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#46 Ian Kingsbury

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 07:02 PM

I think one must consider communication always. This is one reason HDH often comes to mind. (for me anyway). I think he must be viewed in the context of the testimony of PMG J.E. Day (and his successor) and the historical role of the USPO (not USPS). It was to him that the request that theUSPO participate in the covert (and illegal) mail opening campaigns a couple of weeks after starting work (afaik the campaign took off around '53.) came in the form of a meeting with top CIA as published in the later investigation of inteligence agencies>. Therfore while the USPO PI servide was a separate entity within the USPO this must have been transmitted to the head of the USPO PI department and as HDH said he was in constant contact with his superiors in Washington who therefore must have been in constant communication with someone. One thing I've yet to learn is exactly who was the USPO PI head?



John

Found this interesting maybe you will?.

Postal Reorganization Act
In May 1969, four months after he became a member of President Richard Nixon's Cabinet, Postmaster General Winton M. Blount proposed a basic reorganization of the Post Office Department. The President asked Congress to pass the Postal Service Act of 1963, calling for removal of the Postmaster General from the Cabinet and creation of a self-supporting postal corporation wholly owned by the federal government. On March 12, 1970, after extensive hearings, the House Post Office Committee reported a compromise measure containing postal reform provisions similar to those proposed by the President and providing a pay increase for postal employees, but postal employees called it "too little, too late." Six days later, a postal work stoppage began and ultimately involved approximately 152,000 postal employees in 671 locations. The Postmaster General agreed to negotiate with the seven exclusively recognized unions upon the employees' return to work. Consequently, the employees went back on the job, and negotiations began on March 25. On April 2, the negotiating parties announced they had agreed to recommend to Congress a general wage increase of six percent, retroactive to December 27, 1963, for all federal employees, plus an additional eight percent increase for postal workers that would take effect if the parties could agree on legislation reorganizing the Post Office Department and if the legislation could be enacted. Management and the unions agreed to develop jointly a reorganization plan and, on April 16, 1970, announced agreement on such a plan. The agreement was embodied in a legislative proposal and sent to Congress by President Nixon. The proposal included four basic provisions enunciated earlier by the Postmaster General as necessary to reform the postal system: adequate financing authority; removal of the system from politics, assuring continuity of management; collective bargaining between postal management and employees; and the Postal Service's setting rates after an opportunity for hearings before an impartial rate panel. In addition to the eight percent pay increase for postal employees, the bill provided for negotiation of a new wage schedule so employees could reach the maximum step in grade after no more than 8 years, instead of 21 years. On August 3, by a roll call vote of 57 to 7, the Senate approved the conference report on House Resolution 17070, a modified version of the legislation proposed by the President; three days later, the House of Representatives approved it. On August 12, 1970, President Nixon signed into law the most comprehensive postal legislation since the founding of the Republic, Public Law 91-375.

#47 John Dolva

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 07:25 PM


I think one must consider communication always. This is one reason HDH often comes to mind. (for me anyway). I think he must be viewed in the context of the testimony of PMG J.E. Day (and his successor) and the historical role of the USPO (not USPS). It was to him that the request that theUSPO participate in the covert (and illegal) mail opening campaigns a couple of weeks after starting work (afaik the campaign took off around '53.) came in the form of a meeting with top CIA as published in the later investigation of inteligence agencies>. Therfore while the USPO PI servide was a separate entity within the USPO this must have been transmitted to the head of the USPO PI department and as HDH said he was in constant contact with his superiors in Washington who therefore must have been in constant communication with someone. One thing I've yet to learn is exactly who was the USPO PI head?



John

Found this interesting maybe you will?.

Postal Reorganization Act
In May 1969, four months after he became a member of President Richard Nixon's Cabinet, Postmaster General Winton M. Blount proposed a basic reorganization of the Post Office Department. The President asked Congress to pass the Postal Service Act of 1963, calling for removal of the Postmaster General from the Cabinet and creation of a self-supporting postal corporation wholly owned by the federal government. On March 12, 1970, after extensive hearings, the House Post Office Committee reported a compromise measure containing postal reform provisions similar to those proposed by the President and providing a pay increase for postal employees, but postal employees called it "too little, too late." Six days later, a postal work stoppage began and ultimately involved approximately 152,000 postal employees in 671 locations. The Postmaster General agreed to negotiate with the seven exclusively recognized unions upon the employees' return to work. Consequently, the employees went back on the job, and negotiations began on March 25. On April 2, the negotiating parties announced they had agreed to recommend to Congress a general wage increase of six percent, retroactive to December 27, 1963, for all federal employees, plus an additional eight percent increase for postal workers that would take effect if the parties could agree on legislation reorganizing the Post Office Department and if the legislation could be enacted. Management and the unions agreed to develop jointly a reorganization plan and, on April 16, 1970, announced agreement on such a plan. The agreement was embodied in a legislative proposal and sent to Congress by President Nixon. The proposal included four basic provisions enunciated earlier by the Postmaster General as necessary to reform the postal system: adequate financing authority; removal of the system from politics, assuring continuity of management; collective bargaining between postal management and employees; and the Postal Service's setting rates after an opportunity for hearings before an impartial rate panel. In addition to the eight percent pay increase for postal employees, the bill provided for negotiation of a new wage schedule so employees could reach the maximum step in grade after no more than 8 years, instead of 21 years. On August 3, by a roll call vote of 57 to 7, the Senate approved the conference report on House Resolution 17070, a modified version of the legislation proposed by the President; three days later, the House of Representatives approved it. On August 12, 1970, President Nixon signed into law the most comprehensive postal legislation since the founding of the Republic, Public Law 91-375.


Yes, thank you. Very interesting.

Another matter is that the reorgamisation was apparently known to be under way some time previously, maybe just before, certainly early on during Nixons Presidency and part of that was to retire former USPO PI's because they may know 'too much'. HDH retired in '69.

#48 Robert Howard

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Posted 19 December 2010 - 02:09 AM



I think one must consider communication always. This is one reason HDH often comes to mind. (for me anyway). I think he must be viewed in the context of the testimony of PMG J.E. Day (and his successor) and the historical role of the USPO (not USPS). It was to him that the request that theUSPO participate in the covert (and illegal) mail opening campaigns a couple of weeks after starting work (afaik the campaign took off around '53.) came in the form of a meeting with top CIA as published in the later investigation of inteligence agencies>. Therfore while the USPO PI servide was a separate entity within the USPO this must have been transmitted to the head of the USPO PI department and as HDH said he was in constant contact with his superiors in Washington who therefore must have been in constant communication with someone. One thing I've yet to learn is exactly who was the USPO PI head?



John

Found this interesting maybe you will?.

Postal Reorganization Act
In May 1969, four months after he became a member of President Richard Nixon's Cabinet, Postmaster General Winton M. Blount proposed a basic reorganization of the Post Office Department. The President asked Congress to pass the Postal Service Act of 1963, calling for removal of the Postmaster General from the Cabinet and creation of a self-supporting postal corporation wholly owned by the federal government. On March 12, 1970, after extensive hearings, the House Post Office Committee reported a compromise measure containing postal reform provisions similar to those proposed by the President and providing a pay increase for postal employees, but postal employees called it "too little, too late." Six days later, a postal work stoppage began and ultimately involved approximately 152,000 postal employees in 671 locations. The Postmaster General agreed to negotiate with the seven exclusively recognized unions upon the employees' return to work. Consequently, the employees went back on the job, and negotiations began on March 25. On April 2, the negotiating parties announced they had agreed to recommend to Congress a general wage increase of six percent, retroactive to December 27, 1963, for all federal employees, plus an additional eight percent increase for postal workers that would take effect if the parties could agree on legislation reorganizing the Post Office Department and if the legislation could be enacted. Management and the unions agreed to develop jointly a reorganization plan and, on April 16, 1970, announced agreement on such a plan. The agreement was embodied in a legislative proposal and sent to Congress by President Nixon. The proposal included four basic provisions enunciated earlier by the Postmaster General as necessary to reform the postal system: adequate financing authority; removal of the system from politics, assuring continuity of management; collective bargaining between postal management and employees; and the Postal Service's setting rates after an opportunity for hearings before an impartial rate panel. In addition to the eight percent pay increase for postal employees, the bill provided for negotiation of a new wage schedule so employees could reach the maximum step in grade after no more than 8 years, instead of 21 years. On August 3, by a roll call vote of 57 to 7, the Senate approved the conference report on House Resolution 17070, a modified version of the legislation proposed by the President; three days later, the House of Representatives approved it. On August 12, 1970, President Nixon signed into law the most comprehensive postal legislation since the founding of the Republic, Public Law 91-375.


