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William Kelly

Harvard Gates

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http://whitedeercafe.blogspot.com/2009/08/...lder-women.html

Wait a minute. Whose the Older Women?:

http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/08/01/harvard.gates.flowers/

“….Whalen said an older woman with no cell phone told her that she was worried someone was trying to break into the home, and decided to call 911…”

“…An officer responding to a report of a possible break-in at Gates' Cambridge, Massachusetts, home arrested the professor on July 16 for disorderly conduct. The charge was later dropped.

The arrest sparked a national debate about race and police relations.

Whalen said an older woman with no cell phone told her that she was worried someone was trying to break into the home, and decided to call 911.

Whalen never referred to black suspects when she called authorities about the suspected break-in.

On Thursday, President Barack Obama -- who had weighed in on the controversy, saying initially that police acted "stupidly" -- sat down for a beer at the White House with Gates and the officer who arrested him.

The meeting has been called the "beer summit..."

“…Whalen said an older woman with no cell phone told her that she was worried someone was trying to break into the home, and decided to call 911….”

Whose the "Older Women."

Not only is there still an unidentified confidential informant on the loose, Gates himself has expressed the belief that while he was gone, someone tried to force their way into the apartment, the reason he could't get in.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HarvardGate

On July 16, 2009, Gates had just returned from a trip to China, where he had finished filming a new documentary series for PBS tracing the ancestry of cellist Yo-Yo Ma.[11] As the front door of his home would not open, Gates entered through his back door. He could not, however, open the front door from the inside, even after unlatching it. Gates states that the lock was damaged and speculated that someone had attempted to "jimmy" the lock while he was away. Gates went back outside and, with help from his driver, forced the door open.

Now what was strictly a potentially hot race issue, suddenly becomes a multiple mystery, that's yet to

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Beer Summit Calls Attention to the Cycle of Capitalism

We haven't heard the last of this story yet.

Besides identifying the older women who tipped off the women who called 911, and verifying that the Professor's door was jimmied, and confirming the existence of a neighborhood burglary ring, this story has some economic angles that can also be a "teaching moment."

The beer summit started when President Obama called Sgt. Crowley on his cell phone and caught him at the local Irish pub drinking a beer.

The President invited Crowley to the White House for a beer, and then invited the Professor.

Crowley said he drinks Blue Moon, the professor at first expressed a liking to Red Stripe and Becks, but then requested the local New England Sam Adams beer, named after the revolutionary president.

Joe Biden, a teetotaler, dropped by and drank a non-alcoholic beer.

The problem is, all of these beers are owned by giant mega-global conglamorates, when just a few decades ago - say the 60s, there were dozens of small beer brewers in every major city.

Philadelphia had Schmidts, Schlitz, Piels, Gretz,.....there was even a Camden Beer.

One by one the beer companies bought up the competition and put it out of business, not only ending a product, but ending jobs, destroying neighborhoods and long established communities.

The company that owns Red Stripe, originally a small Jamaican brewery, also owns a small Scotch label and Guinness, the Irish stout, along with hundreds of other some small, some major beers, wines and liquors.

Now that they are so huge, and still need to make a profit, they have to cut costs, and that means consolidate jobs, and ending the 250 years of making scotch in that small Scottish town, and 200 jobs, while they also propose to close the centuries old Guinness factory at St. James Gate Dublin, a certified historic landmark that is so essential to the makeup of the community that the city council forbid rezoning it for residential development.

It's th same with the other beers they drank that day - Foreign owned Bud Light for the Pres, Crowley's Blue Moon is made by Coors and a foreign Belgian conglamorate.

I haven't really checked out Sam Adams, but I have a feeling that they recognized the signifance of the beer summet and talked Professor Gates into switching from Red Stripe or Becks to the local Sam Adam brand, for publicities sake.

Personally, I drink Youngling, the oldest, locally brewed lager, which is darker than Bud and has a slight bight that tells you your drinking lager instead of beer.

The evolution of the ownership of the breweries of America and the world is a good example of the extent of globalization and negative attributes of evolutionary capitalism, where at the end of the cycle, the remaining companies buy out the competition and put them out of business, leaving only one standing, with no competition.

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Beer Summit Calls Attention to the Cycle of Capitalism

- say the 60s, there were dozens of small beer brewers in every major city.

