes were filthy, ripped in several places and missing most of their buttons. He didn't even have proper shoes, only pieces of leather wrapped around his feet and tied with cord.

I stood above Che, my boots near his head, just as Che had once stood over my dear friend and fellow 2506 Brigade member, Nestor Pino. Captured at the Bay of Pigs, Pino was beaten by Castro's soldiers when he told them that he was not a cook or radio operator but the company commander of a paratroop battalion. His body battered, he lay on the earthen floor of a seaside hut taking the kicks and blows. Suddenly, they stopped.

Pino opened his eyes and saw a pair of polished boots next to his face. He looked up. It was Che Guevara, staring coolly down at him. Che spoke as matter-of-factly as if he was telling a child tomorrow is a school day. "We're going to kill you all," he said to Pino.

Pino had survived his ordeal. Now, the situation was reversed. Che Guevara lay at my feet. He looked like a piece of trash.

I said, "Che Guevara, I want to talk to you."

Even now he played the role of comandante. His eyes flashed. "Nobody interrogates me," he replied sarcastically.

"Comandante, " I said, somewhat amazed that he had chosen to answer me at all, "I didn't come to interrogate you. Our ideals are different. But I admire you. You used to be a minister of state in Cuba. Now look at you - you are like this because you believe in your ideals. I have come to talk to you."

He looked at me for about a minute in silence, then agreed to speak and asked if he could sit up. I ordered a soldier to untie him and got him propped onto the rickety wooden bench. I got him tobacco for his pipe.

He would not discuss tactical matters or technical things. When I asked him about some of his specific operations, he responded by saying only, "You know I cannot answer that."

But to more general questions, like "Comandante, of all the possible countries in the region, why did you pick Bolivia to export your revolution?" he answered at length.

He told me he had considered other places - Venezuela, Central America, and the Dominican Republic were three he named. But, he added, experience had shown that when Cuba tried to foment unrest so close to the U.S., the Yanquis reacted strongly and the revolutionary activities failed.

So, Che continued, since countries like Venezuela and Nicaragua were "too important to Yankee imperialism, and the Americans hadn't allowed us any success there, we figured that, by picking a country so far from the U.S. it wouldn't appear to present an immediate threat, the Yanquis wouldn't concern themselves with what we did. Bolivia fulfills that requirement.

"Second," he added, "we were looking for a poor country-and Bolivia is poor. And third, Bolivia shares boundaries with five countries. If we are successful in Bolivia, then we can move into other places-Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Peru, Paraguay."

He told me he believed that he'd lost support in Bolivia because the people were too provincial. "They cannot see their revolution in broad terms-as an international guerrilla movement working for the proletariat-but only as a regional issue," he said. "They want a Boliviano comandante, not a Cuban, even though I am an expert in these matters."

We talked about Cuba. He admitted to me that the economy was in a shambles, largely because of the economic boycott by the U.S. "But you helped cause that," I told Che. "You-a doctor-were made president of the Cuban National Bank. What does a doctor know about economics?"

"Do you know how I became president of the Cuban National Bank?" he asked me. "No. "

"I'll tell you a joke." He laughed. "We were sitting in a meeting one day, and Fidel came in and he asked for a dedicated economista. I misheard him - I thought he was asking for a dedicated comunista, so I raised my hand." He shrugged. "And that's why Fidel selected me as head of the Cuban economy. "

He refused to talk about what he had done in Africa although, when I said we'd been told he had a ten thousand-man guerrilla force, but that his African soldiers were a disaster, he laughed sadly and said, "If I'd really had ten thousand guerrillas it would have been different. But you are right, you know - the Africans were very, very bad soldiers."

He refused to speak badly about Fidel, although he damned him with faint praise. Actually, Che was evasive when Fidel's name came up. It became apparent to me that he was bitter over the Cuban dictator's lack of support for the Bolivian incursion. Indeed, that Che admitted how bad the Cuban economy was represented an indictment of Fidel's leadership, even though he did not specifically criticize him.

Che and I talked for about an hour and a half until, shortly before noon, I heard the chopper arrive. I went outside and discovered that Nino de Guzman had brought a camera from Major Saucedo, who wanted a picture of the prisoner. That was when I purposely screwed up the Bolivian's camera, but had Nino de Guzman snap a picture of

Che and me using my own Pentax. It is the only photograph of Che alive on the day he died.