Yes, thank you. Very interesting.

Another matter is that the reorgamisation was apparently known to be under way some time previously, maybe just before, certainly early on during Nixons Presidency and part of that was to retire former USPO PI's because they may know 'too much'. HDH retired in '69.

I hesitate to post this, considering that the person referenced may not have even been related to Harry Holmes, but at the same time, since the website referenced "a" June Cobb, [The translator of The Shark and The Sardines, and was a player in the Oswald in Mexico charade] I suppose it should be added for the FYI, factor.....
Heck, I don't know if the June Cobb cited is the same June Cobb, maybe I have been doing this too long...lol

http://MLbgCfOWun0J:.../FAQ-links.html

Dr. Ernest Holmes
The Founder of United Centers for Spiritual Living
January 21, 1887 - April 7, 1960
Dr. Ernest Holmes- Dr. Ernest Holmes's work in the Science of Mind is recognized today as one of the leading viewpoints in modern metaphysics and New Thought.
Dr. Holmes developed a universal philosophy and tools for spiritual living that profoundly resonate to this day. His work provides us with a personal spiritual path, an understanding of our relationship with the Universe, and a connected and joyful approach to daily living.
Dr. Holmes wrote his seminal book The Science of Mind in 1926 and revised the text in 1938 to create an edition that has since been published in several languages. Dr. Holmes is also the author of numerous other books on metaphysics and originated the international Science of Mind magazine, which has been in continuous publication since 1927.
Born in Maine, Holmes was largely self-taught, seeking out the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Christian D. Larson, Thomas Troward and Phineas Quimby. Holmes moved to Southern California in 1914. He founded the Institute of Religious Science, which became United Church of Religious Science in 1953, and is now United Centers for Spiritual Living. Holmes inspired the "positive thinking" of Norman Vincent Peale, Peggy Lee, Cary Grant, Cecil B. DeMille and countless others without ever intending to create a religion or a following of masses of people.
http://www.unitedcen...hil_founder.php
http://www.unitedcen...teMap/index.php

On the same page of the bolded link, URL it states

June Cobb Church is located at 1195 East 55th Street in Los Angeles, California. The current minister there is Rev. Margaret E. Tate.
Robert: I believe that is the June Cobb Church [of Religious Science]

At the same time, if you go to this URL, which strongly seems to be inter-related to the former, there are other individuals
Dr. Betancourt, for one, who make me believe......this is all part of that Brave New World, Huxley spoke of; anyone have any soma...., I probably shouldn't have cited that book, Huxley died on November 22, 1963, didn't he......grins
http://www.definingmoment.tv/

I'm really not trying to be funny, it's just kind of a weird topic, as far as I am concerned.
I feel like I'm in Arthur Young territory.........lol

Edited by Robert Howard, 19 December 2010 - 02:22 AM.


#49 Robert Howard

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 01:22 AM

The following passage from
page 218 of Texas Mutiny by Sheila Allee
takes place circa 1953, the circumstances
recounted, concern a potential investigation
into financial accounting irregularities by
George Parr, the portion of the conversation below
takes place as the process of implementing legal inquiry into these
allegations, [miss-appropriation of funds from monies of the Benavides
School District by George Parr] becomes stifled.
"That doesent add up so I decided to do a little investigating on my own. This district chief, his name is Bob Phinney,
and he came to us under some pretty strange circumstances last year. He was postmaster in Austin, and all of a sudden
he’s head of the IRS district. No experience in the Treasury Department. Nothing like that at all. Still, presto he’s my
big boss.
Well I did some poking around and found out that his brother, a guy named Carl Phinney, he was LBJ’s campaign manager
in ‘48. As his reward, this Carl Phinney got to be postmaster in Dallas, and his brother got to be the big post office cheese in
Austin. And now, through some strange twist of fate, he’s the big cheese in my office."





DMN 1973 Retirement Set By IRS Official
(Austin -AP) R. L. Phinney, director of the
Internal Revenue Service for the southern
half of Texas, will retire at the end of this
month after working for 38 years for the
federal government. Phinney estimates he
has collected $52 billion in income taxes
in the last two decades
Phinney was appointed by President Harry
Truman as postmaster in Austin in 1947.
He remained with the post office until
becoming acting collector for the IRS in
1952 and a few months later became the
district director.
Phinney was born in Marble Falls in 1910
and his family moved to Austin in 1916.
His mother died during the 1918 influenza
epidemic and the children went to live in
Brownwood with their grandparents. He
graduated from Brownwood High School
in 1927. He attended the University of
Texas for a couple of years, then went to
work for the Texas Highway Department.

Austin American-Statesman (TX) - August 3, 1992
Bob Phinney, former Austin IRS director, dies
Funeral services for R.L. "Bob" Phinney, former director of the Austin District of the Internal Revenue Service, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Austin Memorial Park. Phinney died Saturday in Ramsey Place Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Austin. He was 82.
Phinney headed the Austin District of the IRS for 21 years. There he gained a reputation for being fair but stern, said U.S. Rep. Jake Pickle, D-Austin.
"Bob Phinney was the kind of public servant that gave public service its best name," Pickle said Sunday. "He was nationally recognized as one of the superior district directors. He was friendly, but tough as nails."
Phinney, born in Marble Falls in 1910, attended college at the University of Texas for two years before dropping out during the Depression because of a lack of funds. In the 1930s he worked with Lyndon B. Johnson setting up a Texas chapter of the National Youth Administration in Austin.
During World War II Phinney served as an officer of the 36th Division of the Texas National Guard in North Africa and Italy and was awarded a Bronze Star for meritorious service in combat.
After the war, Phinney was among several prominent Texans, including Pickle and former governor John Connally, who organized the Austin Broadcasting Company and began operating radio station KVET in 1946. A year later he was named Austin postmaster.
In 1952 Phinney began his 21-year stint as director of the Austin District of the IRS, which included Austin, Houston, San Antonio, El Paso and Corpus Christi.
Although Phinney said he received his share of criticism as an IRS director from disgruntled taxpayers, when he retired in 1973 he said the job had been "more fun than I ever had in my life in the last 21 years. I like to deal with the people."
Phinney is survived by his daughter, Susan Phinney Conrad of Washington, D.C. He was preceded in death by his wife, Helen Louise Avery, in 1988.

Dallas Morning News, The (TX) - January 12, 1987
RITES FOR CARL LAWRENCE PHINNEY TO BE TODAY
Services for Carl Lawrence Phinney, former commanding general of the Texas National Guard and a retired Dallas attorney, will be at 3 p.m. Monday at Highland Park United Methodist Church.
Phinney, 82, died Saturday at Presbyterian Hospital after a lengthy illness.
A native of Marble Falls, Burnet County, Phinney received his law degree from the University of Texas at Austin in 1926.
He joined the Texas National Guard in 1925 and served with the U.S. Army in North Africa and Italy during World War II, receiving the Silver Star award. He retired as a major general in the Army in 1969, after serving eight years as commanding general of the Texas Guard, relatives said.
Phinney practiced law for 50 years, retiring in 1981 as senior partner in the firm of Phinney Hallman Pulley & Coke in Dallas.
He was chairman of the Texas Securities Commission from 1966 to 1973, and had served on the Texas State Board of Control.
He was a member of Highland Park United Methodist Church.
Survivors include his wife, Louise Snow Phinney of Dallas; a daughter, Louise Caldwell of Dallas; a son, Carl Phinney Jr. of Houston; two brothers, Temple Phinney of Dallas and R.L. Phinney of Austin; and six grandchildren.
Memorials may be made to the Communities Foundation of Texas or the Dallas Historical Society Library Fund.

