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Developing Interactive Teaching Styles using an IWB


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#1 Roy Huggins

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 10:05 PM

The following Seminar on IWBs was delivered at IST in Toulouse 2006 by Roy Huggins
One of the questions posed by several delegates at the E-Help Conference in Toulouse is what is the role of ICT in the classroom? The main thrust of my seminar was that teachers need to move away from seeing IWBs and ICT as a teaching or presentation tool to using it as learning tool to engage learners through interactive teaching styles.

Variety is the spice of life and every good teacher knows that you have to use a range of teaching and learning styles that appeal to the different learning strengths of your class. Interactive Whiteboards are an excellent medium for appealing to the visual, kinaesthetic and auditory learners to create memorable lessons that stick in their minds.

One of the first ideas that I showcased at the E-Help Conference was a simple snowballing starter exercise where the teacher uses the IWB to display the key words for the lessons. I asked the delegates to study the key words for two minutes and then use the curtain feature of SmartNotes to cover up the words. They then had to write down as many words as they could remember in two minutes. Once the time was up I then asked them to share their answers with their neighbour and try and add to their list of key words. This is a really nice warm up exercise to get a class discussing and sharing answers. I then again used the curtain feature to reveal the key words and ask them to either self assess or peer assess their answers - a nice opportunity for AFL!

This sort of activity appeals to the visual and auditory learner, but can then be extended by Kinaesthetic learners by asking them to either link the key words or classify them depending upon the topic. I often use similar activities using the spot light tool on a series of hidden pictures and then ask students or groups of students to try and identify the historical character or a historical artefact.

A picture can paint a thousand words and I often use a variety of images on my IWB and ask students to go for 5 bullet points in the back of their books and then during the feedback session to get out of their chairs and annotate on the board. At this stage of my seminar I was able to showcase how you could get a class of students all out of their places in rotation to annotate a diagram with historical inaccuracies to illustrate the simplicity of this idea.

You may be thinking at this stage that none of this is rocket science, but the beauty of these types of starters is that they make very effective low maintence starters and plenaries that help to hook and engage students. ICT does not need to be clever and sophisticated in order to get students enjoying what they are doing. However, as we all know from our own experiences if you over use PowePoints, Drag and Drop or even textbooks and worksheets, they can soon lose their appeal. Variety is critical to a successful lesson.

Once I had completed this stage of my seminar, I then moved onto how to use IWB to develop critical historical thinking skills and accelerated learning styles through the use of graphic organizers.

Visual thinking can be expressed in many ways. Graphic organizers are one way for visual thinkers to arrange their ideas. There are unlimited ways to express these visual ideas. Graphic organizers have many names including visual maps, mind mapping, brainstorms (idea showers) and visual organizers, or whatever other name you wish to give them...but graphic organizers are basically visual ways to represent information. I have a number of different organisers, which I annotate as simple diagrams or for more complex drag and drop activities in SmartNotes.

There are literally dozens upon dozens of versions of graphic organizers; there are almost as many books, manuals, and guides, not to mention websites that can give you a whole range of examples. For our purposes I use thinking skill triangles, venn diagrams, chain of events, simple KWL tables, reliability squares, pie charts and many others including zones of tolerance.

How Do They Work?

Since you know that some of your students are visual learners, and that a picture is worth a thousand words, then you should have in your toolbox some ways to organize ideas, facts, and concepts graphically.

Using boxes, circles, ovals, rectangles, and other shapes, not to mention lines for connecting, students can show information according to its level (main ideas, subtopics, details or elaboration, and so on). They can show how two ideas compare to one another (as in a Venn Diagram) or comparison alley. They can trace the order, sequence, or stages of a process in a cause and consequence diagram. They can be used to show how characters in a historical situation or story work with and relate to one another.

Graphic organizers can be used in all phases of learning from brainstorming ideas as a starter, to presenting findings in a plenary. They can be used individually, or in large groups. For example, some teachers like to create a class concept map as a large group to review at the end of a unit or develop a cause & consequence map while introducing a topic to a whole class. These tools are particularly useful in activities that require critical thinking skills such as source analysis.

My preferred style is to have students working on their own or in groups completing their graphic organisers and then feedback either in a class discussion or kinaesthetically on the whiteboard. The key is to question their choices and get them to explain the reasons behind their arguments or classification on the IWB in order to encourage the auditory learner and develop those critical thinking skills.

