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Oswald and Bus 1213


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#1 Lee Farley

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 05:07 PM

Lee Oswald and the Marsalis Bus

Mr. BALL. St. Paul? You got on at St. Paul? St. Paul and Elm?
Mrs. BLEDSOE. Uh-huh.
Mr. BALL. And the bus was going in what direction?
Mrs. BLEDSOE. West.



Mr. BALL. After your dispatcher checked you in what time did you leave that corner of St. Paul and Elm?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Well, the best I can remember I don’t recall even picking up a passenger there. I think I discharged one lady passenger there on that, to the best I can recall, because I remember that I had, when I crossed Field Street, I think I had five passengers on my bus.


More than three decades ago Sylvia Meagher came to a controversial conclusion. After pouring over the evidence related to Oswald’s escape from the TSBD she concluded that Mary Bledsoe was never on Cecil McWatters bus. In 2011 there are still many people who believe that Oswald “escaped” Dealey Plaza by public transportation. Many are Lone-Assassin theorists, but some are Warren Commission critics.

The sections of Warren Commission testimony from Mary Bledsoe and Cecil McWatters that I have introduced above are but one piece of evidence that supports Sylvia Meagher’s conclusion that she made all those years ago. McWatters never placed Bledsoe on his bus. He distinctly claimed no memory of ever picking up a passenger at St Paul and Elm.

McWatters memory blank concerning Bledsoe is all the more strange due to the seat that Bledsoe claimed she sat in. This was the seat right opposite him on the left hand side of the bus. This being one of the only seats that McWatters would have full view of without having to do a complete 180 to view. I won’t go into Bledsoe’s testimony concerning seeing Oswald because if she wasn’t on the bus then it’s pointless. The confusing nature of the way he was dressed, not wearing a jacket, with holes in his shirt and buttons missing, and a “maniacal” expression are simply perjury suborned from the Warren Commission counsellors, the FBI and the Secret Service. In an adversarial setting this woman would have been laughed out of court.

When Milton Jones was finally located and an affidavit taken from him he supports Meagher’s conclusion that Bledsoe wasn’t on the bus. Jones stated that after the bus had finally gotten through the traffic congestion at Houston and Elm a lady boarded the bus and sat in the seat that Bledsoe claimed she was sat in. This was the lady who took offence to McWatters and Jones “grinning” when they informed her that the President had been shot. The seat she occupied, according to Milton Jones, was directly in front of him at a 45 degree angle. I find it completely unbelievable that Bledsoe would still be sat where she claimed she was sat on the bus and not recall this incident or alternatively that McWatters or Jones didn’t recall that Bledsoe had this lady sat next to her whilst this memorable event with another passenger was going on. Unless, of course, it was Bledsoe that had this conversation with the pair and she actually boarded the bus on the other side of the Marsalis Bridge towards Oak Cliff, specifically around Marsalis Street. Hardly probable however because Jones said the woman who boarded on Marsalis was 40-45 years of age. Either way Bledsoe was not on the bus when it is claimed that Oswald was on the bus.

Disregarding Bledsoe as a witness, and there’s overwhelming evidence to disregard her, we are left with Jones and McWatters. McWatters original affidavit mentions that, “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm and Houston.” We know this “man” he is talking about is Roy Milton Jones because he goes on in his affidavit to say, “I went on out Marsalis and picked a woman up. I asked her if she knew the President had been shot and she thought I was kidding. I told her that if she did not believe me to ask the man behind her.” The "man" McWatters is referring to we know for definite is Roy Milton Jones. “The man was grinning and never did say anything. The woman said that it was not a grinning matter. I don’t remember where I left this man off. This man looks like the #2 man I saw in a line-up tonight.”

The sinister aspect of this affidavit is the location where McWatters says he picked Roy Milton Jones up. We know for certain that he talking about Jones in the affidavit and in his Warren Commission testimony McWatters came clean about his identification on the evening of the 22nd November. He thought he was identifying Jones in the line-up. However, Jones boarded the bus at Harwood & Elm which is the stop before St Paul and Elm where Bledsoe claimed she boarded. The affidavit states that McWatters picked the “man” AKA Milton Jones, at the “lower end of town on Elm and Houston.” When presented with this during his Warren Commission testimony this is what happened:

Mr. BALL. …Let’s look again at this affidavit.
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm around Houston,” as I remember you didn’t stop at Elm and Houston; you stopped at Record and Houston for a pickup.
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes.
Mr. BALL. Do you remember having picked up any man around the lower end of town at Elm around Houston?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Elm and Houston?
Mr. BALL. Yes.
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, no, sir; I didn’t pick up. I made a statement here I picked up---


Joseph Ball stopped McWatters at this point. The bus driver was quite obviously confused that his affidavit would claim that he picked somebody up at Elm and Houston. He knew the night of making the affidavit that the police prevented any vehicles stopping on Elm and Houston and he had testified to this already during the hearing. Joseph Ball interrupted McWatters, I believe, to stop him from saying that he didn’t actually claim this when the affidavit was taken, when by all accounts he actually did because it's in his handwritten affidavit:

Mr. BALL. Take a look at it, “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm around Houston.”
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, I didn’t. I picked - “I picked a man up at the lower end of town at Elm,” no, sir, I didn’t pick up no man. No, I was tied up in traffic there. Market Street is the - I must not have read that very good when I signed that, because I sure didn’t. No, I didn’t.
Mr. BALL. Did you pick up a man at Record and Houston?
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, Sir.
Mr. BALL. You didn’t?
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, sir; that is not even no stop.
Mr. BALL. In other words, this statement is not an accurate statement?
Mr. MCWATTERS. That’s right, Sir…


The implications of this are that either McWatters couldn’t remember on the night of the assassination that earlier in the afternoon the police prevented any vehicle from stopping on Elm & Houston or alternatively he was pressured into writing Elm and Houston as the place where he picked up the “man.” McWatters had to have known that the “man” he picked up (Roy Jones) actually boarded at Harwood which was 9 blocks away from Houston & Elm.

McWatters testimony, due to the problems inherent within it, has to be discarded. The whole confusing and convoluted way it was collected is an embarrassment. The questioning is appalling and there are sections where McWatters is still confusing Oswald with Jones, places where he separates the pair, places where he says the man he identified at the line-up was Oswald and then the clarification at the end where it becomes crystal clear that he was actually identifying Roy Jones.

For example when Joseph Ball asks McWatters how long the man who boarded at Lamar Street (allegedly Oswald) stayed on the bus for McWatters says:

Mr. MCWATTERS. Two blocks was the only distance.
Mr. BALL. How long did it take you to go those 2 blocks?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Now, he paid as far as from St. Paul Street. I made—there wasn’t any traffic holding me up whatsoever.