Dallas Morning News, The (TX) - January 19, 1987
THE OBITUARIES ONLY TOLD HALF THE STORY OF CARL PHINNEY
When Carl Phinney died a little over a week ago, the obits made no mention of his political activities.
Perhaps it was because Gen. Phinney never ran for public office and the files were void of his behind-the-scenes efforts from the municipal level to the White House. As confidant, adviser, campaigner.
There are a host of friends who can gladly fill in the blanks.
He was best known as one of the top men on Lyndon Johnson's team in Dallas, "with free access to the Oval Office' during LBJ's White House years, recalls former Judge Bob Hall.
Whenever Phinney picked up the phone, he got through, says Leroy Hallman, a one-time partner in Phinney, Hallman, Pulley & Coke.
U.S. Appellate Judge Irving Goldberg, now a senior judge and another member of the same LBJ team, parries the political questions while emphasizing his close friendship with and admiration for Phinney and his "patience and kindness.'
Phinney first got to know LBJ when Johnson was National Youth Administration chief in Texas during the 1930s. Their friendship deepened when Johnson was in Congress and led to Phinney's campaign leadership role in North Texas in 1948, when LBJ captured the U.S. Senate seat by 87 votes.
In 1960, "when it wasn't considered popular to be a Democrat in Dallas,' reminds U.S. Judge Barefoot Sanders, Phinney was selected by Johnson and House Speaker Sam Rayburn to serve as Dallas County co-chairman for the Kennedy-Johnson campaign along with Judge Sarah Hughes.
Sanders well remembers Phinney's contribution since he, himself, was chosen to be the Dallas County campaign director.
Though Phinney was a conservative Democrat, he remained a Democrat in the crucial 1952 presidential election when Gov. Allan Shivers, a longtime Phinney friend and political ally, switched to Gen. David Eisenhower.
Phinney stayed with the Democratic Party and supported Illinois Gov. Adlai Stevenson. He did so again in 1956.
Retired Maj. Gen. Lewis Stephens, former commander of the National Guard's 49th Armored Division, recalls how a gracious Phinney would arrange for him and Charles Kirkham, now a vice president of Merrill Lynch, to attend Democratic National conventions.
Stephens' relationship with Phinney began when Stephens left active duty in the '50s and joined the 36th Texas National Guard Division. Phinney was the commander. Stephens became his aide.
Later during the Johnson presidential years, Phinney would call Stephens, though he was no longer his aide, and say, "I want you to drive me down to the ranch.'
One such visit, they encountered the president, Defense Secretary Robert McNamara, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Earle Wheeler, a wartime friend of Phinney's, and others gathered around the pool.
Stephens remembers Phinney's advice on national policy was offered and received as an equal. But he remembers, too, a telling incident during the drive home.
Passing through Belton, Phinney spotted a hitchhiker -- "about 70, obviously down on his luck, but presentable.' Phinney stopped.
"Where're you headed?' he asked.
"Waco' -- just up the road.
"Get in.'
That was Phinney, the man. Two hours after conferring with some of the most powerful men in the world, there he was helping a total stranger, a seeming nobody.
Former Attorney General Waggoner Carr remembers Phinney entering the political world as chief clerk of the Texas House of Representatives in the early '30s. (His wife Louise took over the post when Phinney decided to enter law practice in Dallas.)
It was there that he met Price Daniel, who was later speaker. When Daniel ran successfully for attorney general after the war, Phinney headed up his North Texas campaign. When Daniel ran for U.S. senator, he did the same. When Daniel left the Senate to run for governor, there was Phinney to help him.
When Dallas lost the Baylor Medical School to Houston during World War II, Dr. Edward H. Cary, the prominent Dallas physician and a founding father of the Southwestern Medical Foundation, and the business community created Southwestern Medical School in 1943.
They knew its survival hinged on getting the Legislature to make it a part of the University of Texas system.
Phinney and his partner, Hallman, were chosen to lobby it through. SMS joined UT in 1949.
And it was Phinney who helped Ernest Thompson -- before and after WWII -- win a seat and become a power on the Texas Railroad Commission.
Though he resided in the Park Cities, he practiced law in Dallas and was a top political adviser for years to the legendary Robert L. Thornton and others in the city's establishment.
The list is still incomplete.
It's true Phinney successfully practiced law, built a distinguished military career, was chairman of the Texas Securities Commission and served his community, state and country well.
It's true also the Carl Phinney legacy would show the realm of politics can be an honorable calling for honorable men and women.
END


Robert: So the question becomes, are these allegations regarding
Carl and Robert Phinney’s affiliation true?
Well apparently they definitely were regarding Robert, although the
jury’s still out on Carl.
So the obvious issue is could they have impacted
or interfaced with the “investigation” into mail
and post office box use by
Lee Oswald
Jack Ruby
and significant others,

see
[POST, OFFICE BOXES Sources: WC 22, p. 652; WC 24, p. 259; CD 897, p. 141; CD 1306, p. 124
Rented P.O. Box 6225 on Nov. 1, 1963. Jack Ruby rented P.O. Box 5475 on Nov. 7, 1963.
Michael Bentley Murph's family, Murdock Lead Co. (later Southern Lead), had P.O. Box 5298
(next to Lee Oswald's box), M.B. Murph was a Clerk for Murdock Lead. Mary Hollies, Scott-Foresman
employee on 4th Flr of TSBD had P.O. Box 5944 in Nov. 1963. Terminal Annex box numbers ran from
5001 through 6499.
LHO - P.O. Box 2915, Dallas, rented October 9, 1962, closed May 1963
LHO - P.O. Box 6225, Dallas, rented Nov 1, 1963 (WC Vol 22, pp. 185, 291);
Ruby - rented P.O. Box 5475, Dallas, Nov 7, 1963 ]

as investigated by Harry Holmes in 1963?
As David Belin used to say, You be The Jury

Also see
http://politicalgrav...son-picket.html

#50 John Dolva

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 04:01 AM

Fascinating on many levels, Robert. Could be really significant. (wish I could spend some time in Dallas).
The USPO PMG was since the USPO's formation an automatic Fed Gov Cabinet member. Traditionally appointments were patronaged.
Since the FBI/CIA illegal mail opening programs the PMG (and therefore presumably the head of the PI dep) readily agreed to participate, until JE Day was replaced by Gronowski(sic) mid 63,
the Agencies had a 'backdoor' to the White House through USPO personell. So it looks like LBJ had one set up from early on.
A number of other curious connections and events there too. Of course, as it has a lot to do with the South and hence Segregation forces dating back to the Civil war as the least mentioned perps in anyones list I doubt much will develop from it. For me it's a 'hunch', and an irritatingly niggling one at that, that unfortunately again and again gives me pause for thought.
Anyway, Great Research Robert. (as usual).

#51 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 08:44 AM

[quote name='John Dolva' date='28 January 2010 - 06:51 PM' timestamp='1264704716' post='180875']
''does anyone think it is reasonable to suspect that Truman distributed this timely article to deflect suspicion away from the actual principles behind the plot to kill JFK, and then Oswald'' Oh yes, Tom, I do. I was waiting for you to get around to it :) . The reasons are many: political. I just wrote something that took a lot out of me energy wise, so I'll elaborate later.

