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Denny Zartman

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  1. Denny Zartman

    Russian-born oilman is a vivid presence in JFK files

    It couldn't happen under innocent terms because they didn't casually meet. The only reason De Mohrenschildt and Oswald were ever introduced to each other was because Dallas CIA domestic contacts man J. Walton Moore wanted it to happen. According to the Warren Commission, George De Mohrenschildt was the only person even close to being Oswald's friend. They wouldn't commit to even that, saying only that Oswald may have respected De Mohrenschildt a bit. Otherwise, Oswald had no friends, at least as far as they could determine. If Oswald were really and truly the type of genuinely sympathetic human being that could innocently engender a friendship with a sophisticated stranger, don't you think that he have happened on at least one or two other friends in his life, even if by accident? Oswald didn't make friends with anyone at any of the places he worked. Oswald wasn't even able to develop a friendship with Buell Wesley Frazier, despite riding in his car alone with him regularly.
  2. Denny Zartman

    Russian-born oilman is a vivid presence in JFK files

    http://www.edwardjayepstein.com/diary/dem.htm De Mohrenschildt did not become friends with Lee Harvey Oswald on a whim or by accident. De Mohrenschildt was encouraged to meet Oswald by CIA domestic contacts man J. Walton Moore, and that is the only reason De Mohrenschildt ever met Oswald, according to De Mohrenschildt himself.
  3. Denny Zartman

    Russian-born oilman is a vivid presence in JFK files

    François, Sure. Ruth Paine was an average Dallas housewife who 1. just happened to have a husband and brother in law with high level military clearance, who 2. just happened to have a sister who straight up worked for the CIA, who 3. just happened to be acquainted with a globetrotting socialite with intelligence connections to three countries, who 4. just happened to speak Russian, who 5. just happened to get on the telephone herself, dial up the TSBD, and get Lee Harvey Oswald a job there one month and one week before the assassination, who 6. just happened to have had Oswald's belongings at her home, including the alleged murder weapon and an expensive miniature spy camera with a serial number that indicated it wasn't for retail sale (and that the Dallas cops tried to cover up and call a light meter for totally innocent reasons.) François Carlier, you say in your bio that you're interested in critical thinking, but you seem to be very credulous when it comes to Ruth Paine and the JFK evidence in general. You really believe that all those things cited in the above paragraph are just coincidences? You believe that Lee Harvey Oswald was some sort of nutty, violent, unstable loner with delusions of grandeur, but that he also had such an absolutely charming and winning personality that people like Paine and de Mohrenschildt were just irresistibly attracted to him and driven to help him out in every way possible? Ruth Paine certainly did do something on purpose before the assassination. Ruth Paine took in Lee Harvey Oswald's family. Ruth Paine allowed Oswald to keep the murder weapon at her home. Ruth Paine got on the telephone, Ruth Paine cold-called up the TSBD and Ruth Paine got LHO a job in a building that overlooked the motorcade route. You can't deny the facts. CIA domestic contacts man J Walton Moore encouraged French, German, and American intelligence connected upper class socialite George de Mohrenschildt to meet Oswald. "I would never have contacted Oswald in a million years, if Moore had not sanctioned it." de Mohrenschildt convinced Oswald to move his family to Dallas. de Mohrenschildt introduced Oswald to Ruth Paine, a woman whose sister was in the CIA and whose husband and brother in law both held high level military clearances. Ruth Paine got Oswald his job at the TSBD, and had some of his belongings at her home, including a spy camera that the police actively attempted to cover up. How much more blatant does a pattern have to be before a person can reasonably find it suspicious?
  4. Denny Zartman