Back inside, we resumed our conversation. Che expressed surprise that I knew so much about him, and about Cuba. "You are not a Bolivian," he said.

"No, I am not. Where do you think I am from?"

"You could be a Puerto Rican or a Cuban. Whoever you are, by the sorts of questions you've been asking I believe that you work for the intelligence service of the United States."

"You are right, Comandante," I said. "I am a Cuban. I was a member of the 2506 Brigade. In fact, I was a member of the infiltration teams that operated inside Cuba before the invasion at the Bay of Pigs."

"What's your name?"

"Felix. Just Felix, Comandante." I wanted to say more, but I didn't dare. There was still a slim possibility that he might get out of this alive, and I didn't want my identity to escape with him.

"Ha," Che answered. Nothing more. I don't know what he was thinking at the moment and I never asked.

We started to talk about the Cuban economy once again when we were interrupted by shots, followed by the sounds of a body falling to the floor. Aniceto had been executed in the adjoining room. Che stopped talking. He did not say anything about the shooting, but his face reflected sadness and he shook his head slowly from left to right several times.

Perhaps it was in that instant that he realized that he, too, was doomed, even though I did not tell him so until just before 1 P.M.

I had been putting off the inevitable, shuttling between Che's room and the table where I was photographing his documents. I was taking pictures of his diary when the village schoolteacher arrived.

"Mi Capitan?"

I looked up from my work. "Yes?"

"When are you going to shoot him?"

That caught my attention. "Why are you asking me that?" I asked.

"Because the radio is already reporting that he is dead from combat wounds."

The Bolivians were taking no chances. That radio report sealed Che's fate. I went down the hill, into the schoolhouse and looked Che in the face. "Comandante, " I said, "I have done everything in my power, but orders have come from the Supreme Bolivian Command..."

His face turned as white as writing paper. "It is better like this, Felix. I should never have been captured alive."

When I asked him if he had any message for his family, he said, "Tell Fidel that he will soon see a triumphant revolution in America." He said it in a way that, to me, seemed to mock the Cuban dictator for abandoning him here in the Bolivian jungle. Then Che added, "And tell my wife to get remarried and try to be happy."

Then we embraced, and it was a tremendously emotional moment for me. I no longer hated him. His moment of truth had come, and he was conducting himself like a man. He was facing his death with courage and grace.

I looked at my watch. It was one in the afternoon. I walked outside to where Mario Teran and Lieutenant Perez stood. I looked at Teran, whose face shone as if he had been drinking. I told him not to shoot Che in the face, but from the neck down. Then I walked up the hill and began making notes. When I heard the shots I checked my watch. It was 1: 10 P.M.

Che was dead.

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

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Some more on the CIA and Che. Felix Rodriguez, Gustavo Villoldo, Julio C. Garcia.

(image)

(question mark pure spec based on bodysize, clothes sense and penchant for big glasses.)

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

Terry;

If you would like a quick review on "Che", I will be more than glad to reduce down the pages of the research paper which I wrote on him a lifetime ago, and post them.

Anything for someone who has survived the New Orleans arena!

Tom

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

Terry;

If you would like a quick review on "Che", I will be more than glad to reduce down the pages of the research paper which I wrote on him a lifetime ago, and post them.

Anything for someone who has survived the New Orleans arena!

Tom

****************************************************************

After viewing Spike Lee's documentary on Katrina, and having had survived Betsy in 1965 myself, I finally realized what those Sherman tanks rolling down Esplanade in the early morning hours, while the water was inching up the steps to the veranda, were really on their way to doing. Not going to shoot gators, which is what the guardsmen told us, but to blow up the levee, so the Quarter wouldn't flood. I still love that grand old dame, as does my whole family. We've had many wonderful times and memories there. Hopefully, one day she'll rise again, above it all.

And Purv, please post what you have on Che. Better yet, send it to me: tmauro@pacbell.net

Thanks,

Ter

LOUISIANA 1927

What has happened down here is the wind have changed

Clouds roll in from the north and it started to rain

Rained real hard and rained for a real long time

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

The river rose all day

The river rose all night

Some people got lost in the flood

Some people got away alright

The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

President Coolidge came down in a railroad train

With a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand

The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done

To this poor cracker's land."