_____________

(this is not meant as a diversion, but one of the minor and most iffy points would be that Harry D Holmes' family MAY have had a near direct Truman, in-law connection.)
[/quote]

Friends, is Harry Holmes a low level actor, given far too many lines to read, in the grander scheme of things? I've been suspicious of the motive behind Truman's well timed, op ed criticism of the CIA, in December, 1963.
[quote]http://www.maebrusse...IA article.html
The Washington Post
December 22, 1963 - page A11

Harry Truman Writes:
Limit CIA Role
To Intelligence

By Harry S Truman
Copyright, 1963, by Harry S Truman

INDEPENDENCE, MO., Dec. 21 — I think it has become necessary to take another look at the purpose and operations of our Central Intelligence Agency—CIA. At least, I would like to submit here the original reason why I thought it necessary to organize this Agency during my Administration, what I expected it to do and how it was to operate as an arm of the President.....[/quote]

[quote]http://www.google.co...362e11f7ae91af6
Farley to Visit Texas

$3.95 - New York Times - Mar 13, 1940
Plans for the visit were made public today by Burris C. Jackson of Hillsboro, chairman of the convention committee of the Texas Postmasters Association.

http://news.google.c...sociation&hl=en

BC JACKSON DIES; COTTON EXECUTIVE; Texan Organized and Led...

$3.95 - New York Times - Dec 27, 1967
... Mr. Jackson was postmaster at Hillsboro and twice was president of the National Postmasters Association, the first to hold the office twice. ...
Burris Jackson Dies; Figure In Cotton...A a democrat, Jackson was a personal friend of presidents Roosevelt, Truman and Johnson‎ - Meriden Journal
[/quote]

October 19, 1959:
http://news.google.c...ew louder&hl=en
Posted Image

[quote]http://news.google.c...iminary-*&hl=en
Washington Report Holmes Alexander Fulton Lewis Jr.
‎Reading Eagle - Apr 22, 1954
...Tom Clark, who was Attorney General at the time, as one of those who should be summoned to testify. He points out that Maury Hughes a law partner of Clark's brother has figured prominently in other preliminary inquiries into the case The Capone gangster case in itself should be investigated...

http://www.acorn.net...e/rambler4.html
Crime and Cover-Up (p. 44): Here Scott discusses links between Ruby, Roselli, and Ramsey Clark. "One of Ruby's...`close personal friends' and character witnesses for his liquor license was Hal Collins (22 H 928), brother-in-law of prominent local attorney Robert L. Clark, the brother and uncle respectively of U.S. Attorneys General Tom and Ramsey Clark (CD 4.371)

http://nl.newsbank.c...ackval=GooglePM
1.) '42 GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE COLLINS DIES
Author: The Dallas Morning News (DAL) + _____
Publish Date: November 11, 1986
Word Count: 162
Document ID: 0ED3CEC6E664EF1F
Hal H. Collins, the former Mineral Wells resort owner who challenged Coke Stevenson for the Texas governor's mansion in 1942, died Friday afternoon at his home in Dallas. He was 93.

Collins was born in Kountze, Hardin County, the son of state Sen. V.A. Collins. He sold Ford cars across the state and was mayor of Taylor in Williamson County before buying the Crazy Water Company in Mineral Wells in 1929.

The company operated a popular resort hotel and bottled and sold...

... Collins is survived by two sons Hal H Collins Jr of Houston and Larry D Collins of Dallas daughters Mary Ann Collins Clark of La Jolla Calif Ruth Collins ....[/quote]

[quote]http://www.earljones...g3509.htm#99932

Halley "Hal" Houston COLLINS "Sr"-99932 [Parents] was born on 10 Dec 1893 in Chester, , Texas. He married Alice Harriett "Jack" HALL-99933 on 6 Dec 1913 in Beaumont, Jefferson, Texas.

Other marriages:

BRAMBLETT, Leatrice

[Notes]

Alice Harriett "Jack" HALL-99933 was born on 26 Jul 1897 in Beaumont, Jefferson, Texas. She died on 9 Aug 1940. She married Halley "Hal" Houston COLLINS "Sr"-99932 on 6 Dec 1913 in Beaumont, Jefferson, Texas.

They had the following children:

F i Mary Ann COLLINS-99939 was born on 10 Jun 1917.
M ii Haley Houston COLLINS "Jr"-99935 was born on 14 Jun 1918.
F iii Ruth Claire COLLINS-99943 was born on 2 Apr 1920.
M iv Larry Donald COLLINS-99948 was born on 31 Jul 1923.
F v Louella Alice COLLINS-99954 was born on 13 Jan 1932.

http://www.earljones...g3510.htm#99942

Robert L. CLARK-99942.Robert married Mary Ann COLLINS-99939 on 29 Jun 1957 in Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

Mary Ann COLLINS-99939 [Parents] was born on 10 Jun 1917 in Houston, Harris, Texas. She married Robert L. CLARK-99942 on 29 Jun 1957 in Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

Other marriages:

LIGHT, Otto T.

[quote]http://www.findagrav...6563377&df=all
Mary Ann Collins Clark
Birth: Jun. 10, 1917
Death: Mar. 18, 2002

Inscription:
B: Corpus Christi, Tx. Entombed 03/22/02

Note: Preceded by husb. Robert L. Clark.[/quote]

George W. GRAHAM-99944 was born in Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas. He married Ruth Claire COLLINS-99943 on 11 Mar 1939 in Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

Ruth Claire COLLINS-99943 [Parents] was born on 2 Apr 1920 in Taylor, Williamson, Texas. She married George W. GRAHAM-99944 on 11 Mar 1939 in Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

They had the following children:...

http://www.earljones...g3509.htm#99932

Haley Houston COLLINS "Jr"-99935 [Parents] was born on 14 Jun 1918 in Houston, Harris, Texas. He married Pauline MC DERMOTT-99936 on 22 Apr 1944 in London, England.

[Notes]

Pauline MC DERMOTT-99936.Pauline married Haley Houston COLLINS "Jr"-99935 on 22 Apr 1944 in London, England.

(Jack Ruby's "bud" Hal Collins, who neither the FBI or WC ever found time to interview, although he happened to be the brother of Tom C. Clark's sister-in-law, Mary Ann Collins Clark, is buried in Rhode Island, which makes little sense, but is what it is.....)

http://www.findagrav...r&GRid=46834542

Hal Houston Collins, Jr

Birth: Jun. 14, 1918
Harris County
Texas, USA
Death: Mar. 2, 1995
Humble
Harris County
Texas, USA

Family links:
Spouse:
Pauline McDermott Collins (1924 - 2010)*

Burial:
Swan Point Cemetery
Providence
Providence County
Rhode Island, USA
[/quote]
Posted Image

[quote name='Tom Scully' date='24 January 2010 - 02:09 PM' timestamp='1264342152' post='180439']
http://books.google....nG=Search Books

Investigation as to the manner ... the Board of Parole is operating and ...‎ - Page 182
United States. Congress. House. Comm. on Expenditures in the Executive Departments - 1948 - 938 pages
... Kans., signed by S. Nanini, president and treasurer. Rock Road Construction
Co., Chicago, 111., re recommendation for parole of Louis Campagna. 9-g. ...

http://books.google....A...ey hoy bank
Captive city - Page 230
Ovid Demaris - Social Science - 1969 - 366 pages
While Crown hobnobbed with Mike Igoe, Sam Nanini, Jake Arvey, ... and other old-
time cronies, Hoy made the nightclub scene with Sidney and Marshall Korshak, ...[/quote]
[quote]http://www.google.co...101c70e0585a74a
Diaries, 1949-1959: Volume 1

Drew Pearson, Tyler Abell - 1974 - 592 pages - Snippet view
Tom Clark told me afterward that it led to very high places. J. Edgar Hoover intimated the same thing. He said the people Ragen pointed to had now reformed. I learned later that it pointed to the Hilton hotel chain, Henry Crown, ...

