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William Kelly

Donald P. Norton

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There are two Donald Nortons, Donald O. Norton, the guy Armstrong and Kathleen have been chasing, and Donald P. Norton, the former Air Force homosexual who was recruited to inform on gay servicemen. There is already a thread going on Donald O. Norton, and this one concerns the other one - Donald P. Norton.

I bring this up because of the information developed from the Armstrong files related to J. M. Langton, the Dallas SA ONI who ran informants, including one who was homosexual and was reporting on gay servicemen, just as DPN was. Although DPN says he thought he was working for CIA, the name CIA never came up, and I believe that is Garrison or his investigators who put together reports on DPN who surmised that. Instead, I believe that he was recruited by some branch of military intelligence, probably Air Force though it could have been Navy or even Army or Army Reserves, because the CIA would normally pass on those kind of assignments to the FBI or some other military intelligence agency that is legally allowed to operate domestically.

Also relevant is the case of Martin and Mitchell, two former Navy guys who worked for NSA and defected to USSR via Mexico City and Cuba and were suspected of being homosexual, but apparently were not.

See: The Worst Internal Scandal in NSA History Was Blamed on Cold War Defectors’ Homosexuality - Page 1 - News - Seattle - Seattle Weekly

DONALDP. NORTON

As summarized from interview notes taken by investigators(Charles Ward/R. Billings) for the New Orleans District Attorney (NODA) andnewspaper clips, released by the NARA under the JFK Act.

Born on January 23, 1932, a native of Columbus, Georgia, Donald P. Norton wasraised and educated in Georgia before entering the U.S.Air Force in October, 1949. A musician who played the organ and self-describedTV personality, Norton enlisted with the understanding he would play in the AirForce Band, which he did until 1952 when he was discharged over what hedescribed as a "personal involvement" and an "indiscretion"that led to him being sentenced to six months in a federal prison.

Returning to Georgia he continued his musicaleducation at a conservatory where he earned a bachelor and master degrees andin 1957 a job playing at the officers club at Fort Benning, Columbus, Georgia, where he performed forand met generals and other officers and officials. While there he wasapproached by a man representing the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), who told him "wewant to know who does what to whom," which the NODA investigator surmised,"the obvious implication being that it would his duty to ferret outhomosexuals in high military places." The money, Norton said, was good,$500 a month, and Norton continued what he called his "witch hunting"assignment until 1958, when the colonel who employed him was charged withembezzlement.

Norton thenmoved to Atlanta where he performed onweekends at the officers club, whose secretary Norton was convinced, was also agovernment agent, continuing to turn over information about homosexuals, proof"based on experience."

In early 1958he received a phone call from his contact who asked him if he would like totake a trip to Cuba. He met"Hugh Pharris" at the Easter Airline ticket counter at the Atlanta Airport. "Pharris" gavehim a case of phonograph records, saying "it is in the jackts,"samples of which he was to take to Carlo Media, a Cuban television personality,who was also working for the CIA at the time."Pharris" was described as a man who wore sun glasses and a verysloppy wig, who Norton is convinced was David Ferrie. A young lady was withhim, Carlotta Roth, a dancer at the Domino Lounge in Atlanta. After traveling to Cuba, Norton returned to Georgia via Miami and New York and reported to his CIA contact in Atlanta.

Norton saidhis next assignment was to infiltrate the Fulton County jail, where he was placedin the same cell with Robert Bolling, accused of dynamiting a synagogue. Otherassignments were more his specialty, to determine the existence of homosexualsin government jobs.

In 1960,while on a pleasure trip to New Orleans, Norton said he went to the My-O-MyClub, a homosexual hangout, where he saw "Hugh Pharris" (aka DavidFerrie), though he didn't break operational security and talk to him.

According tothe NODA investigation report of the interview with Norton, "…it should benoted that the man's (Norton's) physical appearance and his behavior indicateat a glance his sexual nature. A man of rather delicate features, slightlyoverweight, he is extremely nervous, a chain smoker, which may well be explainedby the fact that he is indeed frightened. On the other hand, he is afast-talking, well rehearsed witness, although his testimony is often confusingdue to his penchant for inconsequential gossip. He has a very inflated egoabout his musical talents and his ability to decipher weaknesses of others. Hedescribes himself as a passive homosexual who is really a bisexual, althoughthe latter terminology must be considered doubtful. On observation it must bestated that it seems unlikely that a man of such homosexual tendencies would beemployed by the intelligence agency, but, as he described the nature of hiswork, this was exactly the reason they hired him. He described the reason forgoing to work for the agency as two-fold. One, 'they had something on me,' he says,and two, 'the money was good.'"

Norton saidhe was paid on an assignment-by-assignment basis, received his orders by phonefrom a man who was only identified as "the Captain," and never heardthe term "CIA" by the initials used to describe theagency, and the first reference was the last reference to the company. He wastightly insulated from other CIA operatives and only knowsof a few others who have worked for the agency.

In September,1962, Norton said he was given the assignment of delivering $50,000 to theHotel Yamajel, in Monterray, Mexico. Driving in his own 1956Buick, he registered under his own name.

According tothe NODA investigator's report, "It should be noted here that Norton'sknowledge of Cuban policy of this country is extremely vague. He is able totheorize as if it were some revelation that the United States or CIA was behind the overthrowof Batista, but then when Castro threw out the CIA, it in turn, and the U.S. government turned againstCastro. He does however say that Carlo Media, the CIA-employed Cuban is now ina Castro prison, so he thinks. He says that after the Castro overthrow his onlyassignment involving Cuba was this courier trip toMonterray to turn over $50,000 to Harvey Lee…"

Afterregistering at the Yamajel Hotel, Norton said he was met by "HarveyLee" before he could even get to his room. They went into the bar and hada few beers. Norton described "Harvey Lee" as "a man of slightbuild who dressed casually, who appeared identical to Oswald except for thefact that his hair was not as thin as the hair of the man he saw in picturesidentified as Lee Harvey Oswald."

Norton alsonoted that "Harvey Lee" refused to look him in the eye. When askedwhere he was from, Norton recalled the answer, he thinks, was New Orleans. In return for the caseof money, in return Norton was given a case of documents in manila envelops,"the nature of which he does not know."

FromMonterray, Norton said he then drove to Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where he became atelevision personality and played at the bar of the Georgian Terracerestaurant. "There he was met by a man he can only describe as resemblingOral Roberts, the evangelist, and says this man came to him and used the codeidentification 'the weather is very warm in Tulsa," and Norton turned overthe documents to him in the parking lot, where the man was driving aVolkswagon.

Returning tothe United States, Norton was arrested at the behest of Albert Penn of FivePoints, Alabama, who Norton knew as a homosexual, and from whom he receivedsome of his instructions. Penn accused Norton of stealing checks, but he wasacquitted of the charge and released.

In 1965Norton went to Albany, Georgia, where he was contactedby "the Captain," who may be also known as "Del Merton." InAlbany in 1966 he saw a man he now knows to beClay Shaw with James A. Gray, an extreme right-wing political power, talkingtogether at the Double Gate Country Club. Gray then offered to help establishNorton in Albany with a $6,000 loan, which was ostensiblyand surreptitiously repaid by the CIA. Norton described Gary as a dangerous person andmoneyman behind the Continental Room, where Gordon Leonard was the front man.Norton later crossed paths with Clay Shaw once again at the Domino Bar in Atlanta.

In Albany, Norton was told torecruit the services of an ex-Marine police officer, John Stickler, and afriend, Jack C. White, Jr., but failed to follow through on the assignment.

In lateNovember 1966 Norton was instructed to go to Freeport, Grand Bahama Island, where he was to get thenames of the homosexuals working at the missile tracking station on Grand Bahama, his last assignment forthe CIA. After a week he returned to Miami where he called hiscontact, a "Mr. Green," who informed him that "something was brewingin New Orleans and…he should take along, quiet vacation."

According tothe NODA report, "Norton claims he had no idea as to the nature of the New Orleans development, and that hehad no idea why he was being told to take this vacation. It worried him a greatdeal, so he went on a long circuitous trip attempting to find out what washappening, shy he had been summarily dismissed, so to speak. He suspected thathe had done something wrong but did not know the nature of the misdeed. Hefirst went to Key West to contact a CIA friend there, but wasunsuccessful. He returned to Miami but was unable to reachGreen again. He then drove to Savannna, and by this time was really frightened.He got in a plane and flew to Dallas and tried to contact aman named Stanley Walsh, who he had known in Houston, a man he describes as aformer trapeze artist, a former paratrooper who had been working for theagency…"

Flying to Honolulu, Norton contacted aretired naval captain, a doctor then in private practice, who told Norton toforget the problem. Another CIA contact, Bill Rusk, camefrom Texas, an alcoholic with Mafia connections whoran a liquor store in the Pioneer Hotel, who told him, "Join the party orget out."