    Russian-born oilman is a vivid presence in JFK files

    In one of the first conversations I ever had with anyone about the assassination, my friend said "Guys like George de Mohrenschildt don't just 'make friends' with guys like Lee Harvey Oswald." If we believe the Warren Commission, de Mohrenschildt, a high-society man with connections to German, French, and American intelligence was possibly LHO's only friend. CIA domestic contact service man J. Walton Moore tells de Mohrenschildt to make contact with Oswald. de Mohrenschildt later says "I would never have contacted Oswald in a million years, if Moore had not sanctioned it." de Mohrenschildt convinces Oswald to move to Dallas. de Mohrenschildt introduces Oswald to Ruth Paine, average Dallas housewife that just happens to have CIA and high level military connections herself. Ruth Paine helps Oswald get a job at the TSBD a month and a week before the assassination.
  5. I just finished reading "I Heard You Paint Houses" (2016 paperback edition), and I think there are some portions worthy of further discussion that weren't fully touched on in the posts above. This is my breakdown of the portions of the book I think are most relevant to the JFK assassination: Frank Sheeran, a labor union official, worked for Russell Bufalino, (Mafia boss of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Bufalino family from 1959 to 1989) and labor union leader Jimmy Hoffa. Sheeran had a criminal career from 1945 to 1975, including multiple murders. Sheeran claims to have murdered Hoffa in 1975. Pg. 119 – Sheeran says he met Jack Ruby several times. Sheeran says that he saw Ruby in the company of Sam Giancana (the boss of the Mafia’s Chicago Outfit from 1957–1966), and Paul “Red” Dorfman (the head of the Chicago Waste Handler's Union and a member of the Chicago Outfit.) Pgs. 128 – 129 – Sheeran describes meeting Carlos Marcello’s (Mafia boss of New Orleans) pilot David Ferrie (initially the central figure in New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison’s 1966 JFK investigation.) Sheeran says that some time before the 1961 failed Bay Of Pigs invasion of Cuba he was told by Hoffa to drive a truck to Baltimore, Maryland, and meet Ferrie at a landing strip at the Harry C. Campbell concrete plant. A group of soldiers loaded military uniforms, weapons, and ammunition onto Sheeran's truck and Sheeran drove the weapons to Orange Grove, Florida. According to Sheeran, Ferrie told him to deliver the weapons to E. Howard Hunt., even describing Hunt’s large ears. Sheeran says he delivered the weapons to Hunt and a group of anti-Castro Cubans. Pgs 162 – 163 – Sheeran says that a few days before the JFK assassination he was told by Russell Bufalino to go to a restaurant in New York, New York. At the restaurant Sheeran was given a duffel bag of what he assumed to be rifles and was instructed to take the bag to David Ferrie at the concrete plant landing strip in Baltimore, Maryland. Sheeran says that he did as instructed, delivering the bag to Ferrie and another man that Sheeran declined to name but recognized as a member of New York’s Genovese crime family. Pgs 241-242 – Sheeran claims that in October 1974 Jimmy Hoffa gave Sheeran more details about Sheeran’s November 1963 mission to Baltimore, Maryland. Hoffa allegedly told Sheeran: - The duffel bag contained high powered rifles intended for the JFK assassination - The rifles were replacements for rifles that were in the trunk of a Ford Thunderbird that was totaled in a drunk driving accident - Ferrie was delivering the replacement rifles - Actual police officers, and conspirators posing as police officers, were part of the assassination - Policemen friends of Jack Ruby were originally intended to kill Oswald, but somehow Ruby “bungled” it, and had to take care of Oswald himself - Ruby feared being tortured and murdered if he failed to kill Oswald - Mob bosses Carlos Marcello, Sam Giancana, and Santo Trafficante Jr. (Mafia boss of Florida and Cuba) were involved in the assassination - Says that all the conspirators were also involved in the Bay Of Pigs Pgs 332 – 335 – Author Charles Brandt questions Sheeran about why so many people were involved in the killing of Jimmy Hoffa. Sheeran responds that it is essentially a precautionary measure for the assassins. A single assassin would themselves be killed after the assassination just to keep things quiet, but when multiple assassins are used in a hit, the conspirators are not likely to have all the assassins killed.
  6. This whole post was well-said, and a excellent defense of hardworking people like Roberts. What kind of attention-getting or exaggerated story is that anyway? If Earlene Roberts was truly the type who wanted to exaggerate a detail to get attention, doesn't it seem logical that Oswald would be the subject? Imagine the attention she would have gotten if she told the world that Oswald passed by her muttering a confession to killing JFK and his intent to kill a policeman next.