http://news.google.c...&um=1&scoring=a
Ex-farmer, judge Crown remembered as 'wise, fair'
- Daily Herald - NewsBank - Mar 8, 1997
Crown clerked for US Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark from 1956 to 1959 and ... law at the Chicago firm of Jenner and Block, where he became a partner.
[/quote]
[quote]http://news.google.c...gbird mob&hl=en
Daytona Beach Morning Journal - Oct 26, 1963 pg. 8
Murder Of A Chicago Gambler . Washington Merry Go Round
By Drew Pearson

...I took the story back to Washington and Atty. Gen. Tom Clark authorized a dozen or so FBI men to check on Ragen's facts. A couple of weeks later, they reported that they were true. They also reported that control of the underworld reached into very high places. Some of the rulers of the underworld had become supposedly respected businessmen and politicians whose names were household words in Chicago. Some of them, it was stated, had reformed. Yet they still controlled the mob...
Daytona Beach Morning Journal - Oct 26, 1963 pg. 8
Murder Of A Chicago Gambler . Washington Merry Go Round
By Drew Pearson

...I took the story back to Washington and Atty. Gen. Tom Clark authorized a dozen or so FBI men to check on Ragen's facts. A couple of weeks later, they reported that they were true. They also reported that control of the underworld reached into very high places. Some of the rulers of the underworld had become supposedly respected businessmen and politicians whose names were household words in Chicago. Some of them, it was stated, had reformed. Yet they still controlled the mob...

http://www.google.co...101c70e0585a74a
The Kennedy assassination cover-up - Page 96
Donald Gibson - 2000 - 306 pages - Google eBook - Preview

...Warren said he had checked on Jenner with a number of people and they all recommended him. Two of Jenner's references were mentioned by name. Tom Clark, former Attorney General of the US and active supporter in the Truman years of J. Edgar Hoover's anti- subversion efforts, knew Jenner through their common participation on the Judiciary Committee of the American Bar ....[/quote]

[quote]http://www.google.co...101c70e0585a74a
Federal bar news: Volume 13

Federal Bar Association - 1966 - Snippet view
In his address, Mr. Jenner stated that a series of extraordinary coincidences made it seem most likely that the assassination of President Kennedy was the work of one man — Lee Harvey Oswald. "After months of intensive research, the reading of some 40000 pages of material assembled by units of the federal government, and the questioning of scores of persons, including Oswald's wife, we came to the conclusion that there was no conspiracy, either domestic or foreign," Jenner said.

http://select.nytime...DAB0994DE484D81
THE ORDEAL OF LESTER CROWN - Free Preview - The New York Times
New York Times - Dec 7, 1986

...The family turned to Albert E. Jenner Jr., a lawyer and longtime friend who is on the board of General Dynamics. ''Whenever the kids got into trouble,'' Jenner says, ''they never bothered the old man. They talked to me, and I got them out of trouble.'' In return for his cooperation with the grand jury, Lester Crown was granted immunity from prosecution....
[/quote]

Edited by Tom Scully, 07 February 2011 - 10:40 AM.


#52 Robert Howard

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 12:17 AM

Hard to believe this person was circa 1949, the wartime liason chief between the Pentagon and the Post office.
Jackson, Col Burris C. 40352978
b. Jan. 27, 1906 d. Dec. 25, 1967
http://www.findagrav...&GRid=40352978

The Victoria Advocate - Oct 19, 1959
and Colonel Burris C Jackson of Hillsboro, Texas wartime liason chief between the Pentagon and Post Office Department



DMN December 26, 1967
Cotton Expert Burris Dies
Burris C. Jackson, 62, one of the most widely known
figures in the world cotton industry, died here
Monday.
Jackson, a Hill County ginner, merchant and farmer
was president of the National Cotton Council
of America and the only council president to be
director more than 20 years. He also served as
perennial chairman of the American Cotton
Congress. Jackson, a native of Hillsboro, was
chosen world cotton’s Man of the Year in 1960 by
the “Cotton Digest.”
His activities in more than 40 years included
organizing the statewide cotton committee of Texas
in 1936. The committee, which included all
elements of the industry, served as a model
for the national council which was organized in
Dallas in 1938.
Jackson was chairman of the Texas Cotton
Research Advisory Committee, the National Affairs
Committee of the American Cotton Shippers
Association and the legislation and public relations
committee’s of the Texas Cotton Ginners Association.
He was a former president of the Texas Cotton
Association.
Jackson joined his father’s cotton ginning
and land firm, Jackson & Co., in 1926.
He became managing partner in 1930
and assumed ownership in 1940.
Long a supporter of the Democratic party, he
served as postmaster of Hillsboro nearly 20 years.
He also served as chairman of the Democratic Party
in Hill County.
He was particularly well known for hosting
large gatherings at annual barbeques in Hillsboro.
After attending Hillsboro College and Texas A&M,
he served in the Army during World War II.
He was a member of Hillsboro’s First Methodist
Church which he had served as a board member more
than 30 years.
Among his civic and community activities were
serving as district commander of Lions International,
commander of an American Legion Post,
president of the National Association of Postmasters
and the International DeMolay Alumni and the State
Fair Board, president of Hillsboro Lions Club and a
member of Texas Civil War Centennial Commission
Survivors: Wife, two brothers, Randolph M. Jackson
and Kirby H. Jackson of Dallas, and a sister, Mrs. Nancy
Barker of Wichita Falls.
Funeral Services will be at 2:00 pm Wednesday in the
First Baptist Church of Hillsboro.
Burial will be in Ridge Park Cemetery here.


But then again, in an odd way it makes perfect sense.
I've read enough obits of intel related persons to realize
they don't exactly shout those types of things from the rooftops.

Obviously, Burris Jackson is just one of many persons
you cited in the thread; but I thought we might all
get a little more aware of just how complicated
a simple subject like a Postal Inspector in a particular
city can be.......

Maybe the Yankee and Cowboy War isn't the ideal
phrase to sum up the dynamic of having a liberal
Democrat President coming to, arguably a city
which had and has a tremendous amount of
political power, during what one writer called
the Second Civil War, but it does emphasize
a point, that is worth being made.

The dynamics of these postal official
inter-relationships through generations
reminds me of that theme song from
the old sitcom Cheers,
"Where Everybody Knows Your Name"

Ironically, somewhere in all the declassified
files is some sort of reference to Lee Oswald
applying for a job as a "cotton picker," I
promise I am not making that up........

Indulge me for one last item, the massive amount
of persons, places, various levels of government,
military, intelligence and soforth can become a little
maddening, but ultimately everything does fit.

Take Connie Trammell and Jack Ruby and
his taking her to her appointment before the
assassination..........

A Little background
What about the fact that on the day before the assassination Brading told a Dallas parole officer he planned on visiting Lamar Hunt, who was a right-wing extremist and an avowed Kennedy hater, and that on that same day Jack Ruby was admittedly in Hunt's office building? Says Reitzes,

Though Peter Noyes unaccountably misses the "Cabana connection" between Ruby and Braden, Noyes does note that Braden is alleged to have paid a visit to the offices of the Hunt Oil Company the day before the assassination -- the same day Jack Ruby drove a young woman named Connie Trammell to those same offices for a job interview with Lamar Hunt. Hunt security chief Paul Rothermel would later state that Ruby himself did not enter Hunt's office that day, but Rothermel was certain that at some point, Braden did. Braden, however, has always maintained that only his associates visited with the Hunts.

Reitzes should know better. He cites books that paint a much more accurate picture than the selective portrait he provides here. In his effort to leave some room for doubt that Brading visited with Lamar Hunt that day, Reitzes never mentions that Brading told a parole officer he planned on visiting Hunt and that Brading's meeting with the parole officer is documented in federal parole records, yet this is pointed out in David Scheim's book The Mafia Killed President Kennedy, which Reitzes cites. Similarly, in arguing that Ruby didn't meet with Hunt, Reitzes omits the fact that Warren Commission staffers Leon Hubert and Burt Griffin determined that Ruby did meet with Hunt and that Ruby gave an "innocent explanation" for the meeting, yet this information is also discussed in Scheim's book. Nor does Reitzes bother to tell the reader that the name "Lamar Hunt" was found in one of Ruby's notebooks. If Reitzes had dealt with all the available facts on the matter, he would have had to concede there is evidence that both Brading and Ruby met with Lamar Hunt.
See

http://www.mtgriffit...s/vsmcadams.htm


Someone, somewhere has at least once asked themselves, but what was going on; Yes it gets a little
weird, sifting through the whole miasma, until you realize that Trammell Crow and the Dallas Trade Mart
to some degree were practically synonymous in terms of developer and development.

