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28 Years Before the WC, a Young Republican Political Leader Courageoulsy Challenged the LN "Community"


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#1 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:33 AM

This thread was inspired by the impression I came away with after reading John Simkin's thread,

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=15583
Tom Mooney and Lee Harvey Oswald


I guess the reason that so many seemingly "good people" in the U.S. can make careers as lawyers, judges, and in law enforcement, all of them complacent, almost always, is because they satisfy themselves with the notion that the American legal system is not about
attempting to guarantee that justice is done, but simply that the guarantee to "due process" is maintained, above all else.

Once there was a young republican governor who was willing to risk his career and his reputation. He spoke out.
He was crushed. Perhaps the memory of what he said and did, and the price he was made to pay for doing it, was still fresh in the minds of good men who did nothing, in the months and years following the Warren Commission investigation and issuance of its report.:

Gov. Xxxxx said in a statement after granting

the reprieve one day beore Xxxxxx was first

scheduled to die, Jan. xx, Xxxxx, that he had

never expressed an opinion "upon the guilt or

innocence of Xxxxxx."

He said: "I do, however, share with hundreds

of thousands of our people the doubt as to the

value of the evidence that placed him in the

Xxxxxx xxxxx on the night of the crime...I

do doubt that this crime could have been

committed by one man, and I am worried about

the eagerness of some of our law enforcement

agencies to bring about the death of this one

man so that the books can be closed in the

thought that another great crime mystery has

been successfully solved."


Twenty years after the [crime]--two years

before he died--Xxxxx said his view was

unchanged, adding:

"If Xxxxxx had been kept behind prison bars

for a reasonable time, there would have been

an opportunity to answer many of the

unanswered question, particularly those

involving an accomplice or accomplices."



#2 Greg Parker

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:40 AM

This thread was inspired by the impression I came away with after reading John Simkin's thread,

http://educationforu...showtopic=15583
Tom Mooney and Lee Harvey Oswald


I guess the reason that so many seemingly "good people" in the U.S. can make careers as lawyers, judges, and in law enforcement, all of them complacent, almost always, is because they satisfy themselves with the notion that the American legal system is not about
attempting to guarantee that justice is done, but simply that the guarantee to "due process" is maintained, above all else.

Once there was a young republican governor who was willing to risk his career and his reputation. He spoke out.
He was crushed. Perhaps the memory of what he said and did, and the price he was made to pay for doing it, was still fresh in the minds of good men who did nothing, in the months and years following the Warren Commission investigation and issuance of its report.:

Gov. Xxxxx said in a statement after granting

the reprieve one day beore Xxxxxx was first

scheduled to die, Jan. xx, Xxxxx, that he had

never expressed an opinion "upon the guilt or

innocence of Xxxxxx."

He said: "I do, however, share with hundreds

of thousands of our people the doubt as to the

value of the evidence that placed him in the

Xxxxxx xxxxx on the night of the crime...I

do doubt that this crime could have been

committed by one man, and I am worried about

the eagerness of some of our law enforcement

agencies to bring about the death of this one

man so that the books can be closed in the

thought that another great crime mystery has

been successfully solved."


Twenty years after the [crime]--two years

before he died--Xxxxx said his view was

unchanged, adding:

"If Xxxxxx had been kept behind prison bars

for a reasonable time, there would have been

an opportunity to answer many of the

unanswered question, particularly those

involving an accomplice or accomplices."


Harry Hoffman on the Lindberg kidnapping. Probably a number of other similar, but less well known examples exist.

#3 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 06:08 AM

Harry Hoffman on the Lindberg kidnapping. Probably a number of other similar, but less well known examples exist.


Yeah, Greg, NJ Governor Hoffman really stuck his neck out and apparently worked that case for a long time. It killed his political career and his reputation.:

POLITICAL NOTES: The Hoffman Case - TIME
On the night of Oct. 17, 1935, eight days after New Jersey's Court of Errors & Appeals had unanimously affirmed Hauptmann's death sentence, Governor Hoffman ...
http://www.time.com/...,755961,00.html

CRIME: Hoffman to Hauptmann - TIME
Governor Hoffman directed the State Police "to continue their search for any ... that placed [Hauptmann] in the Lindbergh nursery on the night of the crime. ...
http://www.time.com/...,847628,00.html

http://news.google.com/newspapers?
Documents Said To Vindicate Lindbergh

Kidnap... Schenectady Gazette - Oct 22, 1985

Newly recovered documents on the kidnapping of aviator Charles A Lindbergh's son show that
the baby was killed and the right man was executed for the the crime, although he was
beaten while in police custody, state investigators said yesterday. The 23,633
reports, letters, newspaper articles and photographs, found after 50 years in the
garage of the former governor who was unsure about the case
, erase lingering questions and
disprove claims by men claiming to be Linbergh' son, said state Attorney General
Irwin I. Kimmelman....
...The recently recovered documents include 10,000 items state police did not know were
missing and nine fingerprints taken from the Lindberg baby's crib and toys...
..There was also a report from a doctor who examined Hauptmann several days after his
arrest in New York City and found bruises indicating that he had been beaten while in
the custody of the police there
, Kimmelman said. "It was wrongful," Kimmelman said of the
beatings. But he said that they were "not material to the case since no confession was
beaten out of him..."
San Francisco attorney Robert Bryan,
representing Anna Hauptmann, said the documents would exonerate her husband,
although he was not specific.

Bryan interviewed his client yesterday on the "CBS Morning News," said he has learned from a
reliable source that the documents contain evidence showing that "the trial of the
century...was a trial by fraud."


