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John Connally and the Assassination of JFK


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#31 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 11:50 PM

The Connally and Fisher at Endeavor are alive, according to Forbes.com and other sources. Both are active in their careers. Connally has III after his name.



Thanks Tom!

Edited by Scott Kaiser, 03 March 2012 - 11:59 PM.


#32 Guest_Robert Morrow_*

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 01:16 AM

Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006)

http://www.opednews....ion_the_bes.htm

The handwritten note lay in the bottom drawer of my old rolltop desk, one I bought for $50 in a junk store in Richmond, VA, 39 years ago.

"Dear Doug & Amy," it read. "Thanks for dinner and for listening." The signature was a bold "John" and the letterhead on the note simply said "John B. Connally" and was dated July 14, 1982.

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.


This is some very important information and it is why I do not think John Connally was involved in the JFK assassation. #1 I do not think he would endanger his or his wife's life by getting in that limo with Kennedy if he knew shots were to be fired in it #2 Connally always insisted that different bullets hit him and JFK, which is rejection of the "magic bullet theory." #3 and very importantly, note what Connally is saying - he warned Kennedy not to come to Texas but that LYNDON JOHNSON was being an asshole and insisted. Got that? LBJ was arranging things (through CIA/military) to murder John Kennedy. And LBJ first tried to get Jackie to ride in his car and then on the day of the JFK assassination was trying to get Connally in his car and send his enemy Ralph Yarborough into the kill zone.

I think this interview is of historical value.

At that time in 1963, LBJ's fortunes were on the way down; Connally's was on the way up nand their was a split between the 2 men. In reality LBJ, Connally and Ralph Yarborough were all feuding with one another.

#33 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 01:44 AM


Doug Thompson, Is Deception the Best Way to Serve Your Country? (30th March, 2006)

http://www.opednews....ion_the_bes.htm

The handwritten note lay in the bottom drawer of my old rolltop desk, one I bought for $50 in a junk store in Richmond, VA, 39 years ago.

"Dear Doug & Amy," it read. "Thanks for dinner and for listening." The signature was a bold "John" and the letterhead on the note simply said "John B. Connally" and was dated July 14, 1982.

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.


This is some very important information and it is why I do not think John Connally was involved in the JFK assassation. #1 I do not think he would endanger his or his wife's life by getting in that limo with Kennedy if he knew shots were to be fired in it #2 Connally always insisted that different bullets hit him and JFK, which is rejection of the "magic bullet theory." #3 and very importantly, note what Connally is saying - he warned Kennedy not to come to Texas but that LYNDON JOHNSON was being an asshole and insisted. Got that? LBJ was arranging things (through CIA/military) to murder John Kennedy. And LBJ first tried to get Jackie to ride in his car and then on the day of the JFK assassination was trying to get Connally in his car and send his enemy Ralph Yarborough into the kill zone.

I think this interview is of historical value.

At that time in 1963, LBJ's fortunes were on the way down; Connally's was on the way up nand their was a split between the 2 men. In reality LBJ, Connally and Ralph Yarborough were all feuding with one another.



Doug Thompson later revealed that in 1982 when he asked Connally if he was convinced that Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed John F. Kennedy. "Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission." Connally was adamant about Oswald not firing any shoots, he says, "Absolutely not," .

Could Connally have known something more to the plot to assassinate Kennedy?

Edited by Scott Kaiser, 04 March 2012 - 01:44 AM.


#34 Guest_Robert Morrow_*

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:24 AM

I think Connally smelled a dead rat after the JFK assassination - he probably suspected LBJ because he knew him so well - but I do not thin Connally had foreknowledge.

#35 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 05:31 AM

I think Connally smelled a dead rat after the JFK assassination - he probably suspected LBJ because he knew him so well - but I do not thin Connally had foreknowledge.



I don’t usually respond to forwards, but since this is something where I have seen the documents, here we go:



Governor Connally from his hospital bed did his first interview about what happened, the interview is quite extensive and comprehensive.

“When the shots rang out, I said, My God they’re going to kill us both.” He later changed it to “All”, the next day, and as we have heard many times since.



He was not supposed to be in the limo with JFK and Jackie but for the President’s insistence, Ralph Yarborough was to be the guest in the limo, and JFK argued with the Governor, convincing him to be in the car with them. Cliff Carter sent for Connally’s clothes and had them dry cleaned immediately, thus making them useless for evidence.



Since the shooter teams didn’t have duplex radios back then, they had no idea that the target(s) had changed, and that the green light to “go” could not be recalled. (Short of an abort command by the “God” Team Abort Leader) played in the JFK movie by Gerald Patrick Hemming, “Charlie Mike” would have been the order to “Continue Mission”.



Of course Lyndon Johnson was several cars back in the caravan, and hit the floor out of range, well before the head shots occurred, according to two authors including Jim Marrs, “Crossfire”, pages 249 and 250. Both he and Senator Yarborough were on the floor listening to a walkie talkie turned down low so only they could hear it, perhaps it was a special channel opened for the occasion by the Secret Service. No transcripts of this channel have ever been made public.



