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#1 John Simkin

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 02:30 PM

I thought itmight be interesting to start a thread on Douglas Caddy. He is one of those figures who is linked to both the JFK assassination and Watergate.

Caddy was born in 1938. While attending the New York University Law School he became an active member of the far right group, Young Americans for Freedom (YAF). Eventually he became YAF's first executive director. After graduating in 1966 Caddy went to work for General Foods Corporation in White Plains, New.York.

In 1969 Caddy was transferred to corporate headquarters in Washington. According to Caddy: "The corporate plan was to open an office for Washington representation a year later. Meanwhile, I was ordered as an employee to work out of the public affairs firm of Robert Mullen and Co., which General Foods had retained for decades." Caddy met E. Howard Hunt after he joined the staff of Robert Mullen, being recommended by Richard Helms, then director of the CIA.

Caddy left General Foods and joined the Washington Law firm of Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen. In 1970 Hunt became a client of the company. When Charles Colson invited Hunt to join the White House staff in 1971, Caddy provided him with a character reference.

Caddy, who was an active member of the Republican Party, doing volunteer legal work for Richard Nixon. In March 1972 he had a meeting with John Dean. Over the next four months he performed a number of legal tasks connected with Nixon presidential campaign assigned to him by Dean's office. Caddy also did work for Gordon Liddy, the counsel for the finance committee of the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP).

Caddy's past is clearly locked into Nixon's dirty tricks campaigns. He claims he met Hunt for the first time while he was working at Robert Mullen. However, Hunt had himself been heavily involved in YAF with Charles Colson. We also know that YAF were involved in a bombing campaign against the anti-war movement in the late 1960s. Caddy also became involved with Dean and Liddy in 1972. However, he claims that this had nothing to do with any "dirty tricks" campaigns.

When Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker and James W. McCord were arrested at Watergate, the first person that Hunt and Liddy called for help was Caddy. The other Watergate burglars claimed that they had never heard of Caddy when he arrived to represent them. According to William Turner (Deadly Secrets), Caddy told Sturgis that "Olympus is watching over you." Sturgis assumed that it was "a shibboleth that the fail-safe mechanism was in operation". Later that day Caddy arranged to represent Sturgis, Gonzalez, Martinez, Barker, McCord, Hunt and Liddy.

Eleven days later Caddy was instructed to appear before the Grand Jury. Caddy answered some of the questions but refused to answer those he claimed "involved the attorney-client, which protects confidential and legitimate communications between an attorney and his client."

On 10th July, 1972, Earl J. Silbert filed a "motion to Compel Testimony of Grand Jury Witness Michael Douglas Caddy". At issue were 38 key questions that Caddy refused to answer. According to Caddy, these "38 questions was to attempt through my lips as their defense attorney to implicate and incriminate Hunt and Liddy in the break-in." On 13th July, Caddy once again refused to answer these questions and therefore John J. Sirica sent him to prison.

Caddy was soon released and on 19th July, 1972, Caddy appeared before the Grand Jury and answered all the questions he was asked. He was surprised that he was never questioned about his relationship with John Dean and the White House before the Watergate break-in.

It is also noticable that both Dean and Liddy in their memoirs make no reference to the fact that they did business with Caddy before the Watergate break-in.

Strangely he was never asked to testify before Sam Ervin and the Senate Watergate Committee. However, when Herbert W. Kalmbach was interviewed it was discovered that Caddy had rejected attempts by Anthony Ulasewicz to pay "hush money" to his clients.

In 1984 Caddy became a lawyer for Billie Sol Estes. On 9th August, 1984, Caddy wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the letter Caddy claimed that Estes, Lyndon B. Johnson, Mac Wallace and Cliff Carter had been involved in the murders of Henry Marshall, George Krutilek, Harold Orr, Ike Rogers, Coleman Wade, Josefa Johnson, John Kinser and John F. Kennedy. Caddy added: "Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders."

I wonder why Billie Sol Estes selected Douglas Caddy as his attorney?

