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I had a revelation through a long distance AA meeting, and a number of very supportive PM's, that snapped me out of it (not without some gutwrencing periods though, the tendency is to withdraw totally from everything). Life is too wonderful to ignore. Thank you.

It's made me realise that this sort of thing can be so life giving, hope giving. We are a community through the internet, and there, it seems to me to me, are untapped possibilities. I guess I've outed myself from a sphere where anonymity is important, but it seems that this can be part of the process too in dealing with such a destructive disease.

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Good to have you back, John!

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I had a revelation through a long distance AA meeting, and a number of very supportive PM's, that snapped me out of it (not without some gutwrencing periods though, the tendency is to withdraw totally from everything). Life is too wonderful to ignore. Thank you.

It's made me realise that this sort of thing can be so life giving, hope giving. We are a community through the internet, and there, it seems to me to me, are untapped possibilities. I guess I've outed myself from a sphere where anonymity is important, but it seems that this can be part of the process too in dealing with such a destructive disease.

Thanks for listening to our advice via the PMs. Don't let the bastidges get you down. You are one of the few on this site and on all

other sites who know that we all should be: "Looking for Hate in all the 'Right' Places" which was the title of my first piece on Willoughby.

I gain extra energy and focus whenever those on the Right attempt to dissuade me, discourage me, depose me or disrupt me. They

haven't even figured that out yet either. The more that I am bombarded with McCarthy tactics and techniques the more I fire it right back

at them in spades. That is the strategy I recommend for you as well.

Blowback is one of the best ways to channel your energy into your JFK research. And you can pick up clues on various JFK sites without

even having them dumped into your lap, like the issue about Carlist Catholics surrounding L. Brent Bozell and that Warren Carroll character.

Right away I knew them as H L Hunt and William F. Buckley cronies. It gave me the idea for the posting on "Killing Commies for Christ

the King" which really was their sicko mentality back then. Thank them profusely for their assistance and then go on with more research.

And to take Warren Carroll's lifetime of work for H. L. Hunt, Charles Willoughby in Spain with Franco, and William F. Buckley, Jr. and his 1-2 year association with the CIA and then ignore the fact that he was a true Bircher, a religious right winger and an extremist in the real sense of the word is palpable nonsense.

Dr. Warren H. Carroll is a leading Catholic historian and author, and the founder of Christendom College. He received his Ph.D. in history from Columbia University.

Dr. Carroll served at one time in the CIA's anti-communism division as a Communist propaganda analyst, a job that would later prove most beneficial when writing his monumental comprehensive study of international Communism, Seventy Years of the Communist Revolution (updated and re-released as The Rise and Fall of the Communist Revolution). After his conversion to the Catholic Church, Dr. Carroll worked for the Catholic magazine Triumph, and then founded Christendom College in the mid 1970s with the help of other Catholic laymen. Carroll was also the first president of the college (located in Front Royal, Virginia) until 1987, as well as the chairman of the History Department until his retirement in 2000.

Dr. Carroll currently lives in Manassas, Virginia with his wife Anne, who is the founder of Seton Junior & Senior High School and Seton Home Study School and the author of Christ the King, Lord of History, as well as Christ in the Americas.

He returns to Christendom College weekly each month during the school year to deliver public lectures on select historical topics, ranging from the history of the country of Malta, the Mongol leader Genghis Khan, the French Revolution, and topics from the twentieth century, with lectures on Emperor Karl of Austria and the Russian Revolution in 1917. These public lectures are available for free download through iTunes.

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Thank you John, and Evan,

John, this had nothing to do with the JFK issue. It's about addiction.

Sometimes stuff happens where combinations of events, in spite of how long one has been sober, an excuse arises that seems to justify drinking. When that happens reason is gone. However, I've been strugglimg with this since my early twenties and I know that any attempt to justify it in terms of exterior events is self defeating. It just sets one up for another fall. I drink because I'm an alcoholic, and the only way I can live a rational life is to not drink. Its that simple.

I'll be happy to discuss JFK matters in the JFK forum section.

I'll try to expand on the addiction issue in the Health section. I know there are many souls ensnared in various addictions, and many who don't suffer from it, but do from the results, and can only understand a part of what its like, so I'd like to attempt to use what I've learnt to bridge gaps and provide ideas for those struggling with the issues, whether as the active addict or those many dear ones affected.