McWatters is again talking about Roy Jones. Jones paid from St Paul Street because it was Jones who boarded the bus one block before St Pauls at Harwood. Even after McWatters has made it abundantly clear that it was Jones he identified in the police line-up this exchange happens:

Mr. MCWATTERS. …he was sitting right behind this boy, but I didn’t pay him any particular attention, to the man.
Senator COOPER. You saw him get on the bus?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes.
Senator COOPER. Did you see him get off?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes; I gave him a transfer when he got off the bus, the same place that was, the same place I was stopped where the man come back and stepped up in the bus and told me what he had heard over his radio in his car, the same place that the lady got off, with a suitcase, is the place that the man got off.
Senator COOPER. The man you later identified in the police line-up?
Mr. MCWATTERS. That is correct; yes, sir.


The whole thing is a farce and, like with Bledsoe, cannot be taken seriously. Once it became apparent to the Warren Commission that McWatters was confusing Jones with the man who allegedly got on the bus at Lamar Street they got the FBI to trace Roy Jones and take a statement. Jones confirmed that a man did in fact board the bus some four blocks before Houston Street but Jones’ statement threw more issues into the mix than it actually solved. Which is why, I believe, Jones was not invited to appear before the Commission. The FBI interviewed Jones on March 30th 1964; 18 days after McWatters gave his testimony. If the Commission really wanted to get to the truth in this matter surely they would have gotten Jones on the stand? The main problem for them was Jones’ introduction into the “story” of a pair of Police Officers who boarded the bus to search the passengers for firearms. Unfortunately, this didn’t jibe with McWatters testimony on the stand. McWatters claimed that it was a motorist from the traffic jam that boarded the bus and told McWatters that the President had been shot. There is no mention of Police Officers during McWatters lengthy testimony. Likewise, Jones doesn’t mention anything about a woman disembarking because she was late for a train. He states that the female passenger got on at the same stop as the man (four blocks from Houston); he also claims the female passenger took a seat further towards the back of the bus and the man sat directly behind him. There is no mention of the female passenger taking the seat directly behind the driver (as per McWatters and Bledsoe’s testimony) and there is also no mention of a train. There is no mention of the lady asking for a transfer either; this is because Jones states the female passenger got off the bus by “rear door.” The male passenger got off, according to Jones, by the front doors, and Jones mentions nothing about the male passenger asking for a transfer.

The way the passengers disembarked makes sense given where Jones places them on the bus. If the female passenger took a seat towards the rear of the bus it makes sense that she would disembark by the rear doors. The male passenger got off using the front doors because he was sat directly behind Jones. Jones seems to remember quite a lot from the day when we read his statement that he made to the FBI and on the surface both he and it appear credible. If there was a passenger sat behind the driver with a suitcase, who Mary Bledsoe and McWatters claimed was late for a train, and then requested a transfer should the bus catch her back up, it was certainly lost on Roy Jones because he didn’t remember any of this.

http://www.maryferre...26&relPageId=46 (Jones Statement)

Mary Bledsoe gave her testimony on April 2nd, 1964. Forrest Sorrels was involved in requesting that Bledsoe used notes during her appearance before the Commission. Some work had obviously gone into what she was going to say prior April 2nd and what she was to say had to support what McWatters had already said. Jones making his claims 18 days after McWatters testimony that contradicted what McWatters had said was a real problem and the fact that Jones had made these claims 3 days prior to Bledsoe’s testimony was probably the reason Jones was given a wide berth concerning asking him to clarify his statement under oath.

McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus. Jones claims a man got on the bus where McWatters claimed a man boarded but without the transfers being issued it is meaningless. Remember, McWatters says he only gave two transfers out that day. One was to the woman who sat behind him, with a suitcase, who was going to be late for a train. The other was a man who got off the same stop as her. Bledsoe backed this part of his testimony up, whilst inserting herself into the story more than was necessary by claiming it was her who advised the woman to walk because the train station was only a short distance away. The main problem with this is McWatters doesn’t remember picking up Bledsoe at the stop she said she got on. He doesn’t remember her being on the bus. He also doesn’t remember her being in the seat she said she was in which was directly facing Jones. Jones, likewise, doesn’t remember Bledsoe. In fact, he says another woman occupied that seat Bledsoe was supposed to be sitting in when she boarded the bus once it had travelled over the Marsalis Bridge. The key point in all of this is that Jones claims the woman got off the bus at the rear, so therefore no transfer.
If there’s no transfer for the woman then it’s hard to imagine that McWatters would remember giving a transfer to the man because it was the memorable woman who kicked his memory into gear concerning only having issued two transfers on that stretch of the route.

The man who boarded the bus was in all likelihood just another passenger and certainly not a deranged assassin fleeing the scene of the crime by stupidly getting on a bus that was going to take him back toward it. Within this entire game of hoopla that was created by the Warren Commission are a couple of key questions that I would like to ask curious people to ask of themselves:

1. Why would Oswald get on the Marsalis bus? The nearest this bus would take Oswald to his rooming house on North Beckley is seven blocks away. Oswald regularly used public transport. Public transport has schedules. Anyone regularly using public transport generally knows these schedules. Knowing the schedules helps in not getting canned from work. Oswald must have known the schedule of the Beckley bus. It left the St Paul transfer point at the same time as the Marsalis/Munger bus that Cecil McWatters was driving. That time was 12:36pm. McWatters claimed that he was probably ahead of the Beckley bus because he couldn’t see it in front of him. If Oswald was heading back to his rooming house why would he get a bus that didn’t take him there? Especially if the one that did take him all the way home was probably right behind it?

2. Why would Oswald even contemplate getting a bus West on Elm Street at 12:40pm? He had just walked from Dealey Plaza and knew this bus was going to be taking him back towards the scene of his alleged crime. The official story tells us that he boarded the Marsalis bus when it was caught up in traffic. Actually boarding at an intersection and not at an authorised bus stop. The implication is then made that he disembarked when the man from a car boarded the bus to tell the passengers that the President had been shot. Are we to believe that Oswald didn’t know this, whether he was the assassin or not? Did Oswald think the traffic had backed up for some other reason and he would soon be on his way through the congestion? If he was the assassin was he sat there thinking the Secret Service was still unawares, 10 minutes after the assassination, that the President was missing a large portion of his head? It makes no sense for Oswald to board that bus, assassin or not, for a good couple of reasons.

