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Duke Lane

Ed Hoffman's Activities and Observations

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Good stuff, don't think I've seen this before. The tip of the iceberg, you say?

(In reading further the McAdams-site post on Hoffman, it's clear that he had some issues right from the git-go with what he could see and couldn't see, not far at all from my own uninformed opinions about the trees, etc.) ... Call it what you will; I like the term "bullxxxx factor." Hoffman's story reeks with it, Arnold's doesn't.

Duke, you're completely right!

Speaking of bullxxxx, notice a powerful signature barnyard odor in the Hoffman docs cited below? (This is just the tip of the iceberg. Thought I'd save you from death by stench asphyxiation.)

Okay, let's see if we can trace this according to these documents:

[Hoffman told Mr. Jim Dowdy that] he parked his automobile near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street, about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963.

Hoffman said he was standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway when the motorcade passed him taking President Kennedy to Parkland Hospital. Hoffman said he observed two white males, clutching something dark to their chests with both hands, running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building. The men were running north on the railroad, then turned east, and Hoffman lost sight of both of the men.

Here, Hoffman is parked "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street," which seems to suggest that he is parked on the side of the freeway closest to the tracks, i.e., the east side nearest TSBD. This differs from his physical description - that is, the one he took us to physically! - as being on the side nearest the entrance ramp, from which he claimed (as I remember it) to see not only men in DP, but also the limo as it sped by on its way to Parkland. (I seem to remember him relating the story of SA Hickey and the AR-15, too, and how scared of being shot he'd been!)

It is confusing exactly where he's claiming to have parked since there's no place that can be called "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street" that can be sited in conjunction with "the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway." The former would place him on the bridge over the northernmost portion of the road that comes west out from the Triple Underpass (i.e., "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street"), but there are no railroad tracks "on Stemmons Freeway" until one goes north on Stemmons from Elm some 350-375 feet (ahem! 365.76 feet by Google Earth!). So basically he could have been anywhere at all within about a 500 foot area, according to this report.

Most notably, however, he says that "he sbserved two white males ... running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building." This is very clearly a different place than "behind the picket fence."

Approximately two hours after the above interview with Hoffman, he returned to the Dallas Office of the FBI and advised he had just returned from the spot on Stemmons Freeway where he had parked his automobile and had decided he could not have seen the men running because of a fence west of the Texas School Book Depository building. He said it was possible that he saw these two men on the fence or something else.

Hoffman said the only description he could furnish of the men was that one of them wore a white shirt. He stated he had discussed this matter with his father at the time of the assassination, and his father suggested that he not talk to anyone about this, but after thinking about what he saw, Hoffman stated he decided to tell the FBI.

Oops: he couldn't see what he'd told them he saw! Omigosh! Well, might as well give up a detailed description of "suit man" and "railroad worker man" and their several actions, but because those Feebies aren't among the brightest graduates of law school, best to keep it simple: one had on a white shirt. This leaves plenty of wiggle room given that men in suits often wear white shirts, and there's no description of "railroad worker man" at all, meaning he simply didn't describe him at the time, nothing more or less. Probably because the feds didn't ask.

Virgil E. Hoffman was not interviewed prior to June 28, 1967.

On July 6, 1967, Roy S. Truly, Manager, Texas School Book Depository, advised there is a fence approximately 6 feet tall running from the parking lot west of the Texas School Book Depository for about 150 feet to the north of the Texas School Book Depository. This fence was constructed approximately two years prior to the assassination and has not been moved to date.

On July 5, 1967, Mr. E. Hoffman, father of Virgil E. Hoffman, and Fred Hoffman, brother of Virgil Hoffman, were interviewed at 428 West Main Street, Grand Prairie, Texas. Both advised that Virgil Hoffman has been a deaf mute his entire life and has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him. Both the father and brother stated that Virgil Hoffman loved President Kennedy and had mentioned to them just after the assassination that he (Virgil Hoffman) was standing on the freeway near the Texas School Book Depository at the time of the assassination. Virgil Hoffman told them he saw numerous men running after the President was shot. The father of Virgil Hoffman stated that he did not believe that his son had seen anything of value and doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository and for this reason had not mentioned it to the FBI.

Oh, that sibling rivalry ... and a jealous dad, too! Haven't they ever seen that look of wide-eyed sincerity Hoffman exhibits on the knoll these days? How could they have doubted him? No mention here about needing to fear for his life or any such thing (which the Feebs would have gladly recorded to show what a "kook" these folks were!), just that he "has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him," and that young Ed's own depictions to them included that "he saw numerous men running" after the shooting, and that Dad "did not believe that his son had seen anything of value" and "doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository" at all!

... Mr. Hoffman communicated with [Mr. Freeman] by the use of sign language and Hoffman was concerned that the FBI perhaps did not fully understand what he was trying to communicate. Hoffman communicated the following information to Mr. Freeman:

Hoffman was watching the motorcade of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, at Dallas, Texas. Hoffman was standing on Stemmons Freeway watching the presidential motorcade, looking in an easterly direction when the motorcade sped away and headed north on Stemmons Freeway. Hoffman communicated that this must have been right after President Kennedy was shot. Hoffman saw two men, one with a rifle and one with a handgun, behind a wooden fence, approximately six feet in height, at this moment. This fence is located on the same side of Elm Street as the Texas School Book Depository building but closer to Stemmons Freeway. Since he is deaf, he naturally could not hear any shots but thought he saw a puff of smoke in the vicinity of where the two men were standing. As soon as he saw the motorcade speed away and saw the puff of smoke in the vicinity of the two men, the man with the rifle looked like he was breaking the rifle down by removing the barrel from the stock and placing it in some dark type of suitcase that the other man was holding. The two men then ran north on the railroad tracks by actually running on the tracks. Hoffman was standing approximately 75 yards from this fence. This fence was at approximately the same height or level as the ground floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Both men were white males, both dressed in some type of white suits, and both wore ties. He was too far away to furnish a more detailed description. There were no other people in his area of observation, nor in the area where the two men were standing behind the fence.