From thereNorton went to Canada to hide out, butinexplicitly talked to a reporter, John Taylor of the British Columbia VancoverSun, requesting that Taylor put him in contact withthe New Orleans District Attorney's office. On August 5, 1967, the headlineread: "AMERICAN, 'NOWHERE ELSE TO GO' COMES HERE TO TELLFANTASTIC TALE LINKS CIA WITH OSWALD, CLAYSHAW."

"A linkbetween Lee Harvey Oswald, Clay Shaw, David Ferrie and the Central IntelligenceAgency is claimed by a man now in Vancover. Donald P. Norton, 35, told The Sunhe encountered all three while he was on the payroll of the CIA, the U.S. espionageagency."

"Nortonhas been interviewed here and in New Orleans by officials of the New Orleansdistrict attorney Jim Garrision, whose investigation has been questioned bymany sources, alleged a conspiracy between Shaw and Oswald in the assassinationof former U.S. president John F. Kennedy."

"…Nortonfirst came to see The Sun, July 8. Since then many details of Norton's storyhave been confirmed. But the authenticity of his central claims defy verificationby normal newspaper investigation…"

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There are two Donald Nortons, Donald O. Norton, the guy Armstrong and Kathleen have been chasing, and Donald P. Norton, the former Air Force homosexual who was recruited to inform on gay servicemen. There is already a thread going on Donald O. Norton, and this one concerns the other one - Donald P. Norton.

"Chasing." That man lived 2 hours away from me at one time. I never got into the car and drove there. His fishing supply store became a tourist trap I'm told. There were 2 Oswalds. One, Harvey, was killed; the other disappeared. I'm looking for Lee Oswald. I understand Donald O. Norton is believed to be him, or he knows something.

I am not actively chasing him or researching him, wise guy.

Kathy C.

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Is "Donald Norton" a floating alias used by several persons, like "Maurice Bishop" and "Lee Oswald"?

Edited by David Andrews

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Is "Donald Norton" a floating alias used by several persons, like "Maurice Bishop" and "Lee Oswald"?

No, Donald O. and Donald P. Norton are their real names.

And Kathleen, if you go back to the Donald O. Norton thread you will find that you posted all of his previous addresses as well as a satellite photo of the roof of his house.

My comment wasn't meant to be derogatory, just descriptive, and to differentiate the two so as to focus on the guy I wanted to.

WG

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There are two Donald Nortons, Donald O. Norton, the guy Armstrong and Kathleen have been chasing, and Donald P. Norton, the former Air Force homosexual who was recruited to inform on gay servicemen. There is already a thread going on Donald O. Norton, and this one concerns the other one - Donald P. Norton.

"Chasing." That man lived 2 hours away from me at one time. I never got into the car and drove there. His fishing supply store became a tourist trap I'm told. There were 2 Oswalds. One, Harvey, was killed; the other disappeared. I'm looking for Lee Oswald. I understand Donald O. Norton is believed to be him, or he knows something.

I am not actively chasing him or researching him, wise guy.

Kathy C.

Kathleen: I don't think he meant it literally. It was just a reference to your interest that has been expressed many times on this forum.

Dawn

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Bill this was a post from William Weston some years back, fwiw..b

Subject: Two Oswalds

The Two Oswalds: You are the Jury

by William Weston

When you pick up a book with the title You are the Jury, November 22, =

1963, authored by David Belin, you may think that you have found an =

impartial presentation of the evidence regarding the guilt or innocence =

of Lee Harvey Oswald in the assassination of President Kennedy. But as =

you skim through it, you realize that the title is grossly misleading. =

What you find instead is a highly selective offering of evidence and =

eyewitness testimony supporting the official version: namely, that =

Oswald did it and Oswald did it alone. Witnesses with a viewpoint =

inconvenient to the official version are omitted.=20

Yet Belin is right about one thing, we, the people of the United States =

of America, do form a jury. The assassination of President Kennedy is a =

watershed case that must be resolved or else justice and freedom in this =

country will perish. If the perpetrators of this crime is not exposed =

and punished, an imperial form of government will replace our =

constitutional government. If we deem ourselves responsible citizens and =

not serfs then we should not rest until those who committed this crime =

are brought to justice. Whether we like it or not, we are a jury. We =

therefore must act like a jury, being open-minded and alert in seeking =

the truth. We need to hear ALL the evidence, not just a part of it.=20

The process of finding the truth has been ongoing from the first hours =

of the aftermath of the assassination. We have been receiving pertinent =

evidence of the assassination for over forty years now, mainly through =

off-mainstream books, a few of which have even reached best-seller =

status. In 1966, Mark Lane published Rush to Judgment. Lane interviewed =

important witnesses such as Sam Holland, who was on the Triple Underpass =

and saw smoke rising from the grassy knoll, Lee Bowers, the railroad =

terminal signal station man who saw a flash of light behind the fence of =

the grassy knoll, Helen Markham who provided details about the Tippit =

shooting that challenged the official view. In 1980 Anthony Summers did =

some groundbreaking work with his book Conspiracy, interviewing =

witnesses in New Orleans and establishing a connection to the =

assassination through such right-wing intelligence fanatics as David =

Ferrie and Guy Banister. In 1983 David Lifton wrote a book called Best =

Evidence, which gave us new information about the autopsy at Bethesda =

Hospital, indicating a cover-up at the highest levels of government=20

In 2003, another great book on the assassination has appeared, written =

by John Armstrong, called Harvey and Lee. He presents new witnesses who =

confirm what most researchers have suspected all along: that there was a =

Second Oswald. Just as we, the jury, did not dismiss Lane's witnesses or =

Summer's witnesses, or Lifton's witnesses as confabulating cranks, so we =

must listen to Armstrong's witnesses. Armstrong's book should be read in =

its entirety. However, because of its huge size, a short paper =

highlighting the more prominent episodes dealing with the case for two =

Oswalds can serve as an introduction.

At the end of each episode, there is an evaluation regarding (1) the =

data and (2) the significance in establishing the theory that there were =

two Oswalds. The two evaluations will be given ratings of 1 through 3. =

In the case of the data, 1 means data of the highest quality and 3 the =

poorest. In the case of significance, 1 means highly significant and 3 =

means of low significance.

USMC (October 1956-September 1959) - Allen R. Felde enlisted in the =

Marine Corps at Milwaukee, WI in October 1956. He went to the San Diego =

for basic training and there met Oswald as another recruit. Both of them =

were assigned to Platoon 2060, Second Battalion. In January 1957 both =

Felde and Oswald were transferred to Camp Pendleton for combat training. =

Felde and Oswald were assigned to the same squad of eight men, all of =

whom shared the same tent. While on leave once in Tijuana, Oswald left =

the squad and was not seen again until everyone returned to Camp =

Pendleton. This was also true when the squad went on weekend leaves to =

Los Angeles. Oswald would ride with the group to Los Angeles in a bus =

but would separate from them at the bus depot and would not be seen =

again until they returned to Camp Pendleton.=20

When combat training was over in May 1957, Oswald and Felde were =

transferred to the A & P School at Jacksonville, Florida. In July 1957 =

they were sent to Aviation Electronics School in Memphis, TN. In =

September 1957 Felde transferred to the Marine Corps Air Station at Opa =

Locka, Florida and did not see Oswald again. Felde recalled that Oswald =

continually discussed politics. Oswald was argumentative and frequently =

took the opposite side of an argument just for the sake of a debate. He =

was a good talker and had an excellent vocabulary. He was also a =

voracious reader spending much of his time reading in base libraries as =

well as in his quarters. He became unpopular, and his company was =

avoided if possible. Oswald continually wrote to Senators in Washington =

about various left wing issues. One senator in particular who was in =

receipt of a number of his letters was Senator Strom Thurman. Oswald =

expressed dislike for people of wealth and he championed the cause of =

the working man. He frequently found fault with Eisenhower and Truman =

and had felt the US participation in the Korean War was wrong, because a =

lot of men were killed in this war and nothing was accomplished. Oswald =

also condemned Eisenhower for his poor use of armored units at the time =

of the invasion of Europe.