3. Why would he need a transfer? I have to completely discount Mary Bledsoe’s testimony because the evidence proves she wasn’t on the bus. Because Bledsoe supports McWatters testimony in regard to the bus transfer given out I have to claim my belief that McWatters testimony on this matter was suborned. Jones mentions nothing about transfers being issued. Therefore the question is “where did Oswald get the transfer” that was in his “possession?” I will answer this question a little later because to answer it I believe you first have to contemplate a more fundamental question. Why did he need one? We know that the transfers given out on Elm Street are only good at designated transfer points. As soon as Oswald allegedly got off the bus he was, within four minutes, in William Whaley’s taxi cab. Oswald allegedly got off the Marsalis bus and headed straight for the Greyhound bus station on Lamar Street and immediately got into a cab. So why the need for a transfer? It would appear he had no plans to use it. So why would he even contemplate getting one?

The bus transfer is the most curious item involved in this whole affair. If he wasn’t on the bus then how did he get it? Why did it take the DPD two hours to find it? How did they find out it was McWatters who punched it?

There is nothing in the record that explains how the DPD found out that it was Cecil McWatters who issued this transfer. It is not contained in any reports that were filed by DPD officers or homicide detectives. We know that Lieutenant Wells sent Dhority and Brown to collect McWatters from the Piedmont line bus that was due outside City Hall at Commerce and Harwood at 6:15pm. He was taken inside where he immediately identified Roy Milton Jones in the line-up, he was then questioned, identified the bus transfer, and then an affidavit taken from him. He was kept in City Hall until the small hours of the 23rd. Considering the incredibly short affidavit he submitted and since we know that the line-up took place at 6:15pm, 6-7 hours is an incredibly long time to be interviewed. What they grilled him on for this length of time is anyone’s guess but for him to include in his affidavit that he picked up his passenger from right outside the TSBD goes some way into trying to understand what they were perhaps “talking” to him about. Especially when McWatters knew he wasn’t allowed to stop where he claims he stopped in his statement.

Similar to us not knowing how the DPD found out about McWatters we also have very little documentation that explains whether the DPD took the full book of transfers from McWatters to gain a grasp on the numerical sequences involved in their issuance. In fact, I was under the impression for years that the only evidence in existence of bus 1213 transfers being collected was this photograph of the one allegedly given to Oswald. Transfer number 004459:



What I have always found curious is that the DPD and the FBI seemed to show little interest in tracing the woman that McWatters and Bledsoe claimed got the transfer prior to Oswald’s. The lady making her way to the train station would have been issued transfer number 004458. Obviously, the likelihood that the individual involved would have still had the transfer is minimal but they made no attempt to even find out (ladies purses do sometimes have a steroetypical knack of holding onto items that enter them), or to find her to corroborate McWatters recollections. Much the same way they failed to look for the old lady that Oswald offered his own cab to at the Greyhound Station who could have corroborated William Whaley’s statements. The simple fact of the matter is, if these people existed, I’m sure they would have been looked for.

Concerning the transfer, I will leave you with this. We do know that the DPD confiscated the book of transfers from Cecil McWatters. Whether it was definitely the same book that Oswald's transfer was allegedly issued from is anyone’s guess because the actual book was never photographed. We do know "a" book was taken because a receipt was given for it. The receipt has the following written on the back“Receipt for the book of transfers from which transfer was issued to Oswald the accused assin of Pres, John F. Kennedy.” What is tantalising about this receipt is what it was written on. What is even more tantalising is the number of the thing it was written on. TRansfer receipt #004451. I’ll leave it up to everyone’s imagination to make their own sense out of what this could potentially mean:



http://www.maryferre...07&relPageId=88 (Transfer Receipt)

Without the full transfer book it's impossible to cast-iron prove anything regarding this little gem but at least this does prove that the DPD had the full transfer book in their possession and they certainly kept this fact out of the reports and out of discussion and if this knowledge does one thing for me, it certainly reinforces the thoughts I have had about the Oswald transfer that I've had for more than 15 years; Oswald wasn't on the bus. Nor was he in the cab. He left Dealey Plaza by other means. The transfer was planted.

Edited by Lee Farley, 18 January 2011 - 09:41 AM.


#2 David Williams

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 06:32 PM

Good work Lee


Dave

#3 Ian Kingsbury

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 10:26 PM

Lee Oswald and the Marsalis Bus

Mr. BALL. St. Paul? You got on at St. Paul? St. Paul and Elm?
Mrs. BLEDSOE. Uh-huh.
Mr. BALL. And the bus was going in what direction?
Mrs. BLEDSOE. West.



Mr. BALL. After your dispatcher checked you in what time did you leave that corner of St. Paul and Elm?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Well, the best I can remember I don’t recall even picking up a passenger there. I think I discharged one lady passenger there on that, to the best I can recall, because I remember that I had, when I crossed Field Street, I think I had five passengers on my bus.


More than three decades ago Sylvia Meagher came to a controversial conclusion. After pouring over the evidence related to Oswald’s escape from the TSBD she concluded that Mary Bledsoe was never on Cecil McWatters bus. In 2011 there are still many people who believe that Oswald “escaped” Dealey Plaza by public transportation. Many are Lone-Assassin theorists, but some are Warren Commission critics.

The sections of Warren Commission testimony from Mary Bledsoe and Cecil McWatters that I have introduced above are but one piece of evidence that supports Sylvia Meagher’s conclusion that she made all those years ago. McWatters never placed Bledsoe on his bus. He distinctly claimed no memory of ever picking up a passenger at St Paul and Elm.

McWatters memory blank concerning Bledsoe is all the more strange due to the seat that Bledsoe claimed she sat in. This was the seat right opposite him on the left hand side of the bus. This being one of the only seats that McWatters would have full view of without having to do a complete 180 to view. I won’t go into Bledsoe’s testimony concerning seeing Oswald because if she wasn’t on the bus then it’s pointless. The confusing nature of the way he was dressed, not wearing a jacket, with holes in his shirt and buttons missing, and a “maniacal” expression are simply perjury suborned from the Warren Commission counsellors, the FBI and the Secret Service. In an adversarial setting this woman would have been laughed out of court.