On March 28, 1977, Richard H. Freeman, Texas Instruments, Richardson, Texas, was telephonically contacted by Special Agent [REDACTED] and was requested to contact Mr. Hoffman in an effort to communicate with him and to advise him if he could come to the Dallas FBI Office in order to make a personal visit to the area of Stemmons Freeway from where he observed the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963.

On March 28, 1977, Virgil E. Hoffman accompanied Special Agent [REDACTED] to Stemmons Freeway, also known as Interstate Highway 35 North, Dallas, Texas.

Hoffman communicated that he was driving a 1962 Ford Falcon on November 22, 1963. He parked his car on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway. He could not see the presidential motorcade as it was proceeding west on Elm Street toward the Triple Underpass. He saw the motorcade speed up as it emerged on Stemmons Freeway heading north. His line of vision was due east looking from Stemmons Freeway toward the Texas School Book Depository building. The two men he saw were behind the wooden fence above the grassy knoll north of Elm Street and just before the Triple Underpass. He indicated he saw smoke in that vicinity and saw the man with the rifle disassembling the rifle near some type of railroad track control box located close to the railroad tracks. Both men ran north on the railroad tracks.

He tried to get the attention of a Dallas policeman who was standing on the railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway, but since he could not yell, he could not communicate with the policeman. He drove his car north on Stemmons Freeway after the motorcade passed him in an effort to find the two men, but he lost sight of them.

Special Agent [REDACTED] took color photographs from the area of Stemmons Freeway where Mr. Hoffman was watching the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963. Photographs were also taken of the area north of the grassy knoll where the wooden fence is located, and the area adjacent to it, which is now primarily used as a parking lot. The distance from where Mr. Hoffman was viewing the motorcade on Stemmons Freeway to the area behind the wooden fence is estimated at approximately 280 (105) yards, with the elevation being approximately the same height as the first floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Photographs were taken with a Bessler Topcon camera, using Kodak Vericolor II, Type S film, with a distance setting of infinitive, f Stop 14, and film speed 1/125 of a second.

Ah, the difference a few years can make! Hoffman has now moved from the side of the highway "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street ... standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway" to the west side of the highway, that is, all the way across seven lanes of traffic! Doesn't this seem a strange thing to do when one has a half-hour to wait before the Presidential motorcade even entered Dealey Plaza (Hoffman had originally said he "parked his automobile ... [at] about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963")?

With all that time, why even park on the highway when he could have driving all through downtown and gone directly into DP in plenty of time to see JFK up close and personal? Remembering also that police stopped traffic prior to the motorcade's expected arrival for security purposes, it strains credulity to imagine that not a one of them approached Hoffman, whichever side of the highway he was on, and told him to get his ass away from the path of the motorcade! That they may have, but decided to let him remain, is unlikely based upon the fact that Hoffman could neither hear the officers to be able to respond to their queries, nor speak to them to tell them that he was "okay" and that he was just watching for the President to come along in half an hour or so.

Half an hour! Hardly spur-of-the-moment, eh?

Note also that "railroad worker man" was also "wearing a tie" with his "striped overalls!" Must've been one of those "working executive" types, huh? But at least we now know that he parked "on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway" and waited 30 minutes to see the President speed by when he could've walked over to TSBD and seen him go by at "parade speed!" Buddy, there ain't NO line of sight from there into the railroad yards, some 200 yards away! He has at least surmounted the problem of not being able to see two six-foot-tall men running from the back of the TSBD behind a six-foot fence - that he'd admitted that he couldn't see past - by simply putting them on the side of the fence nearer to him!

One wonders if brother Fred or any of the others with whom ol' Ed shared his fabri— his experiences with is still around, and what they thing of young Virgil's sudden and lasting notoriety ....

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Good stuff, don't think I've seen this before. The tip of the iceberg, you say?
(In reading further the McAdams-site post on Hoffman, it's clear that he had some issues right from the git-go with what he could see and couldn't see, not far at all from my own uninformed opinions about the trees, etc.) ... Call it what you will; I like the term "bullxxxx factor." Hoffman's story reeks with it, Arnold's doesn't.

Duke, you're completely right!

Speaking of bullxxxx, notice a powerful signature barnyard odor in the Hoffman docs cited below? (This is just the tip of the iceberg. Thought I'd save you from death by stench asphyxiation.)

Okay, let's see if we can trace this according to these documents:

[Hoffman told Mr. Jim Dowdy that] he parked his automobile near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street, about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963.

Hoffman said he was standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway when the motorcade passed him taking President Kennedy to Parkland Hospital. Hoffman said he observed two white males, clutching something dark to their chests with both hands, running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building. The men were running north on the railroad, then turned east, and Hoffman lost sight of both of the men.

Here, Hoffman is parked "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street," which seems to suggest that he is parked on the side of the freeway closest to the tracks, i.e., the east side nearest TSBD. This differs from his physical description - that is, the one he took us to physically! - as being on the side nearest the entrance ramp, from which he claimed (as I remember it) to see not only men in DP, but also the limo as it sped by on its way to Parkland. (I seem to remember him relating the story of SA Hickey and the AR-15, too, and how scared of being shot he'd been!)

It is confusing exactly where he's claiming to have parked since there's no place that can be called "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street" that can be sited in conjunction with "the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway." The former would place him on the bridge over the northernmost portion of the road that comes west out from the Triple Underpass (i.e., "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street"), but there are no railroad tracks "on Stemmons Freeway" until one goes north on Stemmons from Elm some 350-375 feet (ahem! 365.76 feet by Google Earth!). So basically he could have been anywhere at all within about a 500 foot area, according to this report.

Most notably, however, he says that "he sbserved two white males ... running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building." This is very clearly a different place than "behind the picket fence."

Approximately two hours after the above interview with Hoffman, he returned to the Dallas Office of the FBI and advised he had just returned from the spot on Stemmons Freeway where he had parked his automobile and had decided he could not have seen the men running because of a fence west of the Texas School Book Depository building. He said it was possible that he saw these two men on the fence or something else.