Through this phase of my seminar I demonstrated a range of drag and drop activities using graphic organisers as well as a number of downloaded flash files that I had captured from www.schoolhistory.co.uk. Unfortunately, half way through this demonstration my file corrupted and I was unable to recover it, demonstrating that you should always have a plan B when using any form of ICT in the classroom!

Amway, after a massive heart attack, I then moved on to showcase how you can use SmartNotes on an IWB to do literacy-modelling exercises with students. Normally after a snowballing session I will move on and read a passage from a textbook or worksheet on a topic like the causes of the First World War. I will then get my students to classify a series of statements into a thinking skills triangle on the IWB, which they will use either later in the lesson or for homework to produce an extended answer. Once they have drafted and written their answers I will scan a selection of class work and get them to peer assess and annotate the answers with the pens on the IWB to highlight effective use of persuasive language, analysis, good use of language, key words, historical facts and even where they would insert additional punctuation and full stops. Once this phase of the AFL exercise is over is over I will then sit down and then begin typing a answer into Smart Notes asking the students to provide the ideas and phrases I will need to construct a model answer. This is highly effective use of ICT on an IWB and is great for developing the literacy and critical thinking skills of students.

For those of you who are wondering what Smart Notes is, it’s a software package that normally bundled with a Smart board. However, you can use this software with any IWB so long as you delete the start-up file from your program files. We have three different IWBs in our department so it makes sense for us all to use the same software package to that it is easier to share resources and ideas. You can download this software from www. And you can also use it on a tablet pc, which can be passed around the classroom,


For my plenary, I then moved onto how to use content generators like Gameshow Presenter to inject a bit of fun, pace, teamwork and good old-fashioned Kinaesthetic learning into the lesson for my plenary. For those of you who have not come across Gameshow Presenter it is a brilliant software package that can be downloaded from www.gameshowpresenter.com. I demonstrated to the delegates how the package could be easily customised to create a really cheesy plenary or starter. In some respects, it is very similar to packages like Fling the Teacher or Penalty Shoot out. The key difference is that the kids love the insults, jibes and over the top praise and congratulations when they get the their answers either right or wrong. The same was also true for the delegates and even John Simpkin appear to enjoy himself and cried foul at one stage!

To conclude, IWB are a great medium for developing interactive teaching styles through the use of graphic organisers, video clips, pictures, snowballing, drag and drop and fun games like gameshow presenter, but if you over use any medium for too long it can lose its impact. One of the mistakes that I made at my school whilst I was the e-learning coordinator was to train everyone how to use GameShow Presenter. Within a couple of weeks of being over exposed, the kids quickly grew bored. ICT is more than a presentational tool and however you engage your students; variety is the spice of life if you want to create high impact memorable lessons. IWB`s are a brilliant medium and if you haven't got one get one, but don't just use it to present ideas, get the kids out of their seats and have some fun!

If you are interested in attending a similar seminar I will be delivering two seminars on IWBs at the SHP Conference in Leeds in July. I've also just agreed to do two more day long seminars on developing interactive teaching styles using ICT for a company called Lighthouse Professional Development in the Autumn term 2006. Folks are always welcome to drop in at Mexborough School during the holidays or after school, by arrangement to swap ideas, resources and have some free hands on training. Why reinvent the wheel?

Kind Regards

Roy

Edited by Roy Huggins, 17 June 2006 - 10:39 AM.


#2 Andy Walker

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 11:33 PM

Thank you for posting your seminar so promptly Roy.
I enjoyed your session which was well planned and informative. I was also impressed by how you coped so well with technical difficulties which were beyond your control so calmly and professionally.

I am not however a big fan of interactive whiteboards and remain to be convinced of their importance to teaching and learning. I believe interactive whiteboards are only so popular in schools because they tend to reinforce traditional teacher led modes of learning. The teacher in front of a class leading the lesson with a visual aid is what we have been doing since schooling began. Teacher active - pupils passive.

I am not sure either that the "interactivity" offered by smartboards etc. actually add that much to a very traditional model.

Specifically I am not sure that calling pupils out to the front of the class to circle something or to complete a drag and drop exercise constitutes interactivity. If it does then it is only interactivity for a few seconds and only for the person volunteering and probably even for them the interactivity is from the elbow down only.

I can see mileage in using a large visual display at the beginnings and ends of lessons to briefly introduce or consolidate the learning and also for fostering open ended discussion of pictorial sources. But can't this be done much more cheaply and just as effectively with an internet ready laptop and a digital projector?
Why spend oodles of money on an expensive board which offers perhaps at best a presentation tool, a reveal tool and a quiz builder?