When Milton Jones was finally located and an affidavit taken from him he supports Meagher’s conclusion that Bledsoe wasn’t on the bus. Jones stated that after the bus had finally gotten through the traffic congestion at Houston and Elm a lady boarded the bus and sat in the seat that Bledsoe claimed she was sat in. This was the lady who took offence to McWatters and Jones “grinning” when they informed her that the President had been shot. The seat she occupied, according to Milton Jones, was directly in front of him at a 45 degree angle. I find it completely unbelievable that Bledsoe would still be sat where she claimed she was sat on the bus and not recall this incident or alternatively that McWatters or Jones didn’t recall that Bledsoe had this lady sat next to her whilst this memorable event with another passenger was going on. Unless, of course, it was Bledsoe that had this conversation with the pair and she actually boarded the bus on the other side of the Marsalis Bridge towards Oak Cliff, specifically around Marsalis Street. Hardly probable however because Jones said the woman who boarded on Marsalis was 40-45 years of age. Either way Bledsoe was not on the bus when it is claimed that Oswald was on the bus.

Disregarding Bledsoe as a witness, and there’s overwhelming evidence to disregard her, we are left with Jones and McWatters. McWatters original affidavit mentions that, “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm and Houston.” We know this “man” he is talking about is Roy Milton Jones because he goes on in his affidavit to say, “I went on out Marsalis and picked a woman up. I asked her if she knew the President had been shot and she thought I was kidding. I told her that if she did not believe me to ask the man behind her.” The "man" McWatters is referring to we know for definite is Roy Milton Jones. “The man was grinning and never did say anything. The woman said that it was not a grinning matter. I don’t remember where I left this man off. This man looks like the #2 man I saw in a line-up tonight.”

The sinister aspect of this affidavit is the location where McWatters says he picked Roy Milton Jones up. We know for certain that he talking about Jones in the affidavit and in his Warren Commission testimony McWatters came clean about his identification on the evening of the 22nd November. He thought he was identifying Jones in the line-up. However, Jones boarded the bus at Harwood & Elm which is the stop before St Paul and Elm where Bledsoe claimed she boarded. The affidavit states that McWatters picked the “man” AKA Milton Jones, at the “lower end of town on Elm and Houston.” When presented with this during his Warren Commission testimony this is what happened:

Mr. BALL. …Let’s look again at this affidavit.
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm around Houston,” as I remember you didn’t stop at Elm and Houston; you stopped at Record and Houston for a pickup.
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes.
Mr. BALL. Do you remember having picked up any man around the lower end of town at Elm around Houston?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Elm and Houston?
Mr. BALL. Yes.
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, no, sir; I didn’t pick up. I made a statement here I picked up---


Joseph Ball stopped McWatters at this point. The bus driver was quite obviously confused that his affidavit would claim that he picked somebody up at Elm and Houston. He knew the night of making the affidavit that the police prevented any vehicles stopping on Elm and Houston and he had testified to this already during the hearing. Joseph Ball interrupted McWatters, I believe, to stop him from saying that he didn’t actually claim this when the affidavit was taken, when by all accounts he actually did because it's in his handwritten affidavit:

Mr. BALL. Take a look at it, “I picked up a man on the lower end of town on Elm around Houston.”
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, I didn’t. I picked - “I picked a man up at the lower end of town at Elm,” no, sir, I didn’t pick up no man. No, I was tied up in traffic there. Market Street is the - I must not have read that very good when I signed that, because I sure didn’t. No, I didn’t.
Mr. BALL. Did you pick up a man at Record and Houston?
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, Sir.
Mr. BALL. You didn’t?
Mr. MCWATTERS. No, sir; that is not even no stop.
Mr. BALL. In other words, this statement is not an accurate statement?
Mr. MCWATTERS. That’s right, Sir…


The implications of this are that either McWatters couldn’t remember on the night of the assassination that earlier in the afternoon the police prevented any vehicle from stopping on Elm & Houston or alternatively he was pressured into writing Elm and Houston as the place where he picked up the “man.” McWatters had to have known that the “man” he picked up (Roy Jones) actually boarded at Harwood which was 9 blocks away from Houston & Elm.

McWatters testimony, due to the problems inherent within it, has to be discarded. The whole confusing and convoluted way it was collected is an embarrassment. The questioning is appalling and there are sections where McWatters is still confusing Oswald with Jones, places where he separates the pair, places where he says the man he identified at the line-up was Oswald and then the clarification at the end where it becomes crystal clear that he was actually identifying Roy Jones.

For example when Joseph Ball asks McWatters how long the man who boarded at Lamar Street (allegedly Oswald) stayed on the bus for McWatters says:

Mr. MCWATTERS. Two blocks was the only distance.
Mr. BALL. How long did it take you to go those 2 blocks?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Now, he paid as far as from St. Paul Street. I made—there wasn’t any traffic holding me up whatsoever.


McWatters is again talking about Roy Jones. Jones paid from St Paul Street because it was Jones who boarded the bus one block before St Pauls at Harwood. Even after McWatters has made it abundantly clear that it was Jones he identified in the police line-up this exchange happens:

Mr. MCWATTERS. …he was sitting right behind this boy, but I didn’t pay him any particular attention, to the man.
Senator COOPER. You saw him get on the bus?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes.
Senator COOPER. Did you see him get off?
Mr. MCWATTERS. Yes; I gave him a transfer when he got off the bus, the same place that was, the same place I was stopped where the man come back and stepped up in the bus and told me what he had heard over his radio in his car, the same place that the lady got off, with a suitcase, is the place that the man got off.
Senator COOPER. The man you later identified in the police line-up?
Mr. MCWATTERS. That is correct; yes, sir.


The whole thing is a farce and, like with Bledsoe, cannot be taken seriously. Once it became apparent to the Warren Commission that McWatters was confusing Jones with the man who allegedly got on the bus at Lamar Street they got the FBI to trace Roy Jones and take a statement. Jones confirmed that a man did in fact board the bus some four blocks before Houston Street but Jones’ statement threw more issues into the mix than it actually solved. Which is why, I believe, Jones was not invited to appear before the Commission. The FBI interviewed Jones on March 30th 1964; 18 days after McWatters gave his testimony. If the Commission really wanted to get to the truth in this matter surely they would have gotten Jones on the stand? The main problem for them was Jones’ introduction into the “story” of a pair of Police Officers who boarded the bus to search the passengers for firearms. Unfortunately, this didn’t jibe with McWatters testimony on the stand. McWatters claimed that it was a motorist from the traffic jam that boarded the bus and told McWatters that the President had been shot. There is no mention of Police Officers during McWatters lengthy testimony. Likewise, Jones doesn’t mention anything about a woman disembarking because she was late for a train. He states that the female passenger got on at the same stop as the man (four blocks from Houston); he also claims the female passenger took a seat further towards the back of the bus and the man sat directly behind him. There is no mention of the female passenger taking the seat directly behind the driver (as per McWatters and Bledsoe’s testimony) and there is also no mention of a train. There is no mention of the lady asking for a transfer either; this is because Jones states the female passenger got off the bus by “rear door.” The male passenger got off, according to Jones, by the front doors, and Jones mentions nothing about the male passenger asking for a transfer.