Caddy wrote an article about Watergate in a recent edition of The Advocate (Ist August, 2005). Caddy obviously feels he was badly treated during the Watergate Scandal. He also believes that the Senate investigation attempted to cover up the links between Watergate and the White House. He is no doubt right about this. But I would go further than that. All those involved in investigating Watergate (including the Washington Post) successfully attempted to cover-up all those dirty tricks operations outside the Watergate incident. That probably involves Caddy and other leaders of the YAF.

Anyway, if you want to read his long article it can be found here:

http://www.advocate...._ektid19186.asp

Douglas Caddy has his own website here:

http://www.reformtexas.com/

Here are the details of Caddy's work for Billie Sol Estes:

http://home.earthlin...floor/estes.htm

#2 James Richards

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 04:12 PM

Douglas Caddy below. Sorry about the poor quality.

James

#3 John Simkin

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 04:25 PM

Douglas Caddy below.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yu are amazing. I did not think you would have one of Caddy. Have you read the article. Have you realized why it is called: Did Gay Bashing by the Prosecutors Cause the Watergate cover-up? I think the adverts are a clue.

#4 Larry Hancock

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 08:37 PM

John, I think you asked the key question on why Estes selected Caddy to represent him to Justice. Of course it may be as simple as the fact that Estes would need a lawyer in DC who had experience negotiating with Justice - Caddy fits the bill and surely his Watergate visiblity made him a prominent name in that. Perhaps Caddy might know and say how Estes was referred, that might not be considered part of client priveleged info. On the other hand its pretty clear from the remarks in his own book that Estes was and is less than happy that his Justice communications were leaked to the public and blames Caddy for that.

Of course in the same book Estes states that he gave a false name to Justice as a witness for his offer...something that neither Justice or his lawyer would look on with much appreciation. Then again said witness is on video with Remond as confirming exactly what was described by Caddy in the letter...again further cluding the whole affair and making Estes look less than reliable.

-- Larry

I thought itmight be interesting to start a thread on Douglas Caddy. He is one of those figures who is linked to both the JFK assassination and Watergate.

Caddy was born in 1938. While attending the New York University Law School he became an active member of the far right group, Young Americans for Freedom (YAF). Eventually he became YAF's first executive director. After graduating in 1966 Caddy went to work for General Foods Corporation in White Plains, New.York.

In 1969 Caddy was transferred to corporate headquarters in Washington. According to Caddy: "The corporate plan was to open an office for Washington representation a year later. Meanwhile, I was ordered as an employee to work out of the public affairs firm of Robert Mullen and Co., which General Foods had retained for decades." Caddy met E. Howard Hunt after he joined the staff of Robert Mullen, being recommended by Richard Helms, then director of the CIA.

Caddy left General Foods and joined the Washington Law firm of Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen. In 1970 Hunt became a client of the company. When Charles Colson invited Hunt to join the White House staff in 1971, Caddy provided him with a character reference.

Caddy, who was an active member of the Republican Party, doing volunteer legal work for Richard Nixon. In March 1972 he had a meeting with John Dean. Over the next four months he performed a number of legal tasks connected with Nixon presidential campaign assigned to him by Dean's office. Caddy also did work for Gordon Liddy, the counsel for the finance committee of the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP).

Caddy's past is clearly locked into Nixon's dirty tricks campaigns. He claims he met Hunt for the first time while he was working at Robert Mullen. However, Hunt had himself been heavily involved in YAF with Charles Colson. We also know that YAF were involved in a bombing campaign against the anti-war movement in the late 1960s. Caddy also became involved with Dean and Liddy in 1972. However, he claims that this had nothing to do with any "dirty tricks" campaigns. 

When Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker and James W. McCord were arrested at Watergate, the first person that Hunt and Liddy called for help was Caddy. The other Watergate burglars claimed that they had never heard of Caddy when he arrived to represent them. According to William Turner (Deadly Secrets), Caddy told Sturgis that "Olympus is watching over you." Sturgis assumed that it was "a shibboleth that the fail-safe mechanism was in operation".  Later that day Caddy arranged to represent Sturgis, Gonzalez, Martinez, Barker, McCord, Hunt and Liddy.

