Jump to content


Spartacus

Jack Lawrence


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1 Ron Ecker

Ron Ecker

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,188 posts

Posted 24 June 2005 - 09:31 PM

There is an article by Sheldon Inkol, "Jack Lawrence Responds," in the September 1992 issue of The Third Decade. In an earlier article, Inkol had accused Lawrence of being an active conspirator. Lawrence called Inkol, and after Lawrence gave his side of the story in the discussions that followed, Inkol apologized to Lawrence in the September 1992 article and expressed his view that Lawrence was probably set up as a potential patsy.

Based on Lawrence's story, what has been written about him in the literature is grossly inaccurate. Indeed Inkol points out that the HSCA did both Lawrence and researchers a great disservice by not even interviewing Lawrence to get his side of the story.

Regarding the car that Lawrence reportedly left parked behind the fence on the grassy knoll, Lawrence said that he left for work from the YMCA in the demonstrator he had between 12:35 and 12:40 pm. He didn't get far because there was a logjam of traffic, so he parked the car at the corner of Ervay and Main and walked to work at Downtown Lincoln Mercury so he wouldn't be late. He said he may have looked flushed when he got there, but the story that he was muddy and ran to the restroom and threw up is nonsense.

Lawrence knew that he had to get the car back as soon as possible because it was illegally parked and might get towed. So one of the other salesmen whose name he can't remember but who was a retired Air Force Colonel drove Lawrence to where he left the car. Inkol says that he would love to know who this Colonel was, because the lie that Lawrence left the car behind the fence on the grassy knoll must have originated with this person.

Editor Jerry Rose added a note to this article saying that Lawrence's story still lacked credibility in some areas and that he hoped to develop an article on it. Rose said he doubted, for example, that Lawrence heard four shots while inside the YMCA about a mile from Dealey Plaza as he claimed. And wouldn't Lawrence rather be late for work, since he had the traffic jam as an excuse, rather than leave the demonstrator in a no parking zone to likely be towed?

I don't know what further may have been written in The Third Decade on this, but I thought that this was worth passing on.

Ron

Edited by Ron Ecker, 24 June 2005 - 09:33 PM.


#2 Justin Martell

Justin Martell

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Location:Sacramento California
  • Interests:JFK,60's and 70's Music, Drug & Alcohol Counseling.

Posted 25 June 2005 - 08:01 AM

There is an article by Sheldon Inkol, "Jack Lawrence Responds," in the September 1992 issue of The Third Decade. In an earlier article, Inkol had accused Lawrence of being an active conspirator. Lawrence called Inkol, and after Lawrence gave his side of the story in the discussions that followed, Inkol apologized to Lawrence in the September 1992 article and expressed his view that Lawrence was probably set up as a potential patsy.

Based on Lawrence's story, what has been written about him in the literature is grossly inaccurate. Indeed Inkol points out that the HSCA did both Lawrence and researchers a great disservice by not even interviewing Lawrence to get his side of the story.

Regarding the car that Lawrence reportedly left parked behind the fence on the grassy knoll, Lawrence said that he left for work from the YMCA in the demonstrator he had between 12:35 and 12:40 pm. He didn't get far because there was a logjam of traffic, so he parked the car at the corner of Ervay and Main and walked to work at Downtown Lincoln Mercury so he wouldn't be late. He said he may have looked flushed when he got there, but the story that he was muddy and ran to the restroom and threw up is nonsense.

Lawrence knew that he had to get the car back as soon as possible because it was illegally parked and might get towed. So one of the other salesmen whose name he can't remember but who was a retired Air Force Colonel drove Lawrence to where he left the car. Inkol says that he would love to know who this Colonel was, because the lie that Lawrence left the car behind the fence on the grassy knoll must have originated with this person.

Editor Jerry Rose added a note to this article saying that Lawrence's story still lacked credibility in some areas and that he hoped to develop an article on it. Rose said he doubted, for example, that Lawrence heard four shots while inside the YMCA about a mile from Dealey Plaza as he claimed. And wouldn't Lawrence rather be late for work, since he had the traffic jam as an excuse, rather than leave the demonstrator in a no parking zone to likely be towed?

I don't know what further may have been written in The Third Decade on this, but I thought that this was worth passing on.

Ron

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks Ron for the informative post. The Lawrence story is interesting indeed. It would be great if he would give an interview or answer some questions because it is still some odd behavior he exhibited that day.