The way the passengers disembarked makes sense given where Jones places them on the bus. If the female passenger took a seat towards the rear of the bus it makes sense that she would disembark by the rear doors. The male passenger got off using the front doors because he was sat directly behind Jones. Jones seems to remember quite a lot from the day when we read his statement that he made to the FBI and on the surface both he and it appear credible. If there was a passenger sat behind the driver with a suitcase, who Mary Bledsoe and McWatters claimed was late for a train, and then requested a transfer should the bus catch her back up, it was certainly lost on Roy Jones because he didn’t remember any of this.

http://www.maryferre...26&relPageId=46 (Jones Statement)

Mary Bledsoe gave her testimony on April 2nd, 1964. Forrest Sorrels was involved in requesting that Bledsoe used notes during her appearance before the Commission. Some work had obviously gone into what she was going to say prior April 2nd and what she was to say had to support what McWatters had already said. Jones making his claims 18 days after McWatters testimony that contradicted what McWatters had said was a real problem and the fact that Jones had made these claims 3 days prior to Bledsoe’s testimony was probably the reason Jones was given a wide berth concerning asking him to clarify his statement under oath.

McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus. Jones claims a man got on the bus where McWatters claimed a man boarded but without the transfers being issued it is meaningless. Remember, McWatters says he only gave two transfers out that day. One was to the woman who sat behind him, with a suitcase, who was going to be late for a train. The other was a man who got off the same stop as her. Bledsoe backed this part of his testimony up, whilst inserting herself into the story more than was necessary by claiming it was her who advised the woman to walk because the train station was only a short distance away. The main problem with this is McWatters doesn’t remember picking up Bledsoe at the stop she said she got on. He doesn’t remember her being on the bus. He also doesn’t remember her being in the seat she said she was in which was directly facing Jones. Jones, likewise, doesn’t remember Bledsoe. In fact, he says another woman occupied that seat Bledsoe was supposed to be sitting in when she boarded the bus once it had travelled over the Marsalis Bridge. The key point in all of this is that Jones claims the woman got off the bus at the rear, so therefore no transfer.
If there’s no transfer for the woman then it’s hard to imagine that McWatters would remember giving a transfer to the man because it was the memorable woman who kicked his memory into gear concerning only having issued two transfers on that stretch of the route.

The man who boarded the bus was in all likelihood just another passenger and certainly not a deranged assassin fleeing the scene of the crime by stupidly getting on a bus that was going to take him back toward it. Within this entire game of hoopla that was created by the Warren Commission are a couple of key questions that I would like to ask curious people to ask of themselves:

1. Why would Oswald get on the Marsalis bus? The nearest this bus would take Oswald to his rooming house on North Beckley is seven blocks away. Oswald regularly used public transport. Public transport has schedules. Anyone regularly using public transport generally knows these schedules. Knowing the schedules helps in not getting canned from work. Oswald must have known the schedule of the Beckley bus. It left the St Paul transfer point at the same time as the Marsalis/Munger bus that Cecil McWatters was driving. That time was 12:36pm. McWatters claimed that he was probably ahead of the Beckley bus because he couldn’t see it in front of him. If Oswald was heading back to his rooming house why would he get a bus that didn’t take him there? Especially if the one that did take him all the way home was probably right behind it?

2. Why would Oswald even contemplate getting a bus West on Elm Street at 12:40pm? He had just walked from Dealey Plaza and knew this bus was going to be taking him back towards the scene of his alleged crime. The official story tells us that he boarded the Marsalis bus when it was caught up in traffic. Actually boarding at an intersection and not at an authorised bus stop. The implication is then made that he disembarked when the man from a car boarded the bus to tell the passengers that the President had been shot. Are we to believe that Oswald didn’t know this, whether he was the assassin or not? Did Oswald think the traffic had backed up for some other reason and he would soon be on his way through the congestion? If he was the assassin was he sat there thinking the Secret Service was still unawares, 10 minutes after the assassination, that the President was missing a large portion of his head? It makes no sense for Oswald to board that bus, assassin or not, for a good couple of reasons.

3. Why would he need a transfer? I have to completely discount Mary Bledsoe’s testimony because the evidence proves she wasn’t on the bus. Because Bledsoe supports McWatters testimony in regard to the bus transfer given out I have to claim my belief that McWatters testimony on this matter was suborned. Jones mentions nothing about transfers being issued. Therefore the question is “where did Oswald get the transfer” that was in his “possession?” I will answer this question a little later because to answer it I believe you first have to contemplate a more fundamental question. Why did he need one? We know that the transfers given out on Elm Street are only good at designated transfer points. As soon as Oswald allegedly got off the bus he was, within four minutes, in William Whaley’s taxi cab. Oswald allegedly got off the Marsalis bus and headed straight for the Greyhound bus station on Lamar Street and immediately got into a cab. So why the need for a transfer? It would appear he had no plans to use it. So why would he even contemplate getting one?

The bus transfer is the most curious item involved in this whole affair. If he wasn’t on the bus then how did he get it? Why did it take the DPD two hours to find it? How did they find out it was McWatters who punched it?

There is nothing in the record that explains how the DPD found out that it was Cecil McWatters who issued this transfer. It is not contained in any reports that were filed by DPD officers or homicide detectives. We know that Lieutenant Wells sent Dhority and Brown to collect McWatters from the Piedmont line bus that was due outside City Hall at Commerce and Harwood at 6:15pm. He was taken inside where he immediately identified Roy Milton Jones in the line-up, he was then questioned, identified the bus transfer, and then an affidavit taken from him. He was kept in City Hall until the small hours of the 23rd. Considering the incredibly short affidavit he submitted and since we know that the line-up took place at 6:15pm, 6-7 hours is an incredibly long time to be interviewed. What they grilled him on for this length of time is anyone’s guess but for him to include in his affidavit that he picked up his passenger from right outside the TSBD goes some way into trying to understand what they were perhaps “talking” to him about. Especially when McWatters knew he wasn’t allowed to stop where he claims he stopped in his statement.

