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Ashton Gray: His repeated violations of Board Guidelines


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#31 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 01:08 AM

[quote name='Jack White' date='Jun 28 2006, 01:59 AM' post='66627']
Thanks for the directions, but I have no time nor desire to restudy Watergate.
I am too busy. Time is short when one is 80.

Jack
[/quote]



At last, the truth. You just don't give a damn about it. Why were you not
just upfront from the start?

Guess it was just easier to join in the demand that someone's membership be revoked
huh?

I'm now beginning to believe there WAS a moon landing.

Dawn

#32 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 03:51 AM

I have not studied Watergate in more than 25 years, but I will
tell you what I concluded after studying the facts at the time.

The Power Control Group (thanks, Dick Sprague) finally realized
that people were getting suspicious of endless assassinations of
the sixties. So they switched methodologies. Suicides, accidents,
scandals, etc. became methods of choice.

When Tricky Dick changed from an asset to a liability, he became
expendable to them. So they "Watergated" him, using CIA assets
and methods. Another assassination would look too suspicious,
and they were almost running out of patsies.

Attempts on Wallace and Flynt and Lennon were the among the the
last of the bullet barrages with patsies....except for Ronnie. George 41
was impatient to ascend to his "rightful" throne, so Ronnie was
quickly expendable. But someone botched the job. Hinckley fired six
shots...BUT ALL MISSED, so the backup plan was used. It too failed.

Remember Agnew and Rockefeller...scandals got them.

To silence Teddy K, they "Chapaquiddiked" him with a phony
scandal. His nephew JohnJohn was "accidented" with a bomb in
his Cessna. JohnJohn was seen as a threat to George 43 and Jeb
in the future. To get Hussein, they invented BinLaden. To get an
Iraq war, 3000 people were expendable in New York and Washington.
There is more, but I prefer brevity.

Jack




Jack:
We are in TOTAL AGREEMENT then. I did not see this post til just now. And it turns out that you and Ashton are also in agreement.

PROGRESS prevails.

Dawn

ps And re your literary qute: If they really did "kill all the lawyers" then who'd bring FOIA suits? :rolleyes:)

#33 Terry Mauro

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Posted 28 June 2006 - 05:38 AM


I am really sorry to hear that from you, Dan. Sometimes those of us who are passionate about this case, have a tendency to get fed up with the "pussy-footing" around of the issues that have taken place in its on-going investigation. Those of us who have witnessed the apparent dumbing-down of their fellow citizens and the accompanying "royal scam" that has been allowed to perpetuate for the past 46 years, can become impatient with all the "political correctness" that's often been called upon, like a stumbling block being placed in the path of disclosure. So if we become a little testy, especially when we find a previously thought-of "ally" calling for a "cease and desist" simply because he's had the unfortunate experience of being slammed by a handful of experts in the field of provocation, doesn't mean that we are resorting to, nor "flipping over" to, the use of the same said tactics of provocation. Ashton asks pointed, if not actual questions of a similar bent that should have been demanded by the American populace itself, long ago, and have been to a degree, by the small voice of a band of concerned and aware citizens who've had the misfortune of being labeled as radicals, kooks, hippies, and other assorted slurs and insults, for merely raising those same points of contention in the past.

Terry,
Obviously I'm a bit hypocritical in sticking around, but I do have things to look into in the archives here and wanted to respond to your post and let you know more or less where I stand on the issue at hand. I completely agree with your points here. I spent much of the Summer of '74 at 11 years old watching and wondering what the continuous live coverage of hearings was all about. I have great admiration for all those who have been "labeled as radicals, kooks, hippies, and other assorted slurs and insults" for doing what in my judgement was their patriotic duty.

I would like to believe that all this is about people being able to vent their frustrations and anger at real-live participant in the events. But when the chief interrogator asserts that Richard M. Nixon was "irrelevant" in the CIA's nefarious plans for national and world domination, very severe questions are raised in my mind. And I can't help but think that the extraordinary animosity towards Mr. Caddy is at best misplaced. Has he not sought to make amends? President Nixon never did. And his apologists have long sought to rehabilitate his image in a variety of ways. The "CIA-did-it" theory of Watergate was originally promoted by John Ehrlichman (in his pseudo-fictional The Company, a book in which a US President is blackmailed by a DCI) and by Charles Colson (who found Jesus in prison, like so many ohters, and has since proceeded to be a leading voice among those who claim Jesus Christ as their own exclusive personal property just as they make similar claims about patriotism and love of country).

I frankly believe that anyone who is willing to let Nixon off the hook for what still clearly seems to have been a White House operation is at best misguided and barking up the wrong tree. At worst, it's something entirely different. And either way, I think it's legitimate to ask questions as to the motivations and "theorizing" of those who are doing so. In Mr. Caddy's case, I can't help but wonder whether the animosity directed at him has less to do with his admitted involvements and partially-understandable prevarications than with his "treasonous" going-over-to-the-other-side. Under a guise of righteous indignation, in other words, and while spreading a unique theory of the CIA ueber alles.

Hopefully, I am wrong about this and we are all having a little misunderstanding among people who are passionate about the same things. In any event, I have too much on my plate right now to get any further involved (re-writing my book [which was the Qumran and Gospels reference] and doing research on another book [which is why I dropped in here and read your reply]). I do appreciate your reply and respect your point of view, and in fact agree with it. I just have some doubts about who is "on the up and up" and don't have the time or patience to while away still more time on it. I also can't take on another whole "line of inquiry" (burrowing into all the evidence and history of Watergate) without losing what little mind I have left.

Sincerely,
Dan


*********************************************************8

"I frankly believe that anyone who is willing to let Nixon off the hook for what still clearly seems to have been a White House operation is at best misguided and barking up the wrong tree. At worst, it's something entirely different. And either way, I think it's legitimate to ask questions as to the motivations and "theorizing" of those who are doing so. In Mr. Caddy's case, I can't help but wonder whether the animosity directed at him has less to do with his admitted involvements and partially-understandable prevarications than with his "treasonous" going-over-to-the-other-side. Under a guise of righteous indignation, in other words, and while spreading a unique theory of the CIA ueber alles."

Dan, nobody's willing to let Nixon off the hook. As I stated in another thread, a good friend of mine, David Lifton, pointed out to me that Nixon was thought of as a Quaker, unsophisticated, a rube, so to speak, by the likes of Hunt, Liddy, and the rest of the Allen Dulles' elitist fascist guard [my emphasis and description of them]. Nixon would never make the cut, and was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret team's real agenda.

When Caddy comes on board like some reformed Jesus freak, no longer consorting with his former fascist clientel, I find it hard to believe. As far as I'm concerned he's merely a former vestige of that group of crooks he agreed to represent. And, weren't all these clowns CIA operatives, in one capacity or another, anyway? They were looking to oust Nixon because Nixon was becoming too idealistic, as far as they were concerned. Same thing with adle-brained Ronnie. He was only as good as his rhetoric, and knack for flag-waving in stirring up the citizenry. As soon as he showed any comprehension of what bills he was signing, or tried to assert his presidential powers, or veto, he was smacked down. Look how easily they were able to pass off Iran Contra right under his nose? The old man had no clue, I'm sure. They used him much in the same way they used Oswald, in the same way they used Nixon, if you really want to split hairs over this issue. They were all patsies. And, Hunt, Liddy, McCord, and the rest must be enjoying themselves on the generous pension funds we've had to foot the bill for.

#34 Ashton Gray

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:50 PM

Nixon was not an idol to (his own) "elite fascist guard," but instead (seen by them as) a mere unsophisticated rube? Contending that is letting Nixon off the hook, as is contending he "was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret teams real agenda."


Richard Nixon on May 20, 1972—the day he was leaving for Moscow, one week before the purported "first break-in" at the Watergate over Memorial Day weekend 1972 (while Nixon was still overseas):“The performance in the psychological warfare field is nothing short of disgraceful. The mountain has labored for seven weeks and when it finally produced, it produced not much more than a mouse. Or to put it more honestly, it produced a rat.

“We finally have a program now under way but it totally lacks imagination and I have no confidence whatever that the bureaucracy will carry it out. I do not simply blame (Richard) Helms and the CIA. After all, they do not support my policies because they basically are for the most part Ivy League and Georgetown society oriented.”

Richard Nixon excerpted from a letter of 20 May 1972 to Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig
When I snap my fingers, you will be fully awake: <SNAP!>

Ashton Gray

Edited by Ashton Gray, 29 June 2006 - 12:59 PM.


#35 Dawn Meredith

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 02:44 PM

“We finally have a program now under way but it totally lacks imagination and I have no confidence whatever that the bureaucracy will carry it out. I do not simply blame (Richard) Helms and the CIA. After all, they do not support my policies because they basically are for the most part Ivy League and Georgetown society oriented.”

Richard Nixon excerpted from a letter of 20 May 1972 to Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig
[/list]When I snap my fingers, you will be fully awake: <SNAP!>

Ashton Gray
[/quote][/color]


One can only HOPE. As the level of "not getting it" here is getting frustrating,
to say the very least.

Dawn

#36 Terry Mauro

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 04:06 PM


Dan, nobody's willing to let Nixon off the hook. As I stated in another thread, a good friend of mine, David Lifton, pointed out to me that Nixon was thought of as a Quaker, unsophisticated, a rube, so to speak, by the likes of Hunt, Liddy, and the rest of the Allen Dulles' elitist fascist guard [my emphasis and description of them]. Nixon would never make the cut, and was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret team's real agenda.

When Caddy comes on board like some reformed Jesus freak, no longer consorting with his former fascist clientel, I find it hard to believe. As far as I'm concerned he's merely a former vestige of that group of crooks he agreed to represent. And, weren't all these clowns CIA operatives, in one capacity or another, anyway? They were looking to oust Nixon because Nixon was becoming too idealistic, as far as they were concerned. Same thing with adle-brained Ronnie. He was only as good as his rhetoric, and knack for flag-waving in stirring up the citizenry. As soon as he showed any comprehension of what bills he was signing, or tried to assert his presidential powers, or veto, he was smacked down. Look how easily they were able to pass off Iran Contra right under his nose? The old man had no clue, I'm sure. They used him ch in the same way they used Oswald, in the same way they used Nixon, if you really want to split hairs over this issue. They were all patsies. And, Hunt, Liddy, McCord, and the rest must be enjoying themselves on the generous pension funds we've had to foot the bill for.

No way, Terry. But at least we're getting clearer on where we're drawing the lines. Nixon was not an idol to (his own) "elite fascist guard," but instead (seen by them as) a mere unsophisticated rube? Contending that is letting Nixon off the hook, as is contending he "was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret teams real agenda." And Ronnie was "smacked down" by the powers behind the throne? when Ronnie had built his entire career being the willing spokesman of corporate power, reactionary ideological politics, and in summa that which is exactly the "real power behind the throne" in the larger society? I guess since Speer and me are the only ones who care enough to fight about this, I'll have to stay in the fight --- and begrudge you fun folks the time wasted when more important things are pressing. But we all have to choose what we consider as important, and right now it's pretty clear that this should be it.....................