Another Marine who remembered Oswald was Sherman Cooley. October 1956 =

was the month when Cooley first met Oswald at the Marine Corps boot camp =

in San Diego. I interviewed Cooley and asked him what he remembered =

about Oswald. One of the most memorable things about Oswald was his =

inability to shoot a rifle. "He could not hit the broad side of a barn =

with a twelve gauge shotgun," Cooley told me. In March 1957 he and =

Oswald went to Jacksonville, Florida, where they were enrolled in the =

same class at the Air Frame and Power (A&P) School. After spending two =

months there, they were sent to Keesler, where they learned how to be =

radar operators. They were transferred to Japan, but Cooley did not see =

Oswald there, for they had been assigned to two widely separated bases. =

The next time he saw him was in the Philippines towards the end of =

November 1957. In fact, the picture of Oswald sitting among a group of =

Marines waiting to board an LST was taken by Cooley himself. At the end =

of December Cooley went back to Japan with a portion of the unit, while =

Oswald stayed with the rest of the unit at Corregidor. They did not see =

one another again until the beginning of January 1959, when they were =

assigned to a radar unit in Santa Ana, California. Oswald had mess duty, =

and Cooley used to see him every morning serving coffee to the men.

I asked Cooley if he remembered Allen Felde. He said that he never heard =

of him, but that is not significant, since there were hundreds of men =

going through training. Then I read Felde's statement over the phone. =

There was much in it that Cooley confirmed to me was correct. The =

details regarding Oswald's personality and interests, he said, described =

him "to a tee." Cooley also confirmed to me that the unit they were in =

was the Second Recruit Battalion. So far, so good. But we start running =

into problems with the platoon numbers. There were three platoons in =

every company. Cooley was in platoon 1068, and Oswald was in either 1069 =

or 1070. I asked him if he can explain what Felde meant, when he said =

that he and Oswald were in platoon 2060. Cooley said it is possible that =

Oswald had been held back and put in a platoon that was sequentially =

later. The 20 series of platoons followed the 10 series of platoons by a =

week. Sometimes the Marines will do that to guys who cannot get with the =

program. They give them extra time in boot camp. I then asked about =

Felde's statement that he and Oswald went to the A&P School in =

Jacksonville from May to July. Cooley said he does not know why Felde =

would say that, since he remembered Oswald at the A&P School from March =

to May. He also does not understand how Oswald could have been at the =

Aviation Electronics School in Memphis. Cooley is quite familiar with =

that school, for he had a son who went there. It is a place where they =

train jet and helicopter mechanics. But Oswald was not in Memphis, he =

was at Keesler, learning radar. In fact, Cooley used to have a picture =

of the graduation class at Keesler and he and Oswald were in it. (He had =

loaned this photo to researcher Henry Hurt in the 1970's, when he was =

writing his book Reasonable Doubt, but it has not been returned.)

So there are a few anomalies in Felde's statement that do not fit the =

overall picture of Oswald's career in the Marines. John Armstrong had =

found a list of those who were in the Aviation Fundamentals class and =

both Felde and Oswald were in that class. The time when the class =

started was March, not May 1958,as stated in the FBI report of an =

interview with Felde.=20

Evaluation: Allen Felde's version bears some similarity to the official =

record of Oswald's military career, e.g. basic training in San Diego and =

advanced training in Jacksonville, yet it verves off from the official =

version in such details as the Aviation Electronics School in Memphis. =

Armstrong has found corroboration for this twist in Oswald's training =

path in a list of those who were in the Aviation Fundamentals. Data =

rating: 1.=20

Felde's observations are strong evidence that there were two Oswalds in =

the Marine Corps at the same time. Significance rating: 1.

New Orleans, Louisiana (fall 1957 through spring 1958) - According to =

the official records and other witnesses, Oswald had been in the Marine =

Corps from October 1956 to September 1959. In August 1957 he was sent =

overseas to serve as a radar operator in Japan and the Philippines. He =

did not come back until November 1958, when he was sent to California. =

Yet there is strong evidence that a Second Oswald had been working in =

New Orleans during that same time period at the Pfisterer Dental =

Laboratory.

Sometime in the fall of 1957, Lee Harvey Oswald came to work for =

Pfisterer. As a dental messenger, he gave satisfactory service to his =

employers. He was called by his first name "Lee." Whenever there was a =

delivery to make, Mr. Williamson would call him up to the counter and =

give him a small cardboard box with a new set of dentures and some =

paperwork. He put the box in a tote bag (something which all the dental =

messengers had) and proceeded to make the delivery.

There were four other messengers, but the one who talked with him the =

most was Palmer McBride. He and Oswald discussed what was happening =

around the world. However, the two subjects that Oswald really cared =

about was communism and the Soviet Union. When it came to personal =

matters, he was quiet and reserved, giving very few details. He did say =

that he was a native of New Orleans and that he went to Beauregard =

Junior High and Warren Easton High School. He also said that he was =

living with his mother in the Senator Hotel directly across the street. =

He never said a word about having any brothers, living in New York or =

Texas, being in the military, or having an interest in firearms. Neither =

did he say anything about being in the Civil Air Patrol. This was a =

particularly odd omission, for he was quite aware that aviation was one =

of McBride's favorite subjects.

McBride and Oswald often talked about space exploration. Oswald loved to =

gloat about Russian space achievements. To him the launching of the =

Sputnik satellite on October 4, 1957 was proof of the superiority of =

communism over capitalism. On January 31, 1958, when a rocket from Cape =

Canaveral launched America's first satellite into space, Oswald was not =

impressed. He scorned the satellite as a mere toy of only 31 pounds =

compared to the Sputnik which was 184 pounds and the Sputnik II which =

was 1120 pounds.

McBride invited Oswald to come to an astronomy club meeting. Oswald was =

interested and called up the president of the club, William Wulf. Wulf =

invited him to his house, so they could talk about him becoming a =

member. McBride would be there too, for he often went to Wulf's house to =

look through the eight-inch telescope.

When work was over at 5:00, and before going to Wulf's house, Oswald =

told McBride he needed to go to the hotel to let his mother know where =

he was going. He asked McBride to come along, for he wanted to show him =

something. They crossed the street and went up the hotel staircase to =

the second floor. They entered his apartment, which was clean and tidy =

but not plush. They saw Oswald's mother who was on her way out. She was =

going to the store to get some groceries. She was identical to the woman =

seen in Dallas in November 1963.=20

After she left, Oswald went to the bookcase and pulled out two books. =

One of them was Das Kapital by Karl Marx and the other was the Communist =

Manifesto by Marx and Engels. He handed them to McBride and said that he =

got them from the public library. He was obviously proud to show them. =

They went outside again and caught the Jackson Street bus to the street =

where McBride lived. They walked into the house and were greeted by =

McBride's mother. When dinner was over, there was still some time left =

before they had to go to Wulf's house. Since both shared a love for =

classical music, they went to McBride's room and listened to a Beethoven =

record, the Fifth Symphony.

While listening to the music, they talked again about the Soviet Union =

and the United States. Oswald said that he liked Khrushchev and thought =

that he was sincere in his efforts to improve the lot of the workers in =

Russia. McBride said that he liked Eisenhower. In spite of his advanced =

age and military background, he was doing a pretty good job at =

maintaining peace between the superpowers. His only failing as far as =

McBride could see was his lethargy regarding the space program. To these =

generally favorable remarks, McBride expected Oswald to counter with his =

usual sarcastic retorts. What came out instead was utterly astounding. =

Oswald said that Eisenhower deserved to be killed, for he was exploiting =

the working people. Then he made a statement to the effect that he would =

like to kill the President himself. In spite of the earnestness by which =

this threat was made, McBride did not take it seriously. It seemed to be =

an isolated outburst of pent-up frustration, an overly emphatic way of =

expressing a strong opinion.=20

Later that evening they took the bus to Wulf's house. The three talked =

about astronomy in general, and Wulf was surprised by how little Oswald =

knew about the subject. He told him that his ignorance would hamper him =

in the club, for he would not know what was going on. But Oswald =

persisted in his desire to join the club.=20

At the next meeting at Wulf's house, Oswald was in attendance listening =

quietly. When it was over and as the members of the club were leaving to =

go home, Oswald went to the bookcase to look at the history books. Since =

Wulf was also interested in history, the two struck up a conversation. =

McBride, who was standing by, listened in. This discussion turned into =

an argument that lasted three hours. Oswald's political and economic =

views were to "the left of Socialism." He sympathized with the Red =

Chinese and favored the admission of China into the United Nations. The =

transition to communism in Russia was inevitable and he glorified the =

virtues of the Soviet Union. He claimed that the United States was not =

telling the truth about the Russian way of life. To this Wulf asked =

sarcastically, "If you like Russia so much, why don't you go over =

there?"

At this point, Mr. Wulf, William's father, came into the room. Mr. Wulf, =

a former tank commander in the German army who fought on the Russian =

front during World War II, interrupted Oswald to tell him that he did =

not want him to make such remarks. He could well remember all the =

trouble the Communists caused in Germany during the 1920's. To this =

Oswald asked, "And what is so wrong with communism?" The impudence of =

this question touched off a big shouting match between Mr. Wulf and =

Oswald. Finally Mr. Wulf took Oswald by the arm, led him to the door and =

told him to get out. After he was gone, he warned his son never to bring =

that boy back to the house again.