Similar to us not knowing how the DPD found out about McWatters we also have very little documentation that explains whether the DPD took the full book of transfers from McWatters to gain a grasp on the numerical sequences involved in their issuance. In fact, I was under the impression for years that the only evidence in existence of bus 1213 transfers being collected was this photograph of the one allegedly given to Oswald. Transfer number 004459:



What I have always found curious is that the DPD and the FBI seemed to show little interest in tracing the woman that McWatters and Bledsoe claimed got the transfer prior to Oswald’s. The lady making her way to the train station would have been issued transfer number 004458. Obviously, the likelihood that the individual involved would have still had the transfer is minimal but they made no attempt to even find out (ladies purses do sometimes have a steroetypical knack of holding onto items that enter them), or to find her to corroborate McWatters recollections. Much the same way they failed to look for the old lady that Oswald offered his own cab to at the Greyhound Station who could have corroborated William Whaley’s statements. The simple fact of the matter is, if these people existed, I’m sure they would have been looked for.

Concerning the transfer, I will leave you with this. We do know that the DPD confiscated the book of transfers from Cecil McWatters. Whether it was definitely the same book that Oswald's transfer was allegedly issued from is anyone’s guess because the actual book was never photographed. We do know "a" book was taken because a receipt was given for it. The receipt has the following written on the back“Receipt for the book of transfers from which transfer was issued to Oswald the accused assin of Pres, John F. Kennedy.” What is tantalising about this receipt is what it was written on. What is even more tantalising is the number of the thing it was written on. Receipt 004451. I’ll leave it up to everyone’s imagination to make their own sense out of what this could potentially mean:



http://www.maryferre...07&relPageId=88 (Transfer Receipt)

Without the full transfer book it's impossible to cast-iron prove anything regarding this little gem but at least this does prove that the DPD had the full transfer book in their possession and they certainly kept this fact out of the reports and out of discussion and if this knowledge does one thing for me, it certainly reinforces the thoughts I have had about the Oswald transfer that I've had for more than 15 years; Oswald wasn't on the bus. Nor was he in the cab. He left Dealey Plaza by other means. The transfer was planted.



Lee

A nice piece of work mate.This gives at least a bit more credence to Roger Craig .But we can now see why they needed to deep 6 Craigs testimony.When does Gerald Hill get the Farley treatment?.


Ian

#4 Jack White

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 03:33 AM

Nice research, Lee.

As I recall, it was Mary Ferrell who first told me that the bus transfer was planted.

If I recall correctly, it was not found in an initial search of Oswald, she said.

And bus drivers of that time DID have personal punches, within limits of what
shapes were available. I notice the punch on the transfer is BATSHAPED, and indicated
LAKEWOOD, which I think means that McWatters drove the LAKEWOOD ROUTE. It has
been many decades since I rode buses and used transfers, but as I recall, the driver
punch indicated the route and was good for any other route WHICH COINCIDED WITH
OR INTERSECTED THE PUNCHED ROUTE. This was to combat "transfer fraud" where
people could use transfers improperly on the same or other routes. I always rode
the RIVERSIDE route, so if it was punched, I could not use the transfer to return
home taking the same route.

Jack

#5 Karl Kinaski

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 08:36 AM

Quote; Fair Play…17th Issue..



A newly-discovered document is Yet Another Eyewitness
by John Kelin
providing additional corroboration to the claim that Lee Harvey Oswald left Dealey Plaza in a Rambler station wagon in the aftermath of the JFK assassination --- and not as the Warren Commission claimed.
Kansas researcher Chris Courtwright recently came across an FBI document at Archives II in College Park, Maryland, which tells the story of eyewitness Roy Cooper. This important document, an FBI affidavit, provides new corroboration to former Dallas Sheriff's Deputy Roger Craig, who in 1963 reported an observation virtually identical to that reported by Cooper.
The Cooper document states:
To: SAC, Dallas
From: SA Earle Haley
Subject: Assassination of President Kennedy
Mr. Roy Cooper, Route 1, Box 135A, Euless, Texas, phone Butler 3-2640, furnished the following information at 12:15 p.m. this date [ll-23-63]. He related an incident about a Nash Rambler being seen leaving the building at Elm and Houston on 11/22/63. He was driving his car and following his boss who was driving a Cadillac. They were coming south on Houston and had to wait for the parade and the incident happened shortly after they reached this intersection. Cooper observed a white male somewhere between 20 and 30 years of age wave at a Nash Rambler station wagon, light colord, as it pulled out and was ready to leave from Elm and Houston. This station wagon pulled out real fast in front of the Cadillac driven by his boss and his employer had to stop abruptly and nearly hit this Nash Rambler. Cooper could not see who was driving the Nash Rambler and could not furnish any further description of the man who jumped into this car. They drove off at a rather fast rate of speed and went down toward the overpass toward Oak Cliff.
Cooper was following his immediate supervisor Mr. Marvin C. Robinson who was taking his Cadillac home to Oak Cliff. Cooper was then to pick up Robinson and they were to go back to their employment in Garland in his car. He advised that Marvin C. Robinson resides on Marsalis Street in Dallas and that the house is five doors off Loop 12 but he does not have the exact residence.
Cooper and Robinson are both employed at Ling Temco Vought at Garland, Texas. He stated that Robinson would either be at home today or might be on duty at the Naval Air Station at Grand Prairie. He believed that Robinson could give further information about the Rambler station wagon, also the driver and the rider.
Marvin Robinson is long known to have filed a report supporting Deputy Craig's story. Robinson's FBI statement (CD 5, p. 70, though not published in the WC material; see also HSCA vol. 12, p. 18) says:
MARVIN C. ROBINSON, 5120 South Marsalis Avenue, telephone number FRanklin 4-5834, advised that approximately between 12:30 and 1:00p.m. on the afternoon of November 22, 1963, while travelling west on Elm Street he crossed the intersection of Elm and Houston Streets shortly after the assassination of President KENNEDY. ROBINSON stated that after he had crossed Houston Street and was in front of the Texas School Book Depository building a light colored Nash stationwagon suddenly appeared before him. He stated this vehicle stopped and a white male came down the grass covered incline between the building and the street and entered the stationwagon after which it drove away in the direction of the Oak Cliff section of Dallas. ROBINSON stated he does not recall the license number on the stationwagon or whether or not it bore a Texas license plate.
He stated further that he did not pay particular attention to the individual who entered the stationwagon and would be unable to identify him.
ROBINSON was unable to furnish any pertinent information concerning the assassination of President KENNEDY.
Roger Craig told the Warren Commission he saw a man he identified as Oswald flee Dealey Plaza in a Nash Rambler station wagon driven by a second man, ten to fifteen minutes after Kennedy's murder.
Just who was driving this vehicle, and who owned it, could go a long way toward explaining what really happened to President Kennedy. See the article, Possible Discovery of an Automobile Used in the JFK Conspiracy, by Richard Bartholomew, in this issue of Fair Play.
Craig's assertions appear in three different documents published in the Warren Commission volumes, two of them dated 11-23-63 and the third dated 11-25-63. Each specifically mentions a Rambler, although his published testimony before the Commission, taken April 1, 1964, does not. Craig said his references to a Rambler were changed to "station wagon."
Officially, Oswald fled the area minutes after the slaying by foot, bus, and finally taxicab, which took him to within blocks of his Oak Cliff rooming house. The Commission states on page 160 of its Report that it "could not accept important elements of Craig's testimony," and that while Craig may have seen someone fleeing, "this man was not Lee Harvey Oswald."
Craig has been a favorite target of Warren Commission apologists, in spite of a growing body of evidence he was telling the truth. He was fired by the Dallas County Sheriff's office in 1967, and committed suicide in 1975 at the age of 39.
The Roy Cooper in these FBI documents is not to be confused with the former KTVH cameraman of the same name. Cooper the cameraman rescued outtakes of assassination coverage from the wastebasket. This footage was largely unknown until the spring of 1996.