Eleven days later Caddy was instructed to appear before the Grand Jury. Caddy answered some of the questions but refused to answer those he claimed "involved the attorney-client, which protects confidential and legitimate communications between an attorney and his client."

On 10th July, 1972, Earl J. Silbert filed a "motion to Compel Testimony of Grand Jury Witness Michael Douglas Caddy". At issue were 38 key questions that Caddy refused to answer. According to Caddy, these "38 questions was to attempt through my lips as their defense attorney to implicate and incriminate Hunt and Liddy in the break-in." On 13th July, Caddy once again refused to answer these questions and therefore John J. Sirica sent him to prison.

Caddy was soon released and on 19th July, 1972, Caddy appeared before the Grand Jury and answered all the questions he was asked. He was surprised that he was never questioned about his relationship with John Dean and the White House before the Watergate break-in.

It is also noticable that both Dean and Liddy in their memoirs make no reference to the fact that they did business with Caddy before the Watergate break-in.

Strangely he was never asked to testify before Sam Ervin and the Senate Watergate Committee. However, when Herbert W. Kalmbach was interviewed it was discovered that Caddy had rejected attempts by Anthony Ulasewicz to pay "hush money" to his clients.

In 1984 Caddy became a lawyer for Billie Sol Estes. On 9th August, 1984, Caddy wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the letter Caddy claimed that Estes, Lyndon B. Johnson, Mac Wallace and Cliff Carter had been involved in the murders of Henry Marshall, George Krutilek, Harold Orr, Ike Rogers, Coleman Wade, Josefa Johnson, John Kinser and John F. Kennedy. Caddy added: "Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders."

I wonder why Billie Sol Estes selected Douglas Caddy as his attorney?

Caddy wrote an article about Watergate in a recent edition of The Advocate (Ist August, 2005). Caddy obviously feels he was badly treated during the Watergate Scandal. He also believes that the Senate investigation attempted to cover up the links between Watergate and the White House. He is no doubt right about this. But I would go further than that. All those involved in investigating Watergate (including the Washington Post) successfully attempted to cover-up all those dirty tricks operations outside the Watergate incident. That probably involves Caddy and other leaders of the YAF.

Anyway, if you want to read his long article it can be found here:

http://www.advocate...._ektid19186.asp

Douglas Caddy has his own website here:

http://www.reformtexas.com/

Here are the details of Caddy's work for Billie Sol Estes:

http://home.earthlin...floor/estes.htm

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



#5 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 11:29 PM


I thought itmight be interesting to start a thread on Douglas Caddy. He is one of those figures who is linked to both the JFK assassination and Watergate.
(John Simkin)

Caddy is someone I have wondered about for years now. For several reasons.

I saw the Estes documents for the first time in 1998, and shortly thereafter learned that Doug Caddy had been one of the Watergate attorneys...hmm... (Dawn Meredith)



In 1969 Caddy was transferred to corporate headquarters in Washington. According to Caddy: "The corporate plan was to open an office for Washington representation a year later. Meanwhile, I was ordered as an employee to work out of the public affairs firm of Robert Mullen and Co., which General Foods had retained for decades." Caddy met E. Howard Hunt after he joined the staff of Robert Mullen, being recommended by Richard Helms, then director of the CIA. (John Simkin)

What does this tell us about the links between Watergate, Dallas (and the possible id of Deep Throat) (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy, who was an active member of the Republican Party, doing volunteer legal work for Richard Nixon. (John Simkin)

So why would Billie Sol ask Caddy to be his attorney??? (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy's past is clearly locked into Nixon's dirty tricks campaigns. He claims he met Hunt for the first time while he was working at Robert Mullen. However, Hunt had himself been heavily involved in YAF with Charles Colson. We also know that YAF were involved in a bombing campaign against the anti-war movement in the late 1960s. Caddy also became involved with Dean and Liddy in 1972. However, he claims that this had nothing to do with any "dirty tricks" campaigns. (John Simkin)

I cannot answer the question of why Billie Sol choose Caddy, but something really caught my eye in the Estes letters. Most of us here know that the dirty tricksters seem to enjoy doing things on significant dates.