Subsequently, McBride decided to curtail his association with Oswald. He =

still got into discussions with him at work, but he no longer invited =

him out for social activities.

Sometime during the spring of 1958, Oswald said he would be moving to =

Fort Worth with his mother. He gave his employers a two-week notice.

About a month after he left, a letter from Oswald came to the Pfisterer =

Dental Laboratory. Mr. Williamson read the letter to all the employees. =

The letter said that he had found a job in Fort Worth as a shoe =

salesman. It also mentioned that he got into trouble at a disturbance on =

a high school campus regarding Negroes or Communists. That was the last =

time McBride heard anything about him until November 22, 1963.=20

Evaluation: It is obvious that Oswald made a big impression on McBride, =

and McBride remembers a considerable amount of detail about him. He also =

has a very good grasp of dates and is positive that he knew Oswald after =

Sputnik (October 1957). His friend William Wulf, when questioned by the =

Warren Commission, said he knew Oswald in 1956 (before the Marine Corps =

period). Armstrong and Robert Groden visited Wulf not long ago and asked =

him to reconstruct chronologically his years of 1956 through 1958. Wulf =

acknowledged at that time that he would have to have known Oswald in the =

year 1958 (during the Marine Corps period). Whether or not we accept =

this statement that contradicts what he said to the Warren Commission in =

1964, at the very least it neutralizes a key source for the contention =

that Oswald was at Pfisterer in 1956.=20

Another source indicating that Oswald was at Pfisterer in 1956 is a W-2 =

recovered from Ruth Paine's house. However, this W-2 is fraudulent =

because the employee identification number that appears on it could not =

have been issued until January 1964. The fact that someone had resorted =

to forged documents not only negates the second main source for the =

contention that Oswald was at Pfisterer in 1956 but it further bolsters =

the truth of McBride's claim that he knew Oswald in 1957 and 1958. Data =

rating: 1.=20

McBride's information clearly shows that there was one Oswald in New =

Orleans while another Oswald was in the Marine Corps at the same time. =

Armstrong is therefore right in declaring that McBride is the most =

significant witness in establishing the case for two Oswalds. =

Significance rating: 1.

Monterrey, Mexico (September 1962) - Donald P. Norton first told Jim =

Garrison about his contacts with Lee Harvey Oswald in July 1967. Born in =

1932 and educated in Georgia, Norton entered the Air Force in 1949 to be =

a musician in the Air Force Band in Washington, D.C. Personal =

indiscretions led to his being discharged in 1952. In 1957 he got a job =

playing at the officers club at Fort Benning, Georgia.=20

It was at this time that a CIA man recruited Norton to spy on generals =

and other high officials who attended parties at which he played and =

point out any homosexuals among them.=20

In 1958, he was given the assignment to contact a man named Hugh =

Pharris. The meeting took place at the airport in Atlanta, at which time =

Pharris gave Norton a sum of money to transport to Cuba. Pharris was an =

alias for David Ferrie, a man who knew Lee Harvey Oswald, Guy Bannister =

and Clay Shaw. Ferrie was wearing sunglasses and wore a very sloppy wig. =

He gave Norton a sample case of phonograph records, which he wanted =

Norton to take to Carlo Media, a Cuban TV star. Media was also working =

for the CIA at this time against the Batista regime. Ferrie said "it" =

was in the case, meaning $150,000 that he was to deliver to Media. After =

he made the delivery, he returned to Atlanta and reported to his CIA =

contact.=20

In 1960 Norton went to New Orleans and saw Ferrie a second time at a =

club with a reputation of being a homosexual hangout.=20

Another assignment took him to the Hotel Yamajel in Monterrey, Mexico in =

September of 1962. As soon as he registered at the hotel, in his own =

name, he was immediately met by a man named Harvey Lee. They went into =

the bar and had a couple of beers. Harvey Lee was slight in build and =

casually dressed. He refused to look Norton in the eye. He said he came =

from New Orleans. Harvey Lee was identical to Lee Harvey Oswald except =

his hair was not as thin as the Oswald displayed by the Dallas police =

after the assassination of President Kennedy. Norton turned over $50,000 =

to Oswald for revolutionary activities against Castro. In return Oswald =

gave Norton a case of documents contained in manila envelopes, the =

nature of which Norton did not know. Norton then drove from Monterey to =

Calgary, Alberta, where he became a TV personality.=20

Norton also knew Clay Shaw. In 1965, Norton went to Albany, GA, where he =

was contacted by his CIA friend. It was in Albany, that he saw Shaw =

talking with James A. Gray, an extreme right-winger, at a country club =

known as the Double Gate Country Club. After speaking with Shaw, Gray =

spoke with Norton and offered to get Norton established in Albany by =

lending him $6,000. Norton took the loan, which was paid back for him by =

way of a surreptitious payment, presumably the CIA.=20

Evaluation: The only source for establishing the fact that Oswald was in =

Monterrey in September 1962 is Norton, a CIA agent. Since intelligence =

agents of all sorts are notoriously unreliable, this reduces the quality =

of the data of this episode. It does appear that Norton was trying to =

get out of the CIA and by doing so he had to expose himself as a =

homosexual, a hazardous thing to do at that time. This fact would =

justify including him in this catalog. Data rating: 3.

At the time Norton encountered Oswald, records show that Oswald was =

working in Fort Worth for the Leslie Welding Company. It is possible =

that Oswald may have taken a weekend to conduct some spy business with =

Norton. Of course Marina Oswald may say that Oswald was at home every =

weekend, yet her statements cannot be trusted. Thus this episode has low =

significance in establishing two Oswalds. Significance rating: 3.

Sparta, Wisconsin (March 29, 1963) - The town of Sparta, Wisconsin is =

over nine hundred miles from the city of Dallas, Texas, yet it was here =

that Lee Harvey Oswald went into John Abbott's barbershop on March 29, =

1963.=20

Between 6:00 and 6:30 pm, a man came in and said he wanted a haircut and =

a shave. He had about two days' of hair growth on his face. John Abbott =

introduced himself and asked the man by what name he could address him. =

He said his name was Lee Harvey Oswald. He was from Texas and he had =

arrived in Sparta by the westbound train. He had a wife in Dallas, whom =

he had deceived into thinking that he was still in Texas looking for a =

job. He had intended to go to La Crosse, but he mistakenly got off the =

train in Sparta thinking he had reached his destination. The next train =

to La Crosse would not arrive until the next day, so Oswald decided to =

find a room for the night at the Nicolet Hotel.=20

Being in Sparta reminded him of an acquaintance in Dallas, who used to =

live in this town. He asked the barber if he knew anyone by the name of =

Philip Hemstock? Abbott was surprised to hear that name, for Hemstock =

had been one of his closest friends, ever since they were small boys in =

a nearby town called Cataract. After they had grown up, Hemstock moved =

down to Texas. Over the years, the two friends had lost touch with one =

another.=20

While speaking about the town, Abbott said that it was a decent place to =

live and that there was a lot of pretty countryside to be seen around =

there. Oswald refused to agree to this. He had been in Russia and said =

that there was not one inch of landscape in the entire United States =

that can compare with that of Russia. Abbott asked him how he happened =

to go to Russia, and he said that he was sent over there at his request =

by the U.S. government. He liked the philosophy of the Russians, and =

would have remained there, but he was disappointed and angry by their =

treatment of him. He expected to get the red carpet treatment and maybe =

some big, important job. Instead they gave him some menial job in a =

factory. Rather than endure this humiliation, he decided to come back to =

the United States.

When he was asked how he happened to be traveling in Wisconsin, he said =

that he had people to see. In fact, his overnight stay in Sparta was =

making him miss a speech by one of these "people" in Wausau that very =

night. By way of explanation, the "people" he was referring to was the =

President and the Governors of the States. He would follow them around =

and listen to their speeches.