Hoffman said the only description he could furnish of the men was that one of them wore a white shirt. He stated he had discussed this matter with his father at the time of the assassination, and his father suggested that he not talk to anyone about this, but after thinking about what he saw, Hoffman stated he decided to tell the FBI.

Oops: he couldn't see what he'd told them he saw! Omigosh! Well, might as well give up a detailed description of "suit man" and "railroad worker man" and their several actions, but because those Feebies aren't among the brightest graduates of law school, best to keep it simple: one had on a white shirt. This leaves plenty of wiggle room given that men in suits often wear white shirts, and there's no description of "railroad worker man" at all, meaning he simply didn't describe him at the time, nothing more or less. Probably because the feds didn't ask.

Virgil E. Hoffman was not interviewed prior to June 28, 1967.

On July 6, 1967, Roy S. Truly, Manager, Texas School Book Depository, advised there is a fence approximately 6 feet tall running from the parking lot west of the Texas School Book Depository for about 150 feet to the north of the Texas School Book Depository. This fence was constructed approximately two years prior to the assassination and has not been moved to date.

On July 5, 1967, Mr. E. Hoffman, father of Virgil E. Hoffman, and Fred Hoffman, brother of Virgil Hoffman, were interviewed at 428 West Main Street, Grand Prairie, Texas. Both advised that Virgil Hoffman has been a deaf mute his entire life and has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him. Both the father and brother stated that Virgil Hoffman loved President Kennedy and had mentioned to them just after the assassination that he (Virgil Hoffman) was standing on the freeway near the Texas School Book Depository at the time of the assassination. Virgil Hoffman told them he saw numerous men running after the President was shot. The father of Virgil Hoffman stated that he did not believe that his son had seen anything of value and doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository and for this reason had not mentioned it to the FBI.

Oh, that sibling rivalry ... and a jealous dad, too! Haven't they ever seen that look of wide-eyed sincerity Hoffman exhibits on the knoll these days? How could they have doubted him? No mention here about needing to fear for his life or any such thing (which the Feebs would have gladly recorded to show what a "kook" these folks were!), just that he "has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him," and that young Ed's own depictions to them included that "he saw numerous men running" after the shooting, and that Dad "did not believe that his son had seen anything of value" and "doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository" at all!

... Mr. Hoffman communicated with [Mr. Freeman] by the use of sign language and Hoffman was concerned that the FBI perhaps did not fully understand what he was trying to communicate. Hoffman communicated the following information to Mr. Freeman:

Hoffman was watching the motorcade of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, at Dallas, Texas. Hoffman was standing on Stemmons Freeway watching the presidential motorcade, looking in an easterly direction when the motorcade sped away and headed north on Stemmons Freeway. Hoffman communicated that this must have been right after President Kennedy was shot. Hoffman saw two men, one with a rifle and one with a handgun, behind a wooden fence, approximately six feet in height, at this moment. This fence is located on the same side of Elm Street as the Texas School Book Depository building but closer to Stemmons Freeway. Since he is deaf, he naturally could not hear any shots but thought he saw a puff of smoke in the vicinity of where the two men were standing. As soon as he saw the motorcade speed away and saw the puff of smoke in the vicinity of the two men, the man with the rifle looked like he was breaking the rifle down by removing the barrel from the stock and placing it in some dark type of suitcase that the other man was holding. The two men then ran north on the railroad tracks by actually running on the tracks. Hoffman was standing approximately 75 yards from this fence. This fence was at approximately the same height or level as the ground floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Both men were white males, both dressed in some type of white suits, and both wore ties. He was too far away to furnish a more detailed description. There were no other people in his area of observation, nor in the area where the two men were standing behind the fence.

On March 28, 1977, Richard H. Freeman, Texas Instruments, Richardson, Texas, was telephonically contacted by Special Agent [REDACTED] and was requested to contact Mr. Hoffman in an effort to communicate with him and to advise him if he could come to the Dallas FBI Office in order to make a personal visit to the area of Stemmons Freeway from where he observed the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963.

On March 28, 1977, Virgil E. Hoffman accompanied Special Agent [REDACTED] to Stemmons Freeway, also known as Interstate Highway 35 North, Dallas, Texas.

Hoffman communicated that he was driving a 1962 Ford Falcon on November 22, 1963. He parked his car on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway. He could not see the presidential motorcade as it was proceeding west on Elm Street toward the Triple Underpass. He saw the motorcade speed up as it emerged on Stemmons Freeway heading north. His line of vision was due east looking from Stemmons Freeway toward the Texas School Book Depository building. The two men he saw were behind the wooden fence above the grassy knoll north of Elm Street and just before the Triple Underpass. He indicated he saw smoke in that vicinity and saw the man with the rifle disassembling the rifle near some type of railroad track control box located close to the railroad tracks. Both men ran north on the railroad tracks.

He tried to get the attention of a Dallas policeman who was standing on the railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway, but since he could not yell, he could not communicate with the policeman. He drove his car north on Stemmons Freeway after the motorcade passed him in an effort to find the two men, but he lost sight of them.

Special Agent [REDACTED] took color photographs from the area of Stemmons Freeway where Mr. Hoffman was watching the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963. Photographs were also taken of the area north of the grassy knoll where the wooden fence is located, and the area adjacent to it, which is now primarily used as a parking lot. The distance from where Mr. Hoffman was viewing the motorcade on Stemmons Freeway to the area behind the wooden fence is estimated at approximately 280 (105) yards, with the elevation being approximately the same height as the first floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Photographs were taken with a Bessler Topcon camera, using Kodak Vericolor II, Type S film, with a distance setting of infinitive, f Stop 14, and film speed 1/125 of a second.

Ah, the difference a few years can make! Hoffman has now moved from the side of the highway "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street ... standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway" to the west side of the highway, that is, all the way across seven lanes of traffic! Doesn't this seem a strange thing to do when one has a half-hour to wait before the Presidential motorcade even entered Dealey Plaza (Hoffman had originally said he "parked his automobile ... [at] about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963")?

