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Mary Pinchot Meyer


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#136 John Simkin

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 05:23 PM

This thread began on 23rd March 2005. It is interesting to observe the role that the Forum played in acquiring information about Mary Pinchot Meyer. It is also good to see that there was a time when Forum members worked together on subjects rather than using it as an opportunity to have a go at each other.

It is also interesting to see that Peter Janney's original idea was to write a film script on the case. He now hopes a film company will adapt the book. I see Oliver Stone has praised the book. Maybe he will do it with George Clooney playing JFK.

#137 Michael Hogan

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 07:33 PM

This thread began on 23rd March 2005. It is interesting to observe the role that the Forum played in acquiring information about Mary Pinchot Meyer. It is also good to see that there was a time when Forum members worked together on subjects rather than using it as an opportunity to have a go at each other.


The discussion was predominantly between you, Lee Forman and James Richards. No wonder things were constructive. The three of you have moved on from active participation here.

Others that had one or two posts:

Roger Fong - inactive

Shanet Clark - inactive

Gerry Hemming - deceased

Pat Speer - still active, thankfully

Tim Gratz - lost posting privileges

Peter Janney - working on book

Larry Hancock - other projects but still active, thankfully

Jefferson Morley - other projects

Dawn Meredith - posts too infrequently

Dixie Dea - deceased

Nina Burleigh - other projects

Robert Howard - still fairly active, thankfully


Quite an impressive list. This was before the moderation system was implemented here. Looking at the above members, there was no need for such a system. I suppose times have changed.

#138 John Simkin

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:30 AM

Tim Gratz - lost posting privileges

Quite an impressive list. This was before the moderation system was implemented here. Looking at the above members, there was no need for such a system. I suppose times have changed.


Tim was only put on temporary moderation (he threatened legal action against me). He decided not to return after moderation (I suspect this was because of other reasons.)

You are right that moderation does mean that some people will not post. But, I know from people that contact me privately, that even a larger number do not post because the moderation is not strong enough. I am afraid that this forum would have been closed down long ago if we had not employed moderation.

Why don't you become a moderator Michael? It will give you a good insight into the problems we face trying to run the forum.

#139 John Simkin

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 07:04 AM

This book is really starting to move. It is now around 2,000 in kindle sales, 1,000 in hardcover after being out for one day with zero media and zero adds. That is momentum. The material on Ben Bradlee could really shake trees, IMO.


That's good news. I would have thought the media would have been interested in the subject matter of the book.

#140 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 04:32 PM

This thread began on 23rd March 2005. It is interesting to observe the role that the Forum played in acquiring information about Mary Pinchot Meyer. It is also good to see that there was a time when Forum members worked together on subjects rather than using it as an opportunity to have a go at each other.

It is also interesting to see that Peter Janney's original idea was to write a film script on the case. He now hopes a film company will adapt the book. I see Oliver Stone has praised the book. Maybe he will do it with George Clooney playing JFK.

Ahhh...for the good old days! I submit nothing has changed in eight years. This is a busier forum and there are more posters today doing this:

Very very sloppy journalism, John Simkin. You post THREE LIES, without even checking with me , while you know I am representing the accuracy of James Files.

The three lies are: .....



....and more posters doing this....more than ever....:

Jack Anderson had a story about June Cobb in Parade magazine supplement in August 1962.



OF THAT STRANGE, wild breed of American adventurers who pursue danger and intrigue around the world, none appears less suited for the role than June Cobb,...


(quote name='Jim Root' date='04 April 2012 - 05:40 PM' timestamp='1333557602' post='250031')
...
1). No Dallas police officier or record from that night suggests that this is true. We only have Walker's unsubstantiated statements both verbal or printed made after the death of Kennedy.

2).Walker then contradicts himself when he suggests that there was "two men" which if you read the police reports and listen to the news broadcasts of the time was the information that the police were acting upon. Why would Walker contridict himself in this letter, one man arrested vs two seen?

3). Walker asks if the CIA was involved in the assassination attempt. Did he have reason to believe that the CIA may have been involved? I ask this question because I believe he knew Oswald was an intelligence asset and had been tasked with assisiting Oswald to enter the Soviet Union as GPH suggests.
(/quote)
Jim, you're right that no police record suggests this. I personnally believe Walker is lying, either in his conscious mind or in his unconscious mind. (For decades General Walker blamed Jesse Curry for covering up the fact, as shown in his writings.) ....


(quote name='Tom Hume' date='28 March 2012 - 05:56 PM' timestamp='1332975401' post='249528')
Thank you Michael, I didn’t know any of this. I had it in my mind that Fred had passed on, but now that you've jogged my memory, I think Tyler may have said his father was in a retirement community out West here someplace. And yes, I was planning to contact Tyler. The last I heard, Bill Kelly had been in touch with Tyler about the photos and other matters, and there was talk of a DVD, not a book. Michael, are you suggesting that I try contacting Fred Newcomb directly?

Perhaps I should also ask this: Does anyone personally know either Fred or Tyler Newcomb and be willing to try to get good copies of the two photos under discussion, the package and the label?

Tom
(/quote)


John, I know I feel discouraged from time to time, it is to be expected, but consider whether you can afford the luxury of posting in a resigned manner. If you won't be the most energetic booster of this forum and of the fine collaborations and contributions many of us are engaged in here, then who do you expect, will be?

An unintended result may be finding encouragement in most unlikely places, instead of finding it here.

Why not leave it to the kibbitzers on the sidelines to run us down, rather than doing it to ourselves?

https://deeppolitics...52309#post52309
03-29-2012 04:01 PM #34
Keith Millea


Don Jefferies is obviously a person with a giant heart.I have great respect for people like him,but hell man,big hearts get smashed in this political cyber war!Tom Skully took a big chance and actually tried to clean up the scuz over at your forum.Where were you and the other mods Don?Nobody came to give Tom any backing what-so-ever.Now,it looks like he is giving up.Well,just let the scuz flow and remember to take a shower everyday.Everything is good....

Edited by Tom Scully, 06 April 2012 - 04:47 PM.


#141 John Dolva

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 04:46 PM

{couldn't quote because of quote # restrictions]

Good point.

This reply is just to make a note of The Ides of March'', Unusual, With Clooney,, at times, coming off as a JFK figure

#142 John Simkin

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:28 PM

Peter Janney's book is reviewed in The Huffington Post today. One again a review is used to attack "conspiracy theorists".

It ends:

Like all great conspiracy theories, Janney's account requires readers to make a certain leap of faith. There is no direct evidence of illegal drug use by Kennedy, yet Janney spends a significant portion of the book exploring possible scenarios and it's clear he thinks hallucinogens had an effect upon Kennedy's outlook. There is equally little evidence that Ben Bradlee did anything wrong, other than perhaps misremembering the exact sequence of events that happened almost 40 years ago. Moreover, key characters have never been located, including Janney's suspected triggerman, Mitchell.

Therein lies the problem. Janney's account leaves ample suspicion, even doubt, about the events surrounding the deaths of both Kennedy and Meyer. But all too often, Janney fills in blanks with conclusions that forward his preconceived narrative.