Abbott was curious how he could travel around the country and still have =

money to spend. Oswald told him that he got his money by blackmailing a =

Texas nightclub operator, for whom he had previously worked. Each time =

he made a contact with this man, he would get fifty dollars. (He never =

gave the name of the nightclub operator.) The money he obtained would be =

used to cover his traveling expenses. Whenever he was ready to embark on =

a journey, he would first plan out all the places where he wanted to go. =

He then went to the Western Union office, and purchased money orders =

which he would mail to himself in various cities. Whenever he came to =

one of his destinations, he would go to the local Western Union office =

and pick up his money. In this way, he always had cash wherever he went. =

To prevent anyone from following this paper trail, he would use a =

combination of different signatures and aliases. He boasted that he was =

capable of writing seventeen different signatures.=20

As Abbott was cutting his hair, he noticed a scar behind the left ear. =

It was a mastoidectomy scar. He happened to notice it because as a =

barber he used the mastoid bone as a guide, and he recalled that its =

absence required him to work around it. When he had finished cutting his =

hair and began to shave his face, he noticed a second scar on the left =

jaw, a narrow scar about an inch long that ran along the jaw line, about =

midway between the front of the chin and the ear. Its slightly raised =

surface area required a little more care with the razor to avoid nicking =

it, and he made the comment "Oh man, you must have hurt yourself bad, =

when you got this scar." Oswald said that he got it when he was in the =

military. He was in the process of loading an airplane, when the hatch =

came down on him and "busted" his jaw. It had been a compound fracture, =

broken in two places. He was angry at the U.S. government for "defacing" =

him, and someday he was going to initiate a lawsuit. To Abbott's eyes, =

he did not think it was enough of a disfigurement to make a lawsuit =

worthwhile.

When the barber was finished, Oswald paid for his haircut and shave and =

left the shop. He was seen going in the direction of the hotel entrance, =

where presumably he spent the night.

Two days later, according to an FBI report, Abbott happened to stop by =

Max's Cafe, where he saw Philip Hemstock's mother, Iris Thompson, who =

worked as a cook in the restaurant. (She is now deceased.) Abbott told =

her about an unsavory character, who came into his shop on Friday and =

said that he knew her son. Mrs. Thompson saw him too, and she said that =

she did not like the kind of person her son had for a friend.

On Friday November 29, after the assassination, Abbott got a surprise =

visit at his barbershop. His old friend Philip Hemstock was back in =

town. He was accompanied by his son Kelly, and they came to the =

barbershop to have Abbott cut their hair. Philip said that he came to =

Sparta to see his mother for Thanksgiving. He left Dallas by car with =

his wife and children the previous Saturday, which was the day after the =

President was killed. The Hemstock family left the following day.=20

On December 4 Hemstock was approached by two FBI agents in Dallas, who =

wanted to ask him three questions. First, why did he leave Dallas to go =

to Sparta the day after the assassination? Second, what did he talk =

about with John Abbott? Lastly, did he ever know Oswald? In reply to =

these questions, he said that he went up to Wisconsin to see his mother. =

When he was in the barbershop, he and Abbott talked about the =

assassination, but no mention was made about Oswald coming to Sparta. =

Finally, he said that he never knew Oswald, nor heard his name until =

after the assassination.

Evaluation: John Abbott is the main source of information on this =

incident. He is corroborated by his brother David, who also worked in =

the barbershop. The strange behavior of his friend Philip Hemstock also =

provides confirmation of the reality of this incident. Data rating: 1.

This incident in Sparta may have involved a second Oswald, perhaps Lee, =

because Harvey was still working at Jaggers, Chiles, Stovall (JCS). On =

March 29, he came into work at 8:00 am and left at 5:45 pm. He worked =

the next day, Saturday, March 30, from 7:45 am to 4:30 pm. Also his =

paycheck for that week shows that he worked the hours that he had =

recorded on his timecards. However, Dr. Jerry Rose pointed out some =

irregularities with his paychecks. It is also known that JCS is somewhat =

spooky, doing work for the Army Mapping Service. Although paychecks =

normally constitute solid evidence, in the case of JCS there are reasons =

to question documentation stemming from that company.=20

If it is true that Oswald was in Sparta, Wisconsin while at the same =

time working for JCS, then this would be a significant episode =

establishing the two Oswalds. However, another explanation is that =

Oswald generated false timecards with the blessing of the JCS management =

and was then allowed to go where he chose to go. This possibility =

reduces the value of this episode in proving there were two Oswalds. =

Significance rating: 2.

Montreal, Canada (Summer 1963) - To dramatize the need to end the Cold =

War by unilateral nuclear disarmament and also to reduce tensions with =

Cuba, members of the Committee for Non-Violent Action (CNVA) had =

conceived the idea of delivering its message via a walking tour from =

Canada to Cuba, beginning in Quebec and proceeding to Washington, D.C. =

and on to Miami, Florida. From Miami, they would take a boat to Havana, =

Cuba. From there they would walk 700 miles to the U.S. Naval Base at =

Guantanamo and hold their final demonstration, calling for the closure =

of the base. Covering an average of 15 miles a day, they would stop at =

various towns or cities along the way, where they would give speeches or =

pass out leaflets. They carried signs, which bore the peace symbol - an =

upside-down broken cross within a circle - and messages such as "Your =

conscience demands it - REFUSE to serve in the ARMED FORCES." Other =

signs reflected a concern for the problem of Cuba: "Soviet Troops and =

U.S. Marines: Leave Cuba" and "Demand Freedom to Visit Cuba." Anyone =

sympathetic to the cause would be invited to join the walk as far as =

they wanted.

The project started in Quebec City on May 26. By June 9 they were in =

Montreal, where they spent several days doing demonstrations. It was =

here that the walkers had Oswald among them for the first time. Oswald =

was among those who paraded in front of the U.S. Consulate in a =

"ban-the-bomb" demonstration. Aurilien Chasse, the senior U.S. Customs =

Representative said that his office was contacted by several persons who =

saw Oswald, wearing a U.S. Navy uniform, distributing pamphlets for the =

Fair Play for Cuba Committee (FPCC) at a small park on the corner of St. =

Jacques and McGill Streets. One person who reported to Chasse was an =

investigator for Customs and Excise named Jean Paul Tremblay. He had a =

special reason to be interested in Oswald because he was working on =

cases involving Cuba at the time. He saw Oswald with two men of about =

the same age and height as Oswald, one being a little taller with a =

freckled face. A third person with Oswald was a short, homely woman who =

took unusually long strides when she walked. Tremblay contacted Oswald =

and received a pamphlet from him. According to one citizen in Seattle, =

Oswald was seen with the head of the FPCC in Montreal.

In an attempt to counter Chasse's letter regarding the Oswald sighting =

in Montreal, an April 8, 1964 letter was written to the Warren =

Commission from J. Edgar Hoover, which said: "For your information, the =

records of the William Reilly and Company, Incorporated, New Orleans, =

Louisiana, reflect that Oswald was on the job Monday through Friday of =

the week June 3 through 7, 1963, and that he was also on the job all of =

the following week, June 10 through 14, 1963."=20

Evaluation: There seems to be some confusion about when Oswald was in =

Montreal. According to the Hoover letter, it would appear that Oswald =

was there in June when the peace walkers were there. However, other =

sources put Tremblay's encounter with Oswald in August.

The sources mentioned above who saw Oswald were working for the =

government. Tremblay and Chaisse may have had their own agenda for =

reporting Oswald's presence in Montreal, especially Tremblay who was =

dealing with cases involving Cuba. Such government involvement in an =

Oswald sighting decreases the quality of the data. Data rating: 2.

If it is true that Oswald was in Montreal while at the same time working =

for Reilly, then this would be a significant episode establishing the =

two Oswalds. However, as in the case of JCS, Reilly was a spooky company =

where false documentation can be generated in service of intelligence =

organizations. Oswald could have generated false timecards with the =

approval of Reilly management and was then allowed to go where he =

wanted. This possibility reduces the value of this episode in proving =

there were two Oswalds. Significance rating: 2.

Rhinelander, Wisconsin (July 15, 1963) - Rhinelander is north of Sparta, =

within a scenic area filled with lakes and streams. On July 15, 1963 =

Oswald was seen was at a two-story wooden frame building located on the =

northeast corner of Brown Street and Frederick. The main business =

establishment occupying the building was Onson's Restaurant. Upstairs on =

the second floor were a number of apartments, which Mr. Onson rented out =

to summer residents staying in town. Next to the restaurant on the =

Frederick Street side of the building was a taxi station. Also in the =

same building at 62 N. Brown Street was Budreau's Music and Appliance =

Store.=20

It was a warm, bright Monday morning in July when Candy Tetzlaff heard =

the jingling of the bell over the door. She looked up and saw a slender =

young man, in his early twenties, neatly groomed and dressed. He seemed =

to be in a hurry, for his manner was brisk and straight-to-business. He =

said that he wanted to buy a radio.

Since Candy did not know how to handle the paperwork of audio equipment =

sales, she called for her employer, Margaret Budreau, who was then =

working in the back part of the store. When Mrs. Budreau came up to the =

counter, she asked the man how she could be of service to him. He said =

that he would like to buy a portable radio.

Mrs. Budreau brought out a Motorola model and put it on the counter. The =

man wanted to hear how it sounded, so a set of batteries was placed =

inside and the power was turned on. Having satisfied himself with its =

functional performance, he was still not ready to purchase it. He said =

he needed to bring in his wife to get her opinion.

