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John Simkin

Aldous Huxley and John F. Kennedy

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Aldous Huxley died on the same day that John F. Kennedy was assassinated. As a result his death was hardly mentioned in the media over the next few days. Huxley is an interesting figure. Although he was born in England he spent the second-half of his life in the United States. His book, Brave New World, published in 1932, was banned for many years in the United States. Time Magazine reported that the book was still banned in some places in America as late as 2004.

David King Dunaway has pointed out: "The novel, the first about human cloning, is a dystopia set five centuries in the future, when overpopulation has led to biogenetic engineering. Through computerized genetic selection, social engineers create a population happy with its lot. All the earth's children are born in hatcheries, and Soma, a get-happy pill, irons out most problems."

Time Magazine saw it as an attack on the culture of the United States with Henry Ford as the new God (worshippers say "Our Ford" instead of "Our Lord"): "Huxley's 1932 work - about a drugged, dull and mass-produced society of the future - has been challenged for its themes of sexuality, drugs and suicide. The book parodies H.G. Wells' utopian novel Men Like Gods and expresses Huxley's disdain for the youth and market-driven culture of the U.S. Chewing gum, then as now a symbol of America's teenybopper shoppers, appears in the book as a way to deliver sex hormones and subdue anxious adults; pornographic films called feelies are also popular grown-up pacifiers."

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jhuxley.htm

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Aldous Huxley died on the same day that John F. Kennedy was assassinated. As a result his death was hardly mentioned in the media over the next few days. Huxley is an interesting figure. Although he was born in England he spent the second-half of his life in the United States. His book, Brave New World, published in 1932, was banned for many years in the United States. Time Magazine reported that the book was still banned in some places in America as late as 2004.

David King Dunaway has pointed out: "The novel, the first about human cloning, is a dystopia set five centuries in the future, when overpopulation has led to biogenetic engineering. Through computerized genetic selection, social engineers create a population happy with its lot. All the earth's children are born in hatcheries, and Soma, a get-happy pill, irons out most problems."

Time Magazine saw it as an attack on the culture of the United States with Henry Ford as the new God (worshippers say "Our Ford" instead of "Our Lord"): "Huxley's 1932 work - about a drugged, dull and mass-produced society of the future - has been challenged for its themes of sexuality, drugs and suicide. The book parodies H.G. Wells' utopian novel Men Like Gods and expresses Huxley's disdain for the youth and market-driven culture of the U.S. Chewing gum, then as now a symbol of America's teenybopper shoppers, appears in the book as a way to deliver sex hormones and subdue anxious adults; pornographic films called feelies are also popular grown-up pacifiers."

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jhuxley.htm

As did C.S. Lewis, which was also overlooked in the press.

Dawn

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Several hours before his death, Huxley's wife Laura gave him a shot containing LSD, telling him to "Go toward the light."

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Several hours before his death, Huxley's wife Laura gave him a shot containing LSD, telling him to "Go toward the light."

That is another thing that JFK and Huxley had in common, they were both taking LSD. JFK's was supplied by Mary Pinchot Meyer.

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Complete baloney John. ANd you should know better by now.

"Finally, in this regard, I must comment on the book's treatment of JFK and Mary Meyer. I was quite surprised that, as with Sheridan, Talbot swallowed the whole apple on this one. As I have written, (The Assassinations pgs 338-345), any serious chronicler has to be just as careful with this episode as with Judith Exner -- and to his credit, Talbot managed to avoid that disinformation filled land mine. Before criticizing him on this, and before I get smeared by people like Jon Simkin, I want to make a public confession. I actually believed the Meyer nonsense at one time. In fact, to my everlasting chagrin, I discussed it -- Timothy Leary and all -- at a talk I did in San Francisco about a year after Oliver Stone's JFK came out. It wasn't until I began to examine who Leary was, who his associates were, and how he fit into the whole explosion of drugs into the USA in the sixties and seventies that I began to question who he was. In light of this, I then reexamined his Mary Meyer story, and later the whole legerdemain around this fanciful tale. Thankfully, Talbot does not go into the whole overwrought "mystery" about her death and her mythologized diary. But he eagerly buys into everything else. Yet to do this, one has to believe some rather unbelievable people. And you then have to ignore their credibility problems so your more curious readers won't ask any questions. For if they do the whole edifice starts to unravel.