;

*********************************************************

"And Ronnie was "smacked down" by the powers behind the throne? when Ronnie had built his entire career being the willing spokesman of corporate power, reactionary ideological politics, and in summa that which is exactly the "real power behind the throne" in the larger society?"


I guess you're not quite aware of where Ronnie's "Star Wars" idea came from?
Have you ever heard of Lyndon LaRouche? He was painted as a pariah, an anti-Semite, a homophobe, and a Communist by the Fourth Estate, in and around 1986, if memory serves me well. Just about the same time as the AIDS epidemic was becoming pandemic, and the Reagan administration was in denial and failing to address the issue. Too busy shutting down all the institutions which had served the disabled and kept them on their medications, and off the mean streets while providing them a safe haven in which to shelter them. All in the name of Reagan's handlers' "trickle-down" aka "voodoo" economics policy. Therefore, when Reagan began consulting with LaRouche, who was the originator of the idea of a Strategic Defense Initiative, his regime became concerned because of the smear campaign they were running on LaRouche and his organization, which ended up with the incarceration of LaRouche and three of his employees on trumped up fraud charges brought against the LaRouche organization by Richard Scaife, of the Mellon-Scaife empire. Apparently, one of the Scaife relatives, an uncle or nephew, had donated money to the LaRouche group in Lynchburg, VA. This didn't sit well with Scaife, who called for an investigation of LaRouche on the premises that his relative was mentally challenged, and at risk for being bilked out of his inheritance. I would venture to say that this was one of the instances where Ronnie was attempting to assert his authority, and even though his handlers went along with the SDI concept in an attempt to use it as trump card against the "evil empire," they were merely humoring him, as well as using him, and the concept, in a foreign policy PR campaign. After all, when Gorbachev took over as chairman of the "evil empire," it was already quite apparent that they were no more "evil" than their American counterparts. And, the SDI concept never did make it off the drawing board, did it? Reagan may have built his entire career by being a willing spokeman of corporate power and reactionary ideological politics, but he was merely a figure head, and not a very smart one at that. Especially, being married to a woman who needed to consult with an astrologist before allowing her husband to make a move, politically, or otherwise. It was Donald Regan, Howard Baker, George Schultz, and Caspar Weingarten, who were the Machivelli's behind that throne. Don't kid yourself, Dan. You'd be much better served by going back to your Qumran project and accomplishing something more worthwhile to contribute to civilization, than becoming bogged down in this quagmire.

Edited by Terry Mauro, 29 June 2006 - 04:16 PM.


#37 Ashton Gray

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Posted 29 June 2006 - 10:33 PM

Nixon was not an idol to (his own) "elite fascist guard," but instead (seen by them as) a mere unsophisticated rube? Contending that is letting Nixon off the hook, as is contending he "was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret teams real agenda." ...I guess since Speer and me are the only ones who care enough to fight about this, I'll have to stay in the fight --- and begrudge you fun folks the time wasted when more important things are pressing. But we all have to choose what we consider as important, and right now it's pretty clear that this should be it.


I already answered this partially, Daniel, but since you've opened the door, and since you feel that right now this should be considered important, I considered it important enough to give you a little more "fleshed out" response.

I realize that this is the JFK forum, and while I'm going to post an appropriately introduced version of this message in the Watergate forum, I'm posting it first in response to you here—since Mr. Caddy elected to put my name in lights in this forum as an accused forum pariah, and since you and one or two others have taken the opportunity not only to imply that my research and presentations on the CIA's role in Watergate are the deluded pursuits of a borderline loon, but also to build a totally specious "case" that to render unto CIA what is CIA's in regard to Watergate is somehow to "take Nixon off the hook."

Therefore I've created this timeline for you, a condensed version of the excellent timeline I've referred to repeatedly. I've excerpted relevant events just for you. In doing so, I've expunged all references to the "S word," or to what else the CIA might have been doing simultaneously, because I don't want you or Mr. Speer to start shaking uncontrollably or to run to your black helicopters again, as Mr. Speer seems wont to do. We don't need to address possible CIA motive in order to see events: who was doing what when.

So here is your own personal version of a relevant portion of that timeline, and I'm going to name it in your honor in the Watergate forum. I have taken it up only to the purported "first break-in" of the Watergate because I consider that entirely sufficient. At the end I will make an effort to sum up as succinctly as possible what I understand your position to be. Without further ado:

CIA-PENTAGON PAPERS-WATERGATE TIMELINE

Friday, 10 April 1970
Richard Helms has rubber-stamped E. Howard Hunt's "early retirement" and has written a letter to Robert R. Mullen on behalf of Hunt, urging Mullen to hire him. Mullen is head of a public relations firm in D.C. that is a front company for CIA. One of the Mullen offices, in Stockholm, Sweden, is "staffed, run, and paid for by CIA." Also at the Mullen firm is Douglas Caddy.

Monday, 13 April 1970
Daniel Ellsberg quits Rand in California, flies to Boston and signs a contract at MIT. He remains, though, a "consultant" for Rand.

Friday, 1 May 1970
E. Howard Hunt ostensibly "retires" from CIA. He goes to work for the Mullen company in D.C. There, he is told by Robert Mullen that he and Douglas Caddy have been selected by Mullen to take over running the CIA front company soon, when Mullen retires.

Tuesday, 5 May 1970
Daniel Ellsberg flies to Washington, D.C. and is there for three days, flies to St. Louis for a day, then flies back to D.C. [FORUM NOTE: Caddy wouldn't answer the question of whether he or Hunt had been in touch, either directly or through intermediaries, with Ellsberg.]

Thursday, 28 May 1970
A CIA Covert Security Approval is requested under Project QK/ENCHANT for the "retired" E. Howard Hunt.

August 1970
Just four months after E. Howard Hunt, James McCord "retires" from CIA.

September 1970
Daniel Ellsberg stops seeing Beverly Hills psychiatrist Lewis Fielding.

November 1970
Douglas Caddy leaves the Mullen firm to work for Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen. Around the same time, E. Howard Hunt becomes a "client" of Caddy and of Gall, Lane. Caddy consults with Hunt regarding wills and "other matters." Around the same time, G. Gordon Liddy is approached by Robert Mardian, asking Liddy to take a position that Mardian describes as "super-confidential."

February 1971
A hidden taping system is installed in the Oval Office of the White House.

Saturday, 17 April 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in Miami and meets with Bernard Barker, Eugenio Martinez, and Felipe De Diego. Bernard Barker has a history of almost seven years with CIA. Eugenio Martinez is on "retainer" with CIA. [NOTE: A little over four months later, these same three men will be involved with Hunt in a purported break-in of the offices of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding, ostensibly in response to Daniel Ellsberg having leaked the Pentagon Papers. But the Pentagon Papers haven't been leaked to the press yet, and won't be for almost two months.]

Early June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg makes "a series of phone calls" to psychiatrist Lewis Fielding shortly before the Pentagon Papers are published. Around this same time, Douglas Caddy meets with E. Howard Hunt and Bernard Barker at the Army-Navy Club in Washington, D.C. [NOTE: Caddy will claim that this is the one and only time that he ever met Bernard Barker.]

Saturday, 12 June 1971
The day before the "Pentagon Papers" are published, Morton Halperin, Leslie Gelb, and Defense Department official Paul Nitze make "a deposit into the National Archives" of "a whole lot of papers." [NOTE: This turns out later to be copies of the not-yet-published Pentagon Papers that will make Daniel Ellsberg famous and launch everything that later comes to be known as "Watergate."]

Sunday, 13 June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg, having highest possible clearances from CIA, leaks the "Pentagon Papers." The New York Times publishes the first of three installments of secret documents that have been passed to Times reporter Neil Sheehan by Daniel Ellsberg. [NOTE: Ellsberg had been connected to Sheehan in Viet Nam by CIA's Edward Landsdale and CIA's Lucien Conein.]

Tuesday, 15 June 1971
G. Gordon Liddy is abruptly transferred from being "Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury" to "Staff Assistant of the President of the United States," part of the White House Domestic Council. Liddy is supplied with White House credentials.

Monday, 28 June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg is indicted for the leak of the Pentagon Papers.

Wednesday, 30 June 1971
The Supreme Court rules 6-3 that the government has not shown compelling evidence to justify blocking further publication of the Pentagon Papers.

Thursday, 1 July 1971
David Young—who is with NSA—is appointed to the White House Domestic Council to work with Egil Krogh. On or about the same date, Carol Ellsberg, Daniel Ellsberg's ex-wife, calls the FBI. She tells them that Daniel Ellsberg had seen a psychiatrist. She says that Ellsberg has "assured her" that he "had told this analyst all about what he had done" (referring to the Pentagon Papers). She volunteers the name of the Beverly Hills psychiatrist: Lewis Fielding. [NOTE: Daniel and Carol Ellsberg have been living apart since January 1964, divorced since 1966. Daniel Ellsberg didn't begin with Fielding until two years after the divorce, in March of 1968 (see), and had quit seeing Fielding in September 1970 (see)—nearly a year before "what he had done."] On or about the same date, John "Jack" Caulfield, Staff Assistant to President Nixon, has created a 12-page political espionage proposal called "Sandwedge." Ostensibly as part of it, Anthony Ulasewicz has rented an apartment at 321 East 48th Street (Apartment 11-C), New York City. G. Gordon Liddy is given the complete "Sandwedge" plan. [NOTE: The apartment is in close proximity to the lab and school of CIA's Cleve Backster. It provides a backstopped New York address and phone. Note, too, that the reference for date of Sandwedge is a document in the National Archives titled "7/71 Sandwedge proposal," despite most anecdotal accounts placing it later in 1971.]

Friday, 2 July 1971
CIA Director Richard Helms is pushing behind the scenes to get E. Howard Hunt into a position connected with the White House in response to the Pentagon Papers having been leaked. H. R. Haldeman tells Nixon that Helms has described Hunt: "Ruthless, quiet and careful, low profile. He gets things done. He will work well with all of us. He's very concerned about the health of the administration. His concern, he thinks, is they're out to get us and all that, but he's not a fanatic. We could be absolutely certain it'll involve secrecy... ." On the same day, Charles Colson sends a memo to H. R. Haldeman with a transcript of a phone conversation he had with E. Howard Hunt the previous day—which he happened to record. Colson says: "The more I think about Howard Hunt's background, politics, disposition and experience, the more I think it would be worth your time to meet him."

Wednesday, 7 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt is hired as a "White House consultant" while keeping his full-time job at CIA front company Mullen. Hunt is supplied with White House credentials.

Thursday, 8 July 1971
The day after starting with the White House, E. Howard Hunt has a private meeting with CIA's Lucien Conein, Hunt's acquaintance of almost 30 years. [NOTE: Conein had been part of the team that Daniel Ellsberg had gone with to Vietnam, headed by CIA's Edward Landsdale, where Ellsberg had been connected up with reporter Neil Sheehan.]