He went outside and soon came back in, leading his wife into the store. =

She was a few inches shorter than the man and she was obviously =

pregnant. She wore a maternity-style dress and, like the man, was neatly =

groomed and respectable-looking. When she began speaking to the man, she =

used words that were completely unintelligible to Mrs. Budreau. The man =

responded in kind. They were not speaking English, but rather they were =

using some unrecognizable foreign language. As the man spoke, he =

apparently was showing the woman how to turn on the radio and adjust the =

volume control by rotating a knob. Then he demonstrated how she could =

tune into different radio stations by adjusting another knob. After this =

brief lesson, she spoke some words that sounded like approval, turned =

around and casually ambled back to the front door. She opened it and =

went outside.

The man turned to Mrs. Budreau and said that he was ready to buy the =

radio. Mrs. Budreau then wrote out a sales slip. The total price was =

$47.33, which included sales tax and the cost of one dollar for a set of =

batteries. To complete the paperwork, Mrs. Budreau needed the man's name =

and address for the ninety-day warranty. When she asked him for this =

information, she was surprised by his adamant refusal. He said that he =

did not want to give his name and address and that he did not want the =

warranty. Mrs. Budreau told him that the warranty was for his own =

protection. If the radio was faulty, he could return it to the store and =

get another one or get his money back. The man became indignant and said =

that the warranty would be no good to him, for he was not a resident of =

Rhinelander, he was just a traveler passing through the area; therefore =

he would not be able to return it to the store, should there be a =

problem with it. Mrs. Budreau patiently told him that it was a Motorola =

policy to have a record of warranty on every radio that the store sold. =

At this he finally said, "My name is Homer Walker,( ??) Jr. and I'm from =

Texas and that's enough."

Mrs. Budreau duly noted down this information on the sales slip. The =

next procedure would have been to put the radio back in its box along =

with a copy of the sales slip. But the man did not want to bother with =

the box. He took the radio and the sales slip, headed for the front door =

and was gone. This however would not be the last time he would be in the =

store.

After he left, Margaret went to the back room where her son and her =

husband were working. They had not seen the couple, but they had heard =

the whole conversation. The three of them had a discussion concerning =

the language that the couple used. It was definitely not French or =

German, for they would have recognized those languages. Could the =

language have been eastern European? Or was it possibly Russian?

Sometime in the early afternoon, Margaret undertook the job of =

re-decorating the shop windows. She hardly began working on this =

project, when she looked through the window and had her attention drawn =

to a car parked in front of the store in one of the angle parking spaces =

that ran along the sidewalk curb. It was a solid-colored, deep blue =

sedan, possibly a Buick, made in the late 1950's. Sitting in the front =

seat and clearly visible through the front windshield was the pregnant =

wife of the man who bought the radio. There was also a little girl in =

the car, about one or two years old. She was a very active child, =

bouncing up and down on the seat, and crawling from the front seat to =

the rear seat and then back to the front seat again.

Mrs. Budreau then wondered where the man was. Perhaps there was =

something wrong with the car and he had gone somewhere looking for help. =

This possibility became less likely as the afternoon hours wore on - =

1:00, 2:00, 3:00. The man still had not returned. During that whole time =

the woman and the little girl did not leave the car. Or rather, almost =

the whole time, for there were two or three times when they got out of =

the car and went into the restaurant next door. A few moments later they =

returned to the car and got back inside. Presumably they went inside =

only to use the restroom facilities. Their movements from the car to the =

restaurant and then from restaurant to the car were noiseless and =

inconspicuous; it seemed as if the woman was trying to keep people from =

noticing them. It was curious that she would rather be cooped up inside =

the car with her bored little daughter, when she could be out doing =

something, such as window shopping or even just walking around the block =

to get some exercise.

Margaret Budreau's curiosity about this family began to change into =

suspicion. Having finished with the windows, she went inside and =

retrieved the Motorola X51 sales slip. Upon it she wrote the number of =

the car.

With other business to occupy her, she paid no more attention to the =

woman and the little girl sitting in the car. The late afternoon hours =

passed by one by one, until it came time to close the store at 5:00. One =

of the last things Margaret Budreau had to do was to count the cash in =

the cash register. A few minutes before closing time, she heard the bell =

over the door and looked up to see the man who claimed to be Homer Wyley =

( ?? see above b.m.) come inside. In his hand was the radio he bought =

that morning. Mrs. Budreau saw that she could not avoid the prospect of =

staying overtime with a customer who had previously manifested a =

disagreeable attitude. When she saw the man put the radio on the =

counter, she asked him if there was something wrong with it. No, he =

said, there was nothing wrong with it. He just came in to purchase an =

extra set of batteries. That was all he wanted. Mrs. Budreau got the =

batteries and put them into a sack. The man paid a dollar for them, took =

the sack and the radio, and left the store.

The Budreaus thought no more about him until four months later, when the =

President had been killed. They learned that the man's name was Lee =

Harvey Oswald and his wife was named Marina. The little girl was their =

daughter June. A second daughter was born to Marina on October 20, and =

she was given the name Rachel.

Evaluation: The witnesses who establish that this incident occurred were =

Margaret Budreau, Candy Tetzlaff, Chet Budreau, and Chet Budreau, Jr. =

There is no reason to doubt the credibility of these witnesses. Data =

rating: 1.

The incident in Rhinelander may have involved a second Oswald because on =

July 15, Oswald was working for the William Reilly Coffee Company in New =

Orleans, as a maintenance man, oiling and greasing the machinery for =

making coffee. On July 15, he came into work at 8:19 in the morning and =

he left at 5:00 in the evening. Maintenance records in Oswald's =

handwriting showed that he was there that day.=20

If it is true that Oswald was in Rhinelander while at the same time =

working for Reilly, then this would be a significant episode =

establishing the two Oswalds. However, another explanation is that =

Oswald generated false timecards with the approval of Reilly management =

and was then allowed to go where he wanted. This possibility reduces the =

value of this episode in proving there were two Oswalds. Significance =

rating: 2.

Scranton, Pennsylvania (July 22 through 25, 1963) - After the peace =

walkers left Montreal, they reached the border of the United States by =

the latter part of June. They reached Scranton, Pennsylvania on July 22 =

and spent several days there doing demonstrations on a street corner of =

Courthouse Square. A 47-year-old minister named Irwin Tucker had been =

listening to the demonstrators, because he was interested in hearing =

their views. Oswald was among this group passing out leaflets. Tucker =

remembered him in particular, for he got into a heated discussion with =

him. Oswald kept "running down the country" and he was arguing that =

"President Kennedy was not doing right by Cuba." Tucker lost his =

patience with this unpatriotic tirade and told the young man (whom he =

later identified as Oswald after November 22) that if liked Castro's =

Cuba so much, he ought to move over there.

The Warren Commission was aware of these peace walkers for during the =

hearings Wesley Liebeler asked Michael Paine if he knew anything about =

George Lakey or Dennis Jamieson or the Committee for Non-Violent Action. =

Paine gave a vague and contradictory response, saying he was familiar =

with these people but then he changed his mind and said he was not =

familiar with them. George Lakey was the executive secretary of the =

Friends Peace Committee and he served as the principal host for the =

peace walkers during their stay in Philadelphia. Dennis Jamieson was the =

chairman of the Friends Peace Committee and he served as chief publicist =

for the march as it went through Pennsylvania. In a Scranton news =

article, a photo of a group of peace walkers on the steps of the YMCA, =

Jamieson can be seen holding a sign that read =

"Quebec-Washington-Guantanamo Walk for Peace."

Evaluation: Irwin Tucker is the main source for the information of this =

incident. The news reports mentioned Anthony Batsavage, Superintendent =

of Police in Scranton, who vouched for Tucker's veracity. Data rating: =

1.

This incident in Scranton may have involved a second Oswald for at the =

time Oswald was supposed to be in New Orleans, although unemployed. It =

is possible that the Oswald who was supposed to be in New Orleans made =

an otherwise unknown trip to Scranton in order to promote his views on =

Cuba. This possibility reduces the value of this episode in proving =

there were two Oswalds. Significance rating: 3.

San Antonio, Texas (September 5, 1963) -Oswald along with his wife =

Marina made an appearance at the terminal building of the San Antonio =

International Airport on Thursday, September 5, 1963. Inside the glass =

and concrete structure were four different airlines: American, Eastern, =

Continental, and Braniff. Out front was a big parking lot which in 1963 =

was free to the public. Off to one side of the building was a covered, =

open-air baggage area, where travelers could pick up their suitcases and =

bags. Nearby and parked along the curb were four to six taxicabs of the =

Yellow Cab Company. A taxicab dispatch office occupied a section of the =

terminal building. Near the dispatch office was another office with a =

sign out front that said "Car Rentals" followed by an arrow.

