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Micah Mileto

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  1. full transcript, Nashville Banner, 1/17/1967: Doctors Believed President Shot In Forehead: Physician by Lewis Williams, Banner State Editor Physicians at Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, thought President John Kennedy had been struck in the left forehead by a bullet, a Gallatin doctor told THE BANNER today. Dr. David Stewart, who moved to Gallatin a year ago from Dallas, where he served his residency in Parkland Hospital, said doctors who administered aid to the President there thought a bullet had struck him in the frontal part of the head "behind the hairline" and had caused the massive damage to the back of the victim's head. "They were working frantically, of course, and nobody had time to make an extensive examination. There was some talk about that (apparent wound) but we never heard any more about it later on." Dr. Stewart said. Stewart, a Gallatin native who served internship at Nashville General Hospital in 1959 and 1960 and was in the Air Force two years before going to Dallas' Parkland Hospital, said he was not in the emergency room when the President was brought there with Texas Gov. John Connally. "I was upstairs in the operating room at the time and later helped care for Connally when they brought him up", he said "but I remember all the excitement just like it was yesterday. We got a call they were bringing the President there and that he was wounded and to 'get ready'. We just stood around waiting to see if it was true or whether it was a crank call.. there wasn't anything to get ready; we were always ready for emergencies." The much-discussed and debated throat wound, which the Warren Commission said was an exit wound and many critics insist was an entrance wound, was used as a hole for insertion of a breathing tube, Stewart said, but "no incision was made." Warren Commission conclusions inferred that doctors at the hospital performed a tracheotomy, thus obliterating the wound to such an extent it could not positively be identified as an entrance or an exit wound (Parkland doctors reported immediately after the assassination it was an entrance wound). Dr. Stewart, however, quoted associates at the hospital as saying no tracheotomy was performed. "The hole was there and they just used it as it was to insert the tube," he declared. "It was not necessary to make an incision at all." Dr. Stewart admitted he had no "first hand knowledge" of the President's wounds. "I can't testify about these things, but they all came from my friends there and I pretty well accept them to be true. I know they have covered up some things and it makes me wonder if they havean't done the same thing about others..." Dr. Stewart quoted a friend, Dr. James Corrico, who worked on the President's body at the hospital, as saying the President's personal physician handed him a quantity of the drug, Solu-Cortes, a cortisone-like medication, and told him "to put it into the IV (intravenous solution). "That's a drug usually given to Addison's Disease patients," Stewart said, "not gunshot victims." The doctor continued: "A lot of us were concerned about the autopsy. The Dallas County coroner (Dr. Earl Rose) was planning an autopsy and we were told he had a sub-machinegun thrown on him and told not to touch the body. It's the law there that anyone- a hobo up to the President- who is killed must be given an autopsy before the body is taken from the county." Dr. Stewart said he was also at the hospital when Lee Oswald was shot. "They brought him in in desperate straits and he died about an hour later without saying a word," the doctor stated. "He was given 14 pints of blood and vigorous surgical treatment, but died from blood loss shock." The bullet fired by Jack Ruby penetrated Oswald's left lung, spleen and left kidney, he added. Asked about the controversial "pristine" bullet the Warren Commission claimed passed through the President, struck Gov. Connally in the back, smashed his wrist and then buried itself in his left thigh, the Gallatin physician said, "I haven't seen the bullet, of course, but it wouldn't have been very pristine. The X-rays showed fragments of lead in the governor's thigh, for one thing." "It leads me to wonder, Stewart said, "I would like to see someone penetrate al the subterfuge and the smokescreens thrown up about all this. I think they would do much better to start counting motives than bullets. I lived in Dallas four years and the people there are no different than anywhere else; some of them are bad, but most of them are good people and the 'climate of hate' that has been kicked around so much just didn't exist." Dr. Stewart has high in his praise for three articles by Henry J. Taylor published recently in THE BANNER pointing out that Oswald was not, as he has been pictured, a "nut," but a hard, dedicated Communist. "I wish Mr. Taylor would be encouraged to do more along this line," the doctor continued. "Had this knowledge been widely accepted three years ago, I'm