#3 Roy Huggins

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Posted 15 June 2006 - 12:11 AM

Hi Andy,

Its all a matter of different horses for courses. I disagree that IWBs cost that much these days, but agree that a lot of the ideas I show cased could be used via a data projector with the teacher dragging dropping the ideas into the graphic organisers. I work in a school where every classroom has an IWB and this will soon be case in nearly every school in the country.

What is key to the use of any meduim of ICT is how it is used interactively to develop the critical thinking skills of students by getting them to explain and develop their ideas. When folks first get their new bright and shiney new IWB there is a tendency for some teachers to revert to teacher led presentations as they make it the focus of every lesson. The key as I meantioned above is variety.

In terms of the critical thinking skills I described in my seminar some folks may prefer to use a wireless enabled tablet PC, others an IWB or a simple data projector or OHP. Quizz generators add an extra dimension, but they are not the be and end all as I explained in my seminar.

The problem with only having just over an hour to effectively give a lecture is that you can only introduce, showcase and skate over some of the key ideas. During one of my normal inset days I tend to spend a lot more time going into some of the practical issues with managing ICT in the classroom as well as looking at ways to use video and PowerPoint as a learning tool as opposed to the presentational tool that you refered to above - teacher led.

If you get the chance during the summer pop over to Mexborough and we can explore some of this ideas in greater detail. Failing that sign up for one of my courses?

Kind Regards

Roy

Edited by Roy Huggins, 15 June 2006 - 09:55 PM.


#4 Simon Ross

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 05:48 AM

Firstly, thank you Roy for the presentation and the lovely resources that you shared.

I think Andy raises an interesting question. His beliefs about IWBs reinforcing traditional teaching models has been borne out in many schools where teachers have been given them, often without a desire to have them or appropriate training on how to use them, and have just used them to pad out teacher talk.

Part of the problem here is that Interactive White Board is rather a misnoma. The fact that Interactive White Boards are called that leads to huge expectations for them to be, well, interactive. Thus teachers up and down the country strive to get the students using them as much as possible, which is a good thing. However, it also leads to teachers challenging their worth focussed on the interactivity: 'Well thats not very interactive is it'. This, I believe, is rather unfair. Its like criticising the tables for not being chairs; we need both to have a classroom, although Andy Schofield might disagree ;)

I would suggest that the interactivity is primarily for the teacher and that is fine. The interactive board allows a teacher to bring the clear instruction pages, large visual images, audio files, movies, games to the class quickly and easily. It then allows the teacher to interact with these things without having to huddle down in front of a computer. The fact that you can write on and move the things on screen also means you are freed from the pre-ordained structure of a previously created powerpoint. Ultimately then it is of benefit to the teacher as it reduces planning time, frees up lesson time, and allows the use of a wide range of resources quickly.

Now, obviously if all you do is use the board then you're stuffed - it is not a panacea for bad teaching, and it can only ever be one tool in the classroom. However, I think this is why advocates of IWBs need to be more open about their limitations when it comes to student interactivity. Experienced teachers will not be dazzled by a large, attractive card sort on a board - they were doing it twenty years ago with laminated paper and photo enlargements. However they are, I believe, more likely to be persuaded by the fact that you can put it together so much more quickly and cheaply with the board.

I've written about this issue on my site:

http://www.ilovehist...iwb/newiwb.html

Edited by Simon Ross, 16 June 2006 - 05:50 AM.


#5 David Richardson

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:40 AM

One of my main reservations about the use of PowerPoint is that you can only really use all the features in it if you've got a data projector … which means quite a hefty investment in each individual classroom … which means in turn the skewing of investment in the school as a whole when so much money is channelled into bricks and mortar that are only in use for a limited number of hours in the day (but have to be funded 24/7/365).

And then there's the way PowerPoint distorts and distracts from proper thinking. I'm just grading portfolios created by primary school teachers who've been on a language didactics course this spring, and a couple of them have included print-outs from PowerPoint/IWB presentations about … parts of speech.

Well, yes, they've produced some nice-looking stuff about nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs … but, sorry, for the kind of young language learners we're talking about, this is a dangerous distraction from the real business of learning. The kids definitely filled out all the answers right in the worksheets … but, at best, they'll have learned nothing about how to use English. Typically (looking at the results when they finally arrive at university), they'll have actively worsened their understanding of the language.