#3 Greg Wagner

Greg Wagner

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 274 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 June 2005 - 06:33 PM

There is an article by Sheldon Inkol, "Jack Lawrence Responds," in the September 1992 issue of The Third Decade. In an earlier article, Inkol had accused Lawrence of being an active conspirator. Lawrence called Inkol, and after Lawrence gave his side of the story in the discussions that followed, Inkol apologized to Lawrence in the September 1992 article and expressed his view that Lawrence was probably set up as a potential patsy.

Based on Lawrence's story, what has been written about him in the literature is grossly inaccurate. Indeed Inkol points out that the HSCA did both Lawrence and researchers a great disservice by not even interviewing Lawrence to get his side of the story.

Regarding the car that Lawrence reportedly left parked behind the fence on the grassy knoll, Lawrence said that he left for work from the YMCA in the demonstrator he had between 12:35 and 12:40 pm. He didn't get far because there was a logjam of traffic, so he parked the car at the corner of Ervay and Main and walked to work at Downtown Lincoln Mercury so he wouldn't be late. He said he may have looked flushed when he got there, but the story that he was muddy and ran to the restroom and threw up is nonsense.

Lawrence knew that he had to get the car back as soon as possible because it was illegally parked and might get towed. So one of the other salesmen whose name he can't remember but who was a retired Air Force Colonel drove Lawrence to where he left the car. Inkol says that he would love to know who this Colonel was, because the lie that Lawrence left the car behind the fence on the grassy knoll must have originated with this person.

Editor Jerry Rose added a note to this article saying that Lawrence's story still lacked credibility in some areas and that he hoped to develop an article on it. Rose said he doubted, for example, that Lawrence heard four shots while inside the YMCA about a mile from Dealey Plaza as he claimed. And wouldn't Lawrence rather be late for work, since he had the traffic jam as an excuse, rather than leave the demonstrator in a no parking zone to likely be towed?

I don't know what further may have been written in The Third Decade on this, but I thought that this was worth passing on.

Ron

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I read somewhere that Lawrence was a marksman in the US Air Force. Is this accurate?

If Lawrence was being set-up as a potential patsy, there certainly wasn't the same level of effort and detail put forth in the frame-up as there was with Oswald. Other than placing him at the scene, what else was there? Seems like a pretty lame frame-up compared to how they manipulated LHO.

#4 Ron Ecker

Ron Ecker

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,188 posts

Posted 26 June 2005 - 07:54 PM

Greg,

I agree that it doesn't sound like much of a framing. How could the conspirators know, for example, that Lawrence would leave the car where he did, so that whoever took him back to pick it up could conveniently lie about where he had left it?

As for Lawrence being an expert marksman in the AF, he told researcher Inkol that he almost didn't get to become an Air Policeman (his highest rank in the AF was Airman 2nd Class) because he was a "lousy shot." He also said that he was blinded in one eye by a rock at the age of 11. He said he didn't own a firearm of any kind.

That said, according to Inkol's article there were some odd or interesting things about Downtown Lincoln Mercury where Lawrence worked. To begin with, it was from this dealership that an Oswald imposter took a car on a test drive, driving it along the same route through Dealey Plaza that the motorcade would take. The salesman on the test drive, Albert Guy Bogard, didn't want to get involved by reporting the incident after the assassination and arrest of Oswald, and the dealership thought that bringing attention to the incident would be bad publicity. Lawrence thought that the incident should be reported and made the call himself, which was what got him fired.

The story of Lawrence running in muddy and throwing up after the assassination, which Lawrence says was nonsense, also had to come from personnel at the dealership.

Inkol states that Downtown Lincoln Mercury was at the corner of Commerce and Industrial, where JFK's limo would have turned had an alternate motorcade route been chosen. (Why wouldn't the turn have been at Main and Industrial?) This was one reason Inkol originally proposed that Lawrence might have been a potential shooter, not at the plaza but at the dealership.

Salesman Bogard supposedly committed suicide on February 14, 1966. (Inkol's cited source for this is Penn Jones, so I take it with a grain of salt.) And Inkol says that he was able to identify 16 employees of Downtown Lincoln Mercury at the time of the assassination. Within a few months, at least 10 of them no longer worked there. While car salesmen might change jobs frequently, 4 of the 10 were not salesmen. "Why," Inkol asks, "did so many employees leave the dealership at this time?"