In the book "The Men On the Sixth Floor" (Glen Sample and Mark Collom) Sample writes; "Here for the first time is the COMPLETE Text of the Justice Dept letter from Stephen S Trott to Mr. Caddy, fallowed by the reply letter from Mr Caddy to Mr Trott". The Trott letter is dated 5/29/84- this is JFK's birthday....
But Caddy responds not until 8/9/84--the 10 year anniversary of the resignation of his good President-Tricky Dick.
(Larry Hancock)

When Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker and James W. McCord were arrested at Watergate, the first person that Hunt and Liddy called for help was Caddy. The other Watergate burglars claimed that they had never heard of Caddy when he arrived to represent them. According to William Turner (Deadly Secrets), Caddy told Sturgis that "Olympus is watching over you." Sturgis assumed that it was "a shibboleth that the fail-safe mechanism was in operation". Later that day Caddy arranged to represent Sturgis, Gonzalez, Martinez, Barker, McCord, Hunt and Liddy

Normally this would constitute a serious conflict of interest, to represent multiple co-defendants. Caddy knew this.....

Not to mention the issue of just HOW he ever came to represent Billie Sol. (Dawn Meredith)

On 10th July, 1972, Earl J. Silbert filed a "motion to Compel Testimony of Grand Jury Witness Michael Douglas Caddy". At issue were 38 key questions that Caddy refused to answer. According to Caddy, these "38 questions was to attempt through my lips as their defense attorney to implicate and incriminate Hunt and Liddy in the break-in." On 13th July, Caddy once again refused to answer these questions and therefore John J. Sirica sent him to prison. (John Simkin)

Of course, being atty for all of them allowed him to assert the attorney/client privilege. BUt what was he really up to?? (Larry Hancock)

It is also noticable that both Dean and Liddy in their memoirs make no reference to the fact that they did business with Caddy before the Watergate break-in. (John Simkin)

Notable due to its absence...both men are alive, wonder what they would say about all of this if someone were to write the REAL story of Watergate... (Larry Hancock)

Strangely he was never asked to testify before Sam Ervin and the Senate Watergate Committee One has to wonder why. ... (John Simkin)

In 1984 Caddy became a lawyer for Billie Sol Estes. On 9th August, 1984, Caddy wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the letter Caddy claimed that Estes, Lyndon B. Johnson, Mac Wallace and Cliff Carter had been involved in the murders of Henry Marshall, George Krutilek, Harold Orr, Ike Rogers, Coleman Wade, Josefa Johnson, John Kinser and John F. Kennedy. Caddy added: "Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders."

I wonder why Billie Sol Estes selected Douglas Caddy as his attorney?
(John Simkin)

Perhaps William Redmond (sp) can answer this question for us. (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy wrote an article about Watergate in a recent edition of The Advocate (Ist August, 2005). Caddy obviously feels he was badly treated during the Watergate Scandal. He also believes that the Senate investigation attempted to cover up the links between Watergate and the White House. He is no doubt right about this. But I would go further than that. All those involved in investigating Watergate (including the Washington Post) successfully attempted to cover-up all those dirty tricks operations outside the Watergate incident. That probably involves Caddy and other leaders of the YAF. (John Simkin)

This just raises a whole lot more questions than it can begin to answer.

But they are being asked here.

The site where connections from Dallas to Watergate and beyond is under attack, but, ...unstoppable. (Dawn Meredith)

#6 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 12:56 PM


I thought itmight be interesting to start a thread on Douglas Caddy. He is one of those figures who is linked to both the JFK assassination and Watergate.
(John Simkin)

Caddy is someone I have wondered about for years now. For several reasons.