IWB's don't mess up pupil's heads - teachers do (to paraphrase the NRA slogan!), but IWBs surely seem to help.

#6 Roy Huggins

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 06:31 PM

Hi lads,

Yes I agree, IWB can never replace the true artistry of being a good teacher who uses a variety of teaching and learning tools. IWBs do have their limitations or should I say the folks who use them have their limitations because they have been poorly trained!

On the issue of the cost of IWBs and data projectors, it has to be said that the costs have come down considerably over the past few years. I see nothing wrong with schools investing in the future and equipping classrooms with IWBs and data projectors so that we can properly teach 21st Century students with 21st Century technology. However, I do agree that most folks have their IWBs dropped on them, that they are then given limited training and that if you are not careful it can lead to either the IWB dominating some lessons or to teacher led presentations. As I adovacted above, variety is the key to a good lesson and teachers need to look at ways of VAKing their lessons. IWBs are one tool in the armoury of a good teacher, but like any tool its effectiveness can become blunted with over use!

The critical problem with the education system today is that there is not enough government or private investment to provide high quality CPD.

My department receives £400 a year to spend on CPD. Once you have paid for your cover costs that leaves you with £250 to spend on one person - there are four of us in my department! Even then, if we did have the money the CPD provision nationally is very poor. For example, at the end of the day I'm just an ordinary run the mill HOD, but I'm inundated with businessmen, state and private schools asking me to run training seminars on IWB & ICT. The demand is huge. However, I have no intention of giving up my day job even though I could most probably make a very reasonable living out of delivering IWB training. My first love has always been teaching history.

The government needs to invest in improving the provision of CPD and equip teachers with the skills they need to fully exploit the new technologies and use them effectively.

Kind Regards

Roy

PS A very detailed discussion about the use of IWBs can be downloaded from: http://www.schoolhis...topic=3625&st=0

Edited by Roy Huggins, 16 June 2006 - 06:49 PM.


#7 neil mcdonald

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 07:34 PM

I think one issue that needs to be addressed in a more holistic measure is that of staff development in the application and use of ICT in the classroom. IWBs are a fantastic resource that hold a good deal of learning opportunties but only if teachers see the opportunities to use them to the fullest. Using PowerPoint defeats the idea of the IWB. Products like SMART Notes offers a way of producing higher level thinking skills and with the ability to turn the notes into HTML or pdf, the opportunity to place them on the web to download.

#8 John Simkin

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 08:44 AM

Thank you Roy for producing such a practical seminar. I am sure your seminar will be very popular with the classroom teacher as it is full of ideas of how to use the whiteboard in the classroom. However, like Andy, I am concerned about this claim that this has anything to do with interactive teaching and learning.

I have been trying to persuade teachers to use ICT in the history classroom since the early 1980s. It has always been a difficult job. The main reason is that teachers see ICT as a threat to their role in the classroom. All teachers are victims of the traditional paradigm of learning. They see themselves as the “expert” who is transmitting knowledge to their students. ICT poses a threat to their traditional role. That their power in the classroom is being undermined by the students superior knowledge of the technology being used.

The emergence of the internet made the problem worse. Whereas a teacher could go through a computer simulation in the same way they could read a textbook before using it in the classroom, you could not do that with the web. With all the technical support in the world, you could not control the information that the student may “discover” during the lesson. As one very experienced teacher told me at one INSET session, the pupils now saw the computer as some sort of “God” with all the answers (there is a very good Isaac Asimov short story that makes the same point).

This explains why teachers have embraced the whiteboard. It retains the traditional role of the teacher at the front of the classroom transmitting information to the students. It also allows the teacher to claim that they are now using the latest developments in technology. One can see why so many educationalists see it as the “killer application”. However, it has little to do with interactive education. Calling students to the front to put circles on pictures is not active learning. It is what Douglas Barnes famously called "filling in the gaps". It is about asking "closed" questions. It might fool teachers but as Barnes's research shows, it does not fool students.

#9 Andy Walker

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 09:59 AM

Products like SMART Notes offers a way of producing higher level thinking skills and with the ability to turn the notes into HTML or pdf, the opportunity to place them on the web to download.


That's an interesting idea. Do some teachers build up an online repository of their lessons accessible to students online? I can see some potential in that.
However could you explain the bit about smart notes producing higher level thinking skills?