Foremost among this motley crew is Leary. As I was the first to note, there is a big problem with his story about Meyer coming to him in 1962 for psychedelic drugs. Namely, he didn't write about it for 21 years previous --until 1983. He wrote about 25 books in the meantime. (Sort of like going through 25 FBI, Secret Service, and DPD interviews before you suddenly recall seeing Oswald on the sixth floor.) Yet it was not until he hooked up with the likes of Gordon Liddy that he suddenly recalled, with vivid memory, supplying Mary with LSD and her mentioning of her high official friend and commenting, "They couldn't control him any more. He was changing too fast" etc. etc. etc. Another surprising source Talbot uses here is none other than CIA counter-intelligence chief James Angleton, the guy who was likely handling Oswald until 1962. Talbot actually quotes the nutty Cold Warrior, Kennedy antagonist and Warren Commission cover up artist waxing poetic about Kennedy being in love with Mary: "They were in love ... they had something very important." (p. 199) This from a man who, later on, Talbot admits loathed JFK and actually thought he was a Soviet agent.! (p. 275). A further dubious source is Jim Truitt, the former friend of Ben Bradlee who used to work for him at the Washington Post and was also friends with Angleton. Consider: Truitt had been trying to discredit President Kennedy while he was alive by saying he was previously married and had it covered up. In fact, he had pushed this fatuous story on Bradlee. And it appears that Truitt then started the whole drug angle of the story as a way of getting back at Bradlee and the Post for firing him. By 1969 he was so unstable that his wife sought a conservatorship for him and then divorced him in 1971. Truitt tried to get a job with the CIA and when he did not he moved to Mexico into a colony of former CIA agents. There he grew and smoked the mescaline-based hallucinogenic drug peyote. This was his sorry state when he first reported to the press about the "turned on" Meyer/JFK romance. He then shot himself in 1981. Here you have a guy who was a long-time Kennedy basher, became mentally unstable, was a CIA wannabe, and was planting and taking hallucinogenics with other CIA agents-- and then accuses JFK of doing the same, 14 years after the fact. Some witness, huh? I don't even want to mention the last major source Talbot uses to complete this rickety shack. I have a hard time even typing his name. But I have to. Its sleazy biographer David Heymann. Heymann wrote one of the very worst books ever published on Bobby Kennedy, and has made a lucrative career out of trashing the Kennedy family. For me, Heymann is either a notch above or below the likes of Kitty Kelley. But when you're that low, who's measuring?"

Regardless of the debate over JFK and LSD, the accused assassin and designated Patsy had most certainly read Huxley and was interested in psycho drugs, and even asked a New Orleans assistant DA about it.

In addition, I find it extremely interesting that the Army unit responsible for ordering the testing of LSD, at least in these specific experiments, was the ACSI, Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence (ACSI) at the Pentagon, who Col. Brandstetter reported directly to from his 488th Army Reserve Unit in Dallas - This is the same guy who worked with Manuel Ray at the Havana Hilton, reported to DeMohrenschildt's military contacts Col. Sam Kail and Dorithe Matlack, and personally knew Col. Crichton, who arranged Marina's translation of first interview, and two of the Amry Intl agents in the Pilot car in the motorcade.

Brandsteter mentions a Col. Rose, who directed his activities, and I assume is the same Col. William Rose mentioned in this documnet.

- This is uncharted territory for research, if anyone wants to forgo arguments and actually learn something new. - BK

http://jfkcountercoup.wordpress.com/2010/12/11/603/

http://jfkcountercoup.blogspot.com/2010/11/col-frank-m-brandstetter.html

AND - it just so happened that April 1, 1963 - the day the Threasher went down - and the day the accused assassin and Patsy suposidly took a pot shot at Walker, they held a briefing on the matter and decided more field testing was necessary.