Philadelphia had Schmidts, Schlitz, Piels, Gretz,.....there was even a Camden Beer.

One by one the beer companies bought up the competition and put it out of business, not only ending a product, but ending jobs, destroying neighborhoods and long established communities.

The company that owns Red Stripe, originally a small Jamaican brewery, also owns a small Scotch label and Guinness, the Irish stout, along with hundreds of other some small, some major beers, wines and liquors.

Now that they are so huge, and still need to make a profit, they have to cut costs, and that means consolidate jobs, and ending the 250 years of making scotch in that small Scottish town, and 200 jobs, while they also propose to close the centuries old Guinness factory at St. James Gate Dublin, a certified historic landmark that is so essential to the makeup of the community that the city council forbid rezoning it for residential development.

It's th same with the other beers they drank that day - Foreign owned Bud Light for the Pres, Crowley's Blue Moon is made by Coors and a foreign Belgian conglamorate.

I haven't really checked out Sam Adams, but I have a feeling that they recognized the signifance of the beer summet and talked Professor Gates into switching from Red Stripe or Becks to the local Sam Adam brand, for publicities sake.

Personally, I drink Youngling, the oldest, locally brewed lager, which is darker than Bud and has a slight bight that tells you your drinking lager instead of beer.

The evolution of the ownership of the breweries of America and the world is a good example of the extent of globalization and negative attributes of evolutionary capitalism, where at the end of the cycle, the remaining companies buy out the competition and put them out of business, leaving only one standing, with no competition.

I agree the real issue with this summit were the poor beer choices- so many great Americna mocrobrews to be had, though I will say Sam Adams, now the largest American-owned brewery makes outstanding beer, including their Boston lager (my fave), and the Summer Ale.

The article is not entirely accurate though. America now has over 1500 independent breweries, compared to less than 50 in 1980. We are definitely pushing against the grain in beer production. One only needs to look at the great beer snob websites like beeradvocate or ratea-beer. All the best are coming from the US- now easily the cutting edge of global beer production.

I may stop for a Maduro growler at the Cigar City Brewery on the way home- locally produced ale aged in cigar box wood.

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Beer Summit Calls Attention to the Cycle of Capitalism

- say the 60s, there were dozens of small beer brewers in every major city.

Philadelphia had Schmidts, Schlitz, Piels, Gretz,.....there was even a Camden Beer.

One by one the beer companies bought up the competition and put it out of business, not only ending a product, but ending jobs, destroying neighborhoods and long established communities.

The company that owns Red Stripe, originally a small Jamaican brewery, also owns a small Scotch label and Guinness, the Irish stout, along with hundreds of other some small, some major beers, wines and liquors.

Now that they are so huge, and still need to make a profit, they have to cut costs, and that means consolidate jobs, and ending the 250 years of making scotch in that small Scottish town, and 200 jobs, while they also propose to close the centuries old Guinness factory at St. James Gate Dublin, a certified historic landmark that is so essential to the makeup of the community that the city council forbid rezoning it for residential development.

It's th same with the other beers they drank that day - Foreign owned Bud Light for the Pres, Crowley's Blue Moon is made by Coors and a foreign Belgian conglamorate.

I haven't really checked out Sam Adams, but I have a feeling that they recognized the signifance of the beer summet and talked Professor Gates into switching from Red Stripe or Becks to the local Sam Adam brand, for publicities sake.

Personally, I drink Youngling, the oldest, locally brewed lager, which is darker than Bud and has a slight bight that tells you your drinking lager instead of beer.

The evolution of the ownership of the breweries of America and the world is a good example of the extent of globalization and negative attributes of evolutionary capitalism, where at the end of the cycle, the remaining companies buy out the competition and put them out of business, leaving only one standing, with no competition.

I agree the real issue with this summit were the poor beer choices- so many great Americna mocrobrews to be had, though I will say Sam Adams, now the largest American-owned brewery makes outstanding beer, including their Boston lager (my fave), and the Summer Ale.

The article is not entirely accurate though. America now has over 1500 independent breweries, compared to less than 50 in 1980. We are definitely pushing against the grain in beer production. One only needs to look at the great beer snob websites like beeradvocate or ratea-beer. All the best are coming from the US- now easily the cutting edge of global beer production.