"Mary's Mosaic" is an entertaining trip through the dark possibilities of Washington's covert history. Janney's research gives enthusiasts of Kennedy lore, along with fans of Cold War spy tales, much to consider. But despite his unified theory of how it all went down, Janney's book is unlikely to put lingering questions about Meyer's death to rest.

http://www.huffingto...ref=mostpopular

#143 Douglas Caddy

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:44 PM

Mary's Mosaic: Prologue

by Peter Janney

www.lewrockwell.com

May 4, 2012






This is the prologue to Mary's Mosaic: The CIA Conspiracy To Murder John F. Kennedy, Mary Pinchot Meyer, and Their Vision for World Peace. Copyright 2012 by Peter Janney. Reprint permission courtesy of the author. Published by Skyhorse Publishing.

“He was perfect for the CIA. He never felt guilt about anything.”
~ St. John Hunt, reflecting on the life of his father, E. Howard Hunt[1]

Thanksgiving vacation in the fall of 1964 offered a welcome respite from the rigors of boarding school life in New Hampshire.[2] At seventeen, I was full of both testosterone and a lust for freedom that didn’t find much outlet at a New England prep school. I was a “lifer,” as we used to say. I had arrived in the ninth grade, or what was commonly known in the English boarding- school system as “the third form.” I would stay until the end and graduate, but that fall, in my fifth- form junior year, I felt engaged in a Sisyphean struggle to break free: five days off – this year with a driver’s license! – followed by another long slog up the hill. It was 1964. Just a year and half more of this, I kept telling myself, and I’d be out of what seemed like jail. Adolescence, with all of its possibilities, sometimes felt like prison. Dreams and a rich fantasy life were often the only escape.
As the plane began its final approach into Washington’s National Airport, I picked out a number of familiar places stretched out below, including my old alma mater, Georgetown Day School (GDS), the sight of which stirred a flood of memories from my childhood. Something had been lost while I was a student there; and, nearly a decade later, emotional scar tissue still lingered. My best friend and classmate, Michael Pinchot Meyer, had been killed when we were both just nine years old. It had been my first experience with death – losing someone I had been deeply fond of. I didn’t want to think about it.
I consoled myself instead with the promise of freedom that lay before me. It was the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. My father would still be at work when I got home, but my mother and my younger brother would likely be around. I would have most of the afternoon to cruise about town with old friends – certainly enough time to sneak a beer or two and a few cigarettes.
My family’s home was a modern architectural marvel for its time. A long, split-level structure, spacious and light-filled, with large picture windows in most rooms, the house was nestled in one of the last enclaves of Washington’s woods, sheltered from the cacophony of distant traffic. At dinner that evening, I looked out from the split-level dining room through the living room’s floor-to-ceiling windows. Beyond the verdant lawn was the concrete swimming pool, half-drained and dotted with logs to prevent winter ice from cracking its walls. I took my usual place at the table facing my brother, Christopher, with my mother to my left and my father to my right. On the wall behind my mother, an original black-and-white Morris Rosenfeld photograph, Spinnakers Flying, announced the family passion – sailing. My parents had met during summers spent on Cape Cod, and they had imparted their love of navigating the open sea to my brother and me. By the age of seventeen, I had already spent long stretches offshore in the Atlantic racing to Bermuda, and from Annapolis to Newport, Rhode Island.