Nellie Connally related to someone on the Grassy Knoll during one of her unscheduled visits in the 90s, out of range of the TV cameras, said that she heard more than 3 shots, perhaps 5, then on the Larry King Show said that the bullet that hit JFK was not the same one that hit her Husband. Right to the end, the family, (she) would not allow removal of bullet fragments from his body for testing. The person talking with her about the shots has not been seen selling newspapers on the Knoll since.



Frog


An email I received from Treefrog

#36 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:37 PM

Matthews is not naïve, he is following his instructions to obfuscate any possibility of conspiracy. Therefore he will keep his job with the MSM.


Jesse Ventura violated this, and had his MSNBC TV show cancelled only 2 weeks after his outspoken JFK comments in Dallas.


Gerald Ford is another case, with an FBI informant T number, he reported to Hoover everything that happened in the Warren Commission meetings.


When they offered him the Presidency, if he pardoned Nixon, he jumped for the opportunity.


Leap Frog


From: DRBREA
Sent: Sunday, March 04, 2012 10:14 AM
To: treefrog
Subject: Re: John Connally: I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warr



Treefrog:



Thanks for the information. One question I've been thinking about for some time is why does a large proportion of our media and governmental figures (including liberals like Chris Mathews and others) continue to adhere to the lone-gunman position even though its long been discredited by the HSCA and other more recent evidence. This article provides at least one explanation:


I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."


Of course that was also Jerry Ford's explanation for pardoning Nixon. For many people this argument is simply an excuse to keep the bad stuff hidden. But perhaps some of our more naive commentators, like Mathews, believe we really must protect the "children" from hearing the bad stuff. This is a point of view that should be reversed somehow, but is very difficult to fight against when the people that hold this position don't even want to talk about it.



In a message dated 3/3/2012 11:25:46 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, treefrog@ix.netcom.com writes:

I don’t usually respond to forwards, but since this is something where I have seen the documents, here we go:


Governor Connally from his hospital bed did his first interview about what happened, the interview is quite extensive and comprehensive.

“When the shots rang out, I said, My God they’re going to kill us both.” He later changed it to “All”, the next day, and as we have heard many times since.


He was not supposed to be in the limo with JFK and Jackie but for the President’s insistence, Ralph Yarborough was to be the guest in the limo, and JFK argued with the Governor, convincing him to be in the car with them. Cliff Carter sent for Connally’s clothes and had them dry cleaned immediately, thus making them useless for evidence.


Since the shooter teams didn’t have duplex radios back then, they had no idea that the target(s) had changed, and that the green light to “go” could not be recalled. (Short of an abort command by the “God” Team Abort Leader) played in the JFK movie by Gerald Patrick Hemming, “Charlie Mike” would have been the order to “Continue Mission”.


Of course Lyndon Johnson was several cars back in the caravan, and hit the floor out of range, well before the head shots occurred, according to two authors including Jim Marrs, “Crossfire”, pages 249 and 250. Both he and Senator Yarborough were on the floor listening to a walkie talkie turned down low so only they could hear it, perhaps it was a special channel opened for the occasion by the Secret Service. No transcripts of this channel have ever been made public.


Nellie Connally related to someone on the Grassy Knoll during one of her unscheduled visits in the 90s, out of range of the TV cameras, said that she heard more than 3 shots, perhaps 5, then on the Larry King Show said that the bullet that hit JFK was not the same one that hit her Husband. Right to the end, the family, (she) would not allow removal of bullet fragments from his body for testing. The person talking with her about the shots has not been seen selling newspapers on the Knoll since.



Frog


From Robert Morrow:

Note: I do not believe John Connally was involved in the JFK assassination. I believe that Lyndon Johnson was at the epicenter of it. Doug Thompson runs the web page Capital Hill Blue. - Robert Morrow

John Connally: "You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."



http://www.opednews....ion_the_bes.htm

March 29, 2006

Is deception the best way to serve one's country?

By Doug Thompson

The handwritten note lay in the bottom drawer of my old rolltop desk, one I bought for $50 in a junk store in Richmond, VA, 39 years ago. "Dear Doug & Amy," it read. "Thanks for dinner and for listening." The signature was a bold "John" and the letterhead on the note simply said "John B. Connally" and was dated July 14, 1982.

::::::::

The handwritten note lay in the bottom drawer of my old rolltop desk, one I bought for $50 in a junk store in Richmond, VA, 39 years ago.

"Dear Doug & Amy," it read. "Thanks for dinner and for listening." The signature was a bold "John" and the letterhead on the note simply said "John B. Connally" and was dated July 14, 1982.

I met John Connally on a TWA flight from Kansas City to Albuquerque earlier that year. The former governor of Texas, the man who took one of the bullets from the assassination that killed President John F. Kenney, was headed to Santa Fe to buy a house.