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Words and music by Randy Newman

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

Terry;

If you would like a quick review on "Che", I will be more than glad to reduce down the pages of the research paper which I wrote on him a lifetime ago, and post them.

Anything for someone who has survived the New Orleans arena!

Tom

****************************************************************

After viewing Spike Lee's documentary on Katrina, and having had survived Betsy in 1965 myself, I finally realized what those Sherman tanks rolling down Esplanade in the early morning hours, while the water was inching up the steps to the veranda, were really on their way to doing. Not going to shoot gators, which is what the guardsmen told us, but to blow up the levee, so the Quarter wouldn't flood. I still love that grand old dame, as does my whole family. We've had many wonderful times and memories there. Hopefully, one day she'll rise again, above it all.

And Purv, please post what you have on Che. Better yet, send it to me: tmauro@pacbell.net

Thanks,

Ter

LOUISIANA 1927

What has happened down here is the wind have changed

Clouds roll in from the north and it started to rain

Rained real hard and rained for a real long time

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

The river rose all day

The river rose all night

Some people got lost in the flood

Some people got away alright

The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

President Coolidge came down in a railroad train

With a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand

The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done

To this poor cracker's land."

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Words and music by Randy Newman

There can be little doubt that many a private conversation at New Orleans/State/& Federal level has transpired as to some means to "clean out" much of the areas.

Short of a small nuclear blast, awaiting mother nature appears to have been the final resolution.

As regards Mr. Guevara.

Of course, now with the internet, much of the information is now fully available to those who have interest in the subject.

Few are aware of "Pappy" Shelton's role in this event, and even there it has been lost in the other limelight.

Were I to want to dig any deeper into the subject matter, then I would no doubt look into the Esperanza Sugar Mill from which the SF MTT & Shelton operated from during their training of the Bolivian Rangers/Special Forces personnel.

I do believe the subject of "SUGAR" has been discussed here.

Tom

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

Terry;

If you would like a quick review on "Che", I will be more than glad to reduce down the pages of the research paper which I wrote on him a lifetime ago, and post them.

Anything for someone who has survived the New Orleans arena!

Tom

****************************************************************

After viewing Spike Lee's documentary on Katrina, and having had survived Betsy in 1965 myself, I finally realized what those Sherman tanks rolling down Esplanade in the early morning hours, while the water was inching up the steps to the veranda, were really on their way to doing. Not going to shoot gators, which is what the guardsmen told us, but to blow up the levee, so the Quarter wouldn't flood. I still love that grand old dame, as does my whole family. We've had many wonderful times and memories there. Hopefully, one day she'll rise again, above it all.

And Purv, please post what you have on Che. Better yet, send it to me: tmauro@pacbell.net

Thanks,

Ter

LOUISIANA 1927

What has happened down here is the wind have changed

Clouds roll in from the north and it started to rain

Rained real hard and rained for a real long time

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

The river rose all day

The river rose all night

Some people got lost in the flood

Some people got away alright

The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

President Coolidge came down in a railroad train

With a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand

The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done

To this poor cracker's land."

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Words and music by Randy Newman

There can be little doubt that many a private conversation at New Orleans/State/& Federal level has transpired as to some means to "clean out" much of the areas.

Short of a small nuclear blast, awaiting mother nature appears to have been the final resolution.

As regards Mr. Guevara.

Of course, now with the internet, much of the information is now fully available to those who have interest in the subject.

Few are aware of "Pappy" Shelton's role in this event, and even there it has been lost in the other limelight.

Were I to want to dig any deeper into the subject matter, then I would no doubt look into the Esperanza Sugar Mill from which the SF MTT & Shelton operated from during their training of the Bolivian Rangers/Special Forces personnel.

I do believe the subject of "SUGAR" has been discussed here.