During dinner that evening, my father mentioned that it was not too early to think about racing our sailboat from Annapolis to Newport again in the coming year. Sailing was a rite of passage for me, and I looked forward to continuing to master its intricacies under my father’s guidance. The previous summer had already extended my knowledge and experience with a small group trip down the Dalmatian coast from Venice to Athens on a seventy-seven-foot Rhodes ketch. Its colorful skipper, a gallant, distinguished former World War II Marine combat captain named Horace (“Hod”) Fuller, had been a delightful legend to sail with. An accomplished sailor, he sometimes kindly took me aside for tutorials on some of the idiosyncrasies of sailing in the Adriatic Sea.
There were, however, a couple of instances during the trip that disturbed me. Late one night, I had awakened to the sound of Hod Fuller having what sounded like combat nightmares from his World War II experiences. No one else in our group wanted to acknowledge it. Years later, my father, a career CIA senior official, having had his usual “generous” intake of alcohol one evening, remarked that “Hod Fuller was one of the best damn assassins we ever had. . . .” A bit stunned, I curiously inquired as to how he went about his assignments. In at least one instance, my father said, Hod had taken his victim out in a rowboat and shot him in the back of the head and then dumped him overboard.
But on the evening before Thanksgiving, diving into a sumptuous meal of veal scaloppini, I was happily anticipating the short recess that lay before me, and dreaming about being on the ocean again, a place where my freedom flourished. It was comforting to be home, to have a reprieve from academic pressures and boarding-school life, and to be with my family. Amid the challenges and turbulence of adolescence, hearth and home was still a place I could count on. It wouldn’t last much longer, I soon discovered. I wasn’t at all prepared when the conversation took a sudden turn.
“Mary Meyer died earlier this fall,” my mother said, looking at me. I reached for my water.
“What do you mean?” I asked. Her words bludgeoned me.
“She was murdered while walking on the canal towpath,” my mother explained. “They caught the guy who did it. She was taking one of her usual walks during the day. It was a sexual assault.”
Reeling, I tried to make sense of what she was saying. “How was she killed?” I asked, trying to orient myself over the eruption of pounding in my chest.
“She was shot. It’s very sad for all of us.”
I pressed her for more details but absorbed little. Numbness and shock were setting in. I remember my mother mentioning Mary’s funeral, and then something about how my father and another man had gone to the airport to meet Cord Meyer, who had been away on the day of his ex-wife’s murder. My mother was doing all the talking; my father didn’t say anything. He just sat there, staring vacantly off into space. There was something almost eerie about his silence.
My stomach was in knots. Was it only confusion, or was it fear? After a while, I excused myself from the table, saying that I had plans to go out for the evening. In fact, my only impulse was to go to my room and curl up in my bed. That night, I was in and out of sleep. I wanted to cry, but couldn’t. Memories crashed through my mind like a hurricane’s pounding surf. Seeing Georgetown Day School from the plane earlier in the day had already stirred something in me, and now there was no escape.
I had known the Meyer family since 1952, when I was five years old. My mother, Mary Draper, and Mary Pinchot had been classmates in Vassar College’s class of 1942. My father, Wistar Janney, had met Cord Meyer after World War II, and they now worked together at the CIA. Our families were socially entwined – we went camping together, played touch football, visited each other’s homes frequently. The Meyers had three children: Quentin, Michael, and Mark. Michael and I had been born less than one month apart, and Quentin – or “Quenty,” as we called him – was a year and a half older. Mark and my brother, Christopher, were the same age, about two years younger than Michael and I. By the time Michael and I were seven, we were best friends, and often inseparable. We shared a number of bonds, especially baseball and fishing. We had been in the same class at Georgetown Day School for three years, our desks side by side for two of them.
As I lay crawled up in a fetal position that night, the shock of Mary Meyer’s murder brought back a flood of memories of being at Michael’s house in McLean, Virginia, just a few miles from my own house. One sunny spring day, we had been hunting for copperheads in the backyard forest behind the Meyer house. Brandishing knives like the “young bucks” we thought we were, Michael pulled a long stick out of a hole we’d been investigating. Suddenly, a snapping snake came out right behind it, narrowly missing his face. We pulled back, both screaming, and ran as fast as we could. We finally stopped, both of us shaking with an adrenalin rush and laughing uncontrollably. Regaining a bit of composure, we realized that both of us, out of fear and excitement, had urinated in our pants. Humiliated, a bit defeated, but still giddy from the adventure, we returned to the house. Michael’s mother, Mary, was painting in a small studio just off the patio.
“Mom, a copperhead almost bit me!” Michael announced.
Mary Pinchot Meyer looked up from her canvas. Even then, I distinctly remember feeling that there was something unique about Michael’s mother, beyond her glistening, radiant beauty. She was so unlike any other adult in my world at that time. Calm and still, at peace with herself, she had a presence and demeanor that struck me. Less than a year before, Michael and I had been playing baseball in front of their house when Michael sent one of my pitches zooming off his bat and over the house. I ran around to the back in search of the ball and came upon Mary reading on a blanket. She lay completely naked, her backside to the sun. I was breathless. She hadn’t heard me coming, and I stood there for what seemed to me a very long time, gawking. At the time, I had no words for the vision that I beheld, but I knew that beauty such as hers was something I longed to know better. When Mary finally looked up and saw me, she wasn’t embarrassed or upset, or even startled. She just smiled, letting me know that it was okay; no sin had been committed. I found the ball, ran back to play with Mikey, and felt somehow irrevocably altered, even blessed. But it wasn’t anything I could describe at the time.
I had a similar feeling about Mary the day of the copperhead hunt. Mary’s outer beauty seemed to be a manifestation of her inner freedom and peace. Whatever it was, it made me feel safe, and free. I remember her smiling at us in a prideful way. Here we were – dirty, sweaty, and soaked in piss, to boot – and Mary responded by being tender. She had guessed what must have happened and, laughing, directed us to the laundry room. We slipped out of our soiled clothes, put them in the washing machine, and put on the clean underwear that Mary had given us, along with a pile of clean clothes to wear.
“You two look like little Indians,” she said teasingly. “Where’s your war paint?”
I remembered how Michael’s eyes had lit up with excitement.
“Mom, paint an arrowhead on my face!” he blurted out.
“Go get the watercolors I gave you and I will!” she said.
We stood in our underwear on the patio under a warm spring sun. Mary made intricate designs that we took to be tribal symbols on our faces and arms while we began emitting loud Indian war cries. While Mary was painting my face, Michael went in search of two Indian headdresses.
Almost immediately, our exuberance erupted. Michael and I made guttural noises, each trying to outdo the other. War paint in place, we danced as we had seen Indians do on television. Flapping our hands over our mouths like trumpeters with plunger mutes, we shrieked louder and louder, jerking our bodies in wild leaps across the room. We strapped our knife sheaths onto makeshift belts, donned the headdresses, and descended into a kind of primal expression of childhood glee and human joy, running barefoot in circles. It was as if Mary’s brushstrokes of “war paint” had transported us into a primal place of wildness that demanded a surrender to the life force itself. In a sudden, simultaneous move that was pure, unbridled innocence, we stepped out of our underwear. Naked now, our playing became even more frenzied. We ran through the woods toward a small barn, chased each other around a riding circle, and back to the patio, waving our knives in flagrant violation of every childhood safety rule known to man. As our excitement subsided, we dropped to the floor, laughing and exhausted from the thrill of what we had just experienced. Peace and serenity returned, but eventually I became self-conscious. Where were my pants? Shouldn’t I have something on? Once again, Mary’s tender gaze delivered me from any embarrassment.
“Mom, do we have anything to eat? I’m hungry!” asked Michael. We were putting on the clothes that Mary had given us, while Mary directed us to cookies and lemonade in the fridge. It seemed like an eternity had passed. A bit disoriented, I was calm – yet also exhilarated by the sense of an unknown powerful life force that had just moved through me. Mary’s quietly spirited presence had made it all possible. It was as if she had extended her freedom to me, giving me permission that day to explore and experience my own boyhood wildness like no other adult ever had.
Mary’s persona contrasted sharply with that of Michael’s father, Cord Meyer. Insensitive and dismissive, Cord was arrogantly patronizing and never fun to be around. One day Michael and I went fishing on the Potomac River with Cord and his CIA friend and colleague Jim Angleton, who was also godfather to the three Meyer boys. I always found myself completely inhibited around Cord. Michael and I took turns climbing out onto a set of rocks that jutted out from the shoreline. There, we snagged herring by casting into a huge school of passing fish with a three-pronged snag hook. Cord’s demeanor that day had been as intimidating as it was uncomfortable. He and Angleton spent most of the time criticizing our techniques. Already self-conscious, I had to watch my every move lest I provoke one of Cord’s or Angleton’s withering stares. Truth be told, I never liked Cord. Michael feared his father, inasmuch as telling me so. His dread of his father was such a contrast to the connection he had with his mother.
Sleep, if it came at all that dreadful night before Thanksgiving, was fitful as I wrestled with Mary Meyer’s death. Ominously, one horrid thought was the realization that Quenty and Mark would now have only Cord, their aloof father. In my agitation, I continually tossed and repositioned myself, hugging a second pillow for comfort. At one point I woke up; it was still dark outside. I was soaked in moisture, then realizing that in my sleep, I had been crying for my lost childhood friend Michael, and the memory of what had occurred on December 18, 1956.