The meeting wasn't an accident. The flight originated in Washington and I sat in the front row of the coach cabin. During a stop in Kansas City, I saw Connally get on the plane and settle into a first class seat so I walked off the plane and upgraded to a first class seat right ahead of the governor. I not only wanted to meet the man who was with Kennedy on that day in Dallas in 1963 but, as the communications director for the re-election campaign of Congressman Manuel Lujan of New Mexico, I thought he might be willing to help out on what was a tough campaign.

When the plane was in the air, I introduced myself and said I was working on Lujan's campaign. Connally's face lit up and he invited me to move to the empty seat next to him.

"How is Manuel? Is there anything I can do to help?"

By the time we landed in Albuquerque, Connally had agreed to do a fundraiser for Lujan. A month later, he flew back into New Mexico where Amy and I picked him up for the fundraiser. Afterwards, we took him to dinner.

Connolly was both gracious and charming and told us many stories about Texas politics. As the evening wore on and the multiple bourbon and branch waters took their effect, he started talking about November 22, 1963, in Dallas.

"You know I was one of the ones who advised Kennedy to stay away from Texas," Connally said. "Lyndon (Johnson) was being a real asshole about the whole thing and insisted."

Connally's mood darkened as he talked about Dallas. When the bullet hit him, he said he felt like he had been kicked in the ribs and couldn't breathe. He spoke kindly of Jackie Kennedy and said he admired both her bravery and composure.

I had to ask. Did he think Lee Harvey Oswald fired the gun that killed Kennedy?

"Absolutely not," Connally said. "I do not, for one second, believe the conclusions of the Warren Commission."

So why not speak out?

"Because I love this country and we needed closure at the time. I will never speak out publicly about what I believe."

We took him back to catch a late flight to Texas. He shook my hand, kissed Amy on the cheek and walked up the ramp to the plane.

We saw Connally and his wife a couple of more times when they came to New Mexico but he sold his house a few years later as part of a bankruptcy settlement. He died in 1993 and, I believe, never spoke publicly about how he doubted the findings of the Warren Commission.

Connnally's note serves as yet another reminder that in our Democratic Republic, or what's left of it, few things are seldom as they seem. Like him, I never accepted the findings of the Warren Commission. Too many illogical conclusions.

John Kennedy's death, and the doubts that surround it to this day, marked the beginning of the end of America's idealism. The cynicism grew with the lies of Vietnam and the senseless deaths of too many thousands of young Americans in a war that never should have been fought. Doubts about the integrity of those we elect as our leaders festers today as this country finds itself embroiled in another senseless war based on too many lies.

John Connally felt he served his country best by concealing his doubts about the Warren Commission's whitewash but his silence may have contributed to the growing perception that our elected leaders can rewrite history to fit their political agendas.

Had Connally spoken out, as a high-ranking political figure with doubts about the "official" version of what happened, it might have sent a signal that Americans deserve the truth from their government, even when that truth hurts.

Originally published at and © Copyright 2006 by Capitol Hill Blue

Edited by Scott Kaiser, 05 March 2012 - 03:38 PM.


#37 Rodney Rivers

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 07:38 PM


Don,

Interesting post. Connally always seemed OK to me. That photo of him and LBJ looking on as JFK gave his final speech in Fort Worth showed a man unaware of what was soon to transpire, IMO. A picture tells a thousand words and all that.

As for LBJ, as time passes and more information seeps into the public domain, things just look worse and worse. Although this story would be considered heresay and not evidence, most snippets of gossip, memoirs etc, all seem to reinforce the suspicion that LBJ the prime player in setting up his boss. Add to this all the revelations about his background and rise in politics and you have a rocksolid case for conspiracy to murder. Ladybird, Jack Valenti and others who want the issue to remain undisturbed will have to accept that the truth will emerge and, importantly, the public will discover the truth.


Don - thanks for sharing that. In may cases, I don't believe some folks had it within their means to share what they knew - in Connally's case, for example, even after death the family apparently refused to allow the final fragments to be removed from his body.

Mark - Have you ever watched Four Days in November? Pay close attention to the body language of Ladybird and Johnson.

Another unrelated bit that would go well with what you've posted is the case of Emmett Louis Till. There is footage of the reaction of Roy Bryant and J.W Milam when it was announced that they were acquitted. 'Telling,' I guess is the word. Apparently they later confessed to the crime in a magazine interview.

Even recently, I watched Joran van der Sloot giving an interview. Well....I'm no expert. I wonder what an expert would have made of his eyes batting maddenly every time he responded to a difficult question.

I've posted this one before - I think it's a great shot.

- lee


Hey Lee,

Great photo. I agree with Ron that it looks like LBJ is fantasizing about a six shooter. It's a bit comical, really. Unfortunately I haven't seen 'Four days in November' yet but I'll watch out for it.



Mr.DVP has Four Days in November on his youtube Channel here, 8 parts : http://www.youtube.c...4BC0&feature=iv

Also thanks for posting that picture. I think this picture is more telling, which I think Mr. Stapleton was referring to :

Posted Image

It's an eeiry stare he gives JFK hours before he dies. Almost like his eyes are saying You're going to be dead soon. If you've seen the video of this event, you see this stare and then LBJ looking JFK up and down.