certain that the whole course of American history would have been changed. However, it still isn't too late for adequate understanding to be of value." Several Parkland Hospital physicians, nurses and witnesses to the assassination indicated, in statements to reporters at the time of the investigation of in actual testimony before the Warren Commission, that the President sustained a frontal wound in the upper left octant of the head. This theory was ignited by the commission itself and not mentioned in the autopsy report from Bethesda Naval Hospital. Two witnesses to the shooting, James Altgrens and Norman Simalis, both near the President's car, made statements they saw a wound on the left forehead. Dr. Robert McClelland of Parkland Hospital stated in a written report that death "was due to a massive head and brain injury from a gunshot wound IN THE LEFT TEMPLE." Doctors Geisecke and Jenkins told the commission they "noticed a left frontal wound" and several other Parkland physicians and a nurse who attended the doctors described a similar wound. Father Oscar L. Huber, pastor of Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Dallas, who administered last rites over the President,was quoted as saying he "noticed a terrible wound over his left eye." Most of the physicians questioned by the commission were of the opinion that the throat wound was an entrance wound and that the massive damage to the back of the President's head was an exit wound. Analysis of the famed Zapruder film of the assassination indicated the President was knocked backward and to the left by the impact of one bullet, defying Newton's law of conservation of momentum, if all shots had been fired from the rear as the commission claimed. Tissue from the victim's head splattered a motorcycle officer riding behind the car. No less than 64 witnesses to the shooting claimed shots were fired from the "grassy knoll" in front of the Presidential car. Some of them claimed to have seen smoke rising from the area and at least two testified they smelled gunpowder in the vicinity, where officers converged when the shots were fired.
  2. full transcript, Nashville Banner, 1/17/1967: Doctors Believed President Shot In Forehead: Physician by Lewis Williams, Banner State Editor Physicians at Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, thought President John Kennedy had been struck in the left forehead by a bullet, a Gallatin doctor told THE BANNER today. Dr. David Stewart, who moved to Gallatin a year ago from Dallas, where he served his residency in Parkland Hospital, said doctors who administered aid to the President there thought a bullet had struck him in the frontal part of the head "behind the hairline" and had caused the massive damage to the back of the victim's head. "They were working frantically, of course, and nobody had time to make an extensive examination. There was some talk about that (apparent wound) but we never heard any more about it later on." Dr. Stewart said. Stewart, a Gallatin native who served internship at Nashville General Hospital in 1959 and 1960 and was in the Air Force two years before going to Dallas' Parkland Hospital, said he was not in the emergency room when the President was brought there with Texas Gov. John Connally. "I was upstairs in the operating room at the time and later helped care for Connally when they brought him up", he said "but I remember all the excitement just like it was yesterday. We got a call they were bringing the President there and that he was wounded and to 'get ready'. We just stood around waiting to see if it was true or whether it was a crank call.. there wasn't anything to get ready; we were always ready for emergencies." The much-discussed and debated throat wound, which the Warren Commission said was an exit wound and many critics insist was an entrance wound, was used as a hole for insertion of a breathing tube, Stewart said, but "no incision was made." Warren Commission conclusions inferred that doctors at the hospital performed a tracheotomy, thus obliterating the wound to such an extent it could not positively be identified as an entrance or an exit wound (Parkland doctors reported immediately after the assassination it was an entrance wound). Dr. Stewart, however, quoted associates at the hospital as saying no tracheotomy was performed. "The hole was there and they just used it as it was to insert the tube," he declared. "It was not necessary to make an incision at all." Dr. Stewart admitted he had no "first hand knowledge" of the President's wounds. "I can't testify about these things, but they all came from my friends there and I pretty well accept them to be true. I know they have covered up some things and it makes me wonder if they havean't done the same thing about others..." Dr. Stewart quoted a friend, Dr. James Corrico, who worked on the President's body at the hospital, as saying the President's personal physician handed him a quantity of the drug, Solu-Cortes, a cortisone-like medication, and told him "to put it into the IV (intravenous solution). "That's a drug usually