With all that time, why even park on the highway when he could have driving all through downtown and gone directly into DP in plenty of time to see JFK up close and personal? Remembering also that police stopped traffic prior to the motorcade's expected arrival for security purposes, it strains credulity to imagine that not a one of them approached Hoffman, whichever side of the highway he was on, and told him to get his ass away from the path of the motorcade! That they may have, but decided to let him remain, is unlikely based upon the fact that Hoffman could neither hear the officers to be able to respond to their queries, nor speak to them to tell them that he was "okay" and that he was just watching for the President to come along in half an hour or so.

Half an hour! Hardly spur-of-the-moment, eh?

Note also that "railroad worker man" was also "wearing a tie" with his "striped overalls!" Must've been one of those "working executive" types, huh? But at least we now know that he parked "on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway" and waited 30 minutes to see the President speed by when he could've walked over to TSBD and seen him go by at "parade speed!" Buddy, there ain't NO line of sight from there into the railroad yards, some 200 yards away! He has at least surmounted the problem of not being able to see two six-foot-tall men running from the back of the TSBD behind a six-foot fence - that he'd admitted that he couldn't see past - by simply putting them on the side of the fence nearer to him!

One wonders if brother Fred or any of the others with whom ol' Ed shared his fabri— his experiences with is still around, and what they thing of young Virgil's sudden and lasting notoriety ....

Read Ed's book which rebuts such allegations.

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

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Good stuff, don't think I've seen this before. The tip of the iceberg, you say?
(In reading further the McAdams-site post on Hoffman, it's clear that he had some issues right from the git-go with what he could see and couldn't see, not far at all from my own uninformed opinions about the trees, etc.) ... Call it what you will; I like the term "bullxxxx factor." Hoffman's story reeks with it, Arnold's doesn't.

Duke, you're completely right!

Speaking of bullxxxx, notice a powerful signature barnyard odor in the Hoffman docs cited below? (This is just the tip of the iceberg. Thought I'd save you from death by stench asphyxiation.)

Okay, let's see if we can trace this according to these documents:

[Hoffman told Mr. Jim Dowdy that] he parked his automobile near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street, about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963.

Hoffman said he was standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway when the motorcade passed him taking President Kennedy to Parkland Hospital. Hoffman said he observed two white males, clutching something dark to their chests with both hands, running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building. The men were running north on the railroad, then turned east, and Hoffman lost sight of both of the men.

Here, Hoffman is parked "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street," which seems to suggest that he is parked on the side of the freeway closest to the tracks, i.e., the east side nearest TSBD. This differs from his physical description - that is, the one he took us to physically! - as being on the side nearest the entrance ramp, from which he claimed (as I remember it) to see not only men in DP, but also the limo as it sped by on its way to Parkland. (I seem to remember him relating the story of SA Hickey and the AR-15, too, and how scared of being shot he'd been!)

It is confusing exactly where he's claiming to have parked since there's no place that can be called "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street" that can be sited in conjunction with "the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway." The former would place him on the bridge over the northernmost portion of the road that comes west out from the Triple Underpass (i.e., "Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street"), but there are no railroad tracks "on Stemmons Freeway" until one goes north on Stemmons from Elm some 350-375 feet (ahem! 365.76 feet by Google Earth!). So basically he could have been anywhere at all within about a 500 foot area, according to this report.

Most notably, however, he says that "he sbserved two white males ... running from the rear of the Texas School Book Depository building." This is very clearly a different place than "behind the picket fence."

Approximately two hours after the above interview with Hoffman, he returned to the Dallas Office of the FBI and advised he had just returned from the spot on Stemmons Freeway where he had parked his automobile and had decided he could not have seen the men running because of a fence west of the Texas School Book Depository building. He said it was possible that he saw these two men on the fence or something else.

Hoffman said the only description he could furnish of the men was that one of them wore a white shirt. He stated he had discussed this matter with his father at the time of the assassination, and his father suggested that he not talk to anyone about this, but after thinking about what he saw, Hoffman stated he decided to tell the FBI.

Oops: he couldn't see what he'd told them he saw! Omigosh! Well, might as well give up a detailed description of "suit man" and "railroad worker man" and their several actions, but because those Feebies aren't among the brightest graduates of law school, best to keep it simple: one had on a white shirt. This leaves plenty of wiggle room given that men in suits often wear white shirts, and there's no description of "railroad worker man" at all, meaning he simply didn't describe him at the time, nothing more or less. Probably because the feds didn't ask.

Virgil E. Hoffman was not interviewed prior to June 28, 1967.

On July 6, 1967, Roy S. Truly, Manager, Texas School Book Depository, advised there is a fence approximately 6 feet tall running from the parking lot west of the Texas School Book Depository for about 150 feet to the north of the Texas School Book Depository. This fence was constructed approximately two years prior to the assassination and has not been moved to date.

On July 5, 1967, Mr. E. Hoffman, father of Virgil E. Hoffman, and Fred Hoffman, brother of Virgil Hoffman, were interviewed at 428 West Main Street, Grand Prairie, Texas. Both advised that Virgil Hoffman has been a deaf mute his entire life and has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him. Both the father and brother stated that Virgil Hoffman loved President Kennedy and had mentioned to them just after the assassination that he (Virgil Hoffman) was standing on the freeway near the Texas School Book Depository at the time of the assassination. Virgil Hoffman told them he saw numerous men running after the President was shot. The father of Virgil Hoffman stated that he did not believe that his son had seen anything of value and doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository and for this reason had not mentioned it to the FBI.

Oh, that sibling rivalry ... and a jealous dad, too! Haven't they ever seen that look of wide-eyed sincerity Hoffman exhibits on the knoll these days? How could they have doubted him? No mention here about needing to fear for his life or any such thing (which the Feebs would have gladly recorded to show what a "kook" these folks were!), just that he "has in the past distorted facts of events observed by him," and that young Ed's own depictions to them included that "he saw numerous men running" after the shooting, and that Dad "did not believe that his son had seen anything of value" and "doubted he had observed any men running from the Texas School Book Depository" at all!