Just before Christmas vacation began, our school’s holiday festivities took place – a Nativity play, Christmas caroling in the Georgetown Day School assembly, and painting ornaments in the school’s art studio where Mary Meyer and Ken Noland sometimes taught together. The Meyer family didn’t have television in the mid-1950s – only because Mary was against it. Her prescience regarding the docile passivity that television engendered was remarkable. But it didn’t keep the two older Meyer boys – Quenty and Michael – from stealing away to a friend’s house to engage the technological marvel. The way home to the Meyer farmhouse required crossing a busy thoroughfare known as Route 123. Two years earlier, the family’s beloved golden retriever had been hit by a car and killed crossing that roadway. The two boys were on their way home, rushing to be on time for dinner. In the waning winter solstice light of Tuesday’s evening rush hour, some cars had not yet turned on their headlights. The agile Quenty made his way across first, dodging cars as he ran from one side to the other. His younger brother wasn’t so lucky. Michael was struck by an oncoming car and killed.
The next day, after returning home early from work, my father and mother summoned me from my bedroom, where I had been playing. I joined them in the living room, taking a chair opposite the fireplace. My mother sat on the sofa and my father reclined into his favorite orange Eero Saarinen Womb chair, his legs stretched out on the ottoman before him. He was sipping his usual first martini of the evening. Our house was resplendent with FAO Schwarz Christmas pageantry – holly, mistletoe, a towering spruce pine that twinkled with lights and ornaments, with colorfully wrapped gifts everywhere. It was an idyllic scene, but I sat with the unease of one who hears his name called and wonders what he’s done wrong. I was braced for some kind of reprimand, but not for what came next.
“We have something to tell you,” my mother said, looking in my direction without making eye contact. “Mikey Meyer was hit by a car yesterday. He was killed.”
Her words rocked me to the core. The disturbance was cellular. The hollow silence of loss opened into my world. I couldn’t contain it.
“That’s not true! Tell me it’s not true!” I shouted, before collapsing into tears.
“It’s true,” she said, trying to remain calm. I turned toward my father as though he might have a different version of the story to offer.
“Daddy, tell me it’s not true, please tell me it’s not true!” Hysterical, I threatened to throw a heavy ashtray through the living-room picture window. “Tell me it’s not true, or I’ll break the window!” I screamed.
I don’t remember what came next, but I eventually found myself in my father’s arms with my head against his chest. Feeling the thumping of his heart against my head helped calm my sobs. I remembered looking up at his face. For the first time in my life, I saw my father cry.
Later that evening, I overheard my parents talking about going to visit Cord and Mary after I went to bed. I insisted – demanded – that they take me with them. I didn’t know why it was so imperative that I accompany them. After some resistance, they relented. During the fifteen-minute drive to Michael’s house, darkness enshrouded everything, overtaking me. There was no moon or stars in the sky that night. Everything and everywhere was dark.
We entered the front door and walked down an unlit hallway into the Meyers’ living room, where their own postcard-perfect holiday scene – the tree, the wrapped presents – seemed out of place. As my mother embraced Mary, I felt this house, so familiar just days before, was now alien to me. In spite of – or, perhaps, because of – the joy I had once felt in that house, it was almost unbearable to be there now. No longer would it be Michael’s house; nothing would ever be the same again. Mikey had left, and a part of me had gone with him. Emptiness now became my new companion.
I was facing Michael’s mother, whose gaze was fixed on me. She looked into my eyes, as she had done so many times before, but this time it was her sadness, not her serenity, that moved me. I was overwhelmed by it and wanted to look away, but she drew me into her arms. In that moment, the child-adult distinction evaporated. We were equals in our grief, connected by the loss of someone we both had deeply loved and cherished. As she cried, I felt no need to recoil in any discomfort. Even as a young insecure boy, I gladly stood to embrace and hold her, as she had done for me so many times before. It was a moment of transcendence at a very tender age – an experience of connection unlike any I had known before. And it would be decades before I understood the deeper gift she had bestowed upon me.
Mary walked me up the stairs to Michael’s bedroom. “I want you to have something of Michael’s to take with you,” she said. “Find something you want, anything. Michael would have wanted that, I know.” She left me alone in his room to contemplate, to face yet another level of the reality of my best friend’s departure. I would never again be in that room with the Michael I had known and loved. Unbearably, I had to begin to face the loss that night.
Michael’s funeral was held several days later in Bethlehem Chapel inside the National Cathedral. I was still perhaps too numb to register details of the service, but I will never forget the sight of Ruth Pinchot, Michael’s maternal grandmother, sobbing on the sidewalk as we left the church. There was something so pure and powerful about her explosion of grief, the kind of public display of emotion that was simply “not done” among her set. But in that moment, Ruth didn’t care what anybody thought, or how she might be perceived. Her honesty and courage were so much like her daughter Mary’s.
Michael’s casket was taken to the Pinchot family’s estate, Grey Towers, in Milford, Pennsylvania, and then laid to rest in the Pinchot family plot in the Milford cemetery. He had always shared with me so much about Grey Towers – its bountiful trout streams, waterfalls, and forests – but it would take me nearly fifty years before I could bring myself to actually visit his grave.
The late 1950s were not an auspicious time to be a grieving nine-year-old. The “in-vogue” thinking at that time was that beyond a certain point, displays of sadness were unbecoming. I was encouraged to accept what had happened and move on. In my attempt to do so, I sometimes stayed overnight with Quenty and Mark at the Meyers’ house, and would wake up crying in the middle of the night. On those occasions, it was always Mary who comforted me. Expressions of sadness were okay with her, even embraced.
Soon, however, everything changed. Quenty revealed that his parents were divorcing, and that everyone was moving to Georgetown. Meanwhile, at my home, my parents were ill-equipped to handle my grief. They sent me to a psychiatrist, who, in true Freudian fashion, kept making a lot of allusions to my penis. During the six years following Michael’s death, I floundered. My self-confidence eroded. Increasingly, I was impulsive, delinquent, and unruly. Unmoored and untethered, I packed on weight as I turned to sugar in an effort to self-medicate. At fifteen, I left home for boarding school in New Hampshire.
The woman who had comforted me in sorrow and reassured me in so many other ways was now gone forever. Like a volcano, the reality of her death had erupted, and reawakened something awful and inescapable. Why had my parents waited until I was home to tell me, I wondered? As I lay in my bed at dawn that Thanksgiving morning in 1964, the apprehension of uneasiness, even dread, engulfed me. There was something foreboding, something terrible – something I couldn’t possibly know or understand at the time. And that feeling would continue to haunt me for more than forty years.
My father knocked on my bedroom door; it was time to get ready to go hunting. As I dressed, I thought back to what a terrible year it had been for Washington – and the nation. President Kennedy had been assassinated the previous November. In my American history course at school that fall, we were discussing something called the Warren Commission and its final report. I remember that our teacher, Mr. Fauver, had said something to the effect of “Gentlemen, this is a shining example of what makes our country so great, our democracy so vibrant, a government for the people, and by the people.” Reminding us that America was a republic, not a totalitarian state, he urged us to reflect on how President Kennedy’s assassination would have been handled in a country that didn’t have a democratically elected government.
Two years later, in 1966, New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison was challenging the entire veracity of the Warren Report as a massive cover-up, implicating the CIA in President Kennedy’s assassination. When I brought this to my father’s attention for discussion, he became apoplectic that I should ever consider such a thing. [3] Sadly, it was the beginning of a never-to-be resolved rupture in our relationship, and a dramatic separation from my family into adulthood. That fall I entered Princeton as an undergraduate. The Vietnam War was approaching its full escalation, and I made it my focus to begin to understand what was taking place. Further enraging both my parents, I became increasingly vociferous about America’s incursion into Southeast Asia, as well as what the CIA, and my father, were actually doing in the world.
Ten years later, in 1976 – twelve years after Mary Meyer’s murder – the National Enquirer broke the story about her relationship with President Kennedy. Awakened, but not yet fully conscious, I began a journey that culminated in this book. Somewhere inside the recesses of my being, I instinctively suspected there was a connection between the assassination of our president, and the slaying – less than a year later – of the woman he had come to trust and love.
Chapter Notes
[1] Erik Hedegaard, “The Last Confessions of E. Howard Hunt,” Rolling Stone, April 5, 2007.
[2] This entire section was based on a collection of notes over a period of nearly twenty years that I began writing in the early 1970s. As a training clinical psychologist, it was part of my orientation to begin an intensive period of personal psychotherapy that lasted a number of years. All of the vivid recollections in this chapter were based on memories that had been elicited, and noted, in various psychotherapeutic encounters.
[3] In the fall of 1966, New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison reopened his investigation into the Kennedy assassination, after having made the mistake of turning over his earlier investigation to the FBI, which did nothing. Within days after Dallas, Garrison had arrested David Ferrie as a possible associate of Lee Harvey Oswald’s. Further convinced that Oswald could never have acted alone, Garrison soon widened his net to include Guy Banister and Clay Shaw.
In March 1967, Garrison arrested Clay Shaw for conspiring to assassinate President Kennedy. Shaw’s trial would not begin until January 1969, but in the spring of 1968, after having been undermined by Life magazine, Garrison visited with Look magazine’s managing editor, William (“Bill”) Attwood, who had been a Princeton classmate of my father’s. Garrison, according to author Joan Mellen, “outlined his investigation through lunch, dinner and into the night.” Attwood became so impressed with what Garrison had discovered that he called his friend Bobby Kennedy “at one in the morning.” Look was prepared to do a major feature story on the Garrison investigation, but Attwood unexpectedly suffered a significant heart attack, and the article never materialized. (See Joan Mellen, A Farewell to Justice (Dulles, Va.: Potomac Books, 2005), p. 259).