#10 Roy Huggins

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 10:58 AM

I have been trying to persuade teachers to use ICT in the history classroom since the early 1980s. It has always been a difficult job. The main reason is that teachers see ICT as a threat to their role in the classroom. All teachers are victims of the traditional paradigm of learning. They see themselves as the “expert” who is transmitting knowledge to their students. ICT poses a threat to their traditional role. That their power in the classroom is being undermined by the students superior knowledge of the technology being used.


I suppose this comes down to the indivdual teacher's relationship with their students. I've seen akways seen education as two way process and I'm not afraid to ask kids for help when I have got stuck in the past with some aspect of ICT. Young people by their very nature are always on the cutting edge of innovation and technology and harnessing their knowledge, experience and questions is critical in any successful pupil / teacher relationship.

One simple example of useful graphic organiser is the KWL Table which again can be used on an IWB. A KWL table has three columns. The first is 'know' - I normally ask the kids to go for five facts that they may already know about the topic we are about to study in the lesson. The second column is entitled 'Want' to know - which might include two or three questions that they have about the topic. The final column is called 'Learnt'. At the end of the lesson I ask them to go for five new facts that they have learnt in the lesson and feed a sample of them into the table. We then review the learning objectives and then ask them if they have any questions outstanding questions about the topic that I have not answered from their 'What to know' section of their table. A useful extension of this exercise is to then turn it into a KWLH table and add an extra column called 'Homework' and ask the class to research five new additional facts about the topic that they did not learn during the lesson or know before hand.

Graphic organisers like the above are use a useful medium for setting up a dialogue with your students that engages them in the learning objects and outcomes of the lesson and gives them the opportunity to contribute their own questions and background knowlege. Its not revolutionary, but I'm only interested in practical ideas that work. I'd be interested in reading about Douglas Barnes, if you could direct me to some of publications, but when was the last time he taught a full timetable in challenging circumstances with children who are difficult to engage? You have to remember the context of the activities that I show cased during my seminar. What I was showcasing during my hour session was how you could get kids practically engaged during the feedback session after the active learning had already taken place during the lesson. Many of my activities are designed to extend the active learning on the IWB, link up the big ideas and to get students to share their thinking skills and ideas with the rest of the class. Now a simple circling exercise like I showcased on medieval towns is only ever designed to be warm up exercise before the class move on to look in detail at the painting of a French Medieval town and various other one sided sources during the active learning exercises that take place in the lesson and then fed back onto the IWB and then extended through the graphic organisers and the discussions. As Simon said above, the IWB helps to faciliate and marshal the resources and the critical thinking skills during the feedback.

Again, its case of different horses for courses. Some people love them others hate them, but IWBs like any teaching and learning tool should never be allowed to become the sole focus in the lesson.

Kind Regards

Roy

Edited by Roy Huggins, 17 June 2006 - 11:56 AM.


#11 Nick Dennis

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 11:44 AM

I can see what Andy and John are getting at. The board is interactive for the teacher, not really so for the students.

I think there are two seperate issues here. Does the technology help to make it easier to teach/illustrate/reinforce concepts or does it mean a new kind of pedagogy?

I would say it does make it easier to teach concepts/ideas as it allows me to access a whole range of material/resources very quickly. Importantly, it allows me to annotate and save notes on diagrams and pieces of text and bring them up of a series of weeks to show how far ideas/understanding have changed/remained the same. It also allows me to help the students structure their thinking in a clear and accessible way. This can be done without an IWB as a few have pointed out. I would have a major problem as I move around from class to class and remembering to bring all my materials would be nearly impossible.

The crucial point (one backed up by many others) from this discussion is that using the IWB enhances good teaching, rather than creates good teaching. As Roy points out, after using the IWB his students then move to 'traditional' modes of learning.

#12 Roy Huggins

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 12:02 PM

Hi Nick,

I agree it helps to reinforce, illustrate and faciltate the learning. However, it is not a new pedagogy and don't recall having ever said that it was!

I personally find that when you merge other teaching and learning ideas together with ICT thats when you tend to get the best results out of both of them. I believe that this is especially true of accelerated learning which is not quite old hat or traditional yet!

Roy

Edited by Roy Huggins, 17 June 2006 - 02:41 PM.


#13 Nick Dennis

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 12:26 PM

Roy, I never said that you explicitly said that it was a new kind of pedagogy but the tenor of the comments in the following discussion, and in part your replies, suggested that it may be seen as such. Partly this stems from your defence of the techology but I wanted to make clear the point that I think you were getting at - it is an adjunct to good teaching.

