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John Iacoletti

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About John Iacoletti

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  1. Please explain how this is wrong. The proposition is "If a card has a vowel on one side, then it has an even number on the other side." If you turn the K over and it has a vowel on the other side, then this card has a vowel on one side and something other than an even number on the other side (a K). The proposition would be proved false. Edit: I see that Glenn corrected himself in a later post. It does change the answer if you stipulate that the cards must have a letter on one side and a number on the other.
  2. The other side of the K card could be a vowel. There's nothing in Glenn's problem statement that excludes this possibility. If there is a vowel on the other side of the K card, then the proposition is proved false. You cannot discard the K card.
  3. in fact, i think that it IS the case that each card contains both letter and number - in another version of this it so states. but this would not effect (affect?) the answer. if you turn over K, you learn the same thing regardless what's on the other side - even or odd, letter or number, it neither proves nor disproves the postulate. It most certainly matters if you state beforehand that each card must have a letter on one side and a number on the other. If that is not a given, then you have to turn over the K because it might have a vowel on the other side. If that is a given then you only have to turn over the E and the 7. Also, some people are making the mistake of thinking that the puzzle makes a distinction between the top side and the bottom side. The postulate is "if a card has a vowel on one side, then it has an even number on the other side", it doesn't say "if a card has a vowel on the top side, then it has an even number on the bottom side". So you can't just check the card that has a vowel on the top.
  4. This is an awesome puzzle. My answer is that you have to turn over everything but the 4. Some people are making the assumption that each card must have a letter on one side and a number on the other. That's not a given. The "K" could have a vowel on the other side. It's irrelevant what's on the other side of the 4 because if it's a vowel it confirms the proposition but if it's not it doesn't violate the proposition. You only need to look for falsifying evidence .
  5. John Iacoletti

    John Iacoletti

    I'm originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, and have been living in Austin, Texas since 1984. Born in 1962, I don't have any memory of the JFK presidency, but have been interested in and studying his assassination for the last 25 years. I'm working at IBM as a software engineer. I'm married and have two grown children.
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