See
http://blogs.dallaso...ll_crow_set.php

Where was JFK going when he was assassinated?

I'm not pretending that I know all the answers, but it does give one pause to contemplate.











#53 Robert Howard

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 12:06 AM

[quote name='Robert Howard' date='08 February 2011 - 12:17 AM' timestamp='1297120655' post='219159']
Hard to believe this person was circa 1949, the wartime liason chief between the Pentagon and the Post office.
Jackson, Col Burris C. 40352978
b. Jan. 27, 1906 d. Dec. 25, 1967
http://www.findagrav....&GRid=40352978

The Victoria Advocate - Oct 19, 1959
and Colonel Burris C Jackson of Hillsboro, Texas wartime liason chief between the Pentagon and Post Office Department



DMN December 26, 1967
Cotton Expert Burris Dies
Burris C. Jackson, 62, one of the most widely known
figures in the world cotton industry, died here
Monday.
Jackson, a Hill County ginner, merchant and farmer
was president of the National Cotton Council
of America and the only council president to be
director more than 20 years. He also served as
perennial chairman of the American Cotton
Congress. Jackson, a native of Hillsboro, was
chosen world cotton's Man of the Year in 1960 by
the "Cotton Digest."
His activities in more than 40 years included
organizing the statewide cotton committee of Texas
in 1936. The committee, which included all
elements of the industry, served as a model
for the national council which was organized in
Dallas in 1938.
Jackson was chairman of the Texas Cotton
Research Advisory Committee, the National Affairs
Committee of the American Cotton Shippers
Association and the legislation and public relations
committee's of the Texas Cotton Ginners Association.
He was a former president of the Texas Cotton
Association.
Jackson joined his father's cotton ginning
and land firm, Jackson & Co., in 1926.
He became managing partner in 1930
and assumed ownership in 1940.
Long a supporter of the Democratic party, he
served as postmaster of Hillsboro nearly 20 years.
He also served as chairman of the Democratic Party
in Hill County.
He was particularly well known for hosting
large gatherings at annual barbeques in Hillsboro.
After attending Hillsboro College and Texas A&M,
he served in the Army during World War II.
He was a member of Hillsboro's First Methodist
Church which he had served as a board member more
than 30 years.
Among his civic and community activities were
serving as district commander of Lions International,
commander of an American Legion Post,
president of the National Association of Postmasters
and the International DeMolay Alumni and the State
Fair Board, president of Hillsboro Lions Club and a
member of Texas Civil War Centennial Commission
Survivors: Wife, two brothers, Randolph M. Jackson
and Kirby H. Jackson of Dallas, and a sister, Mrs. Nancy
Barker of Wichita Falls.
Funeral Services will be at 2:00 pm Wednesday in the
First Baptist Church of Hillsboro.
Burial will be in Ridge Park Cemetery here.


But then again, in an odd way it makes perfect sense.
I've read enough obits of intel related persons to realize
they don't exactly shout those types of things from the rooftops.

Obviously, Burris Jackson is just one of many persons
you cited in the thread; but I thought we might all
get a little more aware of just how complicated
a simple subject like a Postal Inspector in a particular
city can be.......

Maybe the Yankee and Cowboy War isn't the ideal
phrase to sum up the dynamic of having a liberal
Democrat President coming to, arguably a city
which had and has a tremendous amount of
political power, during what one writer called
the Second Civil War, but it does emphasize
a point, that is worth being made.

The dynamics of these postal official
inter-relationships through generations
reminds me of that theme song from
the old sitcom Cheers,
"Where Everybody Knows Your Name"

Ironically, somewhere in all the declassified
files is some sort of reference to Lee Oswald
applying for a job as a "cotton picker," I
promise I am not making that up........

Indulge me for one last item, the massive amount
of persons, places, various levels of government,
military, intelligence and soforth can become a little
maddening, but ultimately everything does fit.

Take Connie Trammell and Jack Ruby and
his taking her to her appointment before the
assassination..........

A Little background
What about the fact that on the day before the assassination Brading told a Dallas parole officer he planned on visiting Lamar Hunt, who was a right-wing extremist and an avowed Kennedy hater, and that on that same day Jack Ruby was admittedly in Hunt's office building? Says Reitzes,

Though Peter Noyes unaccountably misses the "Cabana connection" between Ruby and Braden, Noyes does note that Braden is alleged to have paid a visit to the offices of the Hunt Oil Company the day before the assassination -- the same day Jack Ruby drove a young woman named Connie Trammell to those same offices for a job interview with Lamar Hunt. Hunt security chief Paul Rothermel would later state that Ruby himself did not enter Hunt's office that day, but Rothermel was certain that at some point, Braden did. Braden, however, has always maintained that only his associates visited with the Hunts.

Reitzes should know better. He cites books that paint a much more accurate picture than the selective portrait he provides here. In his effort to leave some room for doubt that Brading visited with Lamar Hunt that day, Reitzes never mentions that Brading told a parole officer he planned on visiting Hunt and that Brading's meeting with the parole officer is documented in federal parole records, yet this is pointed out in David Scheim's book The Mafia Killed President Kennedy, which Reitzes cites. Similarly, in arguing that Ruby didn't meet with Hunt, Reitzes omits the fact that Warren Commission staffers Leon Hubert and Burt Griffin determined that Ruby did meet with Hunt and that Ruby gave an "innocent explanation" for the meeting, yet this information is also discussed in Scheim's book. Nor does Reitzes bother to tell the reader that the name "Lamar Hunt" was found in one of Ruby's notebooks. If Reitzes had dealt with all the available facts on the matter, he would have had to concede there is evidence that both Brading and Ruby met with Lamar Hunt.
See

http://www.mtgriffit...s/vsmcadams.htm


Someone, somewhere has at least once asked themselves, but what was going on; Yes it gets a little
weird, sifting through the whole miasma, until you realize that Trammell Crow and the Dallas Trade Mart
to some degree were practically synonymous in terms of developer and development.

See
http://blogs.dallaso...ll_crow_set.php

Where was JFK going when he was assassinated?

I'm not pretending that I know all the answers, but it does give one pause to contemplate.
END

MORE
DMN Six Days in the Swim March 16, 1891 page 2
Mrs. Mamie Holmes of Murfeesboro, Tenn., is in the city visiting friends


DMN Mirth amid the Heat August 17, 1891 page 2,
Mrs. Adelaide Holmes of Big Springs is in the city

DMN Letter Box Thieves November 14, 1891 page 5,
Harry Armstrong, alias “Sheeney” the mysterious
prisoner who was caught here by Post office Department Inspector J.E. Jacobs.......


timeline cronology
What is your occupation?
Mr. Holmes.
Postal inspector.
Mr. Belin.
For the U.S. Post Office Department?
Mr. Holmes.
Yes, sir.
Mr. Belin.
How old are you?
Mr. Holmes.
I am 57.
Mr. Belin.
What is your educational background? Did you go to high school here?
Mr. Holmes.
I graduated from high school in Kansas City, and went 2 years to William Jewell College at Liberty, Mo. and went
almost through my third rear in Kansas City. Went to dental college in Kansas City.
Mr. Belin.
Then what did you do?
Mr. Holmes.
Well, all that time I was working in the post office as a clerk, and about that time the war broke out
and I went into the Postal Inspection Service in April 1942, and have been a postal inspector ever since.
Mr. Belin.
Have you been in Dallas ever since then?
Mr. Holmes.
No; I came here July 1, 1948. I have been here ever since.