Tuesday, 20 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt has a private meeting with CIA's Edward G. Landsdale. [NOTE: Landsdale had taken Daniel Ellsberg and Lucien Conein to Vietnam in 1965-66, where Ellsberg had been connected up with reporter Neil Sheehan.]

Thursday, 22 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt goes to CIA headquarters and meets privately with Deputy Director of CIA Robert Cushman.

Friday, 23 July 1971
The CIA supplies E. Howard Hunt with counterfeit ID in the name of "Edward J. Warren." Hunt meets CIA's Stephen Greenwood in a CIA safehouse where a fake driver's license and other ID material, plus a disguise, are given to Hunt.

Saturday, 24 July 1971
Based on a memorandum by Egil Krogh and NSA's David Young, the Special Investigations Unit is established at the White House under them. It comes to be known as the White House Plumbers. [NOTE: David Young gives the unit its nickname, supposedly because it is there to "stop leaks." It never stops a single leak, or accomplishes anything effective regarding security leaks. Liddy and Hunt are already established in their positions weeks before the unit is created. The creation of the Special Investigations Unit does nothing to alter the operational status or position of either of them. Young is running everything that leads to the Fielding office break-in. Young will later be given immunity by Watergate prosecutors, then will report the Fielding "burglary," backed up by CIA-supplied photos]

Friday, 30 July 1971
A highly secure facility has been set up in Room 16 of the Old Executive Office Building adjacent to the White House that G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt use. It includes a secure phone used "mostly to talk to the CIA at Langley."

Early August 1971
G. Gordon Liddy is in regular communication with "State and the CIA," having direct conversations with CIA Director Richard Helms. Liddy is briefed by CIA on "several additional sensitive programs in connection with his assignment to the White House staff." Liddy is also making regular trips to the Pentagon. E. Howard Hunt is making regular trips to the State Department. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations at the time is George H.W. Bush (Sr.)

Monday, 2 August 1971
CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy comes to Room 16 and meets privately with G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt.

Friday, 6 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt again meets clandestinely in a CIA safehouse, this time with CIA's Stephen Greenwood and also with CIA's Cleo Gephart. Hunt purportedly discusses CIA providing a "backstopped address and phone" in New York city. Hunt also asks for CIA to provide phony ID and a disguise for "an associate"—G. Gordon Liddy. [NOTE: Hunt is asking for ID and disguise for Liddy prior to any proposal to break into Lewis Fielding's office. Also, there's already a backstopped address and phone in New York city at 321 East 48th Street, Apartment 11-C, New York City, set up by Anthony Ulasewicz as part of the Sandwedge proposal, which Liddy and Hunt have. See 1 July 1971.]

Wednesday, 11 August 1971
CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy again comes to Room 16 and meets privately with G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt. Soon after, Liddy and Hunt recommend an attempt at surreptitious entry for "acquisition of psychiatric materials" on Daniel Ellsberg from the files of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding. They claim the need, first, for a "feasibility study" of Fielding's Beverly Hills office

Friday, 20 August 1971
The CIA supplies G. Gordon Liddy with counterfeit ID in the name of "George F. Leonard." Hunt and Liddy meet CIA's Stephen Greenwood (called "Steve" in Hunt's account) in a CIA safehouse where a CIA-created fake driver's license and other ID material, plus a disguise, and a camera are issued to Liddy.

Thursday, 26 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly to Los Angeles. Hunt takes pictures of Liddy, in his CIA-issued black wig (which doesn't disguise him), standing in front of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding's office door, with Fielding's name on the door. Liddy also takes pictures of Hunt in his CIA-supplied non-disguise. The photos are taken with the camera supplied to them by CIA.

Friday, 27 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly back to Washington, D.C. CIA's Stephen Greenwood meets them at the airport, where Hunt gives Greenwood the film for developing by CIA. Greenwood delivers prints to Hunt the same day. The CIA keeps a copy of the photos of Liddy and Hunt (in CIA-provided "disguises" that don't disguise them at all) mugging in front of Lewis Fielding's identifiable door. [NOTE: The CIA later turns their copies of the photos over to Watergate investigators, which results in all criminal charges against Daniel Ellsberg for leaking the Pentagon Papers to be dropped.]

Saturday, 28 August 1971
On a Saturday, Hunt and Liddy purportedly are in Room 16 when Liddy tells Hunt that the plan to do a break-in of Fielding's office is approved, but that the two of them are not "to be permitted anywhere near the target premises." [See 27 August 1971, immediately above.] E. Howard Hunt then purportedly calls Bernard Barker in Miami and asks if Barker can "put together a three-man entry team." Barker calls back to say it will be Barker, Eugenio Martinez, and Felipe De Diego. [NOTE: As luck would have it, this happens to be the same three men Hunt had met with in Miami two months before the Pentagon Papers were published. See 17 April 1971.]

Friday, 3 September 1971
A break-in takes place at the office of psychiatrist Lewis J. Fielding in Beverly Hills, California. The break-in is made obvious by the smashing of a window. Accounts of the break-in are irreconcilably conflicting. According to Bernard Barker, E. Howard Hunt, and G. Gordon Liddy, the three Cubans—Barker, Martinez, and De Diego—had entered the office and searched thoroughly, and there was no file on Daniel Ellsberg anywhere. According to Lewis Fielding, there was a file on Ellsberg in his office, which Fielding says he found on the floor the next morning. Fielding claims it was evident that someone had gone through the file. The same night, Hunt and Liddy are in New York City—where Hunt has made an issue of needing "a backstopped address." They check into the Pierre hotel and remain in New York through at least Sunday, 5 September 1971. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that either Liddy or Hunt had been in Los Angeles at all for the Fielding office break-in. Only the anecdotal claims of the co-conspirators account for the whereabouts of Hunt and Liddy that weekend. This is similar to the later purported Watergate first break-in that involves the same personnel.]

October 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in telephone contact with CIA Chief European Division John Hart, and has several telephone conversations with CIA Executive Officer European Division John Caswell. [NOTE: L. Patrick Gray will later order FBI to hold off on interviewing Caswell.]

Friday, 15 October 1971
E. Howard Hunt meets privately with CIA Director Richard Helms.

Early November 1971
CIA's James McCord, purportedly retired in August 1970, signs a contract with the Republican National Committee to handle "security." The contract is in the name of "McCord Associates, Inc." [NOTE: The corporation will not be created until several weeks after the contract is signed; incorporation papers are not filed until 19 November 1971 (see) in Maryland.]

Friday, 19 November 1971
CIA's E. Howard Hunt contacts CIA's Office of Security Director Robert Osborne. On the same day, CIA's James McCord files incorporation papers in Maryland for McCord Associates, Inc., ostensibly a security company, but the incorporation papers say nothing about providing security, and the company is not licensed for security. Included on the board are McCord, his wife, and his sister, Dorothy Berry, who works for an "oil company in Houston." [NOTE: Berry later claimed she had "no idea" she had been listed on the board. Also, the Gulf Resources and Chemical Corporation—an "oil company in Houston" that controls half the world's supply of lithium—will later provide checks that get converted to traceable $100 bills for part of what becomes known as Watergate. See 15 April 1972.]

Wednesday, 8 December 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in touch with senior CIA officer Peter Jessup, who is with the National Security Council staff. On or about the same day, Hunt meets privately again with CIA's Lucien Conein.

Sunday, 12 December 1971
NSA's David Young meets with Egil Krogh and CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy.

Thursday, 16 December 1971
CIA's E. Howard Hunt is in Dallas, Texas—an airline hub. Lt. George W. Bush is living in Houston, Texas. He is a pilot trained on T-38 Talons, a type of plane used as a chase plane.

January 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt are collaborating on a "political espionage" plan to replace the Sandwedge proposal. One of the items they have factored into the budget, ostensibly for "political espionage," is a chase plane. [NOTE: Budgeting and planning for this "chase plane" comes up over and over, but it is utterly ludicrous for any kind of "political espionage" purposes.]

Monday, 10 January 1972
G. Gordon Liddy is in New York city at the apartment Ulasewicz has established at 321 East 48th Street, Apartment 11-C.

Early February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt fly to Miami, home of Bernard Barker and other CIA-connected Cubans. Around the same time, G. Gordon Liddy "recruits" CIA's James McCord as a "wire man," purportedly to be able to do electronic eavesdropping for "political espionage" purposes. [NOTE: At the time, Liddy has no approved budget for any such activities, nor are there any approved plans for, or targets for, any such activities.]

Thursday, 17 February 1972
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy again fly to Miami, ostensibly to meet with Donald Segretti (a.k.a. "Donald Simmons"). While there, Hunt is in contact with CIA's Bernard Barker.

Tuesday, 22 February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy meets with CIA personnel at Langley in connection with CIA "special clearances" he has been granted.

Thursday, 24 February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt meet with a "retired" CIA doctor, introduced by Hunt to Liddy as "Dr. Edward Gunn," to get briefed by him on various covert means of murder for a possible assassination.

Late February 1972
E. Howard Hunt travels to Nicaragua on an "undisclosed mission." [NOTE: See entry for 3 March 1972.]

Wednesday, 1 March 1972
Douglas Caddy, who has E. Howard Hunt as a client, begins to do "legal tasks" for John Dean and G. Gordon Liddy.

Friday, 3 March 1972
Gary O. Morris, psychiatrist of E. Howard Hunt's wife, Dorothy, vanishes while on vacation on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia. No trace is ever found of the pleasure boat he had left on for a cruise with his wife and a local captain, Mervin Augustin.

Monday, 27 March 1972
G. Gordon Liddy's job abruptly changes to general counsel of the Finance Committee to Re-elect the President.

Wednesday, 29 March 1972
Two days after Liddy's job changes, E. Howard Hunt "terminates" in his paid capacity as a White House consultant—yet he keeps his office and the safe he'd used as such, and keeps his White House credentials because he continues to "work there a few hours each week."

Early April 1972
CIA's E. Howard Hunt flies to Chicago and delivers an undisclosed amount of cash in a sealed envelope to W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation. [NOTE: Dorothy Hunt later will die in a plane crash en route to Chicago carrying an envelope of cash.]

Saturday, 15 April 1972
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly to Miami and deliver checks drawn on a Mexico City bank to CIA's Bernard Barker. [NOTE: Several of the checks have originated from Gulf Resources and Chemical Corporation in Houston, which at the time controls half the world's supply of lithium, used in the making of hydrogen bombs and in psychiatric drugs.]

Monday, 24 April 1972
CIA's Bernard Barker cashes a cashier's check for $25,000 at his bank in Miami. [NOTE: This $25,000, from the Dahlberg check, plus two later withdrawals by Barker will equal $114,000. See 2 May and 8 May 1972.]

Monday, 1 May 1972
CIA's James McCord contacts an ex-FBI agent, Alfred Baldwin, who is living in Connecticut. McCord purportedly doesn't know Baldwin, but wants Baldwin to come to Washington, D.C. that night.