May 4, 2012

Peter Janney grew up in Washington, DC, during the 1950s and 1960s. His father was a high-ranking CIA official and a close friend of Richard Helms, James Jesus Angleton, and Mary’s husband, Cord Meyer. His mother and Mary Meyer were classmates at Vassar College.

#144 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 11:18 AM

William Lockwood Mitchell, CIA "assassin" or a vehicle for a now empty plot reduced to what it really is; another smear against the reputation of JFK by an author who could have written about his uncle, Frank Pace, Jr., his first cousin, Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, IV, or about his father, the director of personnel at CIA and about why so many spooks are associated with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, the Woods Hole Museum, and the New England Aquarium.
Optimal Service Rate Selection in Piecewise Linear Markovian ...

books.google.com/.../Optimal_Service_Rate_Selection_in_Piecew.ht...
Optimal Service Rate Selection in Piecewise Linear Markovian Service Systems ... William Lockwood Mitchell ... Dynamic programming and Markov processes ...
Optimal service rate selection in piecewise linear Markovian service

de.scientificcommons.org/4202188 - Germany
Optimal service rate selection in piecewise linear Markovian service systems. (1970). Mitchell, William L. Abstract. Thesis (Ph. D. in Engineering)--University of



I talked to Lisa last night and she said she probably won't reply to Janney's pleas of outrage via the Spanish Inquisition. She said, words to the effect, my approach was cool and analytical, his was almost violently emotional, so what's the point? Obviously, it hit home with him.

Since I was named in the title and am named throughout--even though I wrote not a paragraph of the review--let me reply to a few points of the poor tortured victim of Torquemada/Lisa.

.................

7. We now come to Lt. Mitchell, the CIA hit man that Damore and Janney need so much to create the fantasy of a CIA elimination on the towpath. According to Holmes/Damore and Watson/Janney, Damore wrote a letter to a CIA assassin at a CIA safehouse. Now please sit down before you read what happened next. Sitting down? Good.

The hit man wrote back! Yessiree pardner. Now, in my part two, i will go over just how ridiculous this is. I mean it makes you wonder how much experience the two crack investigators have had with CIA safehouses. Either in person or in reading about them. They are called "safehouses" because they are secure and surveilled and enclosed. The idea that the "hit man" , at a safehouse, would reply to a journalist is so foreign to my experience that its kind of absurd. But this strand of Janney's gets even more nonsensical, and I will deal with it at length n Part 2. And the Fletcher Prouty as backing, is part of it. We wlil then see whose facts are more tenable.

8. He then goes on to try and defend his gallery of rogues who he uses as sources for the book: Damore, Leary, Morrow, Douglas, etc. He knows these guys all have serious problems in credibility. So he tries to innoculate them in advance. To the novice this may seem OK. To the experienced researcher its not. Because he never ever comes completely clean about them--that is to tell you how bad they really are. And in the case of Morrow, he cannot get to the original source anyway. But when you add this crew to Klein, Collier and Horowitz, Priscilla Johnson, Sy Hersh etc, well, that is quite a smelly pile of rubbish if you ask me. But that is what this book is like. And then he screams bloody murder for being criticized. Maybe he expected a Nobel Prize?
..................


This image is from Appendix 3 in Janney's book. Janney refers to it in his description of Damore calling his attorneyJames H Smith in April, 1993, claiming he had "cracked it" by locating Crump trial witness, William L Mitchell. This image is part of one of the six pages of notes Smith is said to have jotted down on his ever present legal pad as Damore related his findings over the telephone.

William L. Mitchell was FBI and an officer in every branch of the military at one time or another, and a father of 5 children.
Janney writes that what is displayed here informs us that Mitchell was 74 years old in April, 1993.:

Posted Image

In addition to the skeptical comments of Jim DiEugenio, please consider that Janney insists he believes the Damore sourced details that led to the discovery of an assassin using the alias William L Mitchell from mid october, 1964 to July 27, 1965, a mystery man who was able to convince police investigators, prosecutors, defense counsel, the trial judge, all 12 jurors, and journalists covering the investigation, arrest, and the trial, that a 2d Lieutenant at the Pentagon, age 45 in fall, 1964, had come forward to volunteer his
testimony. Why, amidst all the other questions arising in this farfetched scenario, would the CIA also offer up a 45 year old to impersonate a junior officer of a rank someone in their 20's would almost always achieve? Janney avoids any reference to witness Mitchell's age, attributing only defense attorney Roundtree's concern that the testimony of the "lean and fit" witness would be convincing.

The core premise of the book is a fairytale. What is real and fascinating is Janney's family background. In 1937, Janney's aunt, his mother's sister, Doris, married: ........

The Autodafé of Lisa Pease and James DiEugenio:


Tomas de Torquemada and the Spanish Inquisition return in a new era of suppression
of freedom of thought and adherence to a rigid dogma – namely their own prejudices!


Lisa Pease’s six-page diatribe against me and my recent book Mary’s Mosaic is, at the very least, a marvel of subjective distortion and shoddy criticism, fueled by her own personal vendetta that someone dared not follow her as she, and her partner James DiEugenio, have attempted over the years to appoint themselves as the ultimate “guardians of truth” in all things Kennedy (see the following: http://www.ctka.net/...9;s_Mosaic.html ).


And as usual, Lisa Pease’s only fallback source in her vain attempts to substantiate anything she writes is James DiEugenio, whom she seems to always regard as unassailable. Together, nothing that these two write can ever be challenged or debated – without one of them launching some kind of personal diatribe against anyone who challenges it, establishing a different opinion. Indeed, during his last appearance on Len Osanic’s Black Ops Radio program (June 28, 2012), DiEugenio gushes over “Lisa Pease’s wonderful – and I really think it’s a really wonderful piece of work . . . because it’s done in her usual very intelligent, very elegant, very incisive kind of a style. And I’m going to be doing Part II to which I am actually working on right now . . .” We wait with bated breadth.

..... Therefore, the “Negro male” spotted by officer Sylvis, who successfully eluded capture by police, couldn’t have been the defendant Ray Crump. This isn’t rocket science, but for the challenged Lisa Pease, it’s too much to tolerate, given her desperation to find some way to discredit me, whereby she finally resorts to attacking my educational credentials.

In addition, Ms. Pease can’t even seem to fathom or consider how “Lt. William L. Mitchell,” a man who told police he was jogging on the towpath when he passed Mary Meyer – allegedly just before the murder took place – told police that a “Negro male” matching Wiggins’ description was following her in an effort to frame Ray Crump. “Mitchell” would then testify against Crump at the murder trial nine months later in July 1965 as part of the CIA’s assassination operation. It doesn’t seem to matter to Pease that “Mitchell” has never been able to be located since the trial, or that his known address during that time was documented as a “CIA safe house” by three separate former CIA employees. At the time of trial in July 1965, Mitchell told a reporter that he had since retired from the military and was now a mathematics instructor at Georgetown University – yet no record of his employment there could ever be located, nor was there ever any bona-fide military service record located for “Mitchell,” either in the Pentagon where he was listed in the directory at the time of the murder, or in the main military data base in St. Louis. This was thoroughly researched by the Peabody Award-winning journalist Roger Charles, as discussed in my book, a fact that Pease fails to mention in one of her many deliberate omissions, which also included Damore’s consultation with L. Fletcher Prouty (as documented by Damore’s attorney James H. Smith) to finally understand who “Mitchell” was, before Damore confronted him. Of course, Lisa Pease is entitled to whatever flawed point of view she wants to embrace, but she’s not entitled to her own set of facts.......