#6 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:59 AM

I dunno, Lee....the FBI even came up with pictures of the bus the WC claimed Oswald briefly rode. This visual prop would have influenced a jury, if a jury had ever been presented with the evidence the government represented was against Oswald.

The guy, Stuart L. Reed, who was supposed to have taken the bus photos in real time, also was presented as having photographed the sixth floor window and Oswald in handcuffs, leaving the Texas Theater.

Reed was an executive, government employee in charge of the Panama Canal operating company civilian employees under the auspices of the U.S. Army. He had only time to seemingly be everywhere at once, taking all the right photos, dropping them off at the developer lab, before he had to scoot onto a slow boat to the Canal Zone, out of New Orleans.

All he had time to do before his boat sailed was to sign a slip authorizing the FBI to pick up his developed photo slides at the Dallas developer. Seems like a rock solid chain of evidence, to me...NOT!!!! Did Reed or any single person snap the shutter on all three of those areas of interest, the bus, the sixth floor window, the arrest scene? We have no way of knowing. There is no testimony from Reed authenticating the photos, or from the lab that developed the slide images. As presented by the FBI, Reed never saw the developed slide images, and then he dropped out of sight. The FBI claimed a government executive (Reed) answering to the military took the photos, and that declaration completely satisfied the WC.













t

#7 J. Raymond Carroll

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 03:18 AM

McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus.


Thank you Lee, you have given us the entire play, except you left out the Prince of Denmark!

Lee Oswald also said that he was on a bus, and he said that he had the transfer in his pocket when arrested. Or so say Hosty, Kelley & Bookhout.

So Bledsoe is merely a corroborative witness. The primary witness is Lee Oswald himself.

#8 Dean Hagerman

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 05:11 AM

Very nice research Lee

Great job

#9 William Kelly

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 05:18 AM


McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus.


Thank you Lee, you have given us the entire play, except you left out the Prince of Denmark!

Lee Oswald also said that he was on a bus, and he said that he had the transfer in his pocket when arrested. Or so say Hosty, Kelley & Bookhout.

So Bledsoe is merely a corroborative witness. The primary witness is Lee Oswald himself.


And if neither Bledsoe nor Oswald were on the bus, how did she know he had a tear in the elbo of his shirt, where there just happens to be a tattered rip?

#10 Robert Morrow

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    ALSO ===>

    I would bet my house, my car, and my bank account that the Clintons & Buddy Young sent 3 Arkansas state trooper goons to beat the living hell out of and nearly murder Gary Johnson (the lawyer for Larry Nichols & neighbor of Gennifer Flowers) on June 26, 1992. They did this because Gary Johnson had security camera videotapes of Bill Clinton often entering Gennifer's condo. The Clintons were denying the Bill/Gennifer affair at that time. The Clinton thugs then stole the tapes. Watch the "New Clinton Chronicles" and go to minute 48 for the Gary Johnson interview.

Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:31 PM

I don't know. With my limited knowledge in this area, I tend to think Oswald was on both the bus and the cab. Call me undecided on this one.

If Oswald got dropped off 4 blocks from where he lived, that would make sense for US intelligence agent Oswald who was living under an assumed named at his boarding house. Oswald would not want for folks to know where he lived.

As for Roger Craig, I think he is a very honest man and I believe him 100% about a Mauser being found. But as for Oswald running down the grass and being picked up in a car, perhaps Craig could be honestly mistaken on this one. Lots of young men at that time looked like Oswald - a very average looking guy.

In any event, no matter what transporation Oswald took, he was back at the boarding house on North Beckley at exactly 1PM. Am I correct on that point? Please correct me if I am not.

And if Oswald leaves his boarding house at 1:03 PM... then there is no way in hell he gets to 10th and Patton at 1:08 - 1:09 when the Tippit shooting occurred at the latest, even if he is walking at an extremely fast pace. I personally did the power walk at 11:05 seconds and a 2nd time at a blistering walk of 10 minutes 25 seconds, cutting corners, practically walking through traffic, etc.

#11 Lee Farley

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 07:31 PM


McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus.


Thank you Lee, you have given us the entire play, except you left out the Prince of Denmark!

Lee Oswald also said that he was on a bus, and he said that he had the transfer in his pocket when arrested. Or so say Hosty, Kelley & Bookhout.

So Bledsoe is merely a corroborative witness. The primary witness is Lee Oswald himself.


You're right, Ray. It is alleged that Lee did claim he was on "a" bus. If we are to believe the notes and reports, and I'm sure I don't have to go through all the problems with them, but if we do put faith in them being completely accurate then Lee Oswald originally claimed he took a bus "all the way home." This would be the Beckley bus. The Beckley bus left the transfer point on St Paul and Elm at 12:36pm. The same time as the "Marsalis-Munger" bus. It makes no sense for Oswald to get on a bus that took him 9 blocks away from where he lived when a bus that did take him all the way home was right behind the one he allegedly got on. It also makes no sense that he would acquire a transfer when the timings suggest that he then allegedly went directly to get a cab. I don't believe it. Either the cab or the bus. Do you really believe if it was Oswald who got on the bus at Griffin Street he did so because he thought the traffic jam would soon start moving? I know he didn't shoot the President but he must have known it had happened. Do you believe Lee Oswald was an idiot like the confirmed lone-assassin theorists?

If you want to put faith in Hosty, Fritz, Kelley and Bookhout then I don't particulary have any issue with that. I'm trying to piece this together using a different route and that is by discarding the "notes" because I have a real problem with them on many different levels.