The car rental office was tiny. It had a glass front and two glass =

doors. Inside was a counter about twenty-one feet long, divided by two =

plastic partitions. Above the counter hung three signs. As customers =

came in, they would see from left to right: Avis, National Car, and =

Hertz. Behind the counter and sitting on stools were three women, each =

wearing the cap and uniform of the company she was representing. The two =

bigger companies, Avis and Hertz, each had counter space of about eight =

feet, whereas National Car was sandwiched in with five feet. Behind the =

counter was a distance of six feet to the back wall. In front of the =

counter was a narrow space of only three feet. Not many people could get =

inside the office, but that was hardly ever a problem. Usually only one =

or two customers would be renting cars at any one time. Most people who =

came in were airline travelers who already had reservations. Walk-in =

customers formed but a small fraction of the business.

The afternoon of Thursday, September 5, was hot and sunny. The =

temperature was well into the 90's. The date was an unforgettable one =

for the Hertz agent, Martha J. Doyle, for it happened to be her =

birthday. She started her shift at 3:00 pm, and she was glad to get into =

an air-conditioned office. Also starting at the same time were Joanne =

Dunsmore, who worked for National Car, and Linda Meyers, who worked for =

Avis. The three women were good friends, even though the companies they =

worked for were highly competitive.=20

It was about 5:00 in the afternoon when Martha noticed through the front =

glass a couple approaching from the right. This direction meant =

something to her, for people coming from the right hardly ever stopped =

in. The big parking lot was to the right and anyone coming from that =

direction usually had their own means of transportation. Those who came =

from the left were airline travelers just getting off the planes.=20

Martha watched as the man opened the door nearest the Hertz side of the =

counter and allowed his wife to pass through. Draped on her folded arms =

was a blanket, and cradled in the blanket was a baby girl. The man and =

the woman were a seedy-looking pair, dressed in shabby clothing - an odd =

contrast to the well-groomed clientele which usually came in to rent =

cars. Judging by their appearance alone, Martha was certain that she did =

not want to do business with them. Nevertheless, for politeness sake, =

she would treat them in the same way that she treated all her walk-in =

customers.

The man was about 27 years old, had light brown hair, weighed 140 to 150 =

pounds and stood about five feet, eight inches tall. He was wearing a =

long-sleeve shirt that must have been white at one time but now had a =

dingy grayish tint to it. He was definitely the dominant one, for he did =

all the talking. The woman said not a single word. She had a big smile =

on her face, which never changed or relaxed and grew more disturbing as =

the minutes went by. At close range, this odd smile gave Martha an =

inescapable view of some ugly-looking teeth. She noticed a brownish =

stain on them, probably due to a smoking habit, and the two upper front =

teeth were slightly chipped. The woman was about the same age as the =

man, stood about three inches shorter, and weighed about 125 pounds. Her =

hair was almost black in color, parted in the middle, and combed in a =

severely tight fashion toward the back. Martha could not see how it was =

arranged behind her head, but it was probably tied into a bun. She wore =

a white blouse and a dark skirt. The skirt went halfway between the =

knees and ankles and the material looked too heavy for the hot weather. =

Her overall appearance was that of foreigner who had just entered the =

country.

The baby in her arms was fast asleep. She was about three months old, =

and she was wearing a short summer outfit, which left her legs =

uncovered. Martha thought she looked beautiful. Her complexion was fair, =

and her hair was light blonde. Indeed her hair was so blonde that Martha =

could scarcely believe that the dark-haired woman could be her mother. =

Then Martha glanced at the light brownish color of the man's hair and =

satisfied herself that the hair color must have come from his side.

The man said he wanted to rent a car. He did not have any =

identification. Without identification, Martha told him, he could not =

rent a car. She then asked him what kind of work he did. He said he was =

in the publishing business.

"Do you mean magazines?" Martha asked politely.

"No, schoolbooks."=20

At the mention of schoolbooks, Martha almost reconsidered her initial =

decision to turn down his request to rent a car. There was after all a =

great deal of money in that line of work. However, in spite of the =

lucrativeness of the schoolbook business, she turned him down.

The man accepted this decision without a word of complaint. He turned =

and opened the door. He went outside, holding the door open as his wife =

followed him out. After they were gone, they became a topic of =

conversation between Martha and Joanne. A few minutes later, they saw =

the strange couple through the window. The man took a pacifier out of =

the baby's mouth and put it in his own mouth. This increased Martha's =

curiosity to such an extent, that she felt compelled to go outside to =

see what else he was going to do. But getting outside was a not a =

straightforward thing to do. Even though the front door was almost =

within her reach, there was no way of getting around the counter. She =

had to go through the back door. She opened it and went into a hallway, =

turning right. She walked to the end of the hallway and opened a door on =

the right hand side leading into the taxicab dispatch office. She went =

through the office and opened the front door. When she finally reached =

the baggage area, the family was nowhere to be seen. Perhaps one of the =

cab drivers had seen something. She went up to a passenger side window =

and leaned her head in and asked if he saw the couple. He did. He =

noticed that the man putting a pacifier in his mouth, then took it out =

and threw it on the ground.

Martha learned nothing more about this man until two and a half months =

later when she saw his picture in the newspaper after the assassination. =

Evaluation: This incident was observed by three women in the car rental =

office. Data rating: 1.

At this time Lee and Marina were supposed to be in New Orleans, although =

it is possible that they could have made a surreptitious trip together =

to San Antonio. Significance rating: 2.

Dallas, Texas (October 23, 1963) - Mrs. Walker said that she is =

convinced that she spent two hours with Oswald between 8 and 10 pm on =

Thursday, about 7 days before Halloween. She was supposed to be out =

calling for her church on a visitation program but a girl friend, Helen =

Sexton, wanted to run around so she took her to the residence of Harold =

Zotch.=20

On this particular occasion Junior Biggs was at Zotch's house and =

introduced her to Oswald Lee, who is identical with Lee Harvey Oswald. =

She stated that Lee received a telephone call soon after she arrived and =

his only comment on the telephone was "Yeah." Later, Lee told Walker he =

was working at either the Texas Book Store or Taylor Book Store and he =

had been working there only 8 days. Junior Biggs commented that Walker =

did not have to worry about Lee's wife, as she lived in Irving, Texas, =

Lee stated he had a room in Oak Cliff. Later on some mention was made of =

coffee and Biggs said Lee made real good coffee, and mentioned he had =

been to Lee's room. Walker asked Lee what nationality he was and Biggs =

answered for him saying, "He is a Barbarian." Walker asked what =

Barbarian was and Biggs replied, "You've read about the Romans, haven't =

you?" Walker still did not know what he meant but dropped the inquiry.=20

During the evening, Biggs stated Lee was writing a book and would have =

it finished by Thanksgiving. Lee told Walker the book was about life =

inside Russian and he claimed to have been there. During this period, =

Lee was only drinking coffee, while others were drinking beer and =

whiskey. During the later part of the visit, Lee received another phone =

call and said, "It's about time, ain't it?" Thereafter he was on the =

phone for 15 to 30 minutes, mostly listening, and occasionally =

interjecting "Yeah." About 10 pm Lee left with a tall, dark-headed young =

man who was driving an old model car. He had come for Lee. Walker could =

not further describe him.=20

Walker described Oswald as 24 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches, 140 pounds, =

medium complexion, dark eyes, dark brown hair slicked down, wearing old =

clothes, clean and neat having a dagger-with-a-snake tattoo on his left =

forearm. She asked him what this meant and he stated, "Don't tread on =

me." She then asked him what he meant by "tread" and he said "you know, =

don't step on me." The man she met looked younger than the man in the =

photo of Oswald at police station. She asked Sexton if she recalled =

meeting Oswald, and Sexton replied that she was getting a divorce and =

had not time to get mixed up in anything else. Walker also asked Junior =

Biggs about this man and Junior claimed that that evening was the first =

and last time he had ever seen Lee. He frequented Zotch's home from =

February 1963 until Christmas 1963. He is originally from Michigan. She =

gives the number and address of Zotch's house in Grand Prairie.=20

The man who picked up Oswald was probably Michael Paine who was driving =

an old model Oldsmobile. That same evening Michael Paine was attending a =

meeting of the John Birch Society. Stevenson was in Dallas for UN Day.=20

Evaluation: Junior Biggs corroborated Mrs. Walker regarding the presence =

of Oswald at Zotch's house. Data rating: 1.