Edited by Rodney Rivers, 06 March 2012 - 07:39 PM.


#38 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:37 PM



Don,

Interesting post. Connally always seemed OK to me. That photo of him and LBJ looking on as JFK gave his final speech in Fort Worth showed a man unaware of what was soon to transpire, IMO. A picture tells a thousand words and all that.

As for LBJ, as time passes and more information seeps into the public domain, things just look worse and worse. Although this story would be considered heresay and not evidence, most snippets of gossip, memoirs etc, all seem to reinforce the suspicion that LBJ the prime player in setting up his boss. Add to this all the revelations about his background and rise in politics and you have a rocksolid case for conspiracy to murder. Ladybird, Jack Valenti and others who want the issue to remain undisturbed will have to accept that the truth will emerge and, importantly, the public will discover the truth.


Don - thanks for sharing that. In may cases, I don't believe some folks had it within their means to share what they knew - in Connally's case, for example, even after death the family apparently refused to allow the final fragments to be removed from his body.

Mark - Have you ever watched Four Days in November? Pay close attention to the body language of Ladybird and Johnson.

Another unrelated bit that would go well with what you've posted is the case of Emmett Louis Till. There is footage of the reaction of Roy Bryant and J.W Milam when it was announced that they were acquitted. 'Telling,' I guess is the word. Apparently they later confessed to the crime in a magazine interview.

Even recently, I watched Joran van der Sloot giving an interview. Well....I'm no expert. I wonder what an expert would have made of his eyes batting maddenly every time he responded to a difficult question.

I've posted this one before - I think it's a great shot.

- lee


Hey Lee,

Great photo. I agree with Ron that it looks like LBJ is fantasizing about a six shooter. It's a bit comical, really. Unfortunately I haven't seen 'Four days in November' yet but I'll watch out for it.



Mr.DVP has Four Days in November on his youtube Channel here, 8 parts : http://www.youtube.c...4BC0&feature=iv

Also thanks for posting that picture. I think this picture is more telling, which I think Mr. Stapleton was referring to :

Posted Image

It's an eeiry stare he gives JFK hours before he dies. Almost like his eyes are saying You're going to be dead soon. If you've seen the video of this event, you see this stare and then LBJ looking JFK up and down.




How do we know that LBJ wasn't just looking into the camera when the picture was taken? And that's his everyday ugly look? <Just saying>? While JFK wanted to be a bit more dramatic and stair off into the distance? What if it was the cameraman's intention to have the photo look like that? Again, <Just saying>...

#39 Guest_Robert Morrow_*

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 04:38 AM

(Folks, I do not believe John Connally was involved in the JFK assassination. I do believe he was manipulated by Lyndon Johnson to do certain things that made the JFK assassination possible. - Robert)

"My Encounter with the Connallys"

By Al Navis

At the 1992 version of ASK (The Assassination Symposium on John F. Kennedy), the final event of the weekend was to be ‘The Dealey Plaza Walk About’. That was to run from 2:00 until 4:00 p.m. and there were maybe ten of us ‘tour guides’ who would take groups of interested symposium attendees—as well as members of the general public who happened to find themselves there—on a tour of Dealey Plaza.

It was perhaps 3:45 p.m. and all the other tour guides were either back at the hotel, on their way back or wrapping up their last group when I glanced up towards Old Elm Street. That part of Elm that ran right in front of the Texas School Book Depository Building and led to the parking lot which is behind the picket fence atop the infamous ‘Grassy Knoll’.

A black Cadillac stretch limousine had pulled up and had parked. Getting out on the curbside was former Texas Governor John Connally wearing a white Stetson hat. Moments later, his wife Nellie also appeared. They had been invited by the ASK organizers for the 2:00 p.m. ‘walk about’ but hadn’t shown up. I hustled up the hill towards the Governor and his wife, held out my hand and introduced myself.

The Governor apologized that his aide had written down the time of the ending of the event instead of the start and he wondered if it was too late. I explained that all the other guides as well as the organizers had already headed back to hotel but that I would be honoured to take them for a brief tour, until it got dark. While it was warm, and it was Texas, it was still the end of November and the thousands of birds that call Dealey Plaza home during the evenings were coming in to roost.

As we strolled slowly across Old Elm and then around the east end of the triangular block and began walking down the gentle slope of Elm Street, I could see that the Governor seemed a bit ill-at-ease.

“I guess,” I said, “That every time you come back to this place, the memories are not at all pleasant.”

“Actually,” replied John Connally, “This is the first time that we’ve been here since…since…that day.”

He hesitated and I could see that even 29 years later, the events of ‘that day’ were a part of John Connally’s daily life…and always would be.

“Nellie and I didn’t live here,” he said. “Austin is where the Governor’s mansion is and then there were the years in Washington. Sometimes I’d have to be here in Dallas for a dinner or an event, but I never allowed the car to come anywhere near here.”