The truth of the matter is this; we don't truly know what Oswald said or didn't say. Remember, Ray, that according to the notes and the reports made by Hosty and Fritz from the first interrogation, Oswald admitted to entering the Texas Theater with his "pistol." I really don't believe he had a pistol and there's certainly no mention of this in Jim Bookhout's original report that he submitted concerning that first interrogation. This then changed in his second report he submitted.

Oswald admitting he had the transfer was Oswald, quite conveniently, throwing the DPD a lifeline. Unfortunately for the story, Oswald didn't admit to having the transfer until day 2 at 10:30am. The DPD supposedly had this in their possession from 4pm onwards on day 1. Oswald, if the story is true, knew they'd taken it from him. Yet he doesn't admit to it or even change his story about going all the way home until the next day. In fact he is not even asked about it. The reason he changes his story is because Fritz knows about William Whaley during the 10:30am interrogation the next day. Yet Whaley isn't known about, officially, until Montgomery and Johnson got to the Oak Cliff Cab Company and were informed of Whaley by the Company Supervisor.

Likewise, he threw them a lifeline by also admitting to the taxi.

I'm sorry, Ray. The whole affair makes no sense to me. Will Fritz discarded Roger Craig's observations very quickly, even though they were backed up (or would have been backed up if pursued) by a number of people. Craig's credibility took a nose dive later in his career and life, but on the day I believe his observations are above reproach. Especially since they're corroborated. I'll take Craig over Bledsoe any day of the week. The problems with her story I have already identified in the topic's first post.

P.S. You do know Jack Ruby was arrested twice for carrying a "concealed" weapon, don't you? I believe it was brought up in Henry Wade's testimony to the Warren Commission.

Edited by Lee Farley, 19 January 2011 - 09:42 PM.


#12 Lee Farley

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 07:41 PM



McWatters, whatever way you look at it, lied under oath. Same with Mary Bledsoe. Without their testimony you cannot prove Oswald was on the bus.


Thank you Lee, you have given us the entire play, except you left out the Prince of Denmark!

Lee Oswald also said that he was on a bus, and he said that he had the transfer in his pocket when arrested. Or so say Hosty, Kelley & Bookhout.

So Bledsoe is merely a corroborative witness. The primary witness is Lee Oswald himself.


And if neither Bledsoe nor Oswald were on the bus, how did she know he had a tear in the elbo of his shirt, where there just happens to be a tattered rip?


Who knows, Bill? But we can't get around the fact that McWatters doesn't remember this woman even though she inserted herself quite memorably into the story concerning the lady with the suitcase. Likewise, Roy Jones doesn't remember her and he places a different woman in the seat that Bledsoe says she was sat in.

Do we believe all the buttons were "torn" off the shirt when she saw him wearing it on the bus as well?

Edited by Lee Farley, 19 January 2011 - 09:00 PM.


#13 Lee Farley

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 09:19 PM

I don't know. With my limited knowledge in this area, I tend to think Oswald was on both the bus and the cab. Call me undecided on this one.

If Oswald got dropped off 4 blocks from where he lived, that would make sense for US intelligence agent Oswald who was living under an assumed named at his boarding house. Oswald would not want for folks to know where he lived.

As for Roger Craig, I think he is a very honest man and I believe him 100% about a Mauser being found. But as for Oswald running down the grass and being picked up in a car, perhaps Craig could be honestly mistaken on this one. Lots of young men at that time looked like Oswald - a very average looking guy.

In any event, no matter what transporation Oswald took, he was back at the boarding house on North Beckley at exactly 1PM. Am I correct on that point? Please correct me if I am not.

And if Oswald leaves his boarding house at 1:03 PM... then there is no way in hell he gets to 10th and Patton at 1:08 - 1:09 when the Tippit shooting occurred at the latest, even if he is walking at an extremely fast pace. I personally did the power walk at 11:05 seconds and a 2nd time at a blistering walk of 10 minutes 25 seconds, cutting corners, practically walking through traffic, etc.


Robert,

It wasn't just Roger Craig that saw this event with the Oswald "lookalike" getting into the car. It's corroborated by several other witnesses.

Earlene Roberts was blind in one eye and could easily have been fooled by someone who maybe looked like Oswald entering his rooming house. They simply went in very quickly and left very quickly. Butch Burroughs stated Oswald was in the movie house prior to 1:07pm.

We are told Oswald claimed he went home to get changed. But we are told he didn't change. We are told he put on a jacket but he was arrested without one and there's no evidence the one they found actually belonged to him. In actual fact Oswald left behind a jacket in the TSBD, or so we are told, that wasn't found for nearly a week. We are also told that he picked up his revolver but there are so many problems with that particular issue it's best to refer to Jim DiEugenio's can of whoop-ass that he unleashed on David Von Pein.

Personally I believe Oswald possibly went straight to the Theater. I don't believe he changed clothes, I don't believe he was wearing a jacket and I don't believe he owned a pistol. If those three things are true then he had no need to go back to 1026 North Beckley. IMO

#14 Lee Farley

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 09:27 PM

I dunno, Lee....the FBI even came up with pictures of the bus the WC claimed Oswald briefly rode. This visual prop would have influenced a jury, if a jury had ever been presented with the evidence the government represented was against Oswald.

The guy, Stuart L. Reed, who was supposed to have taken the bus photos in real time, also was presented as having photographed the sixth floor window and Oswald in handcuffs, leaving the Texas Theater.

Reed was an executive, government employee in charge of the Panama Canal operating company civilian employees under the auspices of the U.S. Army. He had only time to seemingly be everywhere at once, taking all the right photos, dropping them off at the developer lab, before he had to scoot onto a slow boat to the Canal Zone, out of New Orleans.

All he had time to do before his boat sailed was to sign a slip authorizing the FBI to pick up his developed photo slides at the Dallas developer. Seems like a rock solid chain of evidence, to me...NOT!!!! Did Reed or any single person snap the shutter on all three of those areas of interest, the bus, the sixth floor window, the arrest scene? We have no way of knowing. There is no testimony from Reed authenticating the photos, or from the lab that developed the slide images. As presented by the FBI, Reed never saw the developed slide images, and then he dropped out of sight. The FBI claimed a government executive (Reed) answering to the military took the photos, and that declaration completely satisfied the WC.

t


Hi Tom

Are you saying that Reed took photos of McWatters bus "real time" when it was stuck on Elm Street?

Lee

#15 Robert Charles-Dunne

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 11:56 PM

Hi Tom

Are you saying that Reed took photos of McWatters bus "real time" when it was stuck on Elm Street?

Lee


At the risk of tooting my own horn, please see post #11 in this thread:

http://educationforu...?showtopic=7809




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