... Mr. Hoffman communicated with [Mr. Freeman] by the use of sign language and Hoffman was concerned that the FBI perhaps did not fully understand what he was trying to communicate. Hoffman communicated the following information to Mr. Freeman:

Hoffman was watching the motorcade of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, at Dallas, Texas. Hoffman was standing on Stemmons Freeway watching the presidential motorcade, looking in an easterly direction when the motorcade sped away and headed north on Stemmons Freeway. Hoffman communicated that this must have been right after President Kennedy was shot. Hoffman saw two men, one with a rifle and one with a handgun, behind a wooden fence, approximately six feet in height, at this moment. This fence is located on the same side of Elm Street as the Texas School Book Depository building but closer to Stemmons Freeway. Since he is deaf, he naturally could not hear any shots but thought he saw a puff of smoke in the vicinity of where the two men were standing. As soon as he saw the motorcade speed away and saw the puff of smoke in the vicinity of the two men, the man with the rifle looked like he was breaking the rifle down by removing the barrel from the stock and placing it in some dark type of suitcase that the other man was holding. The two men then ran north on the railroad tracks by actually running on the tracks. Hoffman was standing approximately 75 yards from this fence. This fence was at approximately the same height or level as the ground floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Both men were white males, both dressed in some type of white suits, and both wore ties. He was too far away to furnish a more detailed description. There were no other people in his area of observation, nor in the area where the two men were standing behind the fence.

On March 28, 1977, Richard H. Freeman, Texas Instruments, Richardson, Texas, was telephonically contacted by Special Agent [REDACTED] and was requested to contact Mr. Hoffman in an effort to communicate with him and to advise him if he could come to the Dallas FBI Office in order to make a personal visit to the area of Stemmons Freeway from where he observed the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963.

On March 28, 1977, Virgil E. Hoffman accompanied Special Agent [REDACTED] to Stemmons Freeway, also known as Interstate Highway 35 North, Dallas, Texas.

Hoffman communicated that he was driving a 1962 Ford Falcon on November 22, 1963. He parked his car on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway. He could not see the presidential motorcade as it was proceeding west on Elm Street toward the Triple Underpass. He saw the motorcade speed up as it emerged on Stemmons Freeway heading north. His line of vision was due east looking from Stemmons Freeway toward the Texas School Book Depository building. The two men he saw were behind the wooden fence above the grassy knoll north of Elm Street and just before the Triple Underpass. He indicated he saw smoke in that vicinity and saw the man with the rifle disassembling the rifle near some type of railroad track control box located close to the railroad tracks. Both men ran north on the railroad tracks.

He tried to get the attention of a Dallas policeman who was standing on the railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway, but since he could not yell, he could not communicate with the policeman. He drove his car north on Stemmons Freeway after the motorcade passed him in an effort to find the two men, but he lost sight of them.

Special Agent [REDACTED] took color photographs from the area of Stemmons Freeway where Mr. Hoffman was watching the presidential motorcade on November 22, 1963. Photographs were also taken of the area north of the grassy knoll where the wooden fence is located, and the area adjacent to it, which is now primarily used as a parking lot. The distance from where Mr. Hoffman was viewing the motorcade on Stemmons Freeway to the area behind the wooden fence is estimated at approximately 280 (105) yards, with the elevation being approximately the same height as the first floor of the Texas School Book Depository building.

Photographs were taken with a Bessler Topcon camera, using Kodak Vericolor II, Type S film, with a distance setting of infinitive, f Stop 14, and film speed 1/125 of a second.

Ah, the difference a few years can make! Hoffman has now moved from the side of the highway "near the railroad tracks on Stemmons Freeway and Elm Street ... standing a few feet south of the railroad on Stemmons Freeway" to the west side of the highway, that is, all the way across seven lanes of traffic! Doesn't this seem a strange thing to do when one has a half-hour to wait before the Presidential motorcade even entered Dealey Plaza (Hoffman had originally said he "parked his automobile ... [at] about 12:00 noon on November 22, 1963")?

With all that time, why even park on the highway when he could have driving all through downtown and gone directly into DP in plenty of time to see JFK up close and personal? Remembering also that police stopped traffic prior to the motorcade's expected arrival for security purposes, it strains credulity to imagine that not a one of them approached Hoffman, whichever side of the highway he was on, and told him to get his ass away from the path of the motorcade! That they may have, but decided to let him remain, is unlikely based upon the fact that Hoffman could neither hear the officers to be able to respond to their queries, nor speak to them to tell them that he was "okay" and that he was just watching for the President to come along in half an hour or so.

Half an hour! Hardly spur-of-the-moment, eh?

Note also that "railroad worker man" was also "wearing a tie" with his "striped overalls!" Must've been one of those "working executive" types, huh? But at least we now know that he parked "on the west shoulder of Stemmons Freeway at the northbound lane near the Texas and Pacific Railroad overpass that crosses Stemmons Freeway" and waited 30 minutes to see the President speed by when he could've walked over to TSBD and seen him go by at "parade speed!" Buddy, there ain't NO line of sight from there into the railroad yards, some 200 yards away! He has at least surmounted the problem of not being able to see two six-foot-tall men running from the back of the TSBD behind a six-foot fence - that he'd admitted that he couldn't see past - by simply putting them on the side of the fence nearer to him!

One wonders if brother Fred or any of the others with whom ol' Ed shared his fabri— his experiences with is still around, and what they thing of young Virgil's sudden and lasting notoriety ....

+++++++++++++++++++++

Is this the same person Mr. Lane____________________________as of 1999

Dr. Richard H. Freeman

Chief Engineer,

Goddard Space Flight Center thanks sg

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

Well said, Ken. If people like Scull, if that is who he really is, would spend a fraction of the time he waste trolling the forum and would actually read all the evidence before posting, then perhaps one could at least take him seriously rather than just some kook looking for attention.