Nellie Connally said, “Al, you don’t know how tough it was for me to get John to agree to come here today.”

She squeezed his arm and they looked at each other and I could see genuine affection that only a combination of years together and crises weathered can produce.

We continued down Elm Street until we were right below the concrete pedestal on which Abraham Zapruder and his secretary Marilyn Sitzman stood while filming the assassination. I pointed it out to the Connallys, pivoted and turned to face east, directly at the County Records Building. As I pointed up to the roof of that building, I said, “That is where the shooter was who shot you. The bullet entered your back and exited your chest.”

Now I turned to face north and looked up at the sixth floor of the Book Depository and said, “The top floor of windows is the seventh, so the next floor down is the sixth. Way over on the east end is where the Warren Commission said that Lee Oswald was…but we all know he wasn’t. However someone was in that window.

“The shooter who shot you a second time, was in the…”

“A second time?” John Connally interrupted.

“Yes sir,” I responded. “That shooter was on the same floor but in the far west window. While your wife was pulling you towards her, a bullet went through your right wrist and ended up in your left thigh.”

When I said this, I saw Nellie Connally elbow her husband in the ribs gently and say,”See, John, I told you that I felt something hit you when I was pulled you over. Now I have proof.”

“Mrs. Connally,” I said. “This isn’t proof, it’s just my take on who was where on that day. I looked at the wounds on both the Governor and the President as well as the spectator who was hit way down there by the underpass on Commerce Street. I just did what a ballistics person would do at any other shooting scene. Work backwards. Don’t let yourself be swayed by what other people have said happened. Work it out for yourself.”

“For years,” said Nellie Connally, “I have believed that John was struck by two shots, but he has insisted that he felt only one.”

I said, “I think that by the time the second shot hit, maybe two seconds after the first one, that the Governor was already in shock and that he wasn’t capable of feeling anything. He also would have had a loud rushing noise in his ears, so until he was down in your lap and the car was on its way to the hospital, he probably couldn’t hear anything either.”

The Governor was silent for a moment and then asked, “Al, how many shooters do you think were firing at us?”

“Six,” I said.

John Connally chuckled a bit and said, “That’s what shoots you conspiracy buffs down in the press. You always over-reach. How could that many people keep a secret for almost thirty years?”

“Governor?” I asked, “Do you remember the armoured car robbery in Boston in the early fifties?”

“Of course,” he said.

“Imagine that you and I are just chatting about what we’ve done in our lives and I say that I was part of that armed robbery. Do you honestly think that anyone involved in that case would say anything to anyone even forty years after the fact?”

“Probably not,” the Governor said after thinking for a few moments.

“Well,” I said, “At the centre of this event, when you put aside all the theories, trajectories, reports, obfuscations, misdirections and even outright lies, there is one simple fact: a homicide occurred. John Kennedy was killed and the statute of limitations never runs out on murder. So why would anyone risk coming forward even thirty years later?”

The Governor said nothing but I could see him formulating a reply. “So how many people who were involved, know everything?”

“Everything?” I repeated. “Nobody. It wouldn’t be safe for anyone to know everything. The same way that covert operations use ‘cutouts’ and anonymous people to deliver messages and material, I can’t see anyone even wanting to know everything. That is except us!”

The three of us laughed at that and I felt that if I could get John and Nellie Connally to laugh at a place where one of them was shot and both of them scarred forever, then I did my job.

“How long have you been interested in the case?” Nellie Connally asked.

“Early on,” I replied. “I guess I really became interested when I saw Jack Ruby shoot Lee Oswald on live television from ABC Buffalo, while I watched from Toronto.”

“Toronto?” the Governor exclaimed. “You mean you are Canadian?”

“Guilty, Governor Connally,” I said.

“Then your early interest in the assassination is even more intresting,” said Nellie Connally.

“So,” said the Governor, “You said that you thought there were six people involved. Where were they?”

“I said that there were six people shooting at you,” I corrected, “And they were everywhere. My scenario has the first shot hitting the President in the throat fired from behind the picket fence. The second, third and fourth shots were almost simultaneous. One was the shot that hit you, fired from the roof of the Country Records Building. Another was from the co-called ‘Oswald window’ or ‘sniper’s nest’ which hit the President in the back. The third of these three shots was fired from the second floor window of the Dal-Tex Building, went through the limousine’s windshield and then hit the curbstone down by the triple underpass and Commerce Street. A fragment either of the bullet or the curbstone that it hit flew up and slightly wounded a spectator named James Tague. The next shot was the second shot that hit you in the wrist and ended up in your left thigh, fired from the west window on the sixth floor. The final shot is controversial. I believe that it was fired from this storm drain.”

By then I had slowly walked the Connallys down Elm Street until we were at the base of the stairs that led up the ‘grassy knoll’. I moved them gently to the curb, without stepping into traffic.