I saw the Estes documents for the first time in 1998, and shortly thereafter learned that Doug Caddy had been one of the Watergate attorneys...hmm... (Dawn Meredith)



In 1969 Caddy was transferred to corporate headquarters in Washington. According to Caddy: "The corporate plan was to open an office for Washington representation a year later. Meanwhile, I was ordered as an employee to work out of the public affairs firm of Robert Mullen and Co., which General Foods had retained for decades." Caddy met E. Howard Hunt after he joined the staff of Robert Mullen, being recommended by Richard Helms, then director of the CIA. (John Simkin)

What does this tell us about the links between Watergate, Dallas (and the possible id of Deep Throat) (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy, who was an active member of the Republican Party, doing volunteer legal work for Richard Nixon. (John Simkin)

So why would Billie Sol ask Caddy to be his attorney??? (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy's past is clearly locked into Nixon's dirty tricks campaigns. He claims he met Hunt for the first time while he was working at Robert Mullen. However, Hunt had himself been heavily involved in YAF with Charles Colson. We also know that YAF were involved in a bombing campaign against the anti-war movement in the late 1960s. Caddy also became involved with Dean and Liddy in 1972. However, he claims that this had nothing to do with any "dirty tricks" campaigns. (John Simkin)

I cannot answer the question of why Billie Sol choose Caddy, but something really caught my eye in the Estes letters. Most of us here know that the dirty tricksters seem to enjoy doing things on significant dates.

In the book "The Men On the Sixth Floor"  (Glen Sample and Mark Collom) Sample writes; "Here for the first time is the COMPLETE  Text of the Justice Dept letter from Stephen S Trott to Mr. Caddy, fallowed by the reply letter from Mr Caddy to Mr Trott".  The Trott letter is dated 5/29/84- this is JFK's birthday....
But Caddy responds not until 8/9/84--the 10 year anniversary of the resignation of his good President-Tricky Dick.
(Larry Hancock)

When Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker and James W. McCord were arrested at Watergate, the first person that Hunt and Liddy called for help was Caddy. The other Watergate burglars claimed that they had never heard of Caddy when he arrived to represent them. According to William Turner (Deadly Secrets), Caddy told Sturgis that "Olympus is watching over you." Sturgis assumed that it was "a shibboleth that the fail-safe mechanism was in operation".  Later that day Caddy arranged to represent Sturgis, Gonzalez, Martinez, Barker, McCord, Hunt and Liddy

Normally this would constitute a serious conflict of interest, to represent multiple co-defendants.  Caddy knew this.....

Not to mention the issue of just HOW he ever came to represent Billie Sol. (Dawn Meredith)

On 10th July, 1972, Earl J. Silbert filed a "motion to Compel Testimony of Grand Jury Witness Michael Douglas Caddy". At issue were 38 key questions that Caddy refused to answer. According to Caddy, these "38 questions was to attempt through my lips as their defense attorney to implicate and incriminate Hunt and Liddy in the break-in." On 13th July, Caddy once again refused to answer these questions and therefore John J. Sirica sent him to prison. (John Simkin)

Of course, being atty for all of them allowed him to assert the attorney/client privilege.  BUt what was he really up to?? (Larry Hancock)

It is also noticable that both Dean and Liddy in their memoirs make no reference to the fact that they did business with Caddy before the Watergate break-in. (John Simkin)

Notable due to its absence...both men are alive, wonder what they would say about all of this if someone were to write the REAL story of Watergate... (Larry Hancock)

Strangely he was never asked to testify before Sam Ervin and the Senate Watergate Committee One has to wonder why. ...  (John Simkin)

In 1984 Caddy became a lawyer for Billie Sol Estes. On 9th August, 1984, Caddy wrote to Stephen S. Trott at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the letter Caddy claimed that Estes, Lyndon B. Johnson, Mac Wallace and Cliff Carter had been involved in the murders of Henry Marshall, George Krutilek, Harold Orr, Ike Rogers, Coleman Wade, Josefa Johnson, John Kinser and John F. Kennedy. Caddy added: "Mr. Estes is willing to testify that LBJ ordered these killings, and that he transmitted his orders through Cliff Carter to Mac Wallace, who executed the murders."

