Jump to content


Spartacus
Photo

Army Security Agency Group


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Stacey Brzovskis

Stacey Brzovskis

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 26 August 2004 - 07:13 AM

I am looking to find information about the Army Security Agency group during the Vietnam War. My father, Robert E. Wall, Jr., was in this agency during his Active Duty Army years. He served with this agency in Vietnam for 2 tours. My father has been diagnosed as having Manic-Deptressive Disorder. He just sits around or sleeps and takes his medication. He just isn't the same Dad I had growing up. I am trying to find some way to get him to talk to someone about those 2 tours and even after Vietnam. He had missions that he could never talk about. I know some things have been declassified. Even if talking to me is not what he needs, maybe I can say something to him to get him to go to a Vietnam Veteran's Support Group. When I was growing up I would wake up almost once a week to my Dad screaming from his nightmares relating to the War. He has never talked to anyone about that time in the Army. He is only 54 years old. He is very patriotic and proud of his Military service as am I. I just want to try to help him. If you can help I would appreciate it. If you can't then any web sites that you know of relating to this would be very helpful.

#2 Mike Toliver

Mike Toliver

    Experienced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 140 posts

Posted 26 August 2004 - 12:48 PM

I am looking to find information about the Army Security Agency group during the Vietnam War.  My father, Robert E. Wall, Jr., was in this agency during his Active Duty Army years.  He served with this agency in Vietnam for 2 tours.  My father has been diagnosed as having Manic-Deptressive Disorder.  He just sits around or sleeps and takes his medication.  He just isn't the same Dad I had growing up.  I am trying to find some way to get him to talk to someone about those 2 tours and even after Vietnam.  He had missions that he could never talk about.  I know some things have been declassified.  Even if talking to me is not what he needs, maybe I can say something to him to get him to go to a Vietnam Veteran's Support Group.  When I was growing up I would wake up almost once a week to my Dad screaming from his nightmares relating to the War.  He has never talked to anyone about that time in the Army.  He is only 54 years old.  He is very patriotic and proud of his Military service as am I.  I just want to try to help him.  If you can help I would appreciate it.  If you can't then any web sites that you know of relating to this would be very helpful.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi Stacey -

I wish I could help you, but since I was in a regular infantry unit in the Marine Corps, I don't know anything about the "Army Security Agency". May I suggest you contact the military records folks in St. Louis, Missouri? It's a government agency, and you can get at least some of your father's military records even without his permission (you can get the whole "package" with his permission). This would help you see what units he actually served with; in turn, that might help you find folks he was with (nearly all the sizable units have web sites and reunions these days) or get a better understanding of what he did and what he went through.

There are a variety of web sites out there. I'm presuming you've done a search on the Vietnam War or Vietnam Veterans. I don't spend a lot of time on the web looking at this, but if I come across something that looks interesting for you, I'll send it along. I haven't seen anything directly relevant yet.

I wish I could be of more help - please know that I am thinking about you and your dad.

Mike Toliver

#3 David G. Healy

David G. Healy

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,009 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 August 2004 - 07:20 PM

[...]
I am looking to find information about the Army Security Agency group during the Vietnam War. My father, Robert E. Wall, Jr., was in this agency during his Active Duty Army years. He served with this agency in Vietnam for 2 tours. My father has been diagnosed as having Manic-Deptressive Disorder.
[...]

Stacey,

Not sure where you're located. I'm presuming you're in the US. Start here -- do a search on the web for the "VVA", that's: The Vietnam Veterans Association - nearly EVERY metro area in the US has a group, find the one *closest* to you -- drop a note to the group, explaining your Dad's plight [he's NOT alone, nor are you] or call -- in most cases a contact number is provided. They can provide you, referral/contact numbers.

If you have access to internet *newsgroups*, find your way to * alt.war.vietnam * (don't include the *stars*). Post exactly what you posted here, thousands of us Vietnam veterans visit the site daily. It takes a few hours for your thread to appear, check back regularly.

Do ****NOT**** provide names, addresses, phone numbers, etc in the thread you start at alt.vietnam.war.

Warning: the site is cluttered with current political nonsense at the moment, but when a request like yours appears, especially as a new thread, you'll be surprised at the response...

Take care and let us know how you make out. I hope this doesn't sound trite: I know you love your Dad, sometime these problems take years and years coming to the front, it's not you, your Dad or the family's fault - there's help out there, we're not ALL gone, yet!

Keep in touch here, I'll be following this...

Thanks for the note, JohnS...

David Healy

Edited by David G. Healy, 27 August 2004 - 07:01 AM.