“In 1963,” I began, “This opening was a full eight inches high. Plenty of room for a person to fire a handgun and the shot was very close. When I first spoke to Bill and Gail Newman—who were just up Elm Street from here on that day—about eight years ago, I mentioned to Bill that I had heard a radio interview with him done on the afternoon of the assassination and that he had said the last shot ‘sounded different’. When I said this to him, I could see him replaying the assassination in his mind—as I’m sure that both you and Nellie, uh, sorry, Mrs. Connally…”

“Al, ‘Nellie’ is just fine,” she interrupted. “And so is ‘John’. He hasn’t been ‘The Governor’ for a long time now!” She laughed.

“I kinda liked being called ‘Governor’ again, dear,” said John Connally and smiled at his wife.

“Well Billy Newman said that when he thought about it now, the last shot did sound different. I asked him if it was more of a ‘boom’ while the others were more of a ‘crack’ and he said that was it exactly! I asked him if it could have been fired by a handgun instead of a high-powered rifle, from underground instead of from a window and from down to his right, instead of behind him? Newman looked at me and nodded.”

“Why so many people?” asked Nellie Connally.

“If each shooter fired only once, he didn’t need to re-acquire his target and re-aim. It was just pull the trigger and then get the hell outta here. I bet that the gunman who fired the first shot that hit you was already off the roof and down the stairs before the limousine went under the triple underpass. By the time anybody would have thought to look, the shooters were all long gone. Each one in a different direction. I also believe that they didn’t even know where the other shooting locations were either.”

During our little stroll a few people had recognized the Connallys and had come over, some asking for autographs, but most just watching from a distance.

In all, I spent perhaps thirty to forty minutes with the Connallys and when it was over and I walked them back to their limousine, John Connally shook my hand and said. “Son, you’ve given me a lot to think about today and I thank you for that.”

Nellie Connally also shook my hand and gently kissed my cheek. “Thank you, Al,” was all she whispered.

They got into the limousine which during our tour had turned around so the it was now heading east on Old Elm. As the limousine slowly pulled away I thought about my little brush with history. The first time the Connallys had been back in Dealey Plaza since the assassination. I wondered if any of my fellow researchers would believe me when I got back to the Hyatt Reunion Hotel, but some attendees had seen me with the Connallys and others had come up for autographs.

When I got back to the hotel, a few of the researchers had already heard that the Connallys had finally arrived and that I had been their tour guide and I got some good-natured ribbing. When I got back to Toronto a few days later, I roughly wrote down most of the conversation that we shared as best as I could remember it.

But it wasn’t until 14 years later, with the help of those notes, that I finally put together this little narrative.

#40 Scott Kaiser

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 05:09 AM

(Folks, I do not believe John Connally was involved in the JFK assassination. I do believe he was manipulated by Lyndon Johnson to do certain things that made the JFK assassination possible. - Robert)

"My Encounter with the Connallys"

By Al Navis

At the 1992 version of ASK (The Assassination Symposium on John F. Kennedy), the final event of the weekend was to be ‘The Dealey Plaza Walk About’. That was to run from 2:00 until 4:00 p.m. and there were maybe ten of us ‘tour guides’ who would take groups of interested symposium attendees—as well as members of the general public who happened to find themselves there—on a tour of Dealey Plaza.

It was perhaps 3:45 p.m. and all the other tour guides were either back at the hotel, on their way back or wrapping up their last group when I glanced up towards Old Elm Street. That part of Elm that ran right in front of the Texas School Book Depository Building and led to the parking lot which is behind the picket fence atop the infamous ‘Grassy Knoll’.

A black Cadillac stretch limousine had pulled up and had parked. Getting out on the curbside was former Texas Governor John Connally wearing a white Stetson hat. Moments later, his wife Nellie also appeared. They had been invited by the ASK organizers for the 2:00 p.m. ‘walk about’ but hadn’t shown up. I hustled up the hill towards the Governor and his wife, held out my hand and introduced myself.

The Governor apologized that his aide had written down the time of the ending of the event instead of the start and he wondered if it was too late. I explained that all the other guides as well as the organizers had already headed back to hotel but that I would be honoured to take them for a brief tour, until it got dark. While it was warm, and it was Texas, it was still the end of November and the thousands of birds that call Dealey Plaza home during the evenings were coming in to roost.

As we strolled slowly across Old Elm and then around the east end of the triangular block and began walking down the gentle slope of Elm Street, I could see that the Governor seemed a bit ill-at-ease.

“I guess,” I said, “That every time you come back to this place, the memories are not at all pleasant.”

“Actually,” replied John Connally, “This is the first time that we’ve been here since…since…that day.”

He hesitated and I could see that even 29 years later, the events of ‘that day’ were a part of John Connally’s daily life…and always would be.

“Nellie and I didn’t live here,” he said. “Austin is where the Governor’s mansion is and then there were the years in Washington. Sometimes I’d have to be here in Dallas for a dinner or an event, but I never allowed the car to come anywhere near here.”

Nellie Connally said, “Al, you don’t know how tough it was for me to get John to agree to come here today.”

She squeezed his arm and they looked at each other and I could see genuine affection that only a combination of years together and crises weathered can produce.