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I had a revelation through a long distance AA meeting, and a number of very supportive PM's, that snapped me out of it (not without some gutwrencing periods though, the tendency is to withdraw totally from everything). Life is too wonderful to ignore. Thank you.

It's made me realise that this sort of thing can be so life giving, hope giving. We are a community through the internet, and there, it seems to me to me, are untapped possibilities. I guess I've outed myself from a sphere where anonymity is important, but it seems that this can be part of the process too in dealing with such a destructive disease.

Good for you. Nobody is perfect. You are courageous to share your challenge. Today is a new day. That is all that any of us have.

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I had a revelation through a long distance AA meeting, and a number of very supportive PM's, that snapped me out of it (not without some gutwrencing periods though, the tendency is to withdraw totally from everything). Life is too wonderful to ignore. Thank you.

It's made me realise that this sort of thing can be so life giving, hope giving. We are a community through the internet, and there, it seems to me to me, are untapped possibilities. I guess I've outed myself from a sphere where anonymity is important, but it seems that this can be part of the process too in dealing with such a destructive disease.

When my wife died recently I discovered how many wonderful friends I had on this forum. In times of crisis you cannot have enough good friends. In fact, some of my forum friends gave me more support than friends that I saw on a fairly regular basis. One reason for this is that a lot of people find it difficult to deal with grief. I suspect the same is true when their friends are suffering from alcoholism.

Someone once said that they only difference between those in and out of mental hospitals is the number of friends they have to talk to about their problems. I believe this forum can play a similar role in this process.

John, I had the pleasure of meeting you a few years ago. I greatly enjoyed our conversations that evening. I have also appreciated your words of wisdom on the forum over the years. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help you with your struggles against this terrible disease. I can assure you that you have a lot of friends on the forum who are rooting for you to win this battle.

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I had a revelation through a long distance AA meeting, and a number of very supportive PM's, that snapped me out of it (not without some gutwrencing periods though, the tendency is to withdraw totally from everything). Life is too wonderful to ignore. Thank you.

It's made me realise that this sort of thing can be so life giving, hope giving. We are a community through the internet, and there, it seems to me to me, are untapped possibilities. I guess I've outed myself from a sphere where anonymity is important, but it seems that this can be part of the process too in dealing with such a destructive disease.

When my wife died recently I discovered how many wonderful friends I had on this forum. In times of crisis you cannot have enough good friends. In fact, some of my forum friends gave me more support than friends that I saw on a fairly regular basis. One reason for this is that a lot of people find it difficult to deal with grief. I suspect the same is true when their friends are suffering from alcoholism.

Someone once said that they only difference between those in and out of mental hospitals is the number of friends they have to talk to about their problems. I believe this forum can play a similar role in this process.

John, I had the pleasure of meeting you a few years ago. I greatly enjoyed our conversations that evening. I have also appreciated your words of wisdom on the forum over the years. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to help you with your struggles against this terrible disease. I can assure you that you have a lot of friends on the forum who are rooting for you to win this battle.

I really enjoyed it too, John. I remember it with dear memories. I walked away with a renwed faith. My sorrow is that I never met your wife but in a way, i feel i saw her through you. I didn't know. I've learnt a lot in the intervening time about grief in seeing how you deal with it. Perhaps in a way so she lives on.

___________________________

Remember how i had a soda water or something like that? (and so it was till a few days ago) Well, through people on this forum, this was my shortest binge ever!

Two evenings and i woke up and saw myself in the light of me in active alcoholism and I knew i didnt want to go there again. Some of the withdrawals and a realigned relationship with my sobnriety has certainly been hard, but they are all the excuses i used to justify the simple fact that i drink because im an alcoholic. i cant not do it.

Or so i thought.

rock bottom, came, not after six months of slow self destruction, but in a matter of a day and a bit more. Because quite simply in committing to something far more important than self lies a kind of salvation

You, and others, have already helped me enough, and im very grateful.

I think the experience possibly can be a tool of sorts that can be provided to sufferers everywhere. Im going to try to explore it more in the Addiction thread.

...........

Otherwise, let the show continue. ( btw, god bless you, Pam. )

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