given to Addison's Disease patients," Stewart said, "not gunshot victims." The doctor continued: "A lot of us were concerned about the autopsy. The Dallas County coroner (Dr. Earl Rose) was planning an autopsy and we were told he had a sub-machinegun thrown on him and told not to touch the body. It's the law there that anyone- a hobo up to the President- who is killed must be given an autopsy before the body is taken from the county." Dr. Stewart said he was also at the hospital when Lee Oswald was shot. "They brought him in in desperate straits and he died about an hour later without saying a word," the doctor stated. "He was given 14 pints of blood and vigorous surgical treatment, but died from blood loss shock." The bullet fired by Jack Ruby penetrated Oswald's left lung, spleen and left kidney, he added. Asked about the controversial "pristine" bullet the Warren Commission claimed passed through the President, struck Gov. Connally in the back, smashed his wrist and then buried itself in his left thigh, the Gallatin physician said, "I haven't seen the bullet, of course, but it wouldn't have been very pristine. The X-rays showed fragments of lead in the governor's thigh, for one thing." "It leads me to wonder, Stewart said, "I would like to see someone penetrate al the subterfuge and the smokescreens thrown up about all this. I think they would do much better to start counting motives than bullets. I lived in Dallas four years and the people there are no different than anywhere else; some of them are bad, but most of them are good people and the 'climate of hate' that has been kicked around so much just didn't exist." Dr. Stewart has high in his praise for three articles by Henry J. Taylor published recently in THE BANNER pointing out that Oswald was not, as he has been pictured, a "nut," but a hard, dedicated Communist. "I wish Mr. Taylor would be encouraged to do more along this line," the doctor continued. "Had this knowledge been widely accepted three years ago, I'm certain that the whole course of American history would have been changed. However, it still isn't too late for adequate understanding to be of value." Several Parkland Hospital physicians, nurses and witnesses to the assassination indicated, in statements to reporters at the time of the investigation of in actual testimony before the Warren Commission, that the President sustained a frontal wound in the upper left octant of the head. This theory was ignited by the commission itself and not mentioned in the autopsy report from Bethesda Naval Hospital. Two witnesses to the shooting, James Altgrens and Norman Simalis, both near the President's car, made statements they saw a wound on the left forehead. Dr. Robert McClelland of Parkland Hospital stated in a written report that death "was due to a massive head and brain injury from a gunshot wound IN THE LEFT TEMPLE." Doctors Geisecke and Jenkins told the commission they "noticed a left frontal wound" and several other Parkland physicians and a nurse who attended the doctors described a similar wound. Father Oscar L. Huber, pastor of Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Dallas, who administered last rites over the President,was quoted as saying he "noticed a terrible wound over his left eye." Most of the physicians questioned by the commission were of the opinion that the throat wound was an entrance wound and that the massive damage to the back of the President's head was an exit wound. Analysis of the famed Zapruder film of the assassination indicated the President was knocked backward and to the left by the impact of one bullet, defying Newton's law of conservation of momentum, if all shots had been fired from the rear as the commission claimed. Tissue from the victim's head splattered a motorcycle officer riding behind the car. No less than 64 witnesses to the shooting claimed shots were fired from the "grassy knoll" in front of the Presidential car. Some of them claimed to have seen smoke rising from the area and at least two testified they smelled gunpowder in the vicinity, where officers converged when the shots were fired.
  3. Here's a scan of the Lebanon Democrat, 3/30/1967 http://jfk.hood.edu/Collection/Weisberg%20Subject%20Index%20Files/S%20Disk/Stewart%20David%20Dr/Item%2001.pdf Transcript from Stewart's 4/10/1967 appearance on the Joe Dolan Show, KNEW radio, Oakland, CA https://archive.org/stream/nsia-AutopsyJFKNotesPressClippings/nsia-AutopsyJFKNotesPressClippings/Autopsy%20Notes%20PC%20038#mode/2up
  4. Mr. Lifton, the nice people at Nashville Public Library scanned that 1/17/1967 Banner article. https://drive.google.com/open?id=14oRjrE9d-pjxSpvEpHBwqlYuDyNiPFpZ
  5. Groden once claimed that he had an interview with Dr. Perry in the late 70's, where Perry allegedly disagreed with the autopsy photos of the trach incision. Harrison Livingstone sent a letter to Harold Weisberg saying that he knowledge this was not true. Did Groden lie about this? Also, there was the whole thing about Groden showing a picture of the JFK movie dummy and saying it was an authentic autopsy photo.
