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Charles Cingolani

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About Charles Cingolani

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    Member

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  • Website URL
    http://cingolani.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Höchenschwand, Germany
  • Interests
    Author of The Butler Pennsylvania Poems.

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  1. Thomas Merton (1915-1968) was a contemplative monk who spent 27 years inside the walls of a Trappist monastery in Kentucky. Only in his last year was he permitted to travel at any length. Even though he was never at Auschwitz this poetry places him there so as to let a generous sensitivity and tenacious faith like his respond to this horrendous calamity. Merton stands for all those who, in the light of Auschwitz, ask the question: where was God, and in so asking expose their belief to severe trial. Merton's struggle with this question was lived out elsewhere. Only the location has been shifted
  2. The Poetry of Eduard Moerike German and English
  3. Visit to Antietam We Are All Brothers by Charles L. Cingolani I Alone I arrive, walking from Frederick over the gaps, across gentle hills out onto a knoll overlooking this burnished landscape. Before me I see countless writhing rows of indiscernible shapes gathered in terrible rituals mid fire and smoke that darken the sun. From distant corners I hear the rhythmic thudding of cannon, and from fields astir with figures converging the eery muffled rumbling of drums. From b
  4. Visit to Antietam by Charles L. Cingolani I Alone I arrive, walking from Frederick Over the gaps, across gentle hills Out onto a knoll Overlooking this burnished landscape. Before me I see countless writhing rows Of indiscernible shapes gathered In terrible rituals mid fire and smoke That darken the sun. From distant corners I hear The rhythmic thudding of cannon, And from fields astir with figures converging The eery muffled rumbling of drums. From behind, hoofing sod aloft Couriers gallop past Straightway up to lines of men
  5. Reveries at French Fireplaces ~ Träumereien an französischen Kaminen by Richard von Volkmann-Leander Click here for English version.
  6. Cities have long been an object of poetic contemplation. This poetry about a small Western Pennsylvania town attempts to reawaken the past and infuse meaning and newness into happenings one takes for granted. It expresses awe at what is seemingly trivial, it slows down to express wonder at the commonplace. It does this with plain language that penetrates beneath the sensual surface of the events of everyday life for the hidden, mysterious component that reveals the beauty of life’s experience. These poems are more than a nostalgic recounting of memories and occurrences. They have to do with
  7. Newtown, Connecticut 14 December 2012 by Charles L. Cingolani Angel of evil do not descend on this sunlit town in early morning, First grade not yet accustomed to the day, coats crowded on hooks, In corridors the scraping of boots, busy hands adjusting at desks, The bell has rung, their teacher greets, she hovering over them. Toward the windowsill a sidelong glance, the candle the wreath. Their Christmas nearing. Still so new at six. Be merciful angel, do not alight. Stay winged, pass on over. .
  8. Visit to Antietam by Charles L. Cingolani 1. Alone I arrive, walking from Frederick over the gaps, across gentle hills out onto a knoll to view this burnished landscape. Before me I see countless writhing rows of indiscernible shapes gathered in terrible rituals mid fire and smoke that darken the sun. From distant corners I hear the rhythmic thudding of cannon, and from fields astir with figures converging the eery muffled rumbling of drums. From behind, hoofing sod aloft couriers gallop past straightway into throngs to where ruffled flags slant, to men mounted, with
  9. Monk in Auschwitz Thomas Merton (1915-1968) was a contemplative monk who spent 27 years inside the walls of a Trappist monastery in Kentucky. Only in his last year was he permitted to travel at any length. Even though he was never at Auschwitz this poetry places him there so as to let a generous sensitivity and tenacious faith like his respond to this horrendous calamity. Merton stands for all those who, in the light of Auschwitz, ask the question: where was God, and in so asking expose their belief to severe trial. Merton's struggle with this question was lived out elsewhere. O
  10. Visit to Antietam 1. Alone I arrive, walking from Frederick over the gaps, across gentle hills out onto a knoll to view this burnished landscape. Before me I see countless writhing rows of indiscernible shapes gathered in terrible rituals mid fire and smoke that darken the sun. From distant corners I hear the rhythmic thudding of cannon, and from fields astir with figures converging the eery muffled rumbling of drums. From behind, hoofing sod aloft couriers gallop past straightway into throngs to where ruffled flags slant, to men mounted, with swords drawn, about to
  11. Quote from Monk's Progress ~
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