I may stop for a Maduro growler at the Cigar City Brewery on the way home- locally produced ale aged in cigar box wood.

Hey Scott,

Thanks for paying attention, but I can't believe your 1500 independent brewers, up from 50 in 1980, unless that includes the pub brews - where the beers are made at the pub and sold there, but not for outside distribution, as I assume the Cigar City Brewery is one.

Correct?

Bill Kelly

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Beer Summit Calls Attention to the Cycle of Capitalism

- say the 60s, there were dozens of small beer brewers in every major city.

Philadelphia had Schmidts, Schlitz, Piels, Gretz,.....there was even a Camden Beer.

One by one the beer companies bought up the competition and put it out of business, not only ending a product, but ending jobs, destroying neighborhoods and long established communities.

The company that owns Red Stripe, originally a small Jamaican brewery, also owns a small Scotch label and Guinness, the Irish stout, along with hundreds of other some small, some major beers, wines and liquors.

Now that they are so huge, and still need to make a profit, they have to cut costs, and that means consolidate jobs, and ending the 250 years of making scotch in that small Scottish town, and 200 jobs, while they also propose to close the centuries old Guinness factory at St. James Gate Dublin, a certified historic landmark that is so essential to the makeup of the community that the city council forbid rezoning it for residential development.

It's th same with the other beers they drank that day - Foreign owned Bud Light for the Pres, Crowley's Blue Moon is made by Coors and a foreign Belgian conglamorate.

I haven't really checked out Sam Adams, but I have a feeling that they recognized the signifance of the beer summet and talked Professor Gates into switching from Red Stripe or Becks to the local Sam Adam brand, for publicities sake.

Personally, I drink Youngling, the oldest, locally brewed lager, which is darker than Bud and has a slight bight that tells you your drinking lager instead of beer.

The evolution of the ownership of the breweries of America and the world is a good example of the extent of globalization and negative attributes of evolutionary capitalism, where at the end of the cycle, the remaining companies buy out the competition and put them out of business, leaving only one standing, with no competition.

I agree the real issue with this summit were the poor beer choices- so many great Americna mocrobrews to be had, though I will say Sam Adams, now the largest American-owned brewery makes outstanding beer, including their Boston lager (my fave), and the Summer Ale.

The article is not entirely accurate though. America now has over 1500 independent breweries, compared to less than 50 in 1980. We are definitely pushing against the grain in beer production. One only needs to look at the great beer snob websites like beeradvocate or ratea-beer. All the best are coming from the US- now easily the cutting edge of global beer production.

I may stop for a Maduro growler at the Cigar City Brewery on the way home- locally produced ale aged in cigar box wood.

Hey Scott,

Thanks for paying attention, but I can't believe your 1500 independent brewers, up from 50 in 1980, unless that includes the pub brews - where the beers are made at the pub and sold there, but not for outside distribution, as I assume the Cigar City Brewery is one.

Correct?

Bill Kelly

I htink you may be right- But I can tell you a local store by me has over 400 American microbrews (individual breweries) for pick your own six pack bottles, and those are only the ones distributed here in FLorida. In any case there are exponentially more American breweries now that in any time since probably pre-Prohibition.

Cigar City Brewery distributes across central Florida and is adding South Florida. Or you can get your growler filled up at the brewery (conveniently located on my drive home). http://www.cigarcitybeer.com/

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Beer Summit Calls Attention to the Cycle of Capitalism

- say the 60s, there were dozens of small beer brewers in every major city.

Philadelphia had Schmidts, Schlitz, Piels, Gretz,.....there was even a Camden Beer.

One by one the beer companies bought up the competition and put it out of business, not only ending a product, but ending jobs, destroying neighborhoods and long established communities.

The company that owns Red Stripe, originally a small Jamaican brewery, also owns a small Scotch label and Guinness, the Irish stout, along with hundreds of other some small, some major beers, wines and liquors.

Now that they are so huge, and still need to make a profit, they have to cut costs, and that means consolidate jobs, and ending the 250 years of making scotch in that small Scottish town, and 200 jobs, while they also propose to close the centuries old Guinness factory at St. James Gate Dublin, a certified historic landmark that is so essential to the makeup of the community that the city council forbid rezoning it for residential development.