  6. IMO: best evidence that Oswald was an intelligence asset (Guy Bannister, Clay Shaw, Dean Andrews), evidence that Oswald was framed with fabricated evidence (Mexico city, the rifle, no credible witnesses pointing to Oswald's guilt), evidence for multiple shooters (EOP wound, autopsy cover-up involving the throat wound and chest tubes, experimental evidence disproving sound echoes off the grassy knoll).
  7. There is a question of whether this contact took place during or after the autopsy. In Humes' handwritten notes (WC Vol. 17, p. 29), the autopsy protocol (WC D 77 [text]), and Humes' 3/16/1963 testimony to the Warren Commission (WC Vol. 2, p. 347 [text]), the call was said to have taken place on "Saturday morning" 11/23/1963. Technically, this could mean any time between 12:00 – 11:59 AM. The examination may have lasted past midnight, and the pathologists remained in the morgue until the body was prepared for burial by around 3:30-4:00 AM. When Humes was interviewed on 9/16/1977 by the House Select Committee on Assassinations, he said that he remembered the call taking place "11 in the morning, perhaps 10:30, something like that", only after he had time to go home, attend a religious function with his family, then return back to Bethesda Hospital (HSCA Vol. 7, p. 243 [text] [audio]). When Humes appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the article said the call happened at 7:30 AM (JAMA, 5/27/1992, JFK's death - the plain truth from the MDs who did the autopsy [text]). When Humes gave his deposition to the Assassination Records Review Board on 2/13/1996, he said he thought the call happened "...8 or 9 o'clock on Saturday morning" (ARRB, 2/13/1996 [text]). In contrast, Dr. Perry told the Warren Commission that he remembered being called by Humes TWICE, and thought he was called on Friday night 11/22/1963 (WC Vol. 6, p. 7, 3/25/1964 testimony [text]; WC Vol. 3, p. 366, 3/30/1964 testimony [text]). Perry's colleague, Dr. Paul Peters, similarly claimed to remember information from the autopsy leaking among themselves on the same day (Interview by Ben Bradlee, 5/1/1981). Autopsy photographer John Stringer said he remembered the pathologists contacting Dallas and learning of the throat wound while they were still in the morgue (ARRB MD 19, HSCA report on a 8/17/1977 interview with Stringer [text]; ARRB MD 227, report on the ARRB's 4/8/1996 interview with Stringer; Stringer's ARRB deposition, 7/16/1996 [text] [audio]). So did radiologist John Ebersole (Ebersole's 3/9/1978 interview by Gil Delaney, Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy by David S. Lifton, Chapter 23; ARRB MD 60, Ebersole's HSCA testimony, 3/11/1978 [text] [audio]; Ebersole's 12/2/1992 interview by David Mantik, Murder in Dealey Plaza: What We Know Now that We Didn't Know Then about the Death of JFK, edited by James H. Fetzer, Appendix E [audio]). Likewise, William Manchester wrote in his 1967 book The Death of a President: "Commander James J. Humes, Bethesda’s chief of pathology, telephoned Perry in Dallas shortly after midnight, and clinical photographs were taken to satisfy all the Texas doctors who had been in Trauma Room No. 1". Humes was never totally clear whether he considered a bullet passage in the throat prior to his phone call with Perry (WC Vol. 2, p. 347, Humes WC testimony, 3/16/1964 [text]); HSCA Vol. 7, p. 243, 9/16/1977 HSCA interview with Humes and Boswell [text] [audio]; HSCA Vol. 1, p. 323, Humes HSCA testimony, 9/7/1978 [text]; Humes ARRB deposition, 2/13/1996 [text]). Autopsy assistant Dr. J. Thornton Boswell claimed they deduced this DURING the body examination, based on their observation of bruising on the right lung and pleural cavity (Baltimore Sun, 11/25/1966, Richard H. Levine [2nd print]; ARRB MD 26, HSCA report on 8/17/1977 interview with Boswell [text]; Boswell's 3/30/1994 interview by Gary Aguilar [audio, partial]; Boswell's ARRB deposition, 2/13/1996 [text]). Dr. Pierre Finck, the assisting forensic pathologist, claimed the defect in the throat was overlooked as a tracheotomy during their whole time in the morgue (ARRB MD 28, Reports From LtCol Finck to Gen. Blumberg (1/25/65 and 2/1/65); Finck's Shaw trial testimony, 2/24-2/25/1969 [text]; ARRB MD 30, Finck's HSCA testimony, 3/11/1978 [text] [audio]; JAMA, 10/7/1992). Finck's version of the story is the most suspect. Finck said he examined the defect in the throat and found no sign of a bullet passage, and yet the autopsy protocol and statements of Dr. Humes indicate that pre-mortem bruising was observed on the strap muscles beside the trachea, in addition to the bruising on the right lung and pleura (WC D 77 [text]; WC Vol. 2, p. 347, 3/16/1964 Humes WC testimony [text]). Also, the autopsy photographs (NSFW) show what may be a partial bullet hole in the skin around the trach incision, as noted in the 1968 Clark Panel report (ARRB MD 59 [text]) and the HSCA Medical Panel Report (HSCA Vol. 7, p. 93). Numerous other witnesses indicated that a bullet passage in the throat was discussed on the night of the autopsy – including pallbearer George Barnum (Barnum's 11/29/1963 statement, 8/20/1979 interview by David S. Lifton, Best Evidence), Admiral/Dr. Calvin Galloway (Arlen Specter, report on 3/11/1964 interview [page 1] [page 2]; HSCA 180-10079-0460, HSCA report on 3/17/1978 interview with Galloway [text]), Jim Snyder/Robert Richter of CBS (ARRB MD 16, 1/10/1967 CBS memo), mortician Tom Robinson (ARRB MD 63, HSCA interview, 1/12/1977 [text] [audio]; ARRB MD 180, ARRB report on 6/21/1996 interview), Lieutenant Richard Lipsey (HSCA interview, 1/18/1978 [transcript] [audio]; ARRB MD 87 [text]), and laboratory technician James Jenkins (9/23/1979 interview by David S. Lifton, Best Evidence; 4/6/1991 panel discussion [Video, 58:18]).
  8. A medical professional wrote in one of the comment sections, regarding the part about the chest tubes: I must respectfully disagree with the idea that the chest tubes were never inserted. The record is clear that Drs. Ronald Jones, Charles Baxter, and Paul Peters inserted the tubes. Nurses Margaret Hinchliffe and Diana Bowron said they helped the doctors in the task. Nurse Patricia Hutton said that afterwards, she helped remove the tubes from the body.
  9. I blame "le rational skeptic" culture. "Skeptic" in the context meaning "total trust in western government". People are so brainwashed into trusting western government, that anybody who questions it are labeled mentally unstable. There are even some sources claiming that "conspiracy theorists" (people who question western government) are statistically more likely to be mentally "unbalanced". Even if that were true, that isn't a testament to the credibility of western government, it's a testament to how successful their propaganda machine has been - in other words, neurodivergent people are more immune to the social pressure brought by this advertising campaign. Almost everybody in the world has a gullible line of reasoning for most of their opinions - most people can only argue their opinions as well as a creationist could argue against evolution. The "le rational skeptic" crowd just point to the "conspiracy theorists" because "conspiracy" has the connotation of paranoia.
  10. https://old.reddit.com/r/JFKsubmissions/comments/ds3q7h/discussing_jfks_torso_wounds_contents/ Part 8-27 deal with what the pathologists knew at the time at the autopsy, and when exactly Dr. Humes phoned Dr. Perry.
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