(This article is also posted on Lew Rockwell.com: http://lewrockwell.c...anney3.1.1.html )


The small set of details that demolish the speculation presented by Janney and Dovey Roundtree :

Annual report to the president

books.google.comCornell University. College of Engineering - 1961 - Snippet view
Spring Term only) Mr. William Mitchell (5th yr. B.M.E. Candidate. Fall Term only)
News and Notices - JStor

The Annals of Mathematical Statistics
Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1963), pp. 1133-1146
www.jstor.org/stable/2238500
Mitchell, William L., B.M.E., (Cornell University); Graduate Student, Operations Re- search, Harvard University; 70 Perkins Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge
New York mathematical society. List of members, constitution, by-laws

books.google.comAmerican Mathematical Society - 1964 - Snippet view
American Mathematical Society. MISARE ... AI Math., Computation Lab., Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. ... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. l500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. l022,
Combined membership list of the American Mathematical Society and ...

books.google.com American Mathematical Society, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics - 1965 - Snippet view
...... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. 1500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. MITCHELL,
Harvard alumni directory

books.google.com Harvard Alumni Directory (Office), Harvard Alumni Association, Harvard University - 1965 - Snippet view
22310. Ed Adm. g25-29 AM 26, PhD 29 MltcheU, WUliam Lockwood, 1500 Arlington Blvd. , Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. 22209.

Directory of Computer Education and Research: Volume 3
books.google.com T. C. Hsiao - 1973 - 1800 pages

MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. - Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Department of Management Sciences School of Business and Economics CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY, HAYWARD Hayward, California 94542 - July 25, 1939 - BME,
1962, Cornell University; MS, 1963, Harvard University; PhD, 1970, University
of California, Los Angeles - Operations Research - ORSA, TIMS, IMS, ACM,
SIAM, MAA - Visiting Research Associate, University of Stockholm, Summer
1971; Research Assistant, Operations Research Center, University of
California, Berkeley, 1966-70; 1st Lieutenant/Systems Analyst, USADATCOM.
U.S. Army, 1963-65.

Fullbright Fellow University of London, 1965-66
Directory Emeriti - California State University, East Bay

www20.csueastbay.edu/oaa/files/docs/DirectoryEmeriti.pdf
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
California State University, Northridge. Emeritus, 2007. FAUST, JUDITH (1997), Librarian: A.B., 1968, College of William and Mary; M.L.S., 1971,. University of....
Directory of Emeritus Faculty
Professors .....
.......
MITCHELL, BILL (1969), Associate Professor of Business Administration: B.M.E., 1962, Cornell
University; M.S., 1963, Harvard University; Ph.D., 1970, University of California, Berkeley.
Emeritus, 1989



#145 Michael Hogan

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 01:58 PM

Tom, could you elaborate on what the speculation was that was presented by Dovey Roundtree?

And how the small set of details you linked to demolish her speculation?

The small set of details that demolish the speculation presented by Janney and Dovey Roundtree :


Annual report to the president

books.google.comCornell University. College of Engineering - 1961 - Snippet view
Spring Term only) Mr. William Mitchell (5th yr. B.M.E. Candidate. Fall Term only)
News and Notices - JStor

The Annals of Mathematical Statistics
Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1963), pp. 1133-1146
www.jstor.org/stable/2238500
Mitchell, William L., B.M.E., (Cornell University); Graduate Student, Operations Re- search, Harvard University; 70 Perkins Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge
New York mathematical society. List of members, constitution, by-laws

books.google.comAmerican Mathematical Society - 1964 - Snippet view
American Mathematical Society. MISARE ... AI Math., Computation Lab., Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. ... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. l500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. l022,
Combined membership list of the American Mathematical Society and ...

books.google.com American Mathematical Society, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics - 1965 - Snippet view
...... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. 1500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. MITCHELL,
Harvard alumni directory

books.google.com Harvard Alumni Directory (Office), Harvard Alumni Association, Harvard University - 1965 - Snippet view
22310. Ed Adm. g25-29 AM 26, PhD 29 MltcheU, WUliam Lockwood, 1500 Arlington Blvd. , Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. 22209.

Directory of Computer Education and Research: Volume 3
books.google.com T. C. Hsiao - 1973 - 1800 pages

MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. - Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Department of Management Sciences School of Business and Economics CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY, HAYWARD Hayward, California 94542 - July 25, 1939 - BME,
1962, Cornell University; MS, 1963, Harvard University; PhD, 1970, University
of California, Los Angeles - Operations Research - ORSA, TIMS, IMS, ACM,
SIAM, MAA - Visiting Research Associate, University of Stockholm, Summer
1971; Research Assistant, Operations Research Center, University of
California, Berkeley, 1966-70; 1st Lieutenant/Systems Analyst, USADATCOM.
U.S. Army, 1963-65.

Fullbright Fellow University of London, 1965-66
Directory Emeriti - California State University, East Bay

www20.csueastbay.edu/oaa/files/docs/DirectoryEmeriti.pdf
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
California State University, Northridge. Emeritus, 2007. FAUST, JUDITH (1997), Librarian: A.B., 1968, College of William and Mary; M.L.S., 1971,. University of....
Directory of Emeritus Faculty
Professors .....
.......
MITCHELL, BILL (1969), Associate Professor of Business Administration: B.M.E., 1962, Cornell
University; M.S., 1963, Harvard University; Ph.D., 1970, University of California, Berkeley.
Emeritus, 1989



#146 Christopher Hall

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 10:06 PM

Except for books which are patently absurd (e.g. Mark Furman's "A Simple Act of Murder" or Barr McClellan's book - name intnentionally ejected from my memory), I view history books as likely containing some erroneous allegations, whether intentional or not, and possibly some morsels of truth.

In reading Janney's book, I felt that there was an underlying need on his part to demonstrate a special knowledge of certain facts, many of which may well have been true, but didn't contribute to solving the murder mystery.

I also felt that the parts about Mary's using acid trips to change the world through sleeping with the President were either embellishments of what possibly took place or, if true, were facts which would reflect a very impaired individual.

What is undoubtedly true is the fact that Dovey Roundtree (who sounds like an Atticus Finch-type character) walked her client out of the courthouse a free man. This was no small feat in view of the existing state of race relations and the facts that the victim was a white woman and the defendant was a black man.

I have certainly not read the trial transcript, but that would certainly be an interesting and very probably revealing endeavor. As an aside, I would also like to read the transcript from the Liberty vs. Hunt and/or Victor Marchetti.

I am interested to know whether Janney's allegations that this case was handled by someone very high at the DOJ is true and whether that attorney routinely handled other trials involving crimes in the District of Columbia.

I don't know it to be true, but I have read in quite a few places that Jim Angleton and Ben Bradlee crossed paths searching for something at Mary's house (a diary) shortly after her murder. That is suspicious behavior to me.

I have also read in several sources or places that Cord Meyer, near his own death, uttered a comment that the people who killed his ex-wife were that same people who assassinated JFK. Whether this alleged statement from a propaganidist is true, I don't know, but the alleged statement, if he in fact made it, demands consideration. Even liars sometimes tell the truth.

I may get around to reading Nina Burleigh's book on the topic. If I recall correctly, I didn't buy it on Amazon because I had read poor reviews of it.