Ron

#5 James Richards

James Richards

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,288 posts
  • Location:The Gold Coast, Australia

Posted 27 June 2005 - 02:38 AM

Does anyone have a reference for the information that Lawrence was supposedly a Castro supporter having been in Cuba during the revolution?

Also, Lawrence was purportedly at the Cabana during the evening before the assassination where he danced with Beverly Oliver? He was using the name Donny Allen Lance?

This is from memory as I can't find the information in my notes.

James

#6 Ron Ecker

Ron Ecker

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,188 posts

Posted 27 June 2005 - 04:14 AM

James,

Lawrence told the FBI that he and others in the AF would have liked to go to Cuba and help Castro in the Revolution, but that his discharge in 1959 came too late for him to do any good and he had never been to Cuba. He told Inkol that the reason for the emphasis on Cuba in the FBI reports is that the FBI agents keep asking him about it. Docs are in WC v. 26, pp. 452-453, and in links at http://www.geocities.../Documents.html

According to Shaw's book Cover-Up (p. 90), Oliver said that Lawrence was frequently seen at the Carousel Club and was a close friend of George Senator. Lawrence denied these claims. There is no mention in Inkol's article of the Cabana or of dancing with Oliver. Lawrence said he went to "the piano bar" on the night of 11/21 with two other men from the dealership, stayed till closing time after the other two left, and had a bad hangover the next day.

Ron

#7 James Richards

James Richards

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,288 posts
  • Location:The Gold Coast, Australia

Posted 27 June 2005 - 04:21 AM

Thanks, Ron.

I found it curious that the FBI kept asking him about Cuba.I got the impression that the Feds went very easy on Lawrence unlike Bogard.

James

#8 Ron Ecker

Ron Ecker

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,188 posts

Posted 27 June 2005 - 04:36 AM

James,

Here's something I missed. There's a letter to the editor from Oliver in the July 1993 issue of The Third Decade. She was steamed about Inkol commenting on her "experimental camera" claim and Inkol saying "This is one 'witness' whom I wish really would disappear." Oliver wrote, "As for Jack Allen Lawrence, I identified a photograph of him that Gary (Shaw) presented to me as someone I knew as Donny Allen Lance, who frequented the club often visiting with George Senator and as someone I had dances with at the Cabana Hotel on November 21, 1963. His not claiming to frequent the Carousel Club is nothing unusual, there were probably ten thousand men in Dallas back then who would say the same. Regardless of the assassination, it was not a place that men publicly stated they frequented. I can't say anythiing more about Donny Allen Lance. I don't know anything else."

Ron

#9 James Richards

James Richards

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,288 posts
  • Location:The Gold Coast, Australia

Posted 27 June 2005 - 05:17 AM

Thanks, Ron. I knew I had read that Oliver information somwhere.

I'm not too sure what to make of it all though. Beverly claims to have danced with Jack Lawrence, to have been one of the closest eye witnesses to the assassination and to have actually filmed the shooting from an angle which would have given us a look at the knoll area. She was certainly amongst the action.

I don't want to direct this thread away from Lawrence, although he might be connected somehow. I keep thinking about how Beverly was married to Mob guy George McGann at a ceremony where R. D. Matthews was Best Man. Matthews is a close associate of Lewis McWillie and mentor of sorts to Charles Harrelson. Interesting cast of characters.

Could Beverly have been encouraged by someone like Ruby to film the assassination from the ideal spot, maybe figuring the film would be worth a nice chunk of change?

My head hurts now.

Beverly and McGann below. Looks like Matthews on the extreme right.

James

#10 John Simkin

John Simkin

    Super Member

  • admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 16,090 posts

Posted 02 August 2005 - 07:17 AM

Namebase entry for Jack Lawrence:

http://www.namebase....9-Lawrence.html

Duffy,J. Ricci,V. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. 1992 (272)
Giancana,S.& C. Double Cross. 1992 (334)
Groden,R. Livingstone,H. High Treason. 1990 (133-4, 292)
Marrs,J. Crossfire. 1990 (339-40)

#11 Shanet Clark

Shanet Clark

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,625 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:US/Georgia 9/06- PHOTO ON FILE VIA URL
  • Interests:Masters in Education; B.A. (Summa Cum Laude) History. GSU.