It's th same with the other beers they drank that day - Foreign owned Bud Light for the Pres, Crowley's Blue Moon is made by Coors and a foreign Belgian conglamorate.

I haven't really checked out Sam Adams, but I have a feeling that they recognized the signifance of the beer summet and talked Professor Gates into switching from Red Stripe or Becks to the local Sam Adam brand, for publicities sake.

Personally, I drink Youngling, the oldest, locally brewed lager, which is darker than Bud and has a slight bight that tells you your drinking lager instead of beer.

The evolution of the ownership of the breweries of America and the world is a good example of the extent of globalization and negative attributes of evolutionary capitalism, where at the end of the cycle, the remaining companies buy out the competition and put them out of business, leaving only one standing, with no competition.

I agree the real issue with this summit were the poor beer choices- so many great Americna mocrobrews to be had, though I will say Sam Adams, now the largest American-owned brewery makes outstanding beer, including their Boston lager (my fave), and the Summer Ale.

The article is not entirely accurate though. America now has over 1500 independent breweries, compared to less than 50 in 1980. We are definitely pushing against the grain in beer production. One only needs to look at the great beer snob websites like beeradvocate or ratea-beer. All the best are coming from the US- now easily the cutting edge of global beer production.

I may stop for a Maduro growler at the Cigar City Brewery on the way home- locally produced ale aged in cigar box wood.

Hey Scott,

Thanks for paying attention, but I can't believe your 1500 independent brewers, up from 50 in 1980, unless that includes the pub brews - where the beers are made at the pub and sold there, but not for outside distribution, as I assume the Cigar City Brewery is one.

Correct?

Bill Kelly

I htink you may be right- But I can tell you a local store by me has over 400 American microbrews (individual breweries) for pick your own six pack bottles, and those are only the ones distributed here in FLorida. In any case there are exponentially more American breweries now that in any time since probably pre-Prohibition.

Cigar City Brewery distributes across central Florida and is adding South Florida. Or you can get your growler filled up at the brewery (conveniently located on my drive home). http://www.cigarcitybeer.com/

Yea, Scott, I would think these microbreweries are brew pubs where you can order a pint out of the draught, or by the bottle, have lunch and get a six pack to go. They are primarily retail operations, where the old, neighborhood breweries were whole sale industrial producers that employed hundreds of people and distributed regionally, and sometimes nationally.

When I was in college Coors didn't distribute outside Colorado and frats used to drive to Colorado and pick up a couple dozen cases for parties, a theme I think they made into a movie.

Regional beers that went national, besides Coors, like Rolling Rock, are all in trouble of losing their original breweries, that can be made less expensively in one major factory than a lot of small ones.

The brew pubs are successful, but expensive, as each one needs a professional brewer. The first one I encountered, in Freemantle Australia - was impressive, and I am most familiar with the Tunn Tavern in Atlantic City. Named after the Philadelphia tavern where the US Marine Corps was established (circa November 1775?), the Atlantic City namesake makes a few good brews, and is conveniently located at the end of the Expressway and near the train station and new convention hall. But I can't think of another one at the Jersey Shore.

I am also familiar with McSorley's Ale, based on the ale sold at the legendary New York City tap room, the oldest, continously operated bar in the city, where women weren't served until the 1960s. But I don't think they make McSorley's ale in the basement.

I think that my main point still stands - that most of the old, small breweries were bought up by their major national, and now international competition, and put out of business, and the

increase in small brew pubs since the 80s, increases the number of varieties, but doesn't make up for what the old breweries did for their communities.

Cheers,

(Go Phillies, beat Marlins)

Bill Kelly

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Bill- I found the breakdown:

990 brewpubs

446 microbreweries

65 regional craft breweries

20 large breweries (the Miller, Anheuser-Busch, etc.)

25 other non-craft breweries

1545 total US breweries in 2008

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_jLfUyEuMrHk/SpM9...f+medal+map.jpg

Hey Scott,

I also found an article that says that micro brews profits are up 40% (Phila. Inquirer) this year.

My thesis on the expansion of major brewers, the elimination of competition with the takeover and closing of small brewers and the consolidation of what's left into one big conglamorate, still holds water, err lager.

BK

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