I wonder why Billie Sol Estes selected Douglas Caddy as his attorney?
(John Simkin)

Perhaps William Redmond (sp) can answer this question for us. (Dawn Meredith)

Caddy wrote an article about Watergate in a recent edition of The Advocate (Ist August, 2005). Caddy obviously feels he was badly treated during the Watergate Scandal. He also believes that the Senate investigation attempted to cover up the links between Watergate and the White House. He is no doubt right about this. But I would go further than that. All those involved in investigating Watergate (including the Washington Post) successfully attempted to cover-up all those dirty tricks operations outside the Watergate incident. That probably involves Caddy and other leaders of the YAF. (John Simkin)

This just raises a whole lot more questions than it can begin to answer.

But they are being asked here. 

The site where connections from  Dallas to Watergate and beyond is under attack, but, ...unstoppable. (Dawn Meredith)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

_____________________________

Not sure why there are names after portions of the above post, but for clarification, I was responding to John's post, the name "Larry Hancock" should not be in this post...sorry Larry, not sure why this occurred, my computer must be
in need of exorcism :))

Does anyone have the Redmond film?

Who is the witness to whom you refer Larry?

If Caddy leaked Billie sol's information, this makes him all the more suspicious.

He (Caddy) was to do the press conference in May 1998 announcing the fingerprint match for Bar MClellan. Walt Brown did it in Dallas, and Caddy was to do one in DC, but was a no show.

Barr does not seem to know why. (According to a recent email exchange with him).

Dawn

#7 Larry Hancock

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 02:20 PM

Hi Dawn, on your questions:

Tom Bowden previwed a copy of the Remond video in Dallas a few years ago, William was there as I recall and the video was in English. I don't think it has ever gone on sale in the US though, not sure why?

Actually Bowden stated in the video that he had heard one or more of the tapes that Estes describes...on the other hand in his own recent book Estes seems to say that he sold all the tapes long ago...very confusing.

The witness is Kyle Brown, he is on the video describing being in the meeting with Carter and Estes and reportedly has heard the tapes as well.....he is named in the Caddy letters to Justice as a witness but now Estes denies that and says he will not name the real witness.

As to leaking the letters, I have no definite knowledge but Glen Sample received the letters from two sources who he does not identify either source. I've heard speculation on the sources which includes Caddy (the letters were not given to Sample until his first edition was in print) and also another man in Texas who was a good friend of Madeleine Brown and who was writing an unpublished manuscript on the Texas Mafia at the time of his death. Still, the letters would have had to have come from either Justice (unlikely), from Estes himself or somehow from Caddy's office files in some fashion.

#8 John Simkin

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 07:37 AM

I have just been reading Rick Perlstein’s Before the Storm. It contains some interesting information about Douglas Caddy. According to Perlstein, while a teenager, Caddy came under the influence of Marvin Liebman, a former member of the American Communist Party who had been dishonorably discharged from the United States Army for homosexuality. Liebman used Caddy to establish the "Youth for Goldwater" organization.

In September, 1960, Liebman and William F. Buckley established Young Americans for Freedom (YAF). The first meeting was held at Buckley's home in Sharon, Connecticut. Caddy became YAF's first president. E. Howard Hunt and Charles Colson were also involved in the early stages of YAF.

Caddy claims that he first met Hunt until 1970. Caddy went to work for General Foods Corporation in White Plains, New York. In 1969 Caddy was transferred to Washington. According to Caddy: "The corporate plan was to open an office for Washington representation a year later. Meanwhile, I was ordered as an employee to work out of the public affairs firm of Robert Mullen and Co., which General Foods had retained for decades." Mullen was a CIA front and that is why Hunt went to work for the organization (on the advice of Richard Helms) when he "retired" from the CIA in 1970.

Caddy was in no position to deny his friendship with Hunt as he had written a character reference when he got the job in the White House. Nor could Caddy deny he knew John Dean or Gordon Liddy before the Watergate break-in because of the documentation that existed that showed their relationship.