Tuesday, 2 May 1972
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover is found dead in his home in the early morning hours. L. Patrick Gray—who has no background in law enforcement—is appointed as Acting Director of FBI. [NOTE: Hoover's death is attributed to a heart attack, and no autopsy is done. L. Patrick Gray will steer the FBI investigation of Watergate, destroy material taken from the White House safe of E. Howard Hunt, then will resign.] Alfred Baldwin meets with James McCord. McCord issues Baldwin a Smith & Wesson .38 snub-nose revolver. Baldwin is assigned to travel as a bodyguard with Martha Mitchell on "a trip to the midwest." On the same day, CIA's Bernard Barker withdraws an unspecified amount of cash from his bank in Miami. [NOTE: This is the second of three transactions by Barker that will total $114,000.]

Thursday, 4 May 1972
Lt. George W. Bush is ordered to "report to commander, 111 F.I.S., Ellington AFB, not later than (NLT) 14 May, 1972." [NOTE: Bush does not report as ordered. See 19 May 1972.]

Friday, 5 May 1972
CIA's James McCord rents room 419 of the Howard Johnson's motel across the street from the Watergate. The room is registered in the name of McCord Associates.

Monday, 8 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin returns to Washington, D.C. from his trip with Martha Mitchell. He is told by James McCord to keep the .38 revolver because "he might be going on another trip." G. Gordon Liddy, in D.C., calls CIA's Bernard Barker in Miami. Bernard Barker withdraws another unspecified amount of cash from his bank in Miami which, with two other transactions, now totals $114,000. James McCord receives $4,000 in cash from G. Gordon Liddy.

Tuesday, 9 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin leaves Washington, D.C., ostensibly going to his home in Connecticut to "get more clothes." He takes the .38 revolver with him, purportedly because he has been told by James McCord that he might be going on another trip with Martha Mitchell that is scheduled for 11 May 1972. [NOTE: Baldwin doesn't return until 12 May 1972.]

Wednesday, 10 May 1972
CIA's James McCord is in Rockville, Maryland. He pays $3,500 cash for a "device capable of receiving intercepted wire and oral communications." [NOTE: Rockville, Maryland is about six miles from Laurel, Maryland. Five days later presidential candidate George Wallace will be shot in Laurel, Maryland by Arthur Bremer with a .38 calibur revolver. See 15 May 1972.]

Friday, 12 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin returns to Washington, D.C. James McCord tells Baldwin he won't be going with Martha Mitchell so he can "turn in his gun." Baldwin purportedly gives the .38 revovler to McCord. McCord tells Baldwin to move from the Roger Smith hotel, where Baldwin has been staying, into room 419 at the Howard Johnson's motel.

Monday, 15 May 1972
Presidential candidate George Wallace is shot by Arthur Bremer in Laurel, Maryland, ending his presidential campaign and partially paralyzing him.

Wednesday, 17 May 1972
CIA's Bernard Barker makes two calls from Miami to G. Gordon Liddy, and two calls to CIA's E. Howard Hunt.

Friday, 19 May 1972
Lt. George W. Bush (Jr.), a chase plane pilot, contacts a superior officer in the reserves to discuss "options of how Bush can get out of coming to drill from now through November." The memo recording the conversation says that Bush "is working on another campaign for his dad." The memo writer thinks Bush is "also talking to someone upstairs." [NOTE: George H. W. Bush (Sr.) is U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. at this time.] On the same day, President Richard M. Nixon, about to embark on an historic trip to the Soviet Union, writes the following in a letter to Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig: "The performance in the psychological warfare field is nothing short of disgraceful. The mountain has labored for seven weeks and when it finally produced, it produced not much more than a mouse. Or to put it more honestly, it produced a rat. We finally have a program now under way but it totally lacks imagination and I have no confidence whatever that the bureaucracy will carry it out. I do not simply blame (Richard) Helms and the CIA. After all, they do not support my policies because they basically are for the most part Ivy League and Georgetown society oriented." On the same day, E. Howard Hunt makes two calls to Bernard Barker in Miami.

Saturday, 20 May 1972
Richard Nixon leaves Washington, D.C. on his trip to Austria, the Soviet Union, Iran, and Poland. He will not return until 1 June 1972. James McCord sends Alfred Baldwin to Andrews Air Force Base, where Nixon is leaving on Air Force One, purportedly because there might be demonstrations and McCord wants Baldwin to be there for more "surveillance activities." [NOTE: The "reason" supplied by McCord in testimony for this trip by Baldwin is too thin to slice, particularly in light of the amount of security surrounding Nixon's departure. Besides Air Force One, there is a fleet of White House planes at Andrews for use by VIPs and various staff connected with the White House.] On or about the same day, CIA's E. Howard Hunt flies to Miami and meets with Bernard Barker.

Monday, 22 May 1972
Richard Nixon arrives in Moscow and is toasting Soviet leaders at a dinner. On the same day, the CIA "Cuban contingent" arrives in Washington, D.C. from Miami: Bernard Barker, Frank Sturgis, Eugenio Martinez, and Virgilio Gonzalez. They are in D.C. purportedly to carry out a "first break-in" on the following weekend of Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate with G. Gordon Liddy, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, and CIA's James McCord. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that any such "first break-in" ever took place. For full coverage, see The Watergate "First Break-In Dilemma. Note also that while E. Howard Hunt claims that six Cubans arrived on 22 May 1972, the referenced criminal appeals court ruling names only four.]

Tuesday, 23 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin leaves Washington, D.C. again, purportedly going to his home in Connecticut again. No reason is given for his departure.

Friday, 26 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a failed attempt to break into the Watergate—the "Ameritas dinner" attempt. [NOTE: There was no such attempt at a break-in See 26 May 1972: The "Ameritas Dinner" and Alfred Baldwin.]

Saturday, 27 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a second failed attempt to break into the Watergate. [NOTE: But there was no such "second attempt." See 27 May 1972: The "second failed attempt" and Alfred Baldwin.]

Sunday, 28 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a successful "first break-in" at DNC headquarters at the Watergate. According to their later claims, McCord placed two electronic bugs in the DNC headquarters during the "first break-in," and Bernard Barker purportedly had photos taken of the office of the Chairman, Lawrence O'Brien, and of documents on his desk. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that any such "first break-in" ever took place, or the purported two earlier failed attempts on the same holiday weekend. Barker later testified that he never was in O'Brien's office at all, and a telephone company sweep found no electronic bugs in the DNC at all (see 15 June 1972). For full coverage, see The Watergate "First Break-In Dilemma and There was no "first break-in" at the Watergate. There is nothing to account for the whereabouts of Liddy, Hunt, McCord, and Baldwin over the entire Memorial Day Weekend except the conflicting and contradictory anecdotal accounts of the co-conspirators themselves, which they volunteered when "caught" inside the building on 17 June 1972, while being represented by Douglas Caddy. See also 3 September 1971 for similarities in the purported "Fielding office break-in," including personnel involved and the use of a holiday weekend, in that case the Labor Day weekend.]

AFTERWORD: Douglas Caddy will later appear in court ostensibly representing all four of the arrested CIA-connected Cubans, plus CIA's James McCord, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, and G. Gordon Liddy, who has "special CIA clearances." Later, on Wednesday, 3 January 1973, the very day that Daniel Ellsberg goes on trial, CIA's Anthony Goldin hand delivers to the Department of Justice Watergate prosecutors copies of 10 photos of E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy taken at the office of Ellsberg psychiatrist Lewis J. Fielding, with Fielding's name on the door clearly visible. These will later be turned over to the Ellsberg court, and all charges against Ellsberg will be dropped. [NOTE: See 26 August 1971, when Liddy and Hunt flew to Los Angeles to take the photos of each other.]

=========================

Now, Dan, given all the foregoing, allow me to see if I can sum up your position in the most pithy way possible, and you be sure to correct me if I have this wrong. (Drum roll, please.)

DANIEL: NIXON DID IT.

<Cymbal crash>

Ashton Gray

Edited by Ashton Gray, 30 June 2006 - 05:25 AM.


#38 Dawn Meredith

Dawn Meredith

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 12:09 AM

Nixon was not an idol to (his own) "elite fascist guard," but instead (seen by them as) a mere unsophisticated rube? Contending that is letting Nixon off the hook, as is contending he "was merely a puppet whose wims and idiosyncracies were becoming a liability to their secret teams real agenda." ...I guess since Speer and me are the only ones who care enough to fight about this, I'll have to stay in the fight --- and begrudge you fun folks the time wasted when more important things are pressing. But we all have to choose what we consider as important, and right now it's pretty clear that this should be it.


I already answered this partially, Daniel, but since you've opened the door, and since you feel that right now this should be considered important, I considered it important enough to give you a little more "fleshed out" response.

I realize that this is the JFK forum, and while I'm going to post an appropriately introduced version of this message in that forum, I'm posting it first in response to you here—since Mr. Caddy elected to put my name in lights in this forum as an accused forum pariah, and since you and one or two others have taken the opportunity to imply that my research and presentations on the CIA's role in Watergate not only are the deluded pursuits of a borderline loon, but also to build a totally specious "case" that to render unto CIA what is CIA's in regard to Watergate is somehow to "take Nixon off the hook."

Therefore I've created this timeline for you, a condensed version of the excellent timeline I've referred to repeatedly. I've excerpted relevant events just for you. In doing so, I've expunged all references to the "S word," or to what else the CIA might have been doing simultaneously, because I don't want you or Mr. Speer to start shaking uncontrollably or to run to your black helicopters again, as Mr. Speer seems wont to do. We don't need to address possible CIA motive in order to see events: who was doing what when.

So here is your own personal version of a relevant portion of that timeline, and I'm going to name it in your honor in the Watergate forum. I have taken it up only to the purported "first break-in" of the Watergate because I consider that entirely sufficient. At the end I will make an effort to sum up as succinctly as possible what I understand your position to be. Without further ado:

CIA-PENTAGON PAPERS-WATERGATE TIMELINE

Friday, 10 April 1970
Richard Helms has rubber-stamped E. Howard Hunt's "early retirement" and has written a letter to Robert R. Mullen on behalf of Hunt, urging Mullen to hire him. Mullen is head of a public relations firm in D.C. that is a front company for CIA. One of the Mullen offices, in Stockholm, Sweden, is "staffed, run, and paid for by CIA." Also at the Mullen firm is Douglas Caddy.

Monday, 13 April 1970
Daniel Ellsberg quits Rand in California, flies to Boston and signs a contract at MIT. He remains, though, a "consultant" for Rand.

Friday, 1 May 1970
E. Howard Hunt ostensibly "retires" from CIA. He goes to work for the Mullen company in D.C. There, he is told by Robert Mullen that he and Douglas Caddy have been selected by Mullen to take over running the CIA front company soon, when Mullen retires.

Tuesday, 5 May 1970
Daniel Ellsberg flies to Washington, D.C. and is there for three days, flies to St. Louis for a day, then flies back to D.C. [FORUM NOTE: Caddy wouldn't answer the question of whether he or Hunt had been in touch, either directly or through intermediaries, with Ellsberg.]

Thursday, 28 May 1970
A CIA Covert Security Approval is requested under Project QK/ENCHANT for the "retired" E. Howard Hunt.

