Jump to content
The Education Forum
  • Announcements

    • Evan Burton

      OPEN REGISTRATION BY EMAIL ONLY !!! PLEASE CLICK ON THIS TITLE FOR INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION!:   06/03/2017

      We have 5 requirements for registration: 1.Sign up with your real name. (This will be your Username) 2.A valid email address 3.Your agreement to the Terms of Use, seen here: http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=21403. 4. Your photo for use as an avatar  5.. A brief biography. We will post these for you, and send you your password. We cannot approve membership until we receive these. If you are interested, please send an email to: edforumbusiness@outlook.com We look forward to having you as a part of the Forum! Sincerely, The Education Forum Team
Sign in to follow this  
John Simkin

Beatles and Segregated Audience

Recommended Posts

It has emerged that when the Beatles made their first tour of the United States in 1965 the band stipulated that it would not play in front of a "segregated audience".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has emerged that when the Beatles made their first tour of the United States in 1965 the band stipulated that it would not play in front of a "segregated audience".

The Beatles played Atlantic City Convention Hall (now Boardwalk Hall) in late August 1964, a week after the Democratic National Convention was held in the same building - where RFK eulogized JFK and LBJ was nominated.

They performed in the huge hall with a very small sound system and nobody could hear them but it didn't seem to matter to the screaming girls, including LBJ's daughters.

The Beatles also played Dallas early in their career, possibly in '64, and ducked down in their limo as they drove through Dealey Plaza on the way to the Dallas Cabana, where they stayed.

While segregation was not an issue in Atlantic City, it might have been in Dallas at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Beatles played Atlantic City Convention Hall (now Boardwalk Hall) in late August 1964, a week after the Democratic National Convention was held in the same building - where RFK eulogized JFK and LBJ was nominated.

They performed in the huge hall with a very small sound system and nobody could hear them but it didn't seem to matter to the screaming girls, including LBJ's daughters.

I had the good fortune to see the Beatles in 1962, before they had their first hit record. They had just released their first single "Love Me Do" but at that time it had not reached the charts. If I remember correctly it finally reached 18th place. It was their second record, "Please Please Me", that reached number 2 in Britain. I saw them playing at the bottom of the bill at the Odeon theatre in Romford (Essex). Roy Orbison and Brenda Lee were the two main singers on the show. Orbison was amazing and made the Beatles look like amateurs. Nor were the girls screaming at the Beatles at this stage and so you could hear their limitations. However, what impressed me was the quality of their song-writing. (At that time British singers did not write their own material). I went to work the next morning and told my mates that the Beatles were going to be big stars. It is a shame that you can't buy shares in bands like you can in companies. If so, I might have made my fortune from the Beatles success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has emerged that when the Beatles made their first tour of the United States in 1965 the band stipulated that it would not play in front of a "segregated audience".

The Beatles played Atlantic City Convention Hall (now Boardwalk Hall) in late August 1964, a week after the Democratic National Convention was held in the same building - where RFK eulogized JFK and LBJ was nominated.

They performed in the huge hall with a very small sound system and nobody could hear them but it didn't seem to matter to the screaming girls, including LBJ's daughters.

The Beatles also played Dallas early in their career, possibly in '64, and ducked down in their limo as they drove through Dealey Plaza on the way to the Dallas Cabana, where they stayed.

While segregation was not an issue in Atlantic City, it might have been in Dallas at the time.

I'm pretty sure the Dallas venue would have been segregated, it's possible that they would not have been familiar enough with America to have know this when they agreed to do the show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×