Tom

This "Internet" stuff really makes things easier.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=8127

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http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...page&pid=13

Conclusions

At the end of 1967 several different and contradictory images of Che Guevara emerged from U.S. media coverage of his death. The press, in particular, constructed Che almost exclusively from evidence of violence, citing either his personality or his resolve to carry Communism into Latin America. News magazines, on the other hand, relied more on revolution and anti-imperialist struggles in Latin America and elsewhere for a description of his political activities and the cause of his death, Opinion journals also described him as an imaginative revolutionary, a romantic more than a serious politician, whose anti-imperialist fight was based on his pathological hatred of the United States and his need for destruction. In either case, Che's image was conditioned by contradictory observations and resulted in a flawed ideal of friend or foe that haunted the pages of the print media and reflected the uneasiness of U.S. journalism in the face of U.S. involvement in Che Guevara's death.

http://www.che-lives.com/home/modules.php?...wpage&pid=3

Che and his insurrectionists found themselves cornered in Bolivia, the American aid to the Bolivian government on one end, and the lack of assistance from his allies. In addition to this, the CIA also helped anti-Castro Cuban exiles to set up interrogation houses for those Bolivians who were thought to be assisting Che Guevara and/or his guerillas, which were often used for torture of these individuals.

The anti-insurrectionists were notified of the location of Guevara's guerilla encampment by a deserter; and on October 8th, 1967the encampment was encircled and Che was captured while leading a patrol in the vicinity of La Higuera, Bolivia. His surrender was offered after being wounded multiple times in the legs and having his rifle destroyed by a bullet. According to soldiers present at the capture, during the skirmish, as soldiers approached Guevara, he shouted, "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead." Barrientos ordered his execution immediately upon being informed of Guevara's capture. Guevara was summarily executed; he was taken to a rugged old schoolhouse and bound by his hands to a board. Supposedly, Ernesto Guevara did have some last words before his death; he allegedly said to his executioner, “Shoot, coward, you are only going to kill a man,” after which he was shot in the heart.

A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity.

death

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/index.html

Felix Rodriguez' debriefing

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB5/che15_1.htm

issuing orders 500 600. Possibly in fear of Castros promise to hunt down anyone who killed Che he portrayed himself as a 'friend'. He could just as easily have issued order 700.

By the time Felix went on to bring misery to the Nicaraguans his 'conversion' shows itself for what it was.

****************************************************************

"A CIA agent and Veteran of the US invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs, Felix Rodriguez, heard of Guevara's chapter and relayed the information to the CIA. He has said on multiple occasions that he was the one that shot Guevara. This is generally thought to be untrue. After the execution, Rodriguez took Che's Rolex watch, often proudly showing it to reporters during the ensuing years. Guevara died on October 9th. He was buried in an unmarked grave in the vicinity of the execution site after the CIA had removed his hands to send to different parts of the world to ensure his identity."

I wish for Felix Rodriguez to die a slow, horrible death.

Terry;

If you would like a quick review on "Che", I will be more than glad to reduce down the pages of the research paper which I wrote on him a lifetime ago, and post them.

Anything for someone who has survived the New Orleans arena!

Tom

****************************************************************

After viewing Spike Lee's documentary on Katrina, and having had survived Betsy in 1965 myself, I finally realized what those Sherman tanks rolling down Esplanade in the early morning hours, while the water was inching up the steps to the veranda, were really on their way to doing. Not going to shoot gators, which is what the guardsmen told us, but to blow up the levee, so the Quarter wouldn't flood. I still love that grand old dame, as does my whole family. We've had many wonderful times and memories there. Hopefully, one day she'll rise again, above it all.

And Purv, please post what you have on Che. Better yet, send it to me: tmauro@pacbell.net

Thanks,

Ter

LOUISIANA 1927

What has happened down here is the wind have changed

Clouds roll in from the north and it started to rain

Rained real hard and rained for a real long time

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

The river rose all day

The river rose all night

Some people got lost in the flood

Some people got away alright

The river have busted through clear down to Plaquemines

Six feet of water in the streets of Evangeline

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

President Coolidge came down in a railroad train

With a little fat man with a note-pad in his hand

The President say, "Little fat man isn't it a shame what the river has done

To this poor cracker's land."

CHORUS

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tyrin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Louisiana, Louisiana

They're tryin' to wash us away

They're tryin' to wash us away

Words and music by Randy Newman

There can be little doubt that many a private conversation at New Orleans/State/& Federal level has transpired as to some means to "clean out" much of the areas.

Short of a small nuclear blast, awaiting mother nature appears to have been the final resolution.

As regards Mr. Guevara.

Of course, now with the internet, much of the information is now fully available to those who have interest in the subject.