  7. Hi Jim, That was quite enjoyable to listen to, thanks very much for the heads up. It gave me a lot to think about. I have to look into Ralph Leon Yates, and I wasn't aware that the rifle was paid for with an uncashed money order. That's interesting. I was surprised that there was someone else thought the Johnson/Hoover telephone call felt staged. It's something I've always suspected.
  8. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    Hi James, I quite like "Reclaiming Parkland" and I'm grateful that you did the work to write a detailed rebuttal against Bugliosi's book. Thanks. To me, Bugliosi's book read like something he mostly dictated into an audio recorder and barely bothered to edit. There's so much focus on himself and attacking conspiracy theorists that if I were a neutral reader I would wonder about Bugliosi's objectivity. And his reasoning is so circular it's almost ridiculous. It's basically "we know Oswald is guilty because we know Oswald is guilty, and we know that anything we can't explain can be explained in a way that's consistent with Oswald's guilt, because we know Oswald is guilty" rephrased a thousand different ways.
  9. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    Wasn't it David Atlee Phillips that said the people he was with were told they were on a mission to prevent the assassination? I don't believe Oswald was the lone assassin, but it's obvious (at least it was and is to me) that Oswald was involved in the machinery of the conspiracy. I don't know what role Oswald believed he was playing, but you're correct, the conspirators certainly considered him part of the plot since he was to be the patsy.
  10. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    Who says that Oswald was not connected to the events that day?
  11. I don't think there's any innocent way to spin the Earlene Roberts story. The tapping of the horn and then slowly driving away sounds like a signal was being given to Oswald, and it does not sound consistent with the typical behavior of policemen. It appears to indicate a conspiracy involving Dallas police or people posing as Dallas police possibly with the assistance of individuals in the DPD. A fellow conspirator in a police uniform and driving a police car would explain why Oswald was not reluctant to approach Tippit. Has anyone mentioned the convenient extra police uniform Tippit appears to have had with him at the time he stopped LHO? I believe I've heard enough about Westbrook to consider him suspicious.
  12. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    This forum is great, thank you. I feel privileged to be able to post and interact with people so knowledgeable and with authors who names grace my bookshelves this very moment. The JFK assassination remains of interest to me because it seems like no matter how many books or articles or posts I read, I always find out something I didn't know before. It's such a complex case with so many characters and that requires studying minutia as well as trying to grasp the larger picture in order to piece together the truth. It's also endlessly fascinating to me how intelligent people can look at the same set of evidence and draw such radically different conclusions. I guess it's only fair that I should share my own story, since I enjoy reading how other people's opinions on this subject have evolved over time. I was born nearly a decade after the assassination, and I grew up with the lone assassin story as the official history. There were only two books my parents had in the house that addressed it. One I think was called "Lincoln/Kennedy", I'm not sure of the author. As I recall, it was a fairly thin book recounting the two assassinations, had illustrations and pictures, and supported the Lone Nut story. I paged through it and read a bit, but it wasn't that interesting to me as a child. The other book that we had (and I still have) was "The Unanswered Questions About President Kennedy's Assassination" by Sylvan Fox. It had no illustrations, so as a kid I had even less interest in it than I did "Lincoln/Kennedy." I have a vague memory of seeing part of the 1978 TV movie "Ruby & Oswald" at one time, but had no clue what it was about. I was in my early 20's when Oliver Stone's "JFK" came out. I saw it on the original release. I thought Stone's film made a solid case for conspiracy, but my family also subscribed to Newsweek and I was an avid reader of the magazine. Newsweek did a fairly sustained anti-"JFK" series of articles at the time, and I suppose they were effective in making me believe that a lot of the stuff in JFK was questionable at best. Stone was also the brunt of a good deal of ridicule in popular culture as well and I was young enough to let that ridicule influence my opinion of Stone's work. Truth be told, the film also presented such a huge wall of information in a relatively short period that I wasn't able to properly absorb it all at the time. In the end, I was still pretty much indifferent to the JFK assassination. The thing that turned me around, ironically enough, was Gerald Posner's "Case Closed." I checked it out from the library on a whim and read it straight through. I had no problems with his LN recounting of history until the story of the Tippit