Posted 02 August 2005 - 03:07 PM

Namebase entry for Jack Lawrence:

http://www.namebase....9-Lawrence.html

Duffy,J. Ricci,V. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. 1992 (272)
Giancana,S.& C. Double Cross. 1992 (334)
Groden,R. Livingstone,H. High Treason. 1990 (133-4, 292)
Marrs,J. Crossfire. 1990 (339-40)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


What did Sam and Chuck Giancana have to say about Jack Lawrence?

Jack Lawrence being best known as the Dallas car salesman who had contact with an "Oswald" before the shooting, and wretched in a wild eyed state immediately after 12:30 Dallas time on the day of John Kennedy's murder.

Ron: The Lawrence material adds body and shape to what we know, but isn't that all a pretty pat and predictable denial by the accused? I mean, its a first hand rebuttal of the case against him. This stuff about the Air Force colonel and the location of the car, the suicides....it shows a lot of manipulation......

Lawrence looks like a potential patsy, which is just that close to a potential team member, capiche?

MATE
feel free to post more on MRS MCGANN...........start threaad w/photo?


(((((The West Virginia preacher is also in DUFFY and RICCI (1992)
anyone able to summarize the citations on this PERSON OF INTEREST?)))
Shanet/clark


#12 Lee Forman

Lee Forman

    Super Member

  • JFK
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,047 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 02 August 2005 - 05:16 PM

Inkol's information is interesting, but I was under the impression that the tale of his showing up to work pale and sweating, with mud on his clothes and throwing up, aside from the car having been parked in the lot behind the knoll, were the reasons why he was phoned in and arrested by the Dallas Police as a suspect, by his co-workers.

http://mcadams.posc....du/bethell6.htm
[QUOTE]
Friday, February 16, 1968
Bill Boxley arrived back, apparently now convinced of the involvement of Jack Lawrence. Why? Because of Boxley's conversations recently with two Downtown-Lincoln Mercury ex-employees named Rozelle and Falzone. Rozelle points out that Lawrence was hired by one Lorenz, a German (CIA etc., according to Boxley,) who is also "involved". I pointed out to Boxley that the only way we can get anything solid on Lawrence is to find the actual person who retrieved the car in Dealey plaza. Boxley thinks it was Lorenz.[/QUOTE]

This comes from DoubleCross - why did Sam 'Mooney' Giancana list him as one of Marcello's shooter?

[QUOTE]http://www.skepticfi...is/jfkgianc.htm

Marcello provided Jack Lawrence and Charles Harrelson as
gunmen on the grassy knoll area.[/QUOTE]

Let me highlight a few sections:

http://karws.gso.uri...from_front.html

[QUOTE]Jack Lawrence and His Borrowed Car

About a month before the assassination, a man named Jack Lawrence was hired at Downtown Lincoln-Mercury, a Dallas car dealership that was only two blocks from Dealey Plaza. Lawrence got the job by providing job references from New Orleans. These references were later found to be phony. Lawrence was known as an ardent right-wing speaker, and reportedly had been an expert marksmen in the military. The night before the assassination, Lawrence borrowed a car from the dealership, saying he needed it for a date.
Lawrence did not show up for work in the morning. However, thirty minutes after the shooting, he came hurrying through the company's show room. He was pale and sweating and had mud on his clothes. He rushed into the men's room and threw up. He claimed he had been ill, and that he had tried to return the car but was forced to park it because of traffic. His co-workers became suspicious and called the police. Later, the car Lawrence had borrowed was found--it was discovered in the parking lot behind the wooden fence on the grassy knoll (Marrs 339-340; Groden and Livingstone 133-134).

Lawrence was arrested by the Dallas police that evening. However, like other potentially important suspects who were arrested that day, he was released in short order and with little or no investigation into who he was or what he had been doing at the time of the shooting. Lawrence left Dallas as soon as he was released.[/QUOTE]

I was unable to determine Marrs reference info. Apparently the Groden and Livingston reference is not 'High Treason.'

Are these all just coincidences?