We continued down Elm Street until we were right below the concrete pedestal on which Abraham Zapruder and his secretary Marilyn Sitzman stood while filming the assassination. I pointed it out to the Connallys, pivoted and turned to face east, directly at the County Records Building. As I pointed up to the roof of that building, I said, “That is where the shooter was who shot you. The bullet entered your back and exited your chest.”

Now I turned to face north and looked up at the sixth floor of the Book Depository and said, “The top floor of windows is the seventh, so the next floor down is the sixth. Way over on the east end is where the Warren Commission said that Lee Oswald was…but we all know he wasn’t. However someone was in that window.

“The shooter who shot you a second time, was in the…”

“A second time?” John Connally interrupted.

“Yes sir,” I responded. “That shooter was on the same floor but in the far west window. While your wife was pulling you towards her, a bullet went through your right wrist and ended up in your left thigh.”

When I said this, I saw Nellie Connally elbow her husband in the ribs gently and say,”See, John, I told you that I felt something hit you when I was pulled you over. Now I have proof.”

“Mrs. Connally,” I said. “This isn’t proof, it’s just my take on who was where on that day. I looked at the wounds on both the Governor and the President as well as the spectator who was hit way down there by the underpass on Commerce Street. I just did what a ballistics person would do at any other shooting scene. Work backwards. Don’t let yourself be swayed by what other people have said happened. Work it out for yourself.”

“For years,” said Nellie Connally, “I have believed that John was struck by two shots, but he has insisted that he felt only one.”

I said, “I think that by the time the second shot hit, maybe two seconds after the first one, that the Governor was already in shock and that he wasn’t capable of feeling anything. He also would have had a loud rushing noise in his ears, so until he was down in your lap and the car was on its way to the hospital, he probably couldn’t hear anything either.”

The Governor was silent for a moment and then asked, “Al, how many shooters do you think were firing at us?”

“Six,” I said.

John Connally chuckled a bit and said, “That’s what shoots you conspiracy buffs down in the press. You always over-reach. How could that many people keep a secret for almost thirty years?”

“Governor?” I asked, “Do you remember the armoured car robbery in Boston in the early fifties?”

“Of course,” he said.

“Imagine that you and I are just chatting about what we’ve done in our lives and I say that I was part of that armed robbery. Do you honestly think that anyone involved in that case would say anything to anyone even forty years after the fact?”

“Probably not,” the Governor said after thinking for a few moments.

“Well,” I said, “At the centre of this event, when you put aside all the theories, trajectories, reports, obfuscations, misdirections and even outright lies, there is one simple fact: a homicide occurred. John Kennedy was killed and the statute of limitations never runs out on murder. So why would anyone risk coming forward even thirty years later?”

The Governor said nothing but I could see him formulating a reply. “So how many people who were involved, know everything?”

“Everything?” I repeated. “Nobody. It wouldn’t be safe for anyone to know everything. The same way that covert operations use ‘cutouts’ and anonymous people to deliver messages and material, I can’t see anyone even wanting to know everything. That is except us!”

The three of us laughed at that and I felt that if I could get John and Nellie Connally to laugh at a place where one of them was shot and both of them scarred forever, then I did my job.

“How long have you been interested in the case?” Nellie Connally asked.

“Early on,” I replied. “I guess I really became interested when I saw Jack Ruby shoot Lee Oswald on live television from ABC Buffalo, while I watched from Toronto.”

“Toronto?” the Governor exclaimed. “You mean you are Canadian?”

“Guilty, Governor Connally,” I said.

“Then your early interest in the assassination is even more intresting,” said Nellie Connally.

“So,” said the Governor, “You said that you thought there were six people involved. Where were they?”

“I said that there were six people shooting at you,” I corrected, “And they were everywhere. My scenario has the first shot hitting the President in the throat fired from behind the picket fence. The second, third and fourth shots were almost simultaneous. One was the shot that hit you, fired from the roof of the Country Records Building. Another was from the co-called ‘Oswald window’ or ‘sniper’s nest’ which hit the President in the back. The third of these three shots was fired from the second floor window of the Dal-Tex Building, went through the limousine’s windshield and then hit the curbstone down by the triple underpass and Commerce Street. A fragment either of the bullet or the curbstone that it hit flew up and slightly wounded a spectator named James Tague. The next shot was the second shot that hit you in the wrist and ended up in your left thigh, fired from the west window on the sixth floor. The final shot is controversial. I believe that it was fired from this storm drain.”

By then I had slowly walked the Connallys down Elm Street until we were at the base of the stairs that led up the ‘grassy knoll’. I moved them gently to the curb, without stepping into traffic.

“In 1963,” I began, “This opening was a full eight inches high. Plenty of room for a person to fire a handgun and the shot was very close. When I first spoke to Bill and Gail Newman—who were just up Elm Street from here on that day—about eight years ago, I mentioned to Bill that I had heard a radio interview with him done on the afternoon of the assassination and that he had said the last shot ‘sounded different’. When I said this to him, I could see him replaying the assassination in his mind—as I’m sure that both you and Nellie, uh, sorry, Mrs. Connally…”

“Al, ‘Nellie’ is just fine,” she interrupted. “And so is ‘John’. He hasn’t been ‘The Governor’ for a long time now!” She laughed.