shooting. It didn't pass the smell test. Would a guy who had just shot the president and made a squeaky-clean getaway just casually walk toward a policeman that called him over to his police car? That's a red flag for me, but maybe it could be explained away as that Oswald didn't want to act too suspicious right at that moment. Okay, then. But, would a policeman, seeing a person matching the description of the suspect in the killing of the president of the USA, just sit in his patrol car, wave that subject over, and hope that the suspect complies? That doesn't seem plausible and that's a second red flag. But, maybe that can also be explained away as Tippit not wanting to scare the suspect into fleeing. All right, for the sake of argument I can accept that. Yet at this point there is also a third red flag, which is Tippit passing up his first opportunity to call in on his radio and report his location and that he sees a person fitting the description of the suspect being sought. Again, I can set aside even this third red flag for the sake of argument, because maybe at this point Tippit was still evaluating the situation at hand. That's reasonable. So, Oswald walks over to Tippit's police car and the two men either exchange a few words through an open car window. Tippit exits his car, possibly reaching for his gun, when Oswald draws his own gun and shoots Tippit dead as Tippit is crossing the front corner of his police car. Inside that series of events, there's a fourth red flag, and I can't dismiss it as I did the others. I believe, in combination with the other red flags, it's incriminating. After the conversation with Oswald, Tippit, as indicated by his own subsequent actions, seemed to believe that Oswald either needed more interrogation, investigation, or possibly even apprehension. Whatever their conversation, it clearly did not make Tippit believe that Oswald was a person of no further interest. So, why did Tippit again not call in to the police station via his radio and report this encounter with a possible presidential assassin after speaking with Oswald? This is his second opportunity to do so, and his second failure to do so. The first failure to call in can be reasonably rationalized as Tippit possibly needing more information before proceeding. But, after the conversation with Oswald, Tippit had this information and it did not exclude Oswald from being a person of interest. This is where the threads of the LN theory began to unravel for me. I found that the more questions I began to ask, the more uncertain the picture became. Why didn't Oswald have any escape plan? If he killed JFK to "be somebody" and secure his place in history, why did he deny the crime at every opportunity? Why weren't his interrogation sessions recorded? Because there wasn't enough room in the room to have a recording device? Anyone that's seen news footage of that day can see that the narrow hallway outside the interrogation room was crammed with reporters carrying recording equipment, and one recorder couldn't fit in the office? One single stenographer could not be found? Because recording interrogations was just not the way Dallas police did things back then? Please. All this stuff is not conclusive evidence of course, but they're examples of things that just don't pass the smell test. Later learning that Earlene Roberts reported seeing a police car stop and the driver tap his horn twice outside the boarding house during the few minutes that Oswald was inside was a turning point for me, because it explains why Oswald would be unafraid to calmly approach a police car - he had at least one confederate that was a policeman or was posing as one.
  13. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    If Oswald wanted to kill Connelly instead of JFK, why didn't Oswald fire into Connelly's face when the limo was coming up Houston St.? No obstructions, no other path except going in an almost straight line toward Oswald, so little chance of a quick escape. Where's your evidence that Oswald was nutty? As for your question about why Oswald would get his handgun, I believe very few CT's argue that Oswald was not involved in the assassination in any way. He likely returned to his boarding house to get his gun because he knew plans had already gone awry. That's the way it looks to me. Look at the official version of Oswald's alleged escape route. Do you see the path of a man genuinely trying to make an escape?
  14. Denny Zartman

    I Was A Teenage Warren Commission Report Dupe

    This is an interesting thread. I often wonder how people first got into in the JFK assassination and how their thinking evolved as they began to learn more about it. It was one of the reasons I read Mr. Litwin's book. Even if I don't agree with his current conclusion, it might have been enlightening to understand what originally made him think there was a conspiracy, and what happened to change his mind. There's little of that in his book, unfortunately. So, I'm enjoying reading the stories of others describing their intellectual journey regarding this subject.
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