In the article in "The Advocate" Caddy denied knowing any of the burglars. However, this is what Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein (All the President's Men) said about their first meeting with Caddy:

Woodward went inside the courtroom. One person stood out. In a middle row sat a young man with fashionably long hair and an expensive suit with slightly flared lapels, his chin high, his eyes searching the room as if he were in unfamiliar surroundings.

Woodward sat down next to him and asked if he was in court because of the Watergate arrests.

"Perhaps," the man said. "I'm not the attorney of record. I'm acting as an individual."

He said his name was Douglas Caddy and he introduced a small, anemic-looking man next to him as the attorney of record, Joseph Rafferty, Jr. Rafferty appeared to have been routed out of bed; he was unshaven and squinted as if the light hurt his eyes. The two lawyers wandered in and out of the courtroom. Woodward finally cornered Rafferty in a hallway and got the names and addresses of the five suspects. Four of them were from Miami, three of them Cuban-Americans.

Caddy didn't want to talk. "Please don't take it personally," he told Woodward. "It would be a mistake to do that. I just don't have anything to say."

Woodward asked Caddy about his clients.

"They are not my clients," he said.

But you are a lawyer? Woodward asked. "I'm not going to talk to you."

Caddy walked back into the courtroom. Woodward followed. "Please, I have nothing to say." Would the five men be able to post bond? Woodward asked. After politely refusing to answer several more times, Caddy replied quickly that the men were all employed and had families-factors that would be taken into consideration by the judge in setting bond. He walked back into the corridor.

Woodward followed: Just tell me about yourself, how you got into the case.

"I'm not in the case." Why are you here?

"Look," Caddy said, "I met one of the defendants, Bernard Barker, at a social occasion."

Where?

"In D.C. It was cocktails at the Army-Navy Club. We had a sympathetic conversation... that's all I'm going to say."

How did you get into the case?

Caddy pivoted and walked back in. After half an hour, he went out again.

Woodward asked how he got into the case.

This time Caddy said he'd gotten a call shortly after 3:00 A.M. from Barker's wife. "She said her husband had told her to call me if he hadn't called her by three, that it might mean he was in trouble."


Caddy admits in the article that the Grand Jury was not interested in his pre-Watergate relationships with Operation Gemstone and the White House (why not?). Nor was he asked to testify before the Senate Watergate Committee.

It is clear that a successful attempt was made during the trial of the Watergate burglars and the Senate Watergate Committee, to cover up what had been going on outside of the Watergate break-in. This is a passage from Robert Jackson's account in the Los Angeles Times (29th January, 1973) about the Watergate trial:

A clubby atmosphere has prevailed in federal court during the three weeks it has taken the government to present their case in the Watergate bugging trial.

The questioning of Republican officials and others has been more polite than penetrating. Entire areas have been left unprobed.

In corridor discussions, prosecutor Earl Silbert has been asked repeatedly by newsmen why he has not posed additional questions to witnesses or called higher Republican officials to the stand.

Silbert’s contention is that the government is submitting only evidence that is necessary to prove charges in its indictment of the original seven defendants last September.

There is no evidence of a wider conspiracy, he has told reporters. Additional testimony could be immaterial and irrelevant, he has said.

Not only have the prosecution’s questions been limited but the defense attorneys at times have even waived their opportunity to cross-examine.


The Washington Post went along with this strategy. I am convinced that Ben Bradlee and Bob Woodward were involved in a "limited hangout" operation. It was the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times that tried to expand the investigation. I believe Bradlee and Woodward were actually protecting Nixon from the more serious dirty-tricks he had been involved in since 1968. Why? The same reason why the CIA covered up the JFK assassination. Some of its agents were involved. Deep Throat, Bradlee and Woodward managed to remove Nixon while protecting the CIA. Nixon had no option but to accept this as his real crimes were far greater than covering up the Watergate break-in.

