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E-HELP Projects


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#16 John Simkin

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 11:23 AM

Don't worry Dalibor, just focus on women. Nothing else is required of you at the moment.

John has some interesting ideas, but he is just trying them out here. If you wish to participate in the discussions, please do. But nothing has been decided that wasn't decided at the last Toulouse meeting.

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Right. I have just trying to explore some possible approaches. I thought it might be an interesting project to look at how different countries have dealt with war crimes in textbooks, etc. Especially as two leading academics have shown interest in getting involved in this project. Please feel free to ignore my experiments. I will not be offended.

#17 Juan Carlos

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 07:19 AM

Sorry for not participating so far. I have been out in Germany in a European Council Seminar on Migration Flows and Schools.


John's ideas are very useful to get attention on the media. However, we should not forget our written objectives, for those purposes we got the funding.
Until next meeting in Toulouse we should focus on women's history and try to do the best.

My idea of the final course we are going to give in Toulouse in 2007-2008 is a series of lessons, lectures, workshops... that deal with the different possibilities and potentials that teaching history with ICT offer to European teachers.

I'd suggest striving to achieve the very cutting edge pedagogy and practice that will be of practical use to history teachers as suggested in the E-Help seminars.


Andrew is right here. We have, first of all, to collect the best practice and organise it and show it. The most important is that we have to create new resources that exemplify all the possibilities that teachers can utilise at school.

We also urgently need to make a decision about our web presence - mutiple sites linked together simply won't do. Unfortunately I seem to have been talking to myself over this latter point recently.

I would therefore like to see a clear commitment to agreed topic areas covering a range of age groups, National Curriculums and syllabi sooner rather than later. (...)

why not materials for younger students and their teachers too? The bulk of most history teachers teaching is surely with the younger age groups? There are some very interesting possibilities given the countries we represent.


Andy hightlights three important topics:

First of all, we all don't have to work on just the same topic or topics. From my experience, it is evident that a project is successful when every (or most of) member is working on a topic that he/she likes. We simply should organise in a coherent way different resources on a few topics.

I myself will start teaching in English next year :hotorwot As Head of Department I have volunteered to teach (firt time in my life) to the youngest students, 12 years old. Geography and History are taught in the same course, history lessons span from Prehistory to Roman Empire, highlighting every event related to Iberia.
I am planning to set up a course on line on that topics trying to introduce most of the different activities that can be used now on the internet. I think that it should be my (and Ramón Burgaleta's) contribution to E-HELP.
This way we will cover a different topic and a different age that most of you. If I have time enough, I will like to contribute on any Cold War topic.

I agree with Andy that we need to set up a project web site asap. However, the debate on it languished. Why don't start with a simple thing? A not very complicated web site that could be used as a common ground which leads to our web sites? I admit that I have no clear ideas on this. We need time to debate it in Toulouse.

#18 Graham Davies

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  • Interests:I began my career as a teacher of German and French in secondary education in 1965, moving into higher education in 1971, where I taught German (and also English as a Foreign Language to students training to become professional translators) until 1993. I have been involved in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) since 1976. In 1982 I wrote one of the first introductory books on computers in language learning and teaching, which was followed by numerous other printed and software publications. In 1989 I was conferred with the title of Professor of CALL by the Academic Board of Ealing College of Higher Education (later integrated into Thames Valley University). I retired from full-time teaching in 1993 but I continued to work as a Visiting Professor for Thames Valley University until 2001. I was the Founder President of EUROCALL, holding the post from 1993 to 2000. I am a partner in Camsoft, a CALL software development and consultancy business, which was founded in 1982. I have lectured and run ICT training courses for language teachers in 22 different countries and I sit on a number of national and international advisory boards and committees. I have been actively involved in WorldCALL since 1998 and I currently head a working party that is in the process of setting up WorldCALL as an official organisation that aims to assist countries that are currently underserved in the area of ICT and the teaching and learning of modern foreign languages. I am fluent in German, I speak tolerable French, and I can survive in Italian, Russian and Hungarian. I enjoy golf, skiing, walking my dog (a retired racing greyhound) and travelling. I used to scuba-dive regularly - my last dive was on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998 - but now I just swim at my local fitness centre.

Posted 17 May 2005 - 09:55 AM

Just a quick remark concerning the use of cutting-edge technology:

Have you considered using "podcasts"? Podcasting is catching on in some areas of the curriculum. For a definition of podcasting and examples of podcasts for learners and teachers of modern foreign languages see the Partners in Excellence website at: http://www.pie.org.uk
They call their podcasts "PiEcasts".

Partners in Excellence is a consortium of schools in Scotland.

#19 John Simkin

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 03:14 PM

Just a quick remark concerning the use of cutting-edge technology:

Have you considered using "podcasts"? Podcasting is catching on in some areas of the curriculum. For a definition of podcasting and examples of podcasts for learners and teachers of modern foreign languages see the Partners in Excellence website at: http://www.pie.org.uk
They call their podcasts "PiEcasts".

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Thank you for this. I am sure we will explore this idea at our next meeting. See also:

http://educationforu...?showtopic=3805

#20 John Simkin

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 03:24 PM

Until next meeting in Toulouse we should focus on women's history and try to do the best.

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I agree that the main focus at the moment should be on women’s history. I have spent several days working on this and you will see the fruits of my labours in Toulouse. However, if people have the time, I see nothing wrong in exploring other areas of European history. That is what I have been doing with my thread on war crimes. As I said before, this is not compulsory and members are free to ignore my experiments at developing teaching materials.

My idea of the final course we are going to give in Toulouse in 2007-2008 is a series of lessons, lectures, workshops... that deal with the different possibilities and potentials that teaching history with ICT offer to European teachers.

I'd suggest striving to achieve the very cutting edge pedagogy and practice that will be of practical use to history teachers as suggested in the E-Help seminars.


Andrew is right here. We have, first of all, to collect the best practice and organise it and show it. The most important is that we have to create new resources that exemplify all the possibilities that teachers can utilise at school.

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I do not only see our role as collecting examples of good use of technology in the classroom. I think we should go further than that. We should be exploring different ways of using technology in the classroom. This is why I think it is important to experiment with using the Forum to capture the debate that goes on between historians.




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