August 1970
Just four months after E. Howard Hunt, James McCord "retires" from CIA.

September 1970
Daniel Ellsberg stops seeing Beverly Hills psychiatrist Lewis Fielding.

November 1970
Douglas Caddy leaves the Mullen firm to work for Gall, Lane, Powell and Kilcullen. Around the same time, E. Howard Hunt becomes a "client" of Caddy and of Gall, Lane. Caddy consults with Hunt regarding wills and "other matters." Around the same time, G. Gordon Liddy is approached by Robert Mardian, asking Liddy to take a position that Mardian describes as "super-confidential."

February 1971
A hidden taping system is installed in the Oval Office of the White House.

Saturday, 17 April 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in Miami and meets with Bernard Barker, Eugenio Martinez, and Felipe De Diego. Bernard Barker has a history of almost seven years with CIA. Eugenio Martinez is on "retainer" with CIA. [NOTE: A little over four months later, these same three men will be involved with Hunt in a purported break-in of the offices of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding, ostensibly in response to Daniel Ellsberg having leaked the Pentagon Papers. But the Pentagon Papers haven't been leaked to the press yet, and won't be for almost two months.]

Early June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg makes "a series of phone calls" to psychiatrist Lewis Fielding shortly before the Pentagon Papers are published. Around this same time, Douglas Caddy meets with E. Howard Hunt and Bernard Barker at the Army-Navy Club in Washington, D.C. [NOTE: Caddy will claim that this is the one and only time that he ever met Bernard Barker.]

Saturday, 12 June 1971
The day before the "Pentagon Papers" are published, Morton Halperin, Leslie Gelb, and Defense Department official Paul Nitze make "a deposit into the National Archives" of "a whole lot of papers." [NOTE: This turns out later to be copies of the not-yet-published Pentagon Papers that will make Daniel Ellsberg famous and launch everything that later comes to be known as "Watergate."]

Sunday, 13 June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg, having highest possible clearances from CIA, leaks the "Pentagon Papers." The New York Times publishes the first of three installments of secret documents that have been passed to Times reporter Neil Sheehan by Daniel Ellsberg. [NOTE: Ellsberg had been connected to Sheehan in Viet Nam by CIA's Edward Landsdale and CIA's Lucien Conein.]

Tuesday, 15 June 1971
G. Gordon Liddy is abruptly transferred from being "Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury" to "Staff Assistant of the President of the United States," part of the White House Domestic Council. Liddy is supplied with White House credentials.

Monday, 28 June 1971
Daniel Ellsberg is indicted for the leak of the Pentagon Papers.

Wednesday, 30 June 1971
The Supreme Court rules 6-3 that the government has not shown compelling evidence to justify blocking further publication of the Pentagon Papers.

Thursday, 1 July 1971
David Young—who is with NSA—is appointed to the White House Domestic Council to work with Egil Krogh. On or about the same date, Carol Ellsberg, Daniel Ellsberg's ex-wife, calls the FBI. She tells them that Daniel Ellsberg had seen a psychiatrist. She says that Ellsberg has "assured her" that he "had told this analyst all about what he had done" (referring to the Pentagon Papers). She volunteers the name of the Beverly Hills psychiatrist: Lewis Fielding. [NOTE: Daniel and Carol Ellsberg have been living apart since January 1964, divorced since 1966. Daniel Ellsberg didn't begin with Fielding until two years after the divorce, in March of 1968 (see), and had quit seeing Fielding in September 1970 (see)—nearly a year before "what he had done."] On or about the same date, John "Jack" Caulfield, Staff Assistant to President Nixon, has created a 12-page political espionage proposal called "Sandwedge." Ostensibly as part of it, Anthony Ulasewicz has rented an apartment at 321 East 48th Street (Apartment 11-C), New York City. G. Gordon Liddy is given the complete "Sandwedge" plan. [NOTE: The apartment is in close proximity to the lab and school of CIA's Cleve Backster. It provides a backstopped New York address and phone. Note, too, that the reference for date of Sandwedge is a document in the National Archives titled "7/71 Sandwedge proposal," despite most anecdotal accounts placing it later in 1971.]

Friday, 2 July 1971
CIA Director Richard Helms is pushing behind the scenes to get E. Howard Hunt into a position connected with the White House in response to the Pentagon Papers having been leaked. H. R. Haldeman tells Nixon that that Helms has described Hunt: "Ruthless, quiet and careful, low profile. He gets things done. He will work well with all of us. He's very concerned about the health of the administration. His concern, he thinks, is they're out to get us and all that, but he's not a fanatic. We could be absolutely certain it'll involve secrecy... ." On the same day, Charles Colson sends a memo to H. R. Haldeman with a transcript of a phone conversation he had with E. Howard Hunt the previous day—which he happened to record. Colson says: "The more I think about Howard Hunt's background, politics, disposition and experience, the more I think it would be worth your time to meet him."

Wednesday, 7 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt is hired as a "White House consultant" while keeping his full-time job at CIA front company Mullen. Hunt is supplied with White House credentials.

Thursday, 8 July 1971
The day after starting with the White House, E. Howard Hunt has a private meeting with CIA's Lucien Conein, Hunt's acquaintance of almost 30 years. [NOTE: Conein had been part of the team that Daniel Ellsberg had gone with to Vietnam, headed by CIA's Edward Landsdale, where Ellsberg had been connected up with reporter Neil Sheehan.]

Tuesday, 20 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt has a private meeting with CIA's Edward G. Landsdale. [NOTE: Landsdale had taken Daniel Ellsberg and Lucien Conein to Vietnam in 1965-66, where Ellsberg had been connected up with reporter Neil Sheehan.]

Thursday, 22 July 1971
E. Howard Hunt goes to CIA headquarters and meets privately with Deputy Director of CIA Robert Cushman.

Friday, 23 July 1971
The CIA supplies E. Howard Hunt with counterfeit ID in the name of "Edward J. Warren." Hunt meets CIA's Stephen Greenwood in a CIA safehouse where a fake driver's license and other ID material, plus a disguise, are given to Hunt.

Saturday, 24 July 1971
Based on a memorandum by Egil Krogh and NSA's David Young, the Special Investigations Unit is established at the White House under them. It comes to be known as the White House Plumbers. [NOTE: David Young gives the unit its nickname, supposedly because it is there to "stop leaks." It never stops a single leak, or accomplishes anything effective regarding security leaks. Liddy and Hunt are already established in their positions weeks before the unit is created. The creation of the Special Investigations Unit does nothing to alter the operatioinal status or position of either of them. Young is running everything that leads to the Fielding office break-in. Young will later be given immunity by Watergate prosecutors, then will report the Fielding "burglary," backed up by CIA-supplied photos]

Friday, 30 July 1971
A highly secure facility has been set up in Room 16 of the Old Executive Office Building adjacent to the White House that G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt use. It includes a secure phone used "mostly to talk to the CIA at Langley."

Early August 1971
G. Gordon Liddy is in regular communication with "State and the CIA," having direct conversations with CIA Director Richard Helms. Liddy is briefed by CIA on "several additional sensitive programs in connection with his assignment to the White House staff." Liddy is also making regular trips to the Pentagon. E. Howard Hunt is making regular trips to the State Department. U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations at the time is George H.W. Bush (Sr.)

Monday, 2 August 1971
CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy comes to Room 16 and meets privately with G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt.

Friday, 6 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt again meets clandestinely in a CIA safehouse, this time with CIA's Stephen Greenwood and also with CIA's Cleo Gephart. Hunt purportedly discusses CIA providing a "backstopped address and phone" in New York city. Hunt also asks for CIA to provide phony ID and a disguise for "an associate"—G. Gordon Liddy. [NOTE: Hunt is asking for ID and disguise for Liddy prior to any proposal to break into Lewis Fielding's office. Also, there's already a backstopped address and phone in New York city at 321 East 48th Street, Apartment 11-C, New York City, set up by Anthony Ulasewicz as part of the Sandwedge proposal, which Liddy and Hunt have. See 1 July 1971.]

Wednesday, 11 August 1971
CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy again comes to Room 16 and meets privately with G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt. Soon after, Liddy and Hunt recommend an attempt at surreptitious entry for "acquisition of psychiatric materials" on Daniel Ellsberg from the files of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding. They claim the need, first, for a "feasibility study" of Fielding's Beverly Hills office

Friday, 20 August 1971
The CIA supplies G. Gordon Liddy with counterfeit ID in the name of "George F. Leonard." Hunt and Liddy meet CIA's Stephen Greenwood (called "Steve" in Hunt's account) in a CIA safehouse where a CIA-created fake driver's license and other ID material, plus a disguise, and a camera are issued to Liddy.

Thursday, 26 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly to Los Angeles. Hunt takes pictures of Liddy, in his CIA-issued black wig (which doesn't disguise him), standing in front of psychiatrist Lewis Fielding's office door, with Fielding's name on the door. Liddy also takes pictures of Hunt in his CIA-supplied non-disguise. The photos are taken with the camera supplied to them by CIA.

Friday, 27 August 1971
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly back to Washington, D.C. CIA's Stephen Greenwood meets them at the airport, where Hunt gives Greenwood the film for developing by CIA. Greenwood delivers prints to Hunt the same day. The CIA keeps a copy of the photos of Liddy and Hunt (in CIA-provided "disguises" that don't disguise them at all) mugging in front of Lewis Fielding's identifiable door. [NOTE: The CIA later turns their copies of the photos over to Watergate investigators, which results in all criminal charges against Daniel Ellsberg for leaking the Pentagon Papers to be dropped.]

Saturday, 28 August 1971
On a Saturday, Hunt and Liddy purportedly are in Room 16 when Liddy tells Hunt that the plan to do a break-in of Fielding's office is approved, but that the two of them are not "to be permitted anywhere near the target premises." [See 27 August 1971, immediately above.][/i] E. Howard Hunt then purportedly calls Bernard Barker in Miami and asks if Barker can "put together a three-man entry team." Barker calls back to say it will be Barker, Eugenio Martinez, and Felipe De Diego. [NOTE: As luck would have it, this happens to be the same three men Hunt had met with in Miami two months before the Pentagon Papers were published. See 17 April 1971.]

Friday, 3 September 1971
A break-in takes place at the office of psychiatrist Lewis J. Fielding in Beverly Hills, California. The break-in is made obvious by the smashing of a window. Accounts of the break-in are irreconcilably conflicting. According to Bernard Barker, E. Howard Hunt, and G. Gordon Liddy, the three Cubans—Barker, Martinez, and De Diego—had entered the office and searched thoroughly, and there was no file on Daniel Ellsberg anywhere. According to Lewis Fielding, there was a file on Ellsberg in his office, which Fielding says he found on the floor the next morning. Fielding claims it was evident that someone had gone through the file. The same night, Hunt and Liddy are in New York City—where Hunt has made an issue of needing "a backstopped address." They check into the Pierre hotel and remain in New York through at least Sunday, 5 September 1971. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that either Liddy or Hunt had been in Los Angeles at all for the Fielding office break-in. Only the anecdotal claims of the co-conspirators account for the whereabouts of Hunt and Liddy that weekend. This is similar to the later purported Watergate first break-in that involves the same personnel.]