I couldn't find the Police Report on his arrest.

http://spot.acorn.ne.../fredonia3.html

[QUOTE]Albert Bogard was not the only car salesman from downtown Lincoln Mercury to attract the attention of NBC and the FBI. On December 5th, eight days after they were requested to find Jack Lawrence that two Dallas FBI agents finally inquired about him at Downtown Lincoln Mercury. Frank Pizzo told the agents that Lawrence had been fired on November 23, 1963, but he did not tell them why. Instead, Pizzo told the FBI that Lawrence had told another salesman Robert Teter that he (Lawrence) had received a bad conduct discharge from the military because he had tried to help Fidel Castro overthrow Batista in Cuba. By December 7, this is what the FBI had been told about Jack Lawrence and these things are not necessarily true but this is what the FBI had been told.[/QUOTE]

From the French JFK Forum - you gotta love the translation:

[QUOTE]See here for a post of Dennis Morissette unfortunately remained without continuation...

Jack Lawrence was a young guy of South Charleston in Virginia, which is presented at the beginning of October 1963 in Dallas for a job of salesman of cars in a dealer of Lincoln Mercury, located at two corners of street of Dealey Plaza. It was barded eulogistic certificates and references for employment similar to News-Orleans; it was thus engaged illico. Amusing detail: Jack Lawrence did not succeed in selling only one car throughout all its engagement and later, of the researchers will discover that all the references of Lawrence were completely cans.
November 21, Jack Lawrence obtained the right to borrow a car by telling from its owner that it had a very significant appointment.
November 22 in the morning, Jack Lawrence was not seen with its work. However, about thirty minutes after the assassination of JFK, veiled it emerging in the hall of exposure of the dealer, sweating with large drops, the dye pÔlichon and the fringues crades of mud. It precipitated in the wash-hand basins for men to go to vomit its tripe. B)
Then Jack Lawrence told with the other employees that it was sick, that it had wanted to bring back the car but that he had to park it further because of the bad circulation. Two other employees left to seek the car and found it behind the barrier out of wooden with the top of Grassy Knoll overhanging Dealey Plaza. The employees brought back the car and prÚvenirent the DPD of the suspect behavior of Lawrence. This one was questioned and slackened on November 23. It immediately left its job and Dallas to return ouin-ouin in his parents in South Charleston. What a unpleasant young imp!

Lastly, it appears:

- Lawrence Jack was classified expert marksman (the most row for the gunners) to the US Air Force...

- Lawrence Jack was one minute men, it did not like the blacks, it did not like the commies, it did not like the homos but it loved much its dad, his mom, the bimbos, the frik and AmeriKKKe...

- Lawrence Jack would have danced a whole night with Canted Lounge with the blonde and pulpy Beverly Oliver, while Jack Ruby had a coffee in company of a good friend. Beverly told that Lawrence was made call "Donny Allen Lance"...

- Lawrence Jack would have pointed L.A. in Dallas, Jack Lawrence adored Hollywood and the company of the actor Woody Harrelson, wire of the killer of elite, Charles Harrelson...
- This old stubborn person of Sam G would have told with his Chuck brother that Jack Lawrence belonged to the team of Grassy Knoll this famous 22 November in the neighbourhoods of midday thirty...

Which old devil, this Momo... -)[/QUOTE]

His profile is amazingly similar to many of the other suspects. Vaganov could probably tell a similar tale about why he shoved his clothes into the Telephone booth.

White male. Ex-Military. Original Pro-Castro leanings, later allegedly Anti-Communist. Possibly a member of the Minutemen. Allegedly a racist. In Dallas one month before the operation. Leaves Dallas the day after the operation. New Orleans connection. Sam Giancana knows his name and associates him with Marcello. Allegedly used an alias. Mixed up with the 'Oswald' test drive.

Just coincidence.

- lee

#13 Ron Ecker

Ron Ecker

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,188 posts

Posted 02 August 2005 - 06:26 PM

[quote name='Lee Forman' date='Aug 2 2005, 04:16 PM']
Inkol's information is interesting, but I was under the impression that the tale of his showing up to work pale and sweating, with mud on his clothes and throwing up, aside from the car having been parked in the lot behind the knoll, were the reasons why he was phoned in and arrested by the Dallas Police as a suspect, by his co-workers.
[/quote]

"Lawrence denies that he was ever reported to the Dallas Police, taken into custody, or questioned" (Inkol).

[quote]
This comes from DoubleCross - why did Sam 'Mooney' Giancana list him as one of Marcello's shooter?
[/quote]

Probably because Giancana read it somewhere (the same reason he says Roscoe White was a shooter).