Edited by Christopher Hall, 09 August 2012 - 11:35 PM.


#147 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 08:02 AM

Tom, could you elaborate on what the speculation was that was presented by Dovey Roundtree?

And how the small set of details you linked to demolish her speculation?


The small set of details that demolish the speculation presented by Janney and Dovey Roundtree :


Annual report to the president

books.google.comCornell University. College of Engineering - 1961 - Snippet view
Spring Term only) Mr. William Mitchell (5th yr. B.M.E. Candidate. Fall Term only)
News and Notices - JStor

The Annals of Mathematical Statistics
Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1963), pp. 1133-1146
www.jstor.org/stable/2238500
Mitchell, William L., B.M.E., (Cornell University); Graduate Student, Operations Re- search, Harvard University; 70 Perkins Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge
New York mathematical society. List of members, constitution, by-laws

books.google.comAmerican Mathematical Society - 1964 - Snippet view
American Mathematical Society. MISARE ... AI Math., Computation Lab., Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. ... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. l500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. l022,
Combined membership list of the American Mathematical Society and ...

books.google.com American Mathematical Society, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics - 1965 - Snippet view
...... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. 1500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. MITCHELL,
Harvard alumni directory

books.google.com Harvard Alumni Directory (Office), Harvard Alumni Association, Harvard University - 1965 - Snippet view
22310. Ed Adm. g25-29 AM 26, PhD 29 MltcheU, WUliam Lockwood, 1500 Arlington Blvd. , Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. 22209.

Directory of Computer Education and Research: Volume 3
books.google.com T. C. Hsiao - 1973 - 1800 pages

MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. - Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Department of Management Sciences School of Business and Economics CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY, HAYWARD Hayward, California 94542 - July 25, 1939 - BME,
1962, Cornell University; MS, 1963, Harvard University; PhD, 1970, University
of California, Los Angeles - Operations Research - ORSA, TIMS, IMS, ACM,
SIAM, MAA - Visiting Research Associate, University of Stockholm, Summer
1971; Research Assistant, Operations Research Center, University of
California, Berkeley, 1966-70; 1st Lieutenant/Systems Analyst, USADATCOM.
U.S. Army, 1963-65.

Fullbright Fellow University of London, 1965-66
Directory Emeriti - California State University, East Bay

www20.csueastbay.edu/oaa/files/docs/DirectoryEmeriti.pdf
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
California State University, Northridge. Emeritus, 2007. FAUST, JUDITH (1997), Librarian: A.B., 1968, College of William and Mary; M.L.S., 1971,. University of....
Directory of Emeritus Faculty
Professors .....
.......
MITCHELL, BILL (1969), Associate Professor of Business Administration: B.M.E., 1962, Cornell
University; M.S., 1963, Harvard University; Ph.D., 1970, University of California, Berkeley.
Emeritus, 1989


Michael, I get the impression you are toying with me. Of all the choices you had on how to react to the information I shared,
why did you choose to confine your questions only with regard to Ms. Roundtree, and not include Peter Janney as well?
Your questions prompted me to give a closer read to the pieces I had gone over earlier. Aside from Janney relating in his book
what was said by Roundtree to Damore in a 1990's interview, apparently the only information sourced from Roundtree was
William L. Mitchell's address at the time of the trial, 1500 Arlington Blvd.

Roundtree's quoted remarks were confined to the pretrial concerns I would imagine any criminal defense attorney would have,
knowing little about William L. Mitchell aside from being a caucasian, retired military officer teaching mathematics at Georgetown University, and how this background would lend to the credibility of Mitchell and influence client Crump's jury.

I expect that you know perfectly well that the information I posted fits what little was known about witness Mitchell, like a glove, and contains details that have eluded those interested, ever since Janney began describing what Damore had allegedly discovered. Michael, it does not escape my notice that you chose to focus on my misinterpretation of Ms. Roundtree's interest in witness Mitchell and her role in influencing Damore to develop such a sensationalist view of Mitchell's identity and his role, and ignore
what my discovery indicates about Janney's credibility, agenda, and ability to prioritize information, as well as the abilities of his editors and publisher. I wasn't aware you had an axe to grind, until now.

Can you not see that DiEugenio is mostly correct, there is a long history of publication of "works" that amount to smears of the reputation of President Kennedy, on the slimmest of reliable attribution, and the Janney book is another of them, as is the Alford book, as was what was told by James Truitt and by Timothy Leary?

Unless you think I have diminished the light Janney is purportedly shining on the unsolved Meyer murder, why toy with me?
This is one of the influences that served to muddle my perspective about the post verdict role and influence of Ms. Roundtree, and on the surface it seems you want miss the forest, for the Roundtree.

http://www.fff.org/comment/com1204g.asp

The Murder of Mary Pinchot Meyer
by Jacob G. Hornberger, April 11, 2012
.........How much trouble would it be for the Justice Department to issue subpoenas to the Pentagon and the CIA for all records relating to William L. Mitchell, including military and CIA service records and last known addresses? Or a subpoena for records relating to the CIA “safe house” in which Mitchell resided? Or a subpoena for records pertaining to the CIA’s use of Georgetown University as a cover for CIA agents? Or a subpoena to Georgetown University for records relating to William L. Mitchell and records relating to the CIA’s use of Georgetown University as a cover for CIA agents?.....



#148 David Andrews

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 03:23 AM

Delete

Edited by David Andrews, 11 August 2012 - 03:04 AM.


#149 Guest_Tom Scully_*

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 03:52 AM

Tom, could you elaborate on what the speculation was that was presented by Dovey Roundtree?

And how the small set of details you linked to demolish her speculation?


The small set of details that demolish the speculation presented by Janney and Dovey Roundtree :
(quote]
Annual report to the president

books.google.comCornell University. College of Engineering - 1961 - Snippet view
Spring Term only) Mr. William Mitchell (5th yr. B.M.E. Candidate. Fall Term only)
News and Notices - JStor

The Annals of Mathematical Statistics
Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1963), pp. 1133-1146
www.jstor.org/stable/2238500
Mitchell, William L., B.M.E., (Cornell University); Graduate Student, Operations Re- search, Harvard University; 70 Perkins Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge
New York mathematical society. List of members, constitution, by-laws

books.google.comAmerican Mathematical Society - 1964 - Snippet view
American Mathematical Society. MISARE ... AI Math., Computation Lab., Harvard Univ., Cambridge, Mass. ... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. l500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. l022,
Combined membership list of the American Mathematical Society and ...

books.google.com American Mathematical Society, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics - 1965 - Snippet view
...... MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. I Pentagon, OR Group, Systems Dept., USADSC, Washington, D. C. 1500 Arlington Blvd., Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. MITCHELL,
Harvard alumni directory

books.google.com Harvard Alumni Directory (Office), Harvard Alumni Association, Harvard University - 1965 - Snippet view
22310. Ed Adm. g25-29 AM 26, PhD 29 MltcheU, WUliam Lockwood, 1500 Arlington Blvd. , Apt. 1022, Arlington, Va. 22209.

Directory of Computer Education and Research: Volume 3
books.google.com T. C. Hsiao - 1973 - 1800 pages

MITCHELL, WILLIAM L. - Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Department of Management Sciences School of Business and Economics CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY, HAYWARD Hayward, California 94542 - July 25, 1939 - BME,
1962, Cornell University; MS, 1963, Harvard University; PhD, 1970, University
of California, Los Angeles - Operations Research - ORSA, TIMS, IMS, ACM,
SIAM, MAA - Visiting Research Associate, University of Stockholm, Summer
1971; Research Assistant, Operations Research Center, University of
California, Berkeley, 1966-70; 1st Lieutenant/Systems Analyst, USADATCOM.
U.S. Army, 1963-65.