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

Well said, Ken. If people like Scull, if that is who he really is, would spend a fraction of the time he wastes trolling the forum and would actually read all the evidence before posting, then perhaps one could at least take him seriously rather than just some kook looking for attention.

_____________________________

Bill, I agree.

Although I don't condone the tone and tenor of your past exchanges with Jack White, they do tend to pale in comparison to the vitriol vented on you recently by a certain individual, who seems to relish posting silly, mocking emoticons like this-- :blink: -- over and over again as if he thinks they somehow "put you down" or somehow buttress his hard-to-follow arguments in the "Close-up of Duncan McRae's Knoll Shooter" thread. How juvenile to post silly faces like that over and over again. One can only wonder if he didn't learn such behavior from some of his more immature students. You know, the ones who sat in the back of the room and shot "spit wads" at each other....

Like you, I believe Hoffman. I think that a deaf person like Hoffman would be a more believable/credible eyewitness than a "normal" sighted person simply because a deaf person, in order to survive on a day-to-day basis in a world of fast-moving cars, etc, must hone his or her visual skills to compensate for his or her inability to hear. It is obvious to anyone who watches TMWKK on http://www.youtube.com that Hoffman raised a family, and a fairly well-to-do-looking family at that, which is a lot more than be said for a lot of people who have all of their faculties, so he must have been a pretty darn normal guy psychologically.... But for some reason, certain people on this forum (and others as well, I suppose) want to make him out as some kind of weird, yarn-spinning miscreant. All I can say is that I trust Hoffman much more than the people who attack him and his testimony/statements....

Keep up the good work,

--Thomas

_____________________________

Edited by Thomas Graves

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I wrote a long message defending Ed Hoffman yesterday...but it was lost due

to "security measures" by moderators. I am not going to rewrite it.

Suffice it to say that I find Hoffman to be very credible for reasons I am not

going to write again.

Those who doubt him are not in possession of all the facts. Much of any

confusion is from imprecise interpretation of American sign language. There

is also the possibility that Ed himself may have misinterpreted what he saw.

The impressive fact is that Ed REPORTED WHAT HE SAW THE SAME DAY HE

SAW IT. He has never varied from his initial report to his family. It is fact that

he reported it to the FBI and they misintrepreted what he saw and deemed him

a "nut" instead of a deaf mute.

Jack

Edited by Jack White

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

Well said, Ken. If people like Scull, if that is who he really is, would spend a fraction of the time he wastes trolling the forum and would actually read all the evidence before posting, then perhaps one could at least take him seriously rather than just some kook looking for attention.

_____________________________

Bill, I agree.

Although I don't condone the tone and tenor of your past "exchanges" with Jack White, they do tend to pale in comparison to the vitriol vented on you recently by a certain individual, who seems to relish posting silly, mocking emoticons like this-- :lol: -- over and over again as if he thinks they somehow "put you down" or somehow buttress his hard-to-follow "arguments" in the "Close-up of Duncan McRae's Knoll Shooter" thread. How juvenile to post silly faces like that over and over again. One can only wonder if he didn't learn such behavior from some of his more immature students. You know, the ones who sat in the back of the room and shot "spit wads" at each other....

Like you, I believe Hoffman. I think that a deaf person like Hoffman would be a more believable/credible eyewitness than a "normal" sighted person simply because a deaf person, in order to survive on a day-to-day basis in a world of fast-moving cars, etc, must hone his or her visual skills to compensate for his or her inability to hear. It is obvious to anyone who watches TMWKK on http://www.youtube.com that Hoffman raised a family, and a fairly well-to-do-looking family at that, which is a lot more than be said for a lot of people who have all of their faculties, so he must have been a pretty darn normal guy psychologically.... But for some reason, certain people on this forum (and others as well, I suppose) want to make him out as some kind of weird, yarn-spinning miscreant. All I can say is that I trust Hoffman much more than the people who attack him and his testimony/statements....

Keep up the good work,

--Thomas

_____________________________

I agree with you Thomas. Ed is very credible. Much has been made of him being about a hundred yards

from the scene he describes. But consider, a football field is 120 yards long, and spectators have no

problem with seeing a person catch a pass that far away. Also, in 1963 there were no trees to obscure

the view as is the case today.

Thanks.

Jack

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

Well said, Ken. If people like Scull, if that is who he really is, would spend a fraction of the time he wastes trolling the forum and would actually read all the evidence before posting, then perhaps one could at least take him seriously rather than just some kook looking for attention.

_____________________________

Bill, I agree.

Although I don't condone the tone and tenor of your past "exchanges" with Jack White, they do tend to pale in comparison to the vitriol vented on you recently by a certain individual, who seems to relish posting silly, mocking emoticons like this-- :lol: -- over and over again as if he thinks they somehow "put you down" or somehow buttress his hard-to-follow "arguments" in the "Close-up of Duncan McRae's Knoll Shooter" thread. How juvenile to post silly faces like that over and over again. One can only wonder if he didn't learn such behavior from some of his more immature students. You know, the ones who sat in the back of the room and shot "spit wads" at each other....

Like you, I believe Hoffman. I think that a deaf person like Hoffman would be a more believable/credible eyewitness than a "normal" sighted person simply because a deaf person, in order to survive on a day-to-day basis in a world of fast-moving cars, etc, must hone his or her visual skills to compensate for his or her inability to hear. It is obvious to anyone who watches TMWKK on http://www.youtube.com that Hoffman raised a family, and a fairly well-to-do-looking family at that, which is a lot more than be said for a lot of people who have all of their faculties, so he must have been a pretty darn normal guy psychologically.... But for some reason, certain people on this forum (and others as well, I suppose) want to make him out as some kind of weird, yarn-spinning miscreant. All I can say is that I trust Hoffman much more than the people who attack him and his testimony/statements....