[quote]
Let me highlight a few sections:

http://karws.gso.uri...from_front.html

. . . Lawrence got the job by providing job references from New Orleans. These references were later found to be phony.
[/quote]

"He denies providing references from a New Orleans car dealership. . . . Lawrence maintains that he has never been in New Orleans."

[quote]
Lawrence was known as an ardent right-wing speaker, and reportedly had been an expert marksmen in the military.
[/quote]

"Lawrence himself tells me that he almost failed to become an Air Policeman because he was a 'lousy shot' during his training" (Inkol). Also said he was hit in his left eye with a rock at the age of 11 and was blind in that eye ever since.

[quote]
The night before the assassination, Lawrence borrowed a car from the dealership, saying he needed it for a date.
[/quote]

"Lawrence denies that he had to borrow a company car the night before the assassination for a heavy date, since he had a demonstrator already and he was happily married."

[quote]
Lawrence did not show up for work in the morning.
[/quote]

That's because he wasn't scheduled to work until 1 pm. But he still had to come in for an early morning sales meeting, which he did despite a "severe hangover."

[quote]
thirty minutes after the shooting, he came hurrying through the company's show room. He was pale and sweating and had mud on his clothes. He rushed into the men's room and threw up.
[/quote]

Lawrence called this "drivel and false nonsense."

[quote]
He claimed he had been ill, and that he had tried to return the car but was forced to park it because of traffic. His co-workers became suspicious and called the police.
[/quote]

By Lawrence's account no one called the police or had any reason to. But he did feel someone should call the FBI to report that the arrested Oswald had test-driven a car with salesman Bogard, taking the same route that the motorcade would take. When the others didn't want to get the dealership involved, Lawrence said he called the FBI himself, which led to an argument and his being fired the next day.

[quote]
Later, the car Lawrence had borrowed was found--it was discovered in the parking lot behind the wooden fence on the grassy knoll (Marrs 339-340; Groden and Livingstone 133-134).
[/quote]

"It was about 2:30 when the Colonel drove Lawrence back to get the car, which Lawrence insists was not parked behind the fence on the grassy knoll" (Inkol).

[quote]
Lawrence was arrested by the Dallas police that evening. However, like other potentially important suspects who were arrested that day, he was released in short order and with little or no investigation into who he was or what he had been doing at the time of the shooting.
[/quote]

As already stated, Lawrence said he was never arrested or questioned.

[quote]
Lawrence left Dallas as soon as he was released.
[/quote]

"Lawrence says that he looked unsuccessfully for work in Dallas until the first week in December, whereupon he returned to West Virginia. An FBI report indicates that Lawrence checked out of the YMCA on November 30."

Ron

Edited by Ron Ecker, 02 August 2005 - 06:33 PM.


#14 Shanet Clark

Shanet Clark

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,625 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:US/Georgia 9/06- PHOTO ON FILE VIA URL
  • Interests:Masters in Education; B.A. (Summa Cum Laude) History. GSU.

Posted 02 August 2005 - 06:40 PM

Lee
Yours is the best post here in a long time.
Researcher in fact concerning death of Commander in Chief and PT 109 Pilot.






[quote name='Lee Forman' date='Aug 2 2005, 05:16 PM']
Inkol's information is interesting, but I was under the impression that the tale of his showing up to work pale and sweating, with mud on his clothes and throwing up, aside from the car having been parked in the lot behind the knoll, were the reasons why he was phoned in and arrested by the Dallas Police as a suspect, by his co-workers.


Bill Boxley arrived back, apparently now convinced of the involvement of Jack Lawrence. Why? Because of Boxley's conversations recently with two Downtown-Lincoln Mercury ex-employees named Rozelle and Falzone. Rozelle points out that Lawrence was hired by one Lorenz, a German (CIA etc., according to Boxley,) who is also "involved". I pointed out to Boxley that the only way we can get anything solid on Lawrence is to find the actual person who retrieved the car in Dealey plaza. Boxley thinks it was Lorenz.[/QUOTE]

His profile is amazingly similar to many of the other suspects. Vaganov could probably tell a similar tale about why he shoved his clothes into the Telephone booth.