DMN Woman's Club Tea Guests Include Brides, Visitors/Matrimony Notice; January 21, 1947 Page 10
at another table Mrs Guy Holmes hostess to Mmes.

DMN Nacogdoches Ministers Fight Return of Racing March 3, 1947 Page Four
The association headed by the Rev. C.F. Carrico with the Rev. Harry Holmes as treasurer

DMN U. S. Jury Bills 27 for Housing Frauds on Vets; July 15, 1948 Page One
William O. Barnard, Estelle Gremore Payne and Ralph Gremore [defrauded] to Lee Holmes 1409 Metropolitan, $5,500 and $6, 200


Robert: In the late forties through the early fifties, Sam Holmes Jr., was a writer for the DMN



DMN Wanda Jean Holmes Becomes Harry B. Wigzell's Bride; September 16, 1948 Page 14
and ushers were.... and K. M. Holmes, Dallas

Below is the first DMN Article, I found which specifically mentions Postal Inspector Harry Holmes
DMN Stork Takes First Inning September 1949
A 21-year old Negro woman charged with stealing, forging and cashing a $67 postal money order
didn’t show up for her preliminary hearing before the Federal commissioner, Monday.
But Postal Inspector Harry Holmes, the man who had filed the complaint said he wasn’t afraid
she would skip town.
“She’s in Parkland Hospital,” he said. “Gave birth Sunday to a baby boy.”



DMN Postal Clerk Accused of Embezzling November 14, 1952 Page One
Evidence that a Dallas postal clerk
was short $1,487 in his accounts
was uncovered by Post Office Station
Examiner Roy Cox, Postmaster J.
Howard Payne said Monday.
Payne was referring to a case involving
Jewel Hill of 1222 1/2 North Bishop.
Earlier testimony at Hill’s hearing had
indicated the missing funds were
detected by Postal Inspector Harry Holmes.



I found the item below, sort of a jolt
DMN Fishing World Series Draws Only Youths By Kenneth Foree; November 1, 1963
[Vinson is arriving] One from Mexico and the other [Houston E. Holmes is arriving] from Michigan
“This writer drove up here with two of them, two
boys; one whose hair is shot with gray, Howard
Vinson, Irving manufacturer, and one whose hair is snowy white
Houston E (Dooley) Holmes of Dallas and U S Steel, who is perhaps
better known as Whispering Holmes for in normal conversation
you can seldom hear him over a mile.

DMN Artist, 47, Charged in Photo Case; January 24, 1964
A 47 year old Richardson artist and writer was
released on $1,000 bond Thursday, after
he was charged with sending obscene photographs
through the mail.
Ben Herbert Phelper was charged with the federal
offense after three months of investigation by
Richardson police and postal inspectors.
in Germany during World War II.
Phelper told Richardson police that he sent the pictures
to a man in Mansfield, La., hoping to have the man sell them.
The Louisiana man, unknown to Phelper was a
postal inspector.
Phelper also admitted taking 10-second pictures
and color slides of a 17 year-old girl with whom he became
acquainted while giving her $2 per-hour art lessons in 1963.
The crew-cut ruddy-faced Phelper talked softly when he
appeared before U.S Commissioner W. Madden Hill,
Thursday afternoon.
“I did commit the offense,” he volunteered to
US Atty. Barefoot Sanders.
He said he had written “several books”
and had aided in the production of a stage play
about his experiences as a prisoner of war
in Germany during World War II.
Phelper, who lived originally in Illinois, said he had
lived in Richardson for almost three years.
He said he wanted to sell the pictures because
he had no money.
“I don’t even have money to use a phone now” he said.
Postal Inspector H.D. Holmes said Phelper allowed
officers to search his home. Hundreds of obscene pictures
were found, he said.
Phelper was also charged with indecent exposure and
possession of obscene photographs

I cannot assume both John and Tom know the significance
of who Ben Phelper was, although he is referenced
quite a bit in earlier parts of this thread.
[ I kind of hate to get into this, but I am responsible for pointing out anything
that anyone else may not know, but Phelper connects to the dead-Secret
Service agent story.
Here is the Education Forum link to that subject
http://educationforu...topic=9658&st=0
But what is strange about that thread is that there is no mention
of Phelper, which may even be a good thing.
As the old Continuing Inquiry issues which referenced
Ben Phelper in the context of the dead Secret Service
Agent never seemed to lead anywhere.


I only have a couple of pages regarding the TCI material
and am not even sure what year this is all from......
Confirmation of TCI Phelper/Chilton story
In March we reported about Ben Phelper, a Richardson, Texas
artist at the time of the assassination, who told of getting
advance notice of the JFK murder from a CIA agent named
Howard "Skip" G. Chilton, Jr.
Recently I came across in my files the original June 4, 1964
letter from Phelper to Greg Olds, then a Dallas newsman
referring to the incident......
I do know that in TCI Phelper's new address was
Ben Phelper
615 East Sunrise Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
[No zip code on the photo reproduction of the letter, but you can easily
find it on google maps]

All I know is the original reference
is CD 362
CHILTON, HOWARD G., JR.
Sources: CD 362-B
Mary's Comments: Member of family who own Merchants Retail Credit Association. In Ruby's notebooks was a card "From Chilton to Sovereign Club, Inc." Wife: Dale
Many WC documents sourced Merchants Retail Credit Association, most are usually prefaced with the name Birdie Sue Belcher.


Robert: Penn Jones, Jr., was a great guy, but you really have to be careful about some of the stories in TCI some are right on the money, some...are not
I do know that this is interesting to me, if for no other reason that the Florida address is near Flagler Street.
Flagler Street in the 1963 era was a known area of anti-Castro [and anti-Kennedy] figures.......
Just read anything by Richard Case Nagell, or Garrett Trapnell, and that street pops up like a jack-in-the-box.

#54 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 11:00 AM

Enough material out there for a book about midwestern U.S.P.O.
officials of dubious background, but the same fertile ground probably exists for any category of political appointees....

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=arthur+lueder&sa=N&tbs=nws:1,ar:1#sclient=psy&hl=en&safe=off&tbs=nws:1%2Car%3A1%2Csbd%3A1&q=arthur+c.+lueder+greenberg&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=arthur+c.+lueder+greenberg&psj=1&bav=on.1,or.&fp=846ff081f5394e12
THE MOB GOES LEGIT

Pay-Per-View - Chicago Tribune - Nov 11, 1956
Greenberg made heavy political contributions to candidates he favored He installed as president of his brewery Arthur C Lueder a former candidate for mayor .

http://www.google.co...46ff081f5394e12
POLITICAL LOOKOUT

Pay-Per-View - Chicago Tribune - Aug 17, 1968
...One call Regan made for the Baker project was on Tuesday to the Lucerne hotel suite of John AL Shaheen and IV. W. [Smokey] Downey. We recall Shaheen as press secretary for State Auditor Arthur C. Lueder After service with the OSS [office of strategic services] in World War II, ...

AC LUEDER, 81, POSTMASTER 12 YEARS, DIES

Pay-Per-View - Chicago Tribune - May 8, 1957
Arthur C Lueder 81 for mer Chicago postmaster and ... Mr Lueder ran for mayor of Chicago on the Republican ticket in 1923 and was nomi nated for state ...


Edited by Tom Scully, 14 February 2011 - 11:01 AM.