The LN's widow, Anna Hauptmann never stopped working it,

http://www.nj.com/lindbergh/hunterdon
Widow comes back to Flemington to say again

that Bruno was innocent
Oct. 10, 1991

For the first time since 1935, Anna Hauptmann returned to Flemington.
Nearing 93, Mrs. Hauptmann came to the Union Hotel on Friday, across Main Street from the
courthouse where her husband was sentenced to death for the kidnap and murder of the infant
son of aviator Charles Lindbergh.

"I said if I came near Flemington I don't know what will happen to me," Mrs. Hauptmann said.
"When I think what they did to me here, I didn't know if I was strong enough."

Her voice was still thick with a German accent and at times just audible, but her message was
clear: Her Bruno Richard Hauptmann was innocent and unjustly executed and she wants
Gov. Jim Florio to agree.

That message is not new.From the time of her husband's arrest in 1934
and through the trial, his execution in 1936 and the years that followed, she has
maintained the same thing: That on March 1, 1932, that "nasty and cold night" when 20-
month-old Charles Lindbergh Jr. was kidnapped
from his parents' estate in East Amwell

Township, her husband picked her up from the bakery where she worked and the two drove to
their home in the Bronx, where they stayed through the night.
Six weeks after his kidnaping, the baby was found dead, but not before Lindbergh had paid
$50,000 in ransom. Some of the money was eventually traced to Hauptmann, and he was
arrested Sept. 19, 1934. Hauptmann claimed that the money was left by a friend, Isidor
Fisch, who had gone to Europe and died there. After arriving in Flemington from an
undisclosed town in Pennsylvania, where she lives in a senior citizens apartment, Mrs.
Hauptmann was escorted through the Union Hotel's kitchen and into a dining room by San
Francisco lawyer Robert Bryan, who has been working on her behalf since 1981. (See
statement by Robert Bryan)

By her side was also Suzanne Donahue of Clinton, who played Mrs. Hauptmann in a
dramatic re-enactment of the trial that ran through Sunday at the courthouse.
Wearing a maroon and navy paisley dress, gold earrings, a pearl necklace and her wedding
ring on a hand crippled with arthritis, Mrs. Hauptmann spoke. As she did, Ms. Donahue, who
said she also believes that Bruno Hauptmann was innocent, clutched her hand.
Mrs. Hauptmann didn't seem to notice the photographs on the walls that celebrated the
trial and the hotel's place in history. During the trial the jury, the press and onlookers
packed the hotel, creating what has been described as a circus-like atmosphere.
"I'm here again today fighting for my husband. He was innocent, as innocent as you and me,"
said Mrs. Hauptmann. "My husband was innocent, and God knows it. Is there really a God in
heaven? God saw us drive home. Why did He let them do that?"

Bryan said he has accumulated evidence over the last 10 years that shows that Hauptmann
was "totally innocent." Some of this evidence, he said, indicates that witnesses were
pressured and threatened by the state into testifying against Hauptmann.
This spring Bryan again presented his case and sent information to Gov. Florio's office,
which turned the matter over to the attorney general for review.
"That's like the fox guarding the chicken coop," Bryan said. He wants Florio to meet
personally with Mrs. Hauptmann and to proclaim that "the trial of the century was a
miscarriage of justice."

John Shure, a spokesman for Florio, responded, "The attorney general is the chief law
enforcement official the governor should look to for guidance on this."
Over the years, Bryan has tried several times on behalf of Mrs. Hauptmann to get Hauptmann's
name cleared, and has filed several suits, including one charging wrongful death. All
were dismissed.

Today, the Hauptmanns would be celebrating their 66th wedding anniversary. Before leaving
the hotel Friday, Mrs. Hauptmann recalled some of her memories of life before her husband's
arrest....

Neither did this newspaper reporter.:

http://www.google.com/archivesearch?q=+by+samuel+g.+blackman
Samuel G. Blackman, at 90, once Associated Press' top editor
Providence Journal - ProQuest Archiver - Oct 7, 1995
As a young reporter, Samuel G. Blackman broke the news that Charles Lindbergh's baby had
been kidnapped, the first big story in a career of reporting and ...

http://news.google.c...y-one-man&hl=en
The murder that won't die.
Lakeland Ledger - Feb 21, 1982
by samuel g. blackman

Baby's Identity Still At Issue .
Lakeland Ledger - Google News Archive - Feb 21, 1982
Robert, is i-hief justice of the State Su preme Court whether the state had suppressed
any evidence that might have cleared Hauptmann. Wilentz said: Nothing ...

http://news.google.c...y-one-man&hl=en

The Free Lance-Star - Feb 26, 1972
The Lindbergh Kidnaping In I Retrospect .
Free-Lance Star - Google News Archive - Feb 26, 1972
by Samuel G. Blackman

...that Gov. Hoffman, who had given Hauptmann one 30-day reprieve, would still be able to save him from the chair.
Hoffman said in a statement after granting the reprieve one day beore Hauptmann was first scheduled to die, Jan. 17, 1936, that he had never expressed an opinion "upon the guilt or innocence of Hauptman."

He said: "I do, however, share with hundreds if thousands of our people the doubt as to the value of the evidence...

http://news.google.c...y-one-man&hl=en


http://books.google.com/books?
The ghosts of Hopewell: setting the record straight in the ... - Google Books Result
Jim Fisher - 1999 - True Crime - 200 pages
A reporter for News- Week Magazine, ten days after Hauptmann's arrest, ... Elizabeth [sic] Morrow, jealous of her sister's marriage to Lindbergh, ...

http://books.google.com/books?
The case that never dies: the Lindbergh kidnapping
By Lloyd C. Gardner


Edited by Tom Scully, 27 July 2010 - 06:20 AM.





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