White male. Ex-Military. Original Pro-Castro leanings, later allegedly Anti-Communist. Possibly a member of the Minutemen. Allegedly a racist. In Dallas one month before the operation. Leaves Dallas the day after the operation. New Orleans connection. Sam Giancana knows his name and associates him with Marcello. Allegedly used an alias. Mixed up with the 'Oswald' test drive.

Just coincidence.

- lee

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

[/quote]


:eek :eat B) :secret :surfing :eat :eek

#15 Roger Fong

Roger Fong

    Experienced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 04 August 2005 - 10:01 PM

Thanks Ron for the informative post.  The Lawrence story is interesting indeed.  It would be great if he would give an interview or answer some questions because it is still some odd behavior he exhibited that day.

Inkol's article takes up 16 pages and includes 54 footnotes. While Ron has done an admirable job responding to the issues surrounding Jack Lawrence, there really is no substitute for reading Inkol's original article. Lawrence comes through as a very decent fellow. Yes, a few unanswered questions remain, but that's not a good reason for continuing to vilify him.

"Jack Lawrence Reponds" was published in September 1992. In the July 1997 issue of The Fourth Decade, p. 30, Inkol makes the following comments in a letter referring to Beverly Oliver's report that she had seen Lawrence at the Carousel Club and had danced with him:

I find it frustrating that several authors and researchers persist in ignoring or disregarding Jack Lawrence's denials and my careful research on the one hand, while on the other hand they insist on repeating Beverly Oliver's dubious statements at face value. She offers no evidence for her claims, contradicts herself, constantly amends and embellishes her stories, is caught in factual errors (there were no Super-8 cameras in 1963), and profits from the assassination. Why is her word better than Jack Lawrence's? Here, after all, is a person who (by her own admission) supposedly knew Jack Ruby, met Oswald and Ferrie, was there in Dealey Plaza, worked for the Great Southwest Corporation (see Deep Politics, p. 294), dated an assassin, and married a gangster! In addition, according to Peter Dale Scott, "the problem of how to handle the 'Babushka Lady,' and some of her wilder claims, bedeviled the first months for the [HSCA]...and helped precipitate the crisis of confidence which almost wrecked the Committee..


Re: John Simkin's Namebase list of Jack Lawrence references

Duffy,J. Ricci,V. The Assassination of John F. Kennedy. 1992 (272)
Giancana,S.& C. Double Cross. 1992 (334)
Groden,R. Livingstone,H. High Treason. 1990 (133-4, 292)
Marrs,J. Crossfire. 1990 (339-40)

Here's a more complete list from Walt Brown's JFK index.

569, 571 in Brown, People v. Lee Harvey Oswald;
161 in Brown, Treachery in Dallas;
350 in Brown, Warren Omission;
217-218 in Buchanan and Oliver, Nightmare in Dallas;
115-116 in Groden and Livingstone, High Treason;
334 in Giancana, Double Cross;
7, 110 in Groden, The Killing of a President;
123-124 in Jones, Forgive My Grief, II;
155 in Jones, Forgive My Grief, IV;
390, 397, 508 in Livingstone, Killing the Truth;
339-340 in Marrs, Crossfire;
307-308 in Moscovit, Did Castro Kill Kennedy?
90, 110 in Shaw and Harris, Cover-Up;
681-682, 700, 722, 732, 740 in Twyman, Bloody Treason;
Warren Commission 26 Volumes: XXVI, 452-453, 687-688, 704

It's curious that Twyman's book is not included in the Namebase list. Twyman's comments about Lawrence are within the context of his long and rambling chapter on Gerald Patrick Hemming. Although Twyman acknowledges Inkol's research, he (Twyman) repeats some of the stories refuted or denied by Lawrence in Inkol's article, including the reports that Lawrence returned to Downtown Lincoln-Mercury "pale, sweating profusely, out of breath, and with mud on his clothes, and had run into the restroom and vomited." Lawrence explains that because of the conjestion, he had to park his car near the YMCA where he was staying and walk approximately a mile to get work. He denies that the car was parked behind the picket fence on the grassy knoll. He later got a ride from one of the other salesmen known as "the Colonel" to retrieve the car. If the car had been near the grassy knoll, he would not have needed a ride. No one, including Lawrence, has been able to positively identify this colonel.

One additional curiosity: Major Phil Willis also worked at Downtown Lincoln-Mercury.

Edited by Roger Fong, 04 August 2005 - 10:01 PM.





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users