October 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in telephone contact with CIA Chief European Division John Hart, and has several telephone conversations with CIA Executive Officer European Division John Caswell. [NOTE: L. Patrick Gray will later order FBI to hold off on interviewing Caswell.]

Friday, 15 October 1971
E. Howard Hunt meets privately with CIA Director Richard Helms.

Early November 1971
CIA's James McCord, purportedly retired in August 1970, signs a contract with the Republican National Committee to handle "security." The contract is in the name of "McCord Associates, Inc." [NOTE: The corporation will not be created until several weeks after the contract is signed; incorporation papers are not filed until 19 November 1971 (see) in Maryland.]

Friday, 19 November 1971
CIA's E. Howard Hunt contacts CIA's Office of Security Director Robert Osborne. On the same day, CIA's James McCord files incorporation papers in Maryland for McCord Associates, Inc., ostensibly a security company, but the incorporation papers say nothing about providing security, and the company is not licensed for security. Included on the board are McCord, his wife, and his sister, Dorothy Berry, who works for an "oil company in Houston." [NOTE: Berry later claimed she had "no idea" she had been listed on the board. Also, the Gulf Resources and Chemical Corporation—an "oil company in Houston" that controls half the world's supply of lithium—will later provide checks that get converted to traceable $100 bills for part of what becomes known as Watergate. See 15 April 1972.]

Wednesday, 8 December 1971
E. Howard Hunt is in touch with senior CIA officer Peter Jessup, who is with the National Security Council staff. On or about the same day, Hunt meets privately again with CIA's Lucien Conein.

Sunday, 12 December 1971
NSA's David Young meets with Egil Krogh and CIA psychiatrist Bernard Malloy.

Thursday, 16 December 1971
CIA's E. Howard Hunt is in Dallas, Texas—an airline hub. Lt. George W. Bush is living in Houston, Texas. He is a pilot trained on T-38 Talons, a type of plane used as a chase plane.

January 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt are collaborating on a "political espionage" plan to replace the Sandwedge proposal. One of the items they have factored into the budget, ostensibly for "political espionage," is a chase plane. [NOTE: Budgeting and planning for this "chase plane" comes up over and over, but it is utterly ludicrous for any kind of "political espionage" purposes.]

Monday, 10 January 1972
G. Gordon Liddy is in New York city at the apartment Ulasewicz has established at 321 East 48th Street, Apartment 11-C.

Early February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt fly to Miami, home of Bernard Barker and other CIA-connected Cubans. Around the same time, G. Gordon Liddy "recruits" CIA's James McCord as a "wire man," purportedly to be able to do electronic eavesdropping for "political espionage" purposes. [NOTE: At the time, Liddy has no approved budget for any such activities, nor are there any approved plans for, or targets for, any such activities.]

Thursday, 17 February 1972
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy again fly to Miami, ostensibly to meet with Donald Segretti (a.k.a. "Donald Simmons"). While there, Hunt is in contact with CIA's Bernard Barker.

Tuesday, 22 February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy meets with CIA personnel at Langley in connection with CIA "special clearances" he has been granted.

Thursday, 24 February 1972
G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt meet with a "retired" CIA doctor, introduced by Hunt to Liddy as "Dr. Edward Gunn," to get briefed by him on various covert means of murder for a possible assassination.

Late February 1972
E. Howard Hunt travels to Nicaragua on an "undisclosed mission." [NOTE: See entry for 3 March 1972.]

Wednesday, 1 March 1972
Douglas Caddy, who has E. Howard Hunt as a client, begins to do "legal tasks" for John Dean and G. Gordon Liddy.

Friday, 3 March 1972
Gary O. Morris, psychiatrist of E. Howard Hunt's wife, Dorothy, vanishes while on vacation on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia. No trace is ever found of the pleasure boat he had left on for a cruise with his wife and a local captain, Mervin Augustin.

Monday, 27 March 1972
G. Gordon Liddy's job abruptly changes to general counsel of the Finance Committee to Re-elect the President.

Wednesday, 29 March 1972
Two days after Liddy's job changes, E. Howard Hunt "terminates" in his paid capacity as a White House consultant—yet he keeps his office and the safe he'd used as such, and keeps his White House credentials because he continues to "work there a few hours each week."

Early April 1972
CIA's E. Howard Hunt flies to Chicago and delivers an undisclosed amount of cash in a sealed envelope to W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation. [NOTE: Dorothy Hunt later will die in a plane crash en route to Chicago carrying an envelope of cash.]

Saturday, 15 April 1972
E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy fly to Miami and deliver checks drawn on a Mexico City bank to CIA's Bernard Barker. [NOTE: Several of the checks have originated from Gulf Resources and Chemical Corporation in Houston, which at the time controls half the world's supply of lithium, used in the making of hydrogen bombs and in psychiatric drugs.]

Monday, 24 April 1972
CIA's Bernard Barker cashes a cashier's check for $25,000 at his bank in Miami. [NOTE: This $25,000, from the Dahlberg check, plus two later withdrawals by Barker will equal $114,000. See 2 May and 8 May 1972.]

Monday, 1 May 1972
CIA's James McCord contacts an ex-FBI agent, Alfred Baldwin, who is living in Connecticut. McCord purportedly doesn't know Baldwin, but wants Baldwin to come to Washington, D.C. that night.

Tuesday, 2 May 1972
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover is found dead in his home in the early morning hours. L. Patrick Gray—who has no background in law enforcement—is appointed as Acting Director of FBI. [NOTE: Hoover's death is attributed to a heart attack, and no autopsy is done. L. Patrick Gray will steer the FBI investigation of Watergate, destroy material taken from the White House safe of E. Howard Hunt, then will resign.] Alfred Baldwin meets with James McCord. McCord issues Baldwin a Smith & Wesson .38 snub-nose revolver. Baldwin is assigned to travel as a bodyguard with Martha Mitchell on "a trip to the midwest." On the same day, CIA's Bernard Barker withdraws an unspecified amount of cash from his bank in Miami. [NOTE: This is the second of three transactions by Barker that will total $114,000.]

Thursday, 4 May 1972
Lt. George W. Bush is ordered to "report to commander, 111 F.I.S., Ellington AFB, not later than (NLT) 14 May, 1972." [NOTE: Bush does not report as ordered. See 19 May 1972.]

Friday, 5 May 1972
CIA's James McCord rents room 419 of the Howard Johnson's motel across the street from the Watergate. The room is registered in the name of McCord Associates.

Monday, 8 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin returns to Washington, D.C. from his trip with Martha Mitchell. He is told by James McCord to keep the .38 revolver because "he might be going on another trip." G. Gordon Liddy, in D.C., calls CIA's Bernard Barker in Miami. Bernard Barker withdraws another unspecified amount of cash from his bank in Miami which, with two other transactions, now totals $114,000. James McCord receives $4,000 in cash from G. Gordon Liddy.

Tuesday, 9 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin leaves Washington, D.C., ostensibly going to his home in Connecticut to "get more clothes." He takes the .38 revolver with him, purportedly because he has been told by James McCord that he might be going on another trip with Martha Mitchell that is scheduled for 11 May 1972. [NOTE: Baldwin doesn't return until 12 May 1972.]

Wednesday, 10 May 1972
CIA's James McCord is in Rockville, Maryland. He pays $3,500 cash for a "device capable of receiving intercepted wire and oral communications." [NOTE: Rockville, Maryland is about six miles from Laurel, Maryland. Five days later presidential candidate George Wallace will be shot in Laurel, Maryland by Arthur Bremer with a .38 calibur revolver. See 15 May 1972.]

Friday, 12 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin returns to Washington, D.C. James McCord tells Baldwin he won't be going with Martha Mitchell so he can "turn in his gun." Baldwin purportedly gives the .38 revovler to McCord. McCord tells Baldwin to move from the the Roger Smith hotel, where Baldwin has been staying, into room 419 at the Howard Johnson's motel.

Monday, 15 May 1972
Presidential candidate George Wallace is shot by Arthur Bremer in Laurel, Maryland, ending his presidential campaign and partially paralyzing him.

Wednesday, 17 May 1972
CIA's Bernard Barker makes two calls from Miami to G. Gordon Liddy, and two calls to CIA's E. Howard Hunt.

Friday, 19 May 1972
Lt. George W. Bush (Jr.), a chase plane pilot, contacts a superior officer in the reserves to discuss "options of how Bush can get out of coming to drill from now through November." The memo recording the conversation says that Bush "is working on another campaign for his dad." The memo writer thinks Bush is "also talking to someone upstairs." [NOTE: George H. W. Bush (Sr.) is U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. at this time.] On the same day, President Richard M. Nixon, about to embark on an historic trip to the Soviet Union, writes the following in a letter to Henry Kissinger and Alexander Haig: "The performance in the psychological warfare field is nothing short of disgraceful. The mountain has labored for seven weeks and when it finally produced, it produced not much more than a mouse. Or to put it more honestly, it produced a rat. We finally have a program now under way but it totally lacks imagination and I have no confidence whatever that the bureaucracy will carry it out. I do not simply blame (Richard) Helms and the CIA. After all, they do not support my policies because they basically are for the most part Ivy League and Georgetown society oriented." On the same day, E. Howard Hunt makes two calls to Bernard Barker in Miami.

Saturday, 20 May 1972
Richard Nixon leaves Washington, D.C. on his trip to Austria, the Soviet Union, Iran, and Poland. He will not return until 1 June 1972. James McCord sends Alfred Baldwin to Andrews Air Force Base, where Nixon is leaving on Air Force One, purportedly because there might be demonstrations and McCord wants Baldwin to be there for more "surveillance activities." [NOTE: The "reason" supplied by McCord in testimony for this trip by Baldwin is too thin to slice, particularly in light of the amount of security surrounding Nixon's departure. Besides Air Force One, there is a fleet of White House planes at Andrews for use by VIPs and various staff connected with the White House.] On or about the same day, CIA's E. Howard Hunt flies to Miami and meets with Bernard Barker.

Monday, 22 May 1972
Richard Nixon arrives in Moscow and is toasting Soviet leaders at a dinner. On the same day, the CIA "Cuban contingent" arrives in Washington, D.C. from Miami: Bernard Barker, Frank Sturgis, Eugenio Martinez, and Virgilio Gonzalez. They are in D.C. purportedly to carry out a "first break-in" on the following weekend of Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate with G. Gordon Liddy, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, and CIA's James McCord. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that any such "first break-in" ever took place. For full coverage, see The Watergate "First Break-In Dilemma. Note also that while E. Howard Hunt claims that six Cubans arrived on 22 May 1972, the referenced criminal appeals court ruling names only four.]

Tuesday, 23 May 1972
Alfred Baldwin leaves Washington, D.C. again, purportedly going to his home in Connecticut again. No reason is given for his departure.