John and Andy's points that it reinforces traditional modes of teaching qualifies my statement. The implict assumption in their arguments is that using an IWB challenges the traditonal mode of teaching. I think that in your defence and willingness for them to see your position, you did not make your original point clear. Interactive learning/accelerated learning/critical thinking can take place without using the IWB. I would argue, as I think you would, that this technology allows us to pool resources in one tool rather than use a multiplicity of items (video player/tv/ohp and ohts etc) and make our job easier.

Edited by Nick Dennis, 17 June 2006 - 12:28 PM.


#14 Graham Davies

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 12:46 PM

I also tend to support the view that the IWB tends to be "interactive for the teacher and less so for the students" - unless the teacher is particulary active in the classroom firing questions at the class and getting them to do things. Modern language teachers tend to be very active, regardless of the technology that they use. This is because we are teaching a subject that is performance-related (as is music too) rather than knowledge-related. Getting the learners to "perfom" is what we try to do in the classroom.

I got into computer assisted language learning (CALL) in 1976. What made it different from other technologies available at the time (e.g. the language lab) was the interaction that it offered in the form of feedback, branching, help routines etc. When computers were introduced into schools in the early 1980s, many teachers embraced whole-class teaching with a computer, because they could only afford a single computer and a big TV set rather than a computer lab. Some interesting approaches to teaching languages emerged in this way, e.g. getting the class to reconstruct blanked out texts as a group exercise, as a stimulus for oral work (essential in modern languages), etc. Now the wheel seems to have turned full circle. Whatever happened to feedback? Whatever happened to listen / respond / playback activities (essential in modern languages, so that the learner can hear what he/she sounds like)? See:

Davies G. (1988) "Using the computer to stimulate conversation". In Kühlwein W. & Spillner B. (eds.) Sprache und Individuum, Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag.

Piper A. (1986) "Conversation and the computer: a study of the conversational spin-off generated among learners of English as a Foreign Language working in groups", System 14, 2: 187-198.

Bangs P. (2003) "Engaging the learner - how to author for best feedback". In Felix U. (2003) (ed.) Language learning online: towards best practice, Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger.

See Section 4 ("Whole-class teaching and interactive whiteboards") of Module 1.4 at the ICT4LT site - and see the following Section 5 ("Teaching in the computer network room"), which offers an alternative approach:
http://www.ict4lt.org/en/en_mod1-4.htm

BTW, you don't need an expensive IWB setup these days. There is also a cheaper cable-less device, known as CM2, produced by ONfinity - around £450-£500. It has been developed for on-the-road presentations and for multi-room presentations and is used in combination with a standard projector and projection screen. All that you need to do to set up the system is plug in the CM2 device via a USB connection to a PC. There is no cable between the PC and the whiteboard or projection screen. The actual CM2 device is palm-size and you use an extendable electronic pen to click on and draw on the projection screen. It can also be used in conjunction with a large plasma screen, which has to be connected by cable to the PC. There is a video showing the set-up procedure and the CM2 device in operation at: http://www.onfinity.info/. CM2 is available from http://www.compubits.com

#15 Roy Huggins

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 02:43 PM

Roy, I never said that you explicitly said that it was a new kind of pedagogy but the tenor of the comments in the following discussion, and in part your replies, suggested that it may be seen as such. Partly this stems from your defence of the techology but I wanted to make clear the point that I think you were getting at - it is an adjunct to good teaching.

John and Andy's points that it reinforces traditional modes of teaching qualifies my statement. The implict assumption in their arguments is that using an IWB challenges the traditonal mode of teaching. I think that in your defence and willingness for them to see your position, you did not make your original point clear. Interactive learning/accelerated learning/critical thinking can take place without using the IWB. I would argue, as I think you would, that this technology allows us to pool resources in one tool rather than use a multiplicity of items (video player/tv/ohp and ohts etc) and make our job easier.


I totally agree Nick but would go further to say that you can use the IWB through your starters and plenaries to consolidate the learning by linking up or connecting the bigs and providing opportunities for stimualting further discussion.

I like the idaes of these CM2 devices. I'm getting a wireless tablet PC next week which is going to be connected to my IWB and data projector. Umtimately, I look forward to the day when all the kids have palm tops that are linked into the projector so that they can feedback their results or classwork directly to the 'board.'



Roy

Edited by Roy Huggins, 18 June 2006 - 12:03 AM.





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