Keep up the good work,

--Thomas

_____________________________

I agree with you Thomas. Ed is very credible. Much has been made of him being about a hundred yards

from the scene he describes. But consider, a football field is 120 yards long, and spectators have no

problem with seeing a person catch a pass that far away. Also, in 1963 there were no trees to obscure

the view as is the case today.

Thanks.

Jack

****************************

The Ed Hoffman Site..

This is from "Triangle of Fire" the Bob Goodman story....and what became a friendship

with Ed Hoffman.

One afternoon, Bob was on the steps of Dealey Plaza, near where Zapruder had made

the film, and he saw a man standing behind the stockade fence watching him.

In looking in his direction the man, smiled and waved as if he knew him.

Since Bob felt he could not be sure about anyone at the grassy knoll, he ignored him

at first. Then glancing over his shoulder the man waved again..So Bob walked up closer

to the fence, thinking he may want to ask him something.

The man nodded and smiled, and Bob felt there was something different about this

man..and was drawn towards him..as Bob approached him the man looked over his

bifocals, and pounded his index finger on his chest, he then slowly moved his finger

the the corner of his eye and pointed to Elm St...He spoke not a word, and they stared

at each other .Ed wrote on Bob's notepad his name, and that he had seen what had

happened the day of the assassination. Bob had heard about him....

Ed had seen someone behind the stockade fence on the grassy knoll with a rifle when

the President was shot. Through sign language and written notes they communicated,

and Ed told John his story.

On the afternoon of Nov.22/63, he had been on his way to a dental appointment when

he remembered the President was coming to town. As he drove he had seen people

waiting alongside the motorcade route in Dealey Plaza. He passed over the overpass

and pulled his car to the shoulder of the road. He waited near the Stemmons Freeway

overpass bridge. His location was west of Dealey Plaza where the freeway bridge crossed

Elm St.

From this position, he has a good view, not only of the street, but also of the area behind the

stockade fence on the Grassy Knoll. Ed said he had seen a man in a dark blue suit coat and a

fedora-style hat with a rifle behind the fence. He said the man had run with the rifle and had

pitched it to another man who appeared to have broken the rifle down or to have taken it apart,

behind a large, silver-colored railroad switching box located near the corner of the fence, near

the railroad overpass bridge. The man wearing the black fedora had then run back along the fence

for a short distance, and then he had started to walk casually across the parking lot.

As the President's convertible limousine drove down Elm St. and toward the freeway just seconds later,

Ed saw the aftermath of the assassin's bullets. He saw the blood and the agony and the damage to the

President’s head. He knew that something terrible had happened.

Ed communicated with his close friends and family what he had witnessed and had even reported it to the

authorities. The results were a lack of interest and a warning to forget about what he had seen. His story

remained fairly well secret until the summer of 85 when he shared his eyewitness account to veteran researcher

and writer Jim Marrs, who also, on occasion visited the Dealey Plaza area.

Mr. Hoffman explained that there now is a large billboard that now blocks the view that he had on Nov.22/63

and this created a problem. It was impossible to take a photograph

of the view that he had seen that afternoon from the overpass area. The billboard was twelve to fifteen feet

lower and almost at ground level on the day of the assassination.

Every two or three weeks, Ed would drop by Dealey and visit Bob Goodman , and it was on one of these visits

that as they walked over to the train tracks, ,as they stood looking at the back of the billboard, he showed John

where the metal posts that supported the sign had been extended. The metal beams had indeed been welded

and lengthened thus raising the billboard twelve to fifteen feet from it's original position. It was frustrating to Ed

to try to explain his story without showing him his direct viewpoint. Later John discovered a photo taken the day

of the assassination showing the billboard at ground level.

It confirmed Mr. Hoffman’s claim of the position as being a fact..

The photo below was taken on a day, when the sign on the billboard was being replaced, and as can be seen when

removed....The view of the area that Ed saw can be seen quite clearly.....

B..........

Edited by Bernice Moore

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Thanks, Bill. You beat me to the punch. When I saw this, I couldn't wait to whip out a reply. The book is called "Eyewitness." It was published back in 1997, ten years ago! No mention of the book by either of these men. Must not have been aware of it. They owe it to the research community to read it before "going off" any further on this rather repulsive thread. Raising the questions is one thing, but the tone and the slams I would think is beneath these men. Reminds me of a Bugliosi rant. This book was co-written by Ed's pastor, Ron Friedrich, who has also functioned as a sign language interpreter for Ed. The introduction by Ron (with Ed) indicates that the very complaints these two men have registered will be addressed. What more can I say? Read the book.

Well said, Ken. If people like Scull, if that is who he really is, would spend a fraction of the time he wastes trolling the forum and would actually read all the evidence before posting, then perhaps one could at least take him seriously rather than just some kook looking for attention.

_____________________________

Bill, I agree.

Although I don't condone the tone and tenor of your past "exchanges" with Jack White, they do tend to pale in comparison to the vitriol vented on you recently by a certain individual, who seems to relish posting silly, mocking emoticons like this-- :lol: -- over and over again as if he thinks they somehow "put you down" or somehow buttress his hard-to-follow "arguments" in the "Close-up of Duncan McRae's Knoll Shooter" thread. How juvenile to post silly faces like that over and over again. One can only wonder if he didn't learn such behavior from some of his more immature students. You know, the ones who sat in the back of the room and shot "spit wads" at each other....

Like you, I believe Hoffman. I think that a deaf person like Hoffman would be a more believable/credible eyewitness than a "normal" sighted person simply because a deaf person, in order to survive on a day-to-day basis in a world of fast-moving cars, etc, must hone his or her visual skills to compensate for his or her inability to hear. It is obvious to anyone who watches TMWKK on http://www.youtube.com that Hoffman raised a family, and a fairly well-to-do-looking family at that, which is a lot more than be said for a lot of people who have all of their faculties, so he must have been a pretty darn normal guy psychologically.... But for some reason, certain people on this forum (and others as well, I suppose) want to make him out as some kind of weird, yarn-spinning miscreant. All I can say is that I trust Hoffman much more than the people who attack him and his testimony/statements....