Few are aware of "Pappy" Shelton's role in this event, and even there it has been lost in the other limelight.

Were I to want to dig any deeper into the subject matter, then I would no doubt look into the Esperanza Sugar Mill from which the SF MTT & Shelton operated from during their training of the Bolivian Rangers/Special Forces personnel.

I do believe the subject of "SUGAR" has been discussed here.

Tom

This "Internet" stuff really makes things easier.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=8127

Terry;

One may want to look here to find some of the answers.

http://www.namebase.org/main2/John-S-Tilton.html

http://www.hoosier84.com/phx.pdf

(John S. Tilton, Head of Phoenix)

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"This "Internet" stuff really makes things easier.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=8127 " Terry

"First, we commit ourselves to help in the long-range, systematic development of the Bolivian economy--looking on Bolivia as a full partner in the Alliance for Progress - working toward the day when all Bolivians can enjoy a higher standard of living and external assistance is no longer required.

Secondly, we will cooperate with the Bolivian National Planning Commission, the United Nations Advisory Group and the Inter-American Economic and Social Council to work together in developing a long-range program of economic development-and in preparing the necessary technical studies needed."

"Alliance for Progress" is regarded by Castro as the last serious counter by the US to the Cuban revolution spreading to the Latin American countries. He notes that the US$ 20 billion aid package has since reversed to a debt where the interest flowing to the US is of this magnitude. IOW Kennedys progressive policy has in the hands of his successors turned into what results in the anti US Latin America of today. Greed is a beast which ultimately consumes itself. A study in dialectics.

Tom, I think you're correct in connecting pre-Che progressive moves (agrarian reform) in Bolivia with his failure. Just as you in the long range cannot impose reaction, you cannot impose revolt, unless the pre existing conditions are supportive. The russian revolution is another example where the Bolchevics were just one of many (some 600 odd) groupings at the start. Word of mouth established them as the ones with the 'solution'. The people look for a solution. Kennedy offered one, and thus diluted Che's impact. (IMO)

Edited by John Dolva

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"This "Internet" stuff really makes things easier.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=8127 " Terry

"First, we commit ourselves to help in the long-range, systematic development of the Bolivian economy--looking on Bolivia as a full partner in the Alliance for Progress - working toward the day when all Bolivians can enjoy a higher standard of living and external assistance is no longer required.

Secondly, we will cooperate with the Bolivian National Planning Commission, the United Nations Advisory Group and the Inter-American Economic and Social Council to work together in developing a long-range program of economic development-and in preparing the necessary technical studies needed."

"Alliance for Progress" is regarded by Castro as the last serious counter by the US to the Cuban revolution spreading to the Latin American countries. He notes that the US$ 20 billion aid package has since reversed to a debt where the interest flowing to the US is of this magnitude. IOW Kennedys progressive policy has in the hands of his successors turned into what results in the anti US Latin America of today. Greed is a beast which ultimately consumes itself. A study in dialectics.

Tom, I think you're correct in connecting pre-Che progressive moves (agrarian reform) in Bolivia with his failure. Just as you in the long range cannot impose reaction, you cannot impose revolt, unless the pre existing conditions are supportive. The russian revolution is another example where the Bolchevics were just one of many (some 600 odd) groupings at the start. Word of mouth established them as the ones with the 'solution'. The people look for a solution. Kennedy offered one, and thus diluted Che's impact. (IMO)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As a result of these special measures, existing programs, loans already committed to Bolivia by such agencies of the United States government as the Development Loan Fund (for the El Alto airport and the La Esperanza Sugar Mill (emphasis added), for example), and funds committed by the Federal Republic of Germany and such agencies as the Inter-American Development Bank, a total of some $50 million in free world assistance is pledged to Bolivia. The projects to

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Terry's interest appear to be in the "who" of who was behind the final event of the termination of Che.

As to the socio-political aspects, one must dig deeply into the history & peoples of the region as well as the Government actions.

Che violated virtually every commandment of his own doctrine as regards establishment of a rebel force and the qualifications of a rebel leader.

Which merely demonstrates the well known saying: (At least in SF)

"Those who can, do! Those who can't, teach!"-----------or write books on the how to do.

What you (most probably) as well as others often fail to recognize is the original primary mission of the U.S. Army Special Forces.