Friday, 26 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a failed attempt to break into the Watergate—the "Ameritas dinner" attempt. [NOTE: There was no such attempt at a break-in See 26 May 1972: The "Ameritas Dinner" and Alfred Baldwin.]

Saturday, 27 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a second failed attempt to break into the Watergate. [NOTE: But there was no such "second attempt." See 27 May 1972: The "second failed attempt" and Alfred Baldwin.]

Sunday, 28 May 1972
G. Gordon Liddy, Alfred Baldwin, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, CIA's James McCord, and several Cuban CIA contract agents purportedly are engaged in a successful "first break-in" at DNC headquarters at the Watergate. According to their later claims, McCord placed two electronic bugs in the DNC headquarters during the "first break-in," and Bernard Barker purportedly had photos taken of the office of the Chairman, Lawrence O'Brien, and of documents on his desk. [NOTE: There is no physical evidence that any such "first break-in" ever took place, or the purported two earlier failed attempts on the same holiday weekend. Barker later testified that he never was in O'Brien's office at all, and a telephone company sweep found no electronic bugs in the DNC at all (see 15 June 1972). For full coverage, see The Watergate "First Break-In Dilemma and There was no "first break-in" at the Watergate. There is nothing to account for the whereabouts of Liddy, Hunt, McCord, and Baldwin over the entire Memorial Day Weekend except the conflicting and contradictory anecdotal accounts of the co-conspirators themselves, which they volunteered when "caught" inside the building on 17 June 1972, while being represented by Douglas Caddy. See also 3 September 1971 for similarities in the purported "Fielding office break-in," including personnel involved and the use of a holiday weekend, in that case the Labor Day weekend.]

AFTERWORD: Douglas Caddy will later appear in court ostensibly representing all four of the arrested CIA-connected Cubans, plus CIA's James McCord, CIA's E. Howard Hunt, and G. Gordon Liddy, who has "special CIA clearances." Later, on Wednesday, 3 January 1973, the very day that Daniel Ellsberg goes on trial, CIA's Anthony Goldin hand delivers to the Department of Justice Watergate prosecutors copies of 10 photos of E. Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy taken at the office of Ellsberg psychiatrist Lewis J. Fielding, with Fielding's name on the door clearly visible. These will later be turned over to the Ellsberg court, and all charges against Ellsberg will be dropped.[NOTE: See 26 August 1971, when Liddy and Hunt flew to Los Angeles to take the photos of each other.]

=========================

Now, Dan, given all the foregoing, allow me to see if I can sum up your position in the most pithy way possible, and you be sure to correct me if I have this wrong. (Drum roll, please.)

DANIEL: NIXON DID IT.

<Cymbal crash>

Ashton Gray




It's the end of another long day. All I can say is that this chronology of events has me singing an old Everly Brothers song "Wake Up Little Susie".

I hope that .......-(know that)- people are beginning to "get it" here..

Ashton, I honestly do not know how you can make it any MORE clear.

Perhaps reading it twice???? Once for content, twice for comprehension; that lightbulb
moment???

I can only hope.

Dawn

ps Pat: GIven this chronology do you STILL think Ashton is any relation to PATRICK Gray? B)

#39 Pat Speer

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 12:14 AM

Ashton, I read the post above, and have one comment: SFW. READ original source material whenever possible. This time-line links things like so and so knew so and so and so and so was a former CIA guy so we know they must have been up to some BAD things, and that these bad things must have been designed to overthrow Nixon. Where's the beef? For example, it cites that Hunt met with Conein and Lansdale as if--wink wink--they must have been hatching a scheme against Nixon. What was Hunt's initial job, as confirmed by NIxon loyalists like Colson and Ehrlichman? His job was to look through the Bay of Pigs and Diem records, and SEE if they could be USED AGAINST KENNEDY. Helms knew what Nixon was like and dragged his feet on this issue. Eventually, when they couldn't find a smoking gun PROVING that JFK was behind Diem's murder, Hunt created some fake cables--he testified it was at Colson's request--implicating Kennedy in Diem's death. Hunt admitted faking these cables. William Lambert of Life Magazine was shown these cables by Hunt. Dean saw these cables when he removed them from Hunt's safe. The April 28, 1973 Watergate conversation between Nixon and Ehrlichman reflects that COLSON HAD TOLD EHRLICHMAN ABOUT THE FAKE CABLES when they were created. Pat Gray even TESTIFIED that he looked through the cables before he destroyed them. And yet you insist they never existed. Why?

Could it be because then you'd have to admit there were other ways to overthrow Nixon besides an incredibly convoluted plan involving multiple break-ins mutliple lies and multiple players? A reasonable man would say, sure, they existed, Hunt created them, and was going to use them to help destroy Nixon. But you can't accept that because that would mean that Nixon was a liar, or that at least his hatchet man Colson was a liar, and that at least part of the "official" story is true.

Please take this nonsense elsewhere, or at least gussy it up a little so that it makes a wee bit of sense. But before you go, please explain to us what the term "psychological warfare" means. Your time-line seems to imply that Nixon's demand for better Psycholgical Warfare is somehow mysterious, and involves mind control or remote viewing or some such thing. Anyone who'd actually researched the term would have found that "Psychological Warfare" was an early term for black ops involving propaganda. A typical Psy-War op (and one actually proposed by the CIA during Operation Success) would be to deface Catholic shrines with Communist slogans, in order to turn the faithful against communism. Tricky Dick was therefore angry at the CIA because they weren't DIRTY enough! And yet you seem to think he was an innocent duped by forces far more dirty than he could ever perceive.

Dream on. Please cite one person close to Nixon who thought Nixon was a Poillyanna battling dark forces beyond his control, who didn't also feel those dark forces arose from Nixon's own soul.

#40 Jack White

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 09:38 PM

The Ashton Gray timeline is very interesting. I would like to know
the source. Much of it is very informative, if all is true. Now I begin
to see what the Caddy/Gray argument is about.

Jack

#41 John Simkin

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 10:32 PM

Ashton, you might find this timeline helpful:

http://www.spartacus...eChronology.htm

20th March, 1971: Frederick LaRue and Gordon Liddy attend a meeting of the Committee to Re-Elect the President (CREEP) where it was agreed to spend $250,000 "intelligence gathering" operation against the Democratic Party.

27th June, 1971: Donald Segretti attempts to persuade Alex Shipley to join the espionage campaign against leading Democratic Party candidates, Edward Kennedy and Edmund Muskie.

7th July, 1971: Charles Colson and John Ehrlichman appoint E. Howard Hunt to the White House staff. Hunt later becomes a key figure in the White House Special Investigations Unit.

9th September, 1971: John N. Mitchell and Gordon Liddy organizes the break-in of a psychiatrist's office to find files on Daniel Ellsberg.

24th February, 1972: William Loeb, the owner of the Manchester Union Leader newspaper, publishes an article claiming that Edmund Muskie had made derogatory comments about Americans of French-Canadian ancestry (the Canuck Letter).

25th February, 1972: William Loeb publishes an article attacking Muskie's wife. While defending his wife he breaks down in tears and it is believed marks the end of his chances to become the Democratic Party's presidential candidate.

20th March, 1972: John N. Mitchell and Jeb Magruder discuss the proposal made by Gordon Liddy to bug the telephone of the chairman of the national Democratic Party, Larry O'Brien. Magruder phones H. R. Haldeman and he confirms that Richard Nixon wants the operation carried out.

15th April, 1972: William Haddad, sends a letter to Jack Anderson claiming that agents of CREEP were intending to tap the telephones of Larry O'Brien at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel. Anderson ignores the message.

8th May, 1972: Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt arrange for the "Plumbers Unit" to install bugging equipment in the office at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel.

15th May, 1972. Arthur Bremer attempts to assassinate George Wallace. It was later claimed by Bob Woodward that an attorney told him that Charles Colson ordered E. Howard Hunt to break into Bremer's apartment to remove incriminating documents. According to Howard Simons of The Washington Post, this could have been the "ultimate dirty trick".

28th May, 1972. James W. McCord and his men make their first break-in at the Watergate Hotel.

17th June, 1972: Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker and James W. McCord are arrested at 2.30 am during a break-in at the Watergate Hotel.

19th June, 1972: Richard Helms, Cord Meyer and William Colby meet to discuss possible CIA involvement in the Watergate break-in.

19th June, 1972: Bob Woodward has his first meeting with Deep Throat.

20th June, 1972: Richard Nixon tells H. R. Haldeman that the Watergate burglars "are going to need money".

21st June, 1972: Gordon Liddy tells Frederick LaRue and Robert Mardian that the Watergate burglars expect to receive money for bail, legal expenses and family support. Mardian argues that this request is blackmail and should not be paid.

23rd June, 1972: H. R. Haldeman suggests to Richard Helms that Richard Nixon has information on the CIA involvement in the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

25th June, 1972: Alfred Baldwin agrees to cooperate with the government in order to escape going to prison.

26th June, 1972: John Dean meets Vernon Walters to ask him if the CIA would provide financial assistance for the Watergate burglars.

28th June, 1972: Vernon Walters tells John Dean that the CIA is unwilling to provide financial assistance for the Watergate burglars. This information is passed on to John N. Mitchell, Frederick LaRue and Robert Mardian.

29th June, 1972: John Dean meets Herbert W. Kalmbach and tells him that H. R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and John N. Mitchell want him to raise money for the Watergate burglars. Later that day Maurice Stans gives Kalmbach $75,000. Of this money, William Bittman receives $25,000. Dorothy Hunt asks for $450,000 and gets the first installment of $40,000.

6th July, 1972: Richard Helms informs the FBI that the CIA will not be damaged by a full investigation into the Watergate break-in.

19th July, 1972: Frederick LaRue gives $40,000 to Herbert W. Kalmbach. He then takes it to New York and this money is given to Anthony Ulasewicz.

22nd July, 1972: Newsday reports that Gordon Liddy had been sacked by John N. Mitchell because he refused to answer FBI questions about Watergate.

29th July, 1972: Frederick LaRue gives $30,000 to Herbert W. Kalmbach. This is transmitting to Anthony Ulasewicz.

1st August , 1972: The Washington Post reports that a $25,000 cashier's check intended for the the Committee to Reelect the President (CREEP) has been found in the bank account of a Watergate burglar.

30th August, 1972: Richard Nixon announces that John Dean had conducted an investigation into the Watergate affair and found that no-one from the White House was involved.

15th September, 1972: The first indictments in Watergate are made against: Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker, James W. McCord, E. Howard Hunt and Gordon Liddy.

19th September, 1972: Anthony Ulasewicz flies to Washington and delivers $53,000 to Dorothy Hunt and $29,000 to Frederick LaRue.

29th September, 1972: Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of the Washington Post report that John N. Mitchell, while serving as Attorney-General, controlled a secret Republican fund used to finance widespread intelligence-gathering operations against the Democrats (Operation Gemstone).

7th October, 1972: Deep Throat tells Bob Woodward that the "Canuck Letter" that destroyed the presidential campaign of Edmund Muskie was a White House operation.

12th October, 1972: Carl Bernstein publishes a story in the Washington Post about the sabotage of the Edmund Muskie campaign.