#55 John Dolva

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    living in a nice world

Posted 14 February 2011 - 04:36 PM

This possibly relates to a tenuous connection I've been flirting with but not really getting anywhere. Greenberg and Coors

http://z13.invisionf...pic=26007&st=30

""Jeffrey Coors(Knight of Malta) - CNP Board of Governors (1996). CNP Membership Roster (1984-85; 1988; 1996).
Jeffrey H. Coors sits on the Free Congress Foundation board of directors along with the FCF director Paul Weyrich, an ardent supporter of the neo-fascist Society for the Protection of Tradition, Family and Property; and Charles Moser, an editorial adviser to a publication that praises the Nazi Waffen SS. Weyrich, who for years has represented the political interests of the Coors family in Washington, DC, sponsors the work of a convicted Nazi collaborator, Laszlo Pasztor, a Hungarian-American who is employed at FCF. The Coors-funded Heritage Foundation co-sponsored a 1989 forum with a pro-Nazi group, the Anti-Bolshevik Bloc of Nations.The false front "conservative" Heritage Foundation is controlled by British Intelligence(MI6).
Coors family funding continues to flow toward rightist groups, and the family's political involvement plays a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of key organizations defining the political dialogue for both the New Right and the Religious Right. Ironically, the family derives the bulk of its wealth from working-class and middle-class people who purchase Coors beer products. The Coors family, through its political operations, then uses its share of the profits from beer sales to perpetuate and encourage regressive governmental and social policies serving only the narrow interests of a handful of the very wealthy in this country. That they are able to cloud this reality is due to the Coors Corporation's high-visibility advertising campaign.
The Coors family is highly influential in shaping the activities of three organizational pillars of the New Right--the Heritage Foundation, the Free Congress Foundation (FCF) and the Council for National Policy (CNP)--which comprise an influential force in Washington, DC. It involvement with these key groups provides the Coors family with a conservative political base. From this base, the family is connected to prominent activists in other New Right organizations, to groups on the Religious Right, and to allies in governmental agencies and in Congress.
Power Brokers: There are other powerful New Right funders, but it is the Coors family who time and again appear in leadership roles in New Right institutions, offering a guiding hand along with their signed checks. The family is seen, by critics and compatriots alike, as being in the front rank of conservative U.S.. power brokers. Some observers contend that the Coors empire has moderated politically because the Coors Corporation now financially supports some women's, civil rights and gay and lesbian groups. [Still Backing the Hard Right] ""

Does anyone know of this Greenberg and that Greenberg have something in common? Or is it way off target?

Edited by John Dolva, 14 February 2011 - 04:36 PM.


#56 John Dolva

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 04:03 PM

An odd factoid : apparently the guy who formed the format the FBI was structured from was a USPO worker. An old magazine article (parade reprints?) has him as the 'father' of the FBI.

#57 Robert Howard

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 02:43 PM

I have been working in a lot of different things, but wanted to post this at least for Tom Scully....
While there is nothing to indicate the following person's genealogy connects to Harry D Holmes, [I tend to think
he is related to the Mrs. Holmes whom Gary Marck referenced in an earlier post] there is something in the reference
to Troup, Texas that made me perk up, I wonder if Tom feels the same way.....

January 18, 2012 10:47 PM CST January 18, 2012 10:48 PM CST
Sam F. Holmes Jr., former Dallas Morning News reporter, business editor, dies at 91
By JOE SIMNACHER
JOE SIMNACHER The Dallas Morning News
Staff Writer
jsimnacher@dallasnews.com
Published: 18 January 2012 10:47 PM
Sam Ferris Holmes Jr. had passions for reading, writing and people, which he used throughout his Dallas careers in journalism and banking.
The World War II veteran was a courthouse reporter and business editor for The Dallas Morning News before he held several management positions at the First National Bank in Dallas. He also was also active with numerous civic groups.
Mr. Holmes, 91, died Monday of natural causes at The Forum at Park Lane in Dallas.
Services will be at 2 p.m. Thursday at East Dallas Christian Church in Dallas, where he was an active member for more than 60 years. He will be buried in Restland Memorial Park.
“He was an avid reader and he loved to write,” said his son, Charles Holmes of Garland. “He certainly was a people-oriented person and that got him in places where he met lots of people.”
Mr. Holmes kept track of many of the people he met over the years, his son said. “He would call them up and write them notes.”
He was also fond of cats and “could always tell a story with a good punch line,” his son added.
Born in Wichita Falls, Mr. Holmes was raised by an aunt and uncle in Troup, Texas, after his mother died when he was 2 years old. He lettered in four sports at Troup High School, where he graduated in 1938.
He attended Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, and received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin in 1942.
Mr. Holmes joined the Navy Reserve in January 1942 and he was sports editor of the Austin American, now the American-Statesman, while he waited to attend midshipman school that fall. He was commissioned an ensign in January 1943. He served aboard the USS Thomas Jefferson, delivering some of the first Allied troops to North Africa, Sicily and Italy. On June 6, 1944, he was the Jefferson’s officer of the deck during the D-Day landing at Omaha Beach.
He then served 18 months in the Pacific aboard the USS Mayfield Victory, an ammunition ship. Mr. Holmes held the rank of lieutenant when he was released from active duty in April 1946. He was a lieutenant commander when he left the Navy Reserve.
In 1947, Mr. Holmes joined The News and married Doris Kolb. He earned a master’s degree in government from Southern Methodist University in 1953.
Mr. Holmes, who was a dance-band singer in college, often casually performed with Mrs. Holmes, who had a master’s degree in music and played the piano.
He was a courthouse reporter for The News until he was named business editor in 1954. In 1955, he joined the public relations department of the First National Bank in Dallas, where he became personnel director, worked in policy administration and was later the bank’s vice president of economic development.
“He served on a lot of community boards as kind of a bank representative out doing community service,” his son said.
Mr. Holmes served as president of the board of directors for the Visiting Nurse Association, the Greater Dallas Council of Churches and Neighborhood Housing Services of Dallas.
He was also a member of Brookhaven Country Club, a scouting leader and a director of the American Institute of Banking.
In addition to his wife and son, Mr. Holmes is survived by a daughter, Charlotte Davis of Hurst; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.
Memorials may be made to East Dallas Christian Church, Troop 70 of the Circle 10 Council of the Boy Scouts of America, or a charity of choice.
http://www.dallasnew...-dies-at-91.ece


In 60's, They Missed Assassination Evidence; The Postal Inspector
Published: March 02, 1992
In "Fueling the Conspiracy" (letter, Feb. 19), Edward Early questions the interrogation of Lee Harvey Oswald by Harry Holmes, a postal inspector: "It's hard to fathom that a civilian with no apparent involvement would be allowed to question a man who was in custody for the assassination of the President." Mr. Early thus suspects that Harry Holmes may have deliberately delayed the transfer of Oswald to another jail, providing Jack Ruby with the opportunity to murder Oswald.
Indeed, an ordinary citizen brought in to question the accused murderer of the President is hard to fathom, except that Harry Holmes had an important involvement in the investigation of President Kennedy's death: Oswald had sent himself the rifle he used to kill the President through the mail. As David W. Belin, Warren Commission attorney, notes in "Final Disclosure," Oswald bought the murder weapon in Chicago and sent it to himself, via the United States Postal Service, in Texas.
It was Harry Holmes's duty as postal inspector to investigate the Oswald case and the mailing of a weapon across state borders. His presence in Oswald's cell was not the least incongruous. DOUGLAS KROHN New York, Feb. 19, 1992
http://www.nytimes.c...tor-920892.html


This is also for Tom Scully
There have been a lot of attempts, [see mary ferrell chronologies; which end around the time of Clay Shaw's death]
to determine if some of the murders after the assassination possibly tie-in to JFK characters, I have discovered
one that begs the question. Why Would A Dallas Policeman who was killed in the line of duty, not be on the Dallas
Police Departments blog of Dallas Police officers killed in the line of duty?
Someone needs to take a look see into the name HAMMETT and linkages to the JFK assassination.

#58 John Dolva

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 03:34 PM

bump

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:19 PM

A couple of questions. Was it SOP in Dallas to describe any secured non-primary mortgage as a "mechanic's lien", or can I assume a court record of a re-payment of an eight years old mechanics lien of several thousand dollars is just that, a lien placed on a property due to non-payment for services rendered at said property?

Is anyone familiar with Duckes Place, an establishment, circa 1970, located in Dallas at 3007 Colonial Ave.?




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