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John Simkin

Golf and the Great Depression

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In 1923, who was:

1. President of the largest steel company?

2. President of the largest gas company?

3. President of the New York Stock Exchange?

4. Greatest wheat speculator?

5. President of the Bank of International Settlement?

6. Great Bear of Wall Street?

These men were considered some of the worlds most successful of their days.

What ultimately became of them.

The Answers:

1. The president of the largest steel company:

Charles Schwab, died a pauper.

2. The president of the largest gas company:

Edward Hopson, went insane.

3. The president of the NYSE:

Richard Whitney, was released from prison to die at home.

4. The greatest wheat speculator:

Arthur Cooger, died abroad, penniless.

5. The president of the Bank of International Settlement:

shot himself.

6. The Great Bear of Wall Street:

Cosabee Livermore, also committed suicide.

However, in that same year, 1923, the PGA Champion and the winner of the most important golf tournament, the US Open,

was Gene Sarazen. What became of him?

He played golf until he was 92, died in 1999 at the age of 95. He was financially secure at the time of his death.

What is the moral of this story?

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In 1923, who was:

1. President of the largest steel company?

2. President of the largest gas company?

3. President of the New York Stock Exchange?

4. Greatest wheat speculator?

5. President of the Bank of International Settlement?

6. Great Bear of Wall Street?

These men were considered some of the worlds most successful of their days.

What ultimately became of them.

The Answers:

1. The president of the largest steel company:

Charles Schwab, died a pauper.

2. The president of the largest gas company:

Edward Hopson, went insane.

3. The president of the NYSE:

Richard Whitney, was released from prison to die at home.

4. The greatest wheat speculator:

Arthur Cooger, died abroad, penniless.

5. The president of the Bank of International Settlement:

shot himself.

6. The Great Bear of Wall Street:

Cosabee Livermore, also committed suicide.

However, in that same year, 1923, the PGA Champion and the winner of the most important golf tournament, the US Open,

was Gene Sarazen. What became of him?

He played golf until he was 92, died in 1999 at the age of 95. He was financially secure at the time of his death.

What is the moral of this story?

I saw Sarazen take his last public swing (at Augusta National, to formally start the Masters Tournament the year he died).

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.....However, in that same year, 1923, the PGA Champion and the winner of the most important golf tournament, the US Open, was Gene Sarazen. What became of him?

He played golf until he was 92, died in 1999 at the age of 95. He was financially secure at the time of his death.

What is the moral of this story?

Gene Sarazen was one of only five players to win the Grand Slam - each of the four Majors in their lifetime. Who were the others?

BK

Edited by William Kelly

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.....However, in that same year, 1923, the PGA Champion and the winner of the most important golf tournament, the US Open, was Gene Sarazen. What became of him?

He played golf until he was 92, died in 1999 at the age of 95. He was financially secure at the time of his death.

What is the moral of this story?

Gene Sarazen was one of only five players to win the Grand Slam - each of the four Majors in their lifetime. Who were the others?

BK

Off the top of my head-seriously-I would say Nicklaus, Watson, Woods and Player. I know Arnie Palmer never won a PGA.

Edited by Mark Stapleton

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Wikipedia:

"Only five golfers have won all four of golf's modern Majors at any time during their career, an achievement which is often referred to as a Career Grand Slam: Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, and Tiger Woods. Both Woods and Nicklaus have three Career Grand Slams, having won each major at least three times."

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Wikipedia:

"Only five golfers have won all four of golf's modern Majors at any time during their career, an achievement which is often referred to as a Career Grand Slam: Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, and Tiger Woods. Both Woods and Nicklaus have three Career Grand Slams, having won each major at least three times."

Jack,

That's cheating. You're suppose to KNOW these things, not look them up in Wiki.

This was a test of knowledge.

Hogan could probaly have won all four in one year but there was a scheduling problem with the PGA, the easiest of the four to win (unless you're Arnold Palmer).

Over the years the four majors changed, from the British and American Amateur Championships and British and American Opens, as it was when Bobby Jones won all four, and then retired from tournament golf and built Augusta National, where he started the Masters. Evetually, as the best amateur play shifted to the pro ranks, the Masters and the PGA rounded out the four majors.

While golf survived the Great Depression and two world wars, the continuing economic crisis looms heavy over such major events - did they really cancel a F1 Grand Prix?

Even if all the tournaments are cancelled, that only leaves the courses open for regular players.

BK

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Guest Gary Loughran
In 1923, who was:

1. President of the largest steel company?

2. President of the largest gas company?

3. President of the New York Stock Exchange?

4. Greatest wheat speculator?

5. President of the Bank of International Settlement?

6. Great Bear of Wall Street?

These men were considered some of the worlds most successful of their days.

What ultimately became of them.

The Answers:

1. The president of the largest steel company:

Charles Schwab, died a pauper.

2. The president of the largest gas company:

Edward Hopson, went insane.

3. The president of the NYSE:

Richard Whitney, was released from prison to die at home.

4. The greatest wheat speculator:

Arthur Cooger, died abroad, penniless.

5. The president of the Bank of International Settlement:

shot himself.

6. The Great Bear of Wall Street:

Cosabee Livermore, also committed suicide.

However, in that same year, 1923, the PGA Champion and the winner of the most important golf tournament, the US Open,

was Gene Sarazen. What became of him?

He played golf until he was 92, died in 1999 at the age of 95. He was financially secure at the time of his death.

What is the moral of this story?

Longevity is in the Gene (s)

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Wikipedia:

"Only five golfers have won all four of golf's modern Majors at any time during their career, an achievement which is often referred to as a Career Grand Slam: Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus, and Tiger Woods. Both Woods and Nicklaus have three Career Grand Slams, having won each major at least three times."

Jack,

That's cheating. You're suppose to KNOW these things, not look them up in Wiki.

This was a test of knowledge.

Hogan could probaly have won all four in one year but there was a scheduling problem with the PGA, the easiest of the four to win (unless you're Arnold Palmer).

Over the years the four majors changed, from the British and American Amateur Championships and British and American Opens, as it was when Bobby Jones won all four, and then retired from tournament golf and built Augusta National, where he started the Masters. Evetually, as the best amateur play shifted to the pro ranks, the Masters and the PGA rounded out the four majors.

While golf survived the Great Depression and two world wars, the continuing economic crisis looms heavy over such major events - did they really cancel a F1 Grand Prix?

Even if all the tournaments are cancelled, that only leaves the courses open for regular players.

BK

I am familiar with Hogan (home town boy). I followed Nicklaus. I don't care too much for Tiger...too arrogant.

Sarazen was before my time, and that is way back. I always admired Player.

I don't follow golf much any more.

Jack

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