You can find what I have discovered about Caddy so far from here:

http://www.spartacus...k/JFKcaddyD.htm

#9 Pat Speer

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 09:25 AM

James McCord's book A Piece of Tape is quite revealing as to the cooperation between the original lawyers for the burglars, the Justice Department and The White House. McCord makes it clear that the original prosecutors were helping to cover everything up. It was their behavior, as much as anything else, that alerted him to the fact that his country was no longer a nation of laws, and that every branch of the government was infected by Nixon.

#10 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 06:35 PM

James McCord's book A Piece of Tape is quite revealing as to the cooperation between the original lawyers for the burglars, the Justice Department and The White House.  McCord makes it clear that the original prosecutors were helping to cover everything up. It was their behavior, as much as anything else, that alerted him to the fact that his country was no longer a nation of laws, and that every branch of the government was infected by Nixon.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Pat (or anyone)

Has McCord ever given an interview on Watergate, aside the one he gave to Carl Oglesby? (Referenced in "The Yankee and CVowboy War").

It would be interesting to hear what he would have to say after so many years.

Hunt was interviewed last year for, I believe Slate or Salon, can't remember which online mag, and had some very intresting "no comment" lines.

John may have even posted it here, if so, perhaps he can re-post it so that we can see it again.

I will NEVER believe anything other than McCord was a "double agent"; he can deny all he wants. He got caught at Watergate on purpose, the question is why and for whose benefit?

Dawn

#11 Pat Speer

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 10:42 AM

I will NEVER believe anything other than McCord was a "double agent"; he can deny all he wants. He got caught at Watergate on purpose, the question is why and for whose benefit?

Dawn

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I was skeptical about McCord until I read his book. I believe he was exactly what he said he was--a believer in the CIA and the Justice Department who was horrified when Nixon, for self-preservation, soiled the reputation of one and corrupted the other. McCord, unlike too many, could separate an individual from an institution. He was quite patriotic in his own way. On the back of his book, it's announced that he was working on TWO other books which would further illuminate the problems in Washington. And yet, near as I can figure, these books never came out. My question for him then would be what happened to these other books, and whether he was pressured into shutting up once Nixon resigned.

#12 James Richards

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:16 PM

A bit more on Caddy. Sorry if this has been covered and I missed it.

In 1959, New Orleans man Richard Bell organized a group of students to attend the World Youth Conference in Vienna. This drew major opposition from the local American Legion. The Legion organized a Free Enterprize Seminar designed to highlight that the Bell conference was Communist backed. Two of the speakers for the Legion were Douglas Caddy and Guy Banister.

Caddy was also behind a push out of New Orleans to elect Joe McCarthy as President. The clipping below comes from June of 1955.

FWIW.

James

#13 Tim Gratz

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 07:23 AM

His efforts on McCarthy's behalf did not get very far.

His movement was probably under-funded. He should have gotten a contribution from Joe Kennedy!

#14 John Simkin

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 08:28 AM

A bit more on Caddy. Sorry if this has been covered and I missed it.

In 1959, New Orleans man Richard Bell organized a group of students to attend the World Youth Conference in Vienna. This drew major opposition from the local American Legion. The Legion organized a Free Enterprize Seminar designed to highlight that the Bell conference was Communist backed. Two of the speakers for the Legion were Douglas Caddy and Guy Banister.

Caddy was also behind a push out of New Orleans to elect Joe McCarthy as President. The clipping below comes from June of 1955.


Very interesting. Douglas Caddy was the man that William Buckley chose to become the first leader of the Young Americans for Freedom. Caddy, like Buckley, had been a strong supporter of Joe McCarthy in the 1950s. In fact, Buckley was one of the few right-wingers who never deserted McCarthy and continued to praise him in the National Review even after he fell from power. According to Buckley, it was the “pro-communist” Eisenhower who was responsible for the undermining of McCarthy. In fact, it was the CIA that brought down McCarthy, but that is another story.

I have already found strong links between Buckley to E. Howard Hunt, H. L. Hunt and Robert Welch. It now seems that there is a possible link with Buckley to Guy Banister via Caddy.

#15 Tim Gratz

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 08:38 AM

John, have you missed that Buckley wrote a book: "McCarthy and His Enemies"?




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