Check it out :

ACSI Assistant Chief Staff, Intelligence USA

Lt. Col. William B. Rose

NARA ACSI Records 1940-1964 :

http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/rcs/schedules/departments/department-of-defense/department-of-the-army/rg-0319/n1-319-88-003_sf115.pdf

http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/rcs/schedules/departments/department-of-defense/department-of-the-army/rg-0319/n1-319-88-004_sf115.pdf

G-2 homepage: http://www.dami.army.pentagon.mil/

C. Covert Testing on Human Subjects by Military Intelligence Groups - LSD: http://freegovreports.com/index.php/project-mkultra/48-c-covert-testing-on-human-subjects-by-military-intelligence-groups

The two projects involving the operational use of LSD (THIRD CHANCE and DERBY HAT) were apparently approved by the Army Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence (General Willems) on December 7, 1960.

This verbal approval came in the course of a briefing on previous drug programs and on the planned field experimentation. There is no record of written approval being issued by the ACSI to authorize these specific projects until January 1961, and there is no record of any specific knowledge or approval by the Secretary of the Army.

On February 4, 1963, Major General C. F. Leonard, Army ACSI, forwarded a copy of the THIRD CHANCE Trip Report to Army Chief of Staff, General Early Wheeler. Wheeler had apparently requested a copy on February 2. The report was routed through a General Hamlett. While this report included background on the origins of the LSD tests, it appears that General Wheeler may only have read the conclusion and recommendations. The office memorandum accompanying the Trip Report bears Wheeler’s initials. \

5. Termination of Testing

On April 10, 1963, a briefing was held in the ACSI’s office on the results of Projects THIRD CHANCE and DERBY HAT. Both SPT’s concluded that more field testing was required before LSD could be utilized as an integral aid to counterintelligence interrogations. During the presentation of the DERBY HAT results, General Leonard (Deputy ACSI) directed that no further field testing be undertaken. After this meeting the ACSI sent a letter to the Commanding General of the Army Combat Developments Command (CDC) requesting that he review THIRD CHANCE and DERBY HAT and “make a net evaluation concerning the adoption of EA 1729 for future use as an effective and profitable aid in counterintelligence interrogations.” On the same day the ACSI requested that the CDC Commander revise regulation FM 30-17 to read in part:

. . . in no instance will drugs be used as an aid to interrogations in counterintelligence or security operations without prior permission of the Department of the Army. Requests to use drugs as an investigative aid will be forwarded through intelligence channels to the OACSI, DA, for approval. . . .

Medical research has established that information obtained through the use of these drugs is unreliable and invalid. . . .

It is considered that DA [Army] approval must be a prerequisite for use of such drugs because of the moral, legal, medical and political problems inherent in their use for intelligence purposes.

The subsequent adoption of this regulation marked the effective termination of field testing of LSD by the Army.

The official termination date of these testing programs is rather unclear, but a later ACSI memo indicates that it may have occurred in September of 1963. On the 19th of that month a meeting was held between Dr. Van Sims (Edgewood Arsenal), Major Clovis (Chemical Research Laboratory), and ACSI representatives (General Deholm and Colonel Schmidt). “As a result of this conference a determination was made to suspend the program and any further activity pending a more profitable and suitable use.”

US Army Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence Records

http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:vc0VDUOFqgIJ:www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/rcs/schedules/departments/department-of-defense/department-of-the-army/rg-0319/n1-319-88-003_sf115.pdf+ACSI+Assistant+Chief+Staff,+Intelligence&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgy6T39ln2VnTNNgkh59cQLw900Wnbwv8pwRkfg2NPWqwMXESBcOPL_ydHtYxi9ytncHmhvx1NVjf7UPKgOw3pRcJgS7h7jsoNQRS0PB48-2VYQBysENxcLGPsOA5Zn4ex2ipAx&sig=AHIEtbTE2y0X7NdRVnnqVFznLlVT7iH98A

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Does anybody have anything interesting on these ACSI - Edgewood guys?:

Lt. Col William B. Rose

Maj. Gen. C. F. Leonard

Gen.Early Wheeler (Army Chief of Staff)

Dr. Van Sims (Edgewood)

Major Clovis

Gen. Deholm

Col. Schmidt

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i would highly recommend A Terrible Mistake: The Murder of Frank Olson and the CIA's Secret Cold War Experiments by H. P. Albarelli Jr . no real bearing on the assassination but a window into mk-ultra and the way things were done.

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