Fullbright Fellow University of London, 1965-66
Directory Emeriti - California State University, East Bay

www20.csueastbay.edu/oaa/files/docs/DirectoryEmeriti.pdf
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - Quick View
California State University, Northridge. Emeritus, 2007. FAUST, JUDITH (1997), Librarian: A.B., 1968, College of William and Mary; M.L.S., 1971,. University of....
Directory of Emeritus Faculty
Professors .....
.......
MITCHELL, BILL (1969), Associate Professor of Business Administration: B.M.E., 1962, Cornell
University; M.S., 1963, Harvard University; Ph.D., 1970, University of California, Berkeley.
Emeritus, 1989
(/quote]


I knew I had posted about Dovey Roundtree's role in good faith, and now that I can support that I did, I find your obfuscation and attempts to generally discredit me even more troubling.

Let me try to answer some of the question that the members of this panel have raised, based on my research for my book (tentatively entitled Mary's Mosaic.
.

The question has been asked who really was "William L. Mitchell," the alleged assassin of Mary Pinchot Meyer? What we know about Mitchell is that the day after the murder, he went to police in Washington and told them that he believed he passed Mary Meyer on the towpath as he was running east back to Key Bridge and she was walking west toward Fletcher's Boat House. Mitchell told police that a black man (who just happened to fit Ray Crump's description - the man who was charged with the murder) was following her about six hundred feet behind her. Mitchell told police that he ran the towpath regularly, worked at the Pentagon, and was a part time teacher at Georgetown University. Mitchell testified at Crump's murder trial in July, 1965, but his testimony was largely discredtied by Crump's attorney, Dovey Roundtree, Esq. who became a legend after getting Crump acquitted.
.........................
In my possession are several hours of tape recorded interviews between Damore and Crump's attorney Dovey Roundtree, Esq. (Award winning author Katie McCabe is now finishing the authorized biography of Dovey Rountree). Both Roundtree and Damore talk about Mitchell and how "convenient" his testimony was, and they both suspected his involvement. Mitchell never returned any of Roundtree's calls before the trial, and Damore could never locate him. So, as a last resort, Damore wrote Mitchell a letter and sent it to his last known address, the address given in the court transcript. ....


Isn't Janney's take on Dovey Roundtree's point of view regarding Mitchell, unimpeachable, as per the rule about Janney in general?

Now, consider that I am posting that I was mistaken about being mistaken, RE: Roundtree, and I hope you will react appropriately to this. I did not post anything "obviously untrue" about Roundtree, I have the greatest source in the world to confirm it, Janney himself. :

Tom, to the best of my recollection I've never engaged you in any discussions on this Forum. With maybe one or two of the briefest exceptions, I've never made
any comments in reference to any of your posts.

Recently you posted something about Dovey Roundtree that was obviously untrue. I asked two reasonable and polite questions:

1)Tom, could you elaborate on what the speculation was that was presented by Dovey Roundtree? 2) And how the small set of details you linked to demolish her speculation?

Your response implied that you thought I was toying with you and you added that I had an axe to grind, while admitting that you were wrong about Roundtree. If you want
to talk to me like that, I'm fine with it. Just don't expect much respect returned to you.

As per your latest post, I have tried to isolate the part of it that was directed to me. If you have issues with what I wrote or said, why not express them to me in a dedicated post?
It would be a lot easier for everybody, including the members who read these threads casually....


Michael Hogan - Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:32 PM :
"....Recently you posted something about Dovey Roundtree that was obviously untrue. I asked two reasonable and polite questions:...."

You twist the knife, Michael. I had already posted that I was mistaken, even in answer to your feigned concern
about my lumping Roundtree in with Janney, related to suspicion manufacured about William Mitchell's background, but you stuck to your ploy; discredit me for a minor error I admitted to posting, undermine my overall accuracy and reputation, downplay any reference at all to my posting actual details of Mitchell's background which tend to make Janney seem ridiculous for relying on anything attributed to Damore.


Edited by Tom Scully, 20 August 2012 - 04:00 AM.


#150 Michael Hogan

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 05:22 AM

I knew I had posted about Dovey Roundtree's role in good faith, and now that I can support that I did, I find your obfuscation and attempts to generally discredit me even more troubling.

......Isn't Janney's take on Dovey Roundtree's point of view regarding Mitchell, unimpeachable, as per the rule about Janney in general?

Now, consider that I am posting that I was mistaken about being mistaken, RE: Roundtree, and I hope you will react appropriately to this. I did not post anything "obviously untrue" about Roundtree, I have the greatest source in the world to confirm it, Janney himself. :


Tom, to the best of my recollection I've never engaged you in any discussions on this Forum. With maybe one or two of the briefest exceptions, I've never made
any comments in reference to any of your posts.

Recently you posted something about Dovey Roundtree that was obviously untrue. I asked two reasonable and polite questions:

1)Tom, could you elaborate on what the speculation was that was presented by Dovey Roundtree? 2) And how the small set of details you linked to demolish her speculation?

Your response implied that you thought I was toying with you and you added that I had an axe to grind, while admitting that you were wrong about Roundtree. If you want
to talk to me like that, I'm fine with it. Just don't expect much respect returned to you.

As per your latest post, I have tried to isolate the part of it that was directed to me. If you have issues with what I wrote or said, why not express them to me in a dedicated post?
It would be a lot easier for everybody, including the members who read these threads casually....


Michael Hogan - Posted 16 August 2012 - 10:32 PM :
"....Recently you posted something about Dovey Roundtree that was obviously untrue. I asked two reasonable and polite questions:...."

You twist the knife, Michael. I had already posted that I was mistaken, even in answer to your feigned concern
about my lumping Roundtree in with Janney, related to suspicion manufacured about William Mitchell's background, but you stuck to your ploy; discredit me for a minor error I admitted to posting, undermine my overall accuracy and reputation, downplay any reference at all to my posting actual details of Mitchell's background which tend to make Janney seem ridiculous for relying on anything attributed to Damore.


Since you put this part of Janney's post in bold, I suspect that this is the alleged speculation of Dovey Roundtree that you now again claim you demolished:

Both Roundtree and Damore talk about Mitchell and how "convenient" his testimony was, and they both suspected his involvement. Mitchell never returned any of Roundtree's calls before the trial, and Damore could never locate him.


I see you have no problem in using Janney as a source, when it suits you.

You would be well-advised to consider what Dovey Roundtree wrote in her book:

So I have told the reporters who sought me out in the years since her death, all of them searching for some piece of information, some insight or impression of mine that might, finally, illuminate the nature of her murder. If, as several researchers have suggested to me, Mary Meyer's access to the late president and her familiarity with certain facts made her a target of the CIA, I have no knowledge of such matters. (Justice Older Than The Law, Page 189)


I bolded part of it for you. Tom, do me a favor please. When you put something I wrote in bold, could you attribute yourself? I don't want anyone to think that's the way it was originally written.

It's incredible how tortured these threads have become, simply because I wrote that Janney's footnotes, as they pertained to the arrest and trial of Raymond Crump, were sound.

Edited by Michael Hogan, 20 August 2012 - 05:26 AM.





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