Keep up the good work,

--Thomas

_____________________________

I agree with you Thomas. Ed is very credible. Much has been made of him being about a hundred yards

from the scene he describes. But consider, a football field is 120 yards long, and spectators have no

problem with seeing a person catch a pass that far away. Also, in 1963 there were no trees to obscure

the view as is the case today.

Thanks.

Jack

****************************

The Ed Hoffman Site..

This is from "Triangle of Fire" the Bob Goodman story....and what became a friendship

with Ed Hoffman.

One afternoon, Bob was on the steps of Dealey Plaza, near where Zapruder had made

the film, and he saw a man standing behind the stockade fence watching him.

In looking in his direction the man, smiled and waved as if he knew him.

Since Bob felt he could not be sure about anyone at the grassy knoll, he ignored him

at first. Then glancing over his shoulder the man waved again..So Bob walked up closer

to the fence, thinking he may want to ask him something.

The man nodded and smiled, and Bob felt there was something different about this

man..and was drawn towards him..as Bob approached him the man looked over his

bifocals, and pounded his index finger on his chest, he then slowly moved his finger

the the corner of his eye and pointed to Elm St...He spoke not a word, and they stared

at each other .Ed wrote on John's notepad his name, and that he had seen what had

happened the day of the assassination. John had heard about him....

Ed had seen someone behind the stockade fence on the grassy knoll with a rifle when

the President was shot. Through sign language and written notes they communicated,

and Ed told John his story.

On the afternoon of Nov.22/63, he had been on his way to a dental appointment when

he remembered the President was coming to town. As he drove he had seen people

waiting alongside the motorcade route in Dealey Plaza. He passed over the overpass

and pulled his car to the shoulder of the road. He waited near the Stemmons Freeway

overpass bridge. His location was west of Dealey Plaza where the freeway bridge crossed

Elm St.

From this position, he has a good view, not only of the street, but also of the area behind the

stockade fence on the Grassy Knoll. Ed said he had seen a man in a dark blue suit coat and a

fedora-style hat with a rifle behind the fence. He said the man had run with the rifle and had

pitched it to another man who appeared to have broken the rifle down or to have taken it apart,

behind a large, silver-colored railroad switching box located near the corner of the fence, near

the railroad overpass bridge. The man wearing the black fedora had then run back along the fence

for a short distance, and then he had started to walk casually across the parking lot.

As the President's convertible limousine drove down Elm St. and toward the freeway just seconds later,

Ed saw the aftermath of the assassin's bullets. He saw the blood and the agony and the damage to the

President’s head. He knew that something terrible had happened.

Ed communicated with his close friends and family what he had witnessed and had even reported it to the

authorities. The results were a lack of interest and a warning to forget about what he had seen. His story

remained fairly well secret until the summer of 85 when he shared his eyewitness account to veteran researcher

and writer Jim Marrs, who also, on occasion visited the Dealey Plaza area.

Mr. Hoffman explained that there now is a large billboard that now blocks the view that he had on Nov.22/63

and this created a problem. It was impossible to take a photograph

of the view that he had seen that afternoon from the overpass area. The billboard was twelve to fifteen feet

lower and almost at ground level on the day of the assassination.

Every two or three weeks, Ed would drop by Dealey and visit Bob Goodman , and it was on one of these visits

that as they walked over to the train tracks, ,as they stood looking at the back of the billboard, he showed John

where the metal posts that supported the sign had been extended. The metal beams had indeed been welded

and lengthened thus raising the billboard twelve to fifteen feet from it's original position. It was frustrating to Ed

to try to explain his story without showing him his direct viewpoint. Later John discovered a photo taken the day

of the assassination showing the billboard at ground level.

It confirmed Mr. Hoffman’s claim of the position as being a fact..

The photo below was taken on day, when the sign on the billboard was being replaced, and as can be seen when

removed....The view of the area that Ed saw can be seen quite clearly.....

B..........

Bernice...a few corrections...otherwise that is the same story as the first time I heard it, first from Ed's niece

an then from Ed himself.

1. The narrative twice says "John" when it means "Bob", I think.

2. Ed's niece told his story for the very first time at Jim Marrs class at UTA. I was there.

3. Subsequently, his niece asked Ed to appear before the class. He did, and she interpreted for him, speaking

the story as he signed it. It was the same story as written. This was his first meeting with Marrs, who later

interviewed him extensively, and Jim got the same story, which he used in his book.

4. There are some details not covered in the narrative.

Jack

Edited by Jack White

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Hi Jack:

I have corrected the Johns......?? I will check to see if the book was in error, but more

than likely I could have been thinking of someone like a John Travolta.... :lol:

Will make sure....and also check in Marrs...

Thanks..

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Those who doubt him are not in possession of all the facts. Much of any confusion is from imprecise interpretation of American sign language. There is also the possibility that Ed himself may have misinterpreted what he saw.

The impressive fact is that Ed REPORTED WHAT HE SAW THE SAME DAY HE SAW IT. He has never varied from his initial report to his family. It is fact that he reported it to the FBI and they misintrepreted what he saw and deemed him a "nut" instead of a deaf mute.

... And so? James Worrell reported what he "saw" just one day later. Trouble is he never saw it, wasn't there, lied through his teeth. But he DID report it within 24 hours. QED or BFD?

What Ed is telling people today that he saw in 1963 is not, apparently, what he was telling people back in 1963, 1964, 1967 or 1977. Put it off to misunderstanding ASL, but the man could write, couldn't he (and didn't he)?

I can certainly buy, however, that he may have misinterpreted what he saw. As with many people, his memory has simply gotten more vivid with the passage of time.

Jack, you know the photographic record as well as or better than anyone else: did Stemmons have a shoulder to park on at the time or not?

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Is this the same person Mr. Lane____________________________as of 1999

Dr. Richard H. Freeman

Chief Engineer,

Goddard Space Flight Center thanks sg

Forgive me, but I don't understand what that's about.

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