This PRIMARY mission was the conduct of guerilla warfare. A mission that was inherited from the old OSS days of French resistance fighters as well as the numerous CIA Balkans failures.

As a result of this mission, SF also inherited the secondary mission of counter-guerilla warfare activities, and thus the MTT Teams such as the one by "Pappy" Shelton to Bolivia to train the Bolivian Rangers/SF personnel.

If one is going to "practice their art" then they must study the failures as well as the successes of those who came before them as well as continue to moniter the success and/or failure of ongoing operations.

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"This "Internet" stuff really makes things easier.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=8127 " Terry

"First, we commit ourselves to help in the long-range, systematic development of the Bolivian economy--looking on Bolivia as a full partner in the Alliance for Progress - working toward the day when all Bolivians can enjoy a higher standard of living and external assistance is no longer required.

Secondly, we will cooperate with the Bolivian National Planning Commission, the United Nations Advisory Group and the Inter-American Economic and Social Council to work together in developing a long-range program of economic development-and in preparing the necessary technical studies needed."

"Alliance for Progress" is regarded by Castro as the last serious counter by the US to the Cuban revolution spreading to the Latin American countries. He notes that the US$ 20 billion aid package has since reversed to a debt where the interest flowing to the US is of this magnitude. IOW Kennedys progressive policy has in the hands of his successors turned into what results in the anti US Latin America of today. Greed is a beast which ultimately consumes itself. A study in dialectics.

Tom, I think you're correct in connecting pre-Che progressive moves (agrarian reform) in Bolivia with his failure. Just as you in the long range cannot impose reaction, you cannot impose revolt, unless the pre existing conditions are supportive. The russian revolution is another example where the Bolchevics were just one of many (some 600 odd) groupings at the start. Word of mouth established them as the ones with the 'solution'. The people look for a solution. Kennedy offered one, and thus diluted Che's impact. (IMO)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As a result of these special measures, existing programs, loans already committed to Bolivia by such agencies of the United States government as the Development Loan Fund (for the El Alto airport and the La Esperanza Sugar Mill (emphasis added), for example), and funds committed by the Federal Republic of Germany and such agencies as the Inter-American Development Bank, a total of some $50 million in free world assistance is pledged to Bolivia. The projects to

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Terry's interest appear to be in the "who" of who was behind the final event of the termination of Che.

As to the socio-political aspects, one must dig deeply into the history & peoples of the region as well as the Government actions.

Che violated virtually every commandment of his own doctrine as regards establishment of a rebel force and the qualifications of a rebel leader.

Which merely demonstrates the well known saying: (At least in SF)

"Those who can, do! Those who can't, teach!"-----------or write books on the how to do.

What you (most probably) as well as others often fail to recognize is the original primary mission of the U.S. Army Special Forces.

This PRIMARY mission was the conduct of guerilla warfare. A mission that was inherited from the old OSS days of French resistance fighters as well as the numerous CIA Balkans failures.

As a result of this mission, SF also inherited the secondary mission of counter-guerilla warfare activities, and thus the MTT Teams such as the one by "Pappy" Shelton to Bolivia to train the Bolivian Rangers/SF personnel.

If one is going to "practice their art" then they must study the failures as well as the successes of those who came before them as well as continue to moniter the success and/or failure of ongoing operations.

John;

Although the US assistance in the hunt for Che, as well as probable involvement in his final death, are most likely the reasons for his relatively rapid failure in Bolivia, lack of support is ultimate the condition which aided those who searched him down.

Che had, for all purposes, failed to acquire any support in his attempt to form a guerilla army and revolution.

What becomes extremely critical is the fact that even the various Communist organizations which were firmly entrenced in Bolivia, also did not support Che, and there is no firm records of his attempts to secure the assistance of these in-country organizations.

Therefore, unlike the Castro/Cuba events which recognized the absolute necessity of having some "strings attached" to the support, Che appeared to want to accept no assistance which may have had strings attached.

This held true for the Russian, Chinese, as well as it would appear Cuban communist organizations.

So!

In event that Che was "sent" to Bolivia, then he was sent to an intentional failure.

In event that he "chose" Bolivia, then he completely ignored the lessons of Cuba as well as his own rules of doctrine.

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