“I kinda liked being called ‘Governor’ again, dear,” said John Connally and smiled at his wife.

“Well Billy Newman said that when he thought about it now, the last shot did sound different. I asked him if it was more of a ‘boom’ while the others were more of a ‘crack’ and he said that was it exactly! I asked him if it could have been fired by a handgun instead of a high-powered rifle, from underground instead of from a window and from down to his right, instead of behind him? Newman looked at me and nodded.”

“Why so many people?” asked Nellie Connally.

“If each shooter fired only once, he didn’t need to re-acquire his target and re-aim. It was just pull the trigger and then get the hell outta here. I bet that the gunman who fired the first shot that hit you was already off the roof and down the stairs before the limousine went under the triple underpass. By the time anybody would have thought to look, the shooters were all long gone. Each one in a different direction. I also believe that they didn’t even know where the other shooting locations were either.”

During our little stroll a few people had recognized the Connallys and had come over, some asking for autographs, but most just watching from a distance.

In all, I spent perhaps thirty to forty minutes with the Connallys and when it was over and I walked them back to their limousine, John Connally shook my hand and said. “Son, you’ve given me a lot to think about today and I thank you for that.”

Nellie Connally also shook my hand and gently kissed my cheek. “Thank you, Al,” was all she whispered.

They got into the limousine which during our tour had turned around so the it was now heading east on Old Elm. As the limousine slowly pulled away I thought about my little brush with history. The first time the Connallys had been back in Dealey Plaza since the assassination. I wondered if any of my fellow researchers would believe me when I got back to the Hyatt Reunion Hotel, but some attendees had seen me with the Connallys and others had come up for autographs.

When I got back to the hotel, a few of the researchers had already heard that the Connallys had finally arrived and that I had been their tour guide and I got some good-natured ribbing. When I got back to Toronto a few days later, I roughly wrote down most of the conversation that we shared as best as I could remember it.

But it wasn’t until 14 years later, with the help of those notes, that I finally put together this little narrative.



I particularly like the part when he says:


"I just did what a ballistics person would do at any other shooting scene. "Work backwards." Don’t let yourself be swayed by what other people have said happened. Work it out for yourself.”



It makes perfect sense to me! Al Navis is a great guy, who is also doing a fantastic job in helping me unfold my father's life, it has been the pivotal moment in mine, and those who where connected to my father, it has been an ongoing project for sometime now. I truly appreciate all the hard work that he and Brett Karis have put forth into this important project that means more to me then anything else. I could only offer what little I have, or find away to except his estimation. In return of all his hard work. I wish that Al would be richly rewarded and successful to follow. He's a great man! It has been an honor to work with Al Navis.


Thanks!

Scott Kaiser

Edited by Scott Kaiser, 07 March 2012 - 05:26 AM.


#41 Michael Hogan

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 12:06 PM

From The Dallas Morning News:

JFK and Texas' John Connally shared a fateful day and common past
by Alan Peppard
March 30, 2013

http://www.dallasnew...ragile-past.ece

#42 William Kelly

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 04:55 PM

From The Dallas Morning News:

JFK and Texas' John Connally shared a fateful day and common past
by Alan Peppard
March 30, 2013

http://www.dallasnew...ragile-past.ece


Thanks for that one Michael,

A very interesting article, especially in regards the role FDR, Jr. played in these affairs.

Also, despite the author's extensive research, he fails to note that Bobby Hale, who eloped with their daughter and was present when she died of a gunshot, was the son of a former FBI agent and had been seen by an FBI surveillance team break into the apartment of Judyth Cambell Extner, the mob moll who was screwing JFK, Sinatra and Sam Giancana, and apparently passing messages between them.

BK
http://jfkcountercou...n-connally.html

#43 William Kelly

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 06:28 PM


From The Dallas Morning News:

JFK and Texas' John Connally shared a fateful day and common past
by Alan Peppard
March 30, 2013

http://www.dallasnew...ragile-past.ece


Thanks for that one Michael,

A very interesting article, especially in regards the role FDR, Jr. played in these affairs.

Also, despite the author's extensive research, he fails to note that Bobby Hale, who eloped with their daughter and was present when she died of a gunshot, was the son of a former FBI agent and had been seen by an FBI surveillance team break into the apartment of Judyth Cambell Extner, the mob moll who was screwing JFK, Sinatra and Sam Giancana, and apparently passing messages between them.

BK
http://jfkcountercou...n-connally.html


Oh, yea, and then there's the fact that Bobby Hale's mother - the mom of the guy whose shotgun killed Connally's daughter, she works for Texas Employment Commission in Dallas and personally got Oswald the jobs at Leslie Welding and Jaggers/Chiles/Stoval.

I would think that fact worth mentioning.

BK




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