15th October, 1972: Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of the Washington Post report that Donald Segretti was being paid $20,000 a year to run the White House operation to sabotage the Democratic Party campaign.

18th October, 1972: Seymour Hersh of the New York Times publishes details of Donald Segretti's phone calls to E. Howard Hunt.

26th October, 1972: Deep Throat tells Bob Woodward that H. R. Haldeman is a key figure in the cover-up.

27th October, 1972: Time Magazine publishes an article claiming that it had obtained information from FBI files that Dwight Chaplin had hired Donald Segretti to disrupt the Democratic campaign.

11th November, 1972: Richard Nixon is reelected as president after defeating Democratic nominee, George McGovern.

11th November, 1972: Carl Bernstein interviews Donald Segretti who admits that E. Howard Hunt and Gordon Liddy were behind the dirty tricks campaign against the Democratic Party.

14th November, 1972: E. Howard Hunt phones Charles Colson and demands extra money. He sets a deadline of 25th November.

15th November, 1972: Richard Nixon, Charles Colson, H. R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman meet at Camp David to discuss Howard Hunt's latest blackmail threat.

20th November, 1972: Richard Nixon summons Richard Helms to Camp David and demands he resigns as Director of the CIA.

1st December, 1972: John N. Mitchell told John Dean to give a portion of the $350,000 (taken from Hugh Sloan's office) to E. Howard Hunt. This money is then delivered to Frederick LaRue.

8th December, 1972: Dorothy Hunt, the wife of E. Howard Hunt, is killed in a plane crash.

21st December, 1972: James W. McCord writes a letter to Jack Caulfield threatening to disclose details of Operation Sandwedge if Richard Helms loses his job as Director of the CIA.

6th January, 1972: Jack Anderson reports that E. Howard Hunt had arranged for fellow defendants to be paid up to $1000 for each month they spent in jail.

8th January, 1973: The trial of Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker, James W. McCord, E. Howard Hunt and Gordon Liddy begins in Washington. It is presided over by Judge John J. Sirica.

10th January, 1973: E. Howard Hunt tells Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez, Bernard L. Barker at a meeting at the Arlington Towers Hotel where he tells them that the White House would take care of their families while in prison if they pleaded guilty and kept quiet about the Watergate operation.

11th January, 1973: E. Howard Hunt pleads guilty.

13th January, 1973: James W. McCord and Gordon Liddy are convicted of conspiracy, burglary and wiretapping in the Watergate incident.

15th January, 1973: Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzalez, Eugenio Martinez and Bernard L. Barker, plead guilty.

23rd January, 1973: Jeb Magruder claims that Gordon Liddy once threatened to kill him. Hugh Sloan tells Judge John J. Sirica that he paid out about $199,000 in cash to Liddy. He questioned John N. Mitchell about this but was told that Liddy should be given the cash.

24th January, 1973: Deep Throat tells Bob Woodward that Charles Colson and John N. Mitchell were behind the Watergate operation.

7th February, 1973: The Senate votes to create a Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities. The Committee is chaired by Sam Ervin.

9th February, 1973: John Dean phones James Schlesinger and requests his help to extricate FBI files on E. Howard Hunt.

10th February, 1973: The Washington Post reveals that E. Howard Hunt had been investigating Edward Kennedy during the summer of 1972.

19th March, 1973: James W. McCord writes a letter to Judge John J. Sirica claiming that the defendants had pleaded guilty under pressure (from John Dean and John N. Mitchell) and that perjury had been committed during the trial.

20th March, 1973: E. Howard Hunt receives $75,000 from Frederick LaRue.

21st March, 1973: John Dean tells Richard Nixon that the Watergate burglars "are going to cost a million dollars over the next two years". Nixon replies that "I know where it could be gotten".

28th March, 1973: James W. McCord testifies that Gordon Liddy told him that the Watergate operation had been approved by John N. Mitchell when he was still Attorney General.

6th April, 1973: John Dean, the White House Counsel, agrees to co-operate with the Watergate prosecutors.

14th April, 1973: Jeb Magruder claims that John Dean and John N. Mitchell organized the "bugging plans and the payoff scheme".

17th April, 1973: Richard Nixon releases an official statement claiming that he had no prior knowledge of the Watergate affair.

26th April, 1973: The New York Daily News claims that L. Patrick Gray had destroyed documents taken from a safe in Howard Hunt's White House office. These documents included cables fabricated by Hunt to implicate President John F. Kennedy in the 1963 assassination of President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam. Other documents were about Edward Kennedy. Gray later admitted that these documents were destroyed at his home in December, 1972.

27th April, 1973: Deep Throat confirms the story about the documents in Hunt's safe. He tells Bob Woodward that they were "political dynamite" and on 28th June, 1972, John Ehrlichman and John Dean told L. Patrick Gray that the documents should "never see the light of day".

30th April, 1973: Richard Nixon announces that he has dismissed John Dean and accepted the resignations of H. R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, to resign.

5th May, 1973: Newsweek claims that John Dean is about to announce that Richard Nixon knew about the Watergate cover-up.

9th May, 1973: James Schlesinger issues a directive to all CIA employees calling on them to report on "any activities now going on, or that have gone on in the past, which might be construed to be outside the legislative charter of this Agency".

16th May, 1973: Bob Woodward sends a memo to Ben Bradlee that contains the latest information received from Deep Throat. This confirms that Richard Nixon, H. R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, John Dean, Frederick LaRue and John N. Mitchell are all involved in the cover-up of the Watergate scandal. He also points out that E. Howard Hunt has been blackmailing Nixon.

13th June, 1973: Watergate prosecutors find a memo addressed to John Ehrlichman describing in detail the plans to burglarize the office of psychiatrist's office to find files on Daniel Ellsberg.

25th June, 1973: John Dean claims that Richard Nixon participated in the cover-up. Dean also suggests that Nixon might have been making recordings of conversations taking place in the White House.

7th July, 1973: Richard Nixon tells the Senate Committee that he will not testify before it and will not grant access to Presidential documents.

13th July, 1973: Alexander P. Butterfield, a former presidential appointments secretary, informs the Senate Committee of the White House taping system.

23rd July, 1973: Archibald Cox and Sam Ervin demand that Richard Nixon hand over a range of White House tapes and documents.

25th July, 1973: Richard Nixon refuses to surrender any documents or tapes.

25th July, 1973: The Ervin Senate Committee subpoenas several White House tapes.

15th August, 1973: Archibald Cox and Sam Ervin request the Supreme Court instruct Richard Nixon to surrender his tapes.

10th October, 1973: Vice-President Spiro T. Agnew resigns after pleading no contest to a charge of income tax evasion.

12th October, 1973: Richard Nixon nominates Gerald Ford as vice-president.

20th October, 1973: Richard Nixon orders his Attorney-General, Elliot Richardson, to fire Archibald Cox. Richardson refuses and resigns in protest. Nixon orders the deputy Attorney-General, William Ruckelshaus, to fire Cox. Ruckelshaus refuses and is sacked. Robert Bork, the Solicitor-General, now acting as Attorney-General, fires Cox.

23rd October, 1973: Richard Nixon agrees to comply with the subpoena and begins releasing some of the tapes.

21st November, 1973: A gap of over 18 minutes is discovered on the tape of the conversation between Richard Nixon and H. R. Haldeman on June 20, 1972. Nixon's secretary, Rose Mary Woods, denies deliberately erasing the tape.

6th February, 1974: The House of Representatives votes to authorize the House Judiciary Committee to investigate whether grounds exist for the impeachment of President Richard Nixon.

30th April, 1974: Richard Nixon appears on national television to announce his decision to release edited transcripts of his conversations.

24th July, 1974: The Supreme Court, by a unanimous vote of 8-0 upholds the Special Prosecutor's subpoena, ordering Richard Nixon to make the tapes available for the Watergate trials of his former subordinates.

27th July, 1974: The House Judiciary Committee adopts the first Article of Impeachment by a vote of 27-11. The Article charges Richard Nixon with obstruction of the investigation of the Watergate break-in.

5th August, 1974: Richard Nixon releases transcripts of conversations he had with H. R. Haldeman. These tapes prove he ordered a cover-up of the Watergate burglary, six days after the break-in.

7th August, 1974: Three senior Republican congressmen Barry Goldwater, Hugh Scott, John Rhodes meet with Richard Nixon, to tell him that they are going to vote for his impeachment. Nixon is now convinced that he has to resign.

8th August, 1974: In a televised address to the nation at 9 p.m., Richard Nixon announces that he will resign as president of the United States.

8th September, 1974: President Gerald Ford announces a "full free and absolute" pardon to Richard Nixon for "all offenses against the United States" committed between January 20, 1969 and August 9, 1974.

#42 Jack White

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 11:01 PM

In what respects does the Simkin timeline differ (or agree) with the Ashton
timeline, for those of us not inclined to compare them directly?

Jack

#43 Ashton Gray

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 12:15 AM

The Ashton Gray timeline is very interesting. I would like to know
the source. Much of it is very informative, if all is true. Now I begin
to see what the Caddy/Gray argument is about.

Jack


Jack, I didn't include the sources in this excerpt, but 118 different sources are very thoroughly included in the original timeline that I took the excerpts from. It would have been a monumental task to include them in the posting (especially when the link is provided to the actual timeline) because the cites are referenced by links at the end of each event, linking to the relevant source in the list of references at the end, and some events have several different sources cited.

One of the features of the timeline that sets it apart from most, in addition to its very narrow dating of things that often are "timelined" only by month or even grosser strokes, is the fact that it does compare differening accounts of incidents, or, for example, at 23 June 1972, takes different accounts from different testimony and accounts, and breaks the day down by hours.

In my excerpt, I actually added a few things, like Caddy having been dubbed as a successor to Mullen, that aren't in the timeline (although I've sent a suggestion to the site that they should add it).

Ashton Gray

#44 Jack White

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 01:41 AM

Thanks. Can you document Caddy's ties to the Mullen Company? To me that
seems crucial.

I have considerable experience trying to identify "whistleblowers" who do
things that bother their conscience. If Caddy was a Mullen insider, how do
we know that his present stance is not an attempt to get the truth out?
Not all deathbed confessions are when someone is dying. In my opinion
Billie Sol is someone who wants to clear his conscience. Maybe Caddy
knows inside stuff he wants known also.

A suggestion: make a list of things on which you and Caddy agree and
another list of things on which you disagree. It needs to be narrowed down
to points you disagree on. Then each could be analyzed.

Jack

#45 Ashton Gray

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 01:56 AM

Ashton, you might find this timeline helpful:

http://www.spartacus...eChronology.htm


Thanks very much, John. That timeline has long been a friend of mine. :box

Another is the Charlie Citrine timeline, and several others.

Since I found the one I've recently been citing, in the little time available to me for all this I've done a sort of hit-and miss, half-done job of trying to shuffle them all together, but in more than a few places they don't dovetail terribly well, or at all. I think it still should be done, with the conflicts reconciled, and I'm chipping away at it.

Ashton Gray




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