#4 Bob Fromme

Bob Fromme

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Floresville, Texas USA
  • Interests:I am Bob Fromme. I grew up in a small farming community in the northwestern part of Kansas (cattle and wheat country). In 1968 I completed 4 years of college with a B.F.A. I was immediately drafted into the U. S. Army, trained for the Infantry at Fort Lewis, WA and by April 1969, I was assigned to serve as a rifleman in Delta Company, 4th Bn, 12 Inf., 199th Light Infantry Brigade in Vietnam. <br /><br />The first months of my tour of duty were spent working below “The Parrots Beak” in “The Pineapples”, south and west of Saigon (swamps, rice and pineapple fields, canals, rivers and jungle). By late May of 69 I was assigned to “hump the pig” (M 60 machine gun) and the unit was moved toward the coast east of Saigon into the lower part of “The Highlands” (triple canopy jungles, mountains and rubber plantations). By June there were only three men remaining in our squad and or platoon had been reduced to 14 men (from the original 24 soldiers.) I was wounded from a grenade in a firefight on June 13, 1969. <br /><br />After a couple weeks recuperating in the field hospital system, I requested a transferred to work in graphics for the 554th Engineers of the 20th Engineer Brigade. This required me to agree to military service for more then the original two years, however, I wanted to try to use my college training and I had seen enough of the life of and infantryman. I served as a draftsman, illustrator and jeep driver at Cu Chi and later, Lai Khe. One of the projects the unit was working on was,QL. 13, a highway that ran along the Cambodian border. After my time in Vietnam, I served for a few months in the U.S. and received orders to serve in Germany as a topographic draftsman before my discharge and return to Graduate School in the U.S.. <br /><br />Although I did not want to be drafted and I did not like the difficult months that I spent as a combat solder, I continue to feel that the original intention of our government in Vietnam, to try to stop the spread of Communism across the globe, was a reasonable and honorable effort. I hold these feelings even after learning first hand of the price in human life and suffering that must be paid for Freedom and Democracy. When I returned to civilian life, I was angry at the deception and bias of the media and the lack of resolve of the politically driven leaders in U.S. I was also angry at those who were involved in the war protest. I felt that many of these people had not seen combat and were unaware of the huge atrocities that the North Vietnamese forces were inflicting against the citizens in the South. I felt that people like Jane Fonda and John Kerry were dishonoring all U.S. veterans. I was of the opinion that Fonda was probably trying take advantage of the anti-war publicity to advance her celebrity status. I felt that Kerry wanted to go into politics and in atmosphere of the early 70s he realized that his best shot was to use the publicity of the anti-war sentiment in the U.S. to hurl his name and face into public notice. <br /><br />I received an M.A. in 1974 and an M.F.A. in 1980. I have worked as a professional potter, clay sculptor and as an adjunct college instructor, lecturing design, ceramics and art history. For the past 15 years I have been working in public education ( middle and high school), teaching in the visual arts and in digital graphics and animation in a school district on the southeast side of San Antonio, Texas. I am on John's Spartacus site as a resource for students who want to consider another side of the values and issues concerning the Vietnam War. Feel free to ask questions via email at rfromme@stic.net . <br /><br />Now, with well over three decades since that era, I continue to research that period and I do a little writing about my experiences while a soldier. You can find some of my accounts and stories on my site at:<br /><br />http;//fromme-usa.net<br /><br />Here is one example of my accounts published by Primedia in 2002: <br /><br />http://www.thehistorynet.com/vn/bldeathofastaffsergeant/<br /><br />(Note: When this account was first published in Vietnam Magazine, I noticed that the editors had included an error for the maximum number of rounds fired by an M60.... The number should read &quot;500 rounds per minute&quot;.)<br />

Posted 31 August 2004 - 01:43 AM

I am looking to find information about the Army Security Agency group during the Vietnam War. My father, Robert E. Wall, Jr., was in this agency during his Active Duty Army years. He served with this agency in Vietnam for 2 tours.....

Stacey ,

The Army Security Agency was part of Military Intelligence. In the Texas Tech. Virtual Vietnam Archive, there are about 65 documents, books and other materials that relate to that agency. Some of these are copyrighted and not directly available online, yet many of the documents can be saved to disk as pdf files and you will need an Acrobat Reader to view them on your computer. (If your computer doesn't have this software already, the Acrobat Reader is available free from the www.adobe.com web site.) You will have to wade through a lot of junk in order to get some useful information concerning the mission of the A.S.A. in Vietnam. You may want to email the staff at the Texas Tex Archive and ask for the right to view copies of the copyrighted documents. If you explain a bit of your motivation, you will probably find them very willing to try to help you locate useful information.

Point your browser to: http://www.vietnam.t...chive/index.htm

This is the Texas Tech Virtual Vietnam Archive.

To search the Virtual Vietnam Archive, click "Search the Virtual Vietnam Archive" in the left column.
Type Army Security Agency in the box labled “Keyword/ Item.” Select English as the “Language” and fill in any other blanks or boxes that you think may help to pin point the kind of document that you want concerning the “Army Security Agency.”

Click on the “Start Search” button on the left side menu.
When the search is finished, click on “View the Results”

Good luck with your search.

#5 Daniel Marvin

Daniel Marvin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts
  • Location:Cazenovia, New York
  • Interests:Ridding government of evil systems and people.<br /><br />Reporting the truth as I personally lived it.<br /><br />Attempting to bring others forward who lived a covert existence within our military, FBI, NSA or CIA who are willing to come forward - even testify before Congress as I have volunteered to do and so has retired Green Beret MSG Jerry Willsey .

Posted 09 September 2004 - 04:39 AM

I have had no personal experience with ASA. Perhaps Colonel James "Bo" Gritz can either help you or steer you in the right direction. E-mail Bo at bogritz@msn.com

You might want to get his latest book "My Brother's Keeper." A real eye opener.
Just send a check for $24.95 to Judy Gritz, HC-37, P.O. Box 472, Sandy Valley, Neveda 89019 and ask for a signed book.

Take care and know that I pray that you learn more about what your Dad did in Vietnam.

Dangerous Dan




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users