The fact that Oswald had a tattoo on his arm is significant, for the =

Oswald that was examined by Dr. Rose after his death at the hands of =

Jack Ruby had no such tattoo. This would be strong evidence that there =

were indeed two Oswalds. Significance rating: 1

Dallas, Texas (November 1963) - James Markham lived with his mother =

Helen at 328 E. Ninth Street. His mother worked as a waitress at the =

Eatwell Caf=E9 at 1404 Main Street. Jack Ruby and his friends George =

Senator and Jim Martin often ate there. (Jim Martin would eventually =

become Marina's business representative, with Marina staying at his =

house.) Helen Markham would take the bus at 1:00 pm in the afternoon =

which took her to the Eatwell. She left her son James to fend for =

himself.=20

On Saturday, November 9 James went to a bowling alley on Jefferson =

Street called Oak Cliff Lanes. There he met a man named Jerry Tolliver. =

He was a stout, muscular man who appeared to be able to lift weights. He =

was about 27 or 28 years old 5 ft 9 in tall, about 170 pounds. He had =

thinning black hair.=20

Three days later, on Tuesday, November 12, Markham was walking east on =

Jefferson Blvd. A car pulled up to the curb beside him and Tolliver was =

at the wheel. There was another man sitting on the passenger side. =

Tolliver leaned towards the passenger window and asked Markham where he =

was going. "To the Oak Cliff Grill" Markham replied. Tolliver told him =

to get in and he would take Markham over there. Markham got in the rear =

seat. The other man was introduced by Tolliver as "Ozzie" Several blocks =

later, Tolliver stopped the car at the Oak Cliff Grill and Markham got =

out. Then Tolliver and Ozzie drove away.=20

On Saturday, November 16, Markham had gone to Kidd Springs Park in order =

to do some fishing. Ozzie was at the park, who was alone just strolling =

through the park. The two men chatted about trivial matters for a short =

period of time and then they parted.=20

The following Monday James had gone to his brother William's house in =

the afternoon. William was sharing an apartment. on the second floor at =

the Monte Leon Apartment at 221 Lancaster Street. He loved to have =

parties and James would often come over to participate. There were two =

girls at the apartment, one of whom was named Barbara. William's =

roommate was also there, but William had not arrived yet. James went to =

the rear of the apartment and there was a car back there with four young =

men sitting in it, one of whom was Ozzie. The other three men were =

complete strangers to Markham and he had never seen them since. Markham =

talked with these persons. They asked Markham if there was way of making =

easy money. Various burglary jobs were discussed, but no definite plans =

were made. During this time Ozzie said nothing, after about an hour, =

Ozzie and the others left. Ozzie was not driving. James went back into =

the apartment to resume the party with the group there.=20

The following day, November 19, at about 3 pm Markham had walked alone =

to the Texas Theater to see a movie. Inside the theater was Ozzie and =

Tolliver He did not expect the pair to be there, but he did sit with =

them to see the movie. Afterwards, the three men walked to the Beckley =

Club on Jefferson. The three men sat in the club for about an hour, =

drinking soft drinks and chatting about various things. Markham said he =

was not working, because he had just finished serving time in prison. =

Ozzie asked Markham how he felt about that and Markham replied that he =

was rather bitter. While speaking of these matters Ozzie asked "How =

would you like to help me stun the nation?" By stunning the nation Ozzie =

meant killing the President during his forthcoming visit to Dallas. =

Markham thought Ozzie was just kidding around and paid no particular =

attention. They left the Beckley Club and walked together for about a =

block. Markham invited Tolliver and Ozzie to visit with him at his =

mother's house, sometime in the afternoon after his mother had left the =

apartment to go to work. They said that they would do so. They then =

split up with Markham walking in the direction of his mother's house and =

Ozzie and Tolliver going in a different direction. That was the last =

time that Markham saw Ozzie.=20

He was identical with Oswald. Markham did see Tolliver on two occasions =

after the assassination. These were not pre-arranged meetings. Markham =

ran into Tolliver by chance. On one of these occasions Markham asked =

Tolliver if had killed the President and Tolliver just laughed and did =

not answer. James had two friends who saw the Tippit shooting, William =

Arthur Smith and Jimmy Burt.=20

Evaluation: James Markham was a ne'r-do-well who got drunk and got into =

trouble with the law. However he was undeniably at the very heart of =

pre-assassination activities, especially those who later became =

witnesses of the Tippit shooting. Yet his statements remain =

uncorroborated. This is probably because of the great fear that =

descended upon all those who knew anything contrary to the official =

story of the Tippit shooting. Markham himself paid a price for his =

outspokenness, namely being thrown out a second story window by police =

officers who came to arrest him for a suspected robbery. His injuries =

were such that he had to be taken to the hospital. These considerations =

earn Markham a higher rating of credibility than he would normally =

deserve. Data rating: 2.

Markham saw and spoke to Ozzie (Oswald) on four separate occasions, =

Tuesday November 12, Saturday, November 16, Monday, November 18, and =

Tuesday, November 19. He may have encountered a Second Oswald, if we can =

trust the statements of Ruth Paine and Marina Oswald as well as the =

employee attendance records of the Texas School Book Depository. Since =

all three sources are questionable, these lower the significance of this =

event. Significance rating: 2.

Conclusion: From the foregoing, we see that the most significant =

episodes in terms of establishing the case for the two Oswalds are =

before the Russian period (1959-1962). I believe that these pre-1959 =

episodes are significant enough to constitute proof that there were =

indeed two Oswalds. The problems in finding significance in the later =

episodes probably reflect an intensification of efforts to monitor the =

Oswald and keep anomalous episodes from popping up that would alert =

people to their existence. Thus we the jury of the United States of =

America must commend John Armstrong for his research and we must now =

take it into consideration as we move ever closer to identifying the =

perpetrators of the assassination and bring them to justice. The future =

<P>When you pick up a book with the title <I>You are the Jury, November =

22,=20

1963</I>, authored by David Belin, you may think that you have found an=20

impartial presentation of the evidence regarding the guilt or innocence =

of Lee=20

Harvey Oswald in the assassination of President Kennedy. But as you skim =

through=20

it, you realize that the title is grossly misleading. What you find =

instead is a=20

highly selective offering of evidence and eyewitness testimony =

supporting the=20

official version: namely, that Oswald did it and Oswald did it alone. =

Witnesses=20

with a viewpoint inconvenient to the official version are omitted. </P>

<P>Yet Belin is right about one thing, we, the people of the United =

States of=20

America, do form a jury. The assassination of President Kennedy is a =

watershed=20

case that must be resolved or else justice and freedom in this country =

will=20

perish. If the perpetrators of this crime is not exposed and punished, =

an=20

imperial form of government will replace our constitutional government. =

If we=20

deem ourselves responsible citizens and not serfs then we should not =

rest until=20

those who committed this crime are brought to justice. Whether we like =

it or=20

not, we are a jury. We therefore must act like a jury, being open-minded =

and=20

alert in seeking the truth. We need to hear ALL the evidence, not just a =

part of=20

it. </P>

<P>The process of finding the truth has been ongoing from the first =

hours of the=20

aftermath of the assassination. We have been receiving pertinent =

evidence of the=20

assassination for over forty years now, mainly through off-mainstream =

books, a=20

few of which have even reached best-seller status. In 1966, Mark Lane =

published=20

<I>Rush to Judgment</I>. Lane interviewed important witnesses such as =

Sam=20

Holland, who was on the Triple Underpass and saw smoke rising from the =

grassy=20

knoll, Lee Bowers, the railroad terminal signal station man who saw a =

flash of=20

light behind the fence of the grassy knoll, Helen Markham who provided =

details=20

about the Tippit shooting that challenged the official view. In 1980 =

Anthony=20

Summers did some groundbreaking work with his book <I>Conspiracy,=20

</I>interviewing witnesses in New Orleans and establishing a connection =

to the=20

assassination through such right-wing intelligence fanatics as David =

Ferrie and=20

Guy Banister. In 1983 David Lifton wrote a book called <I>Best Evidence, =

</I>which gave us new information about the autopsy at Bethesda =

Hospital,=20

indicating a cover-up at the highest levels of government </P>

<P>In 2003, another great book on the assassination has appeared, =

written by=20

John Armstrong, called <I>Harvey and Lee.</I> He presents new witnesses =

who=20

confirm what most researchers have suspected all along: that there was a =

Second=20

Oswald. Just as we, the jury, did not dismiss Lane's witnesses or =

Summer's=20

witnesses, or Lifton's witnesses as confabulating cranks, so we must =

listen to=20

Armstrong's witnesses. Armstrong's book should be read in its entirety. =

However,=20

because of its huge size, a short paper highlighting the more prominent =

episodes=20

dealing with the case for two Oswalds can serve as an introduction.</P>

<P>At the end of each episode, there is an evaluation regarding (1) the =

data and=20

(2) the significance in establishing the theory that there were two =

Oswalds. The=20

two evaluations will be given ratings of 1 through 3. In the case of the =

data, 1=20

means data of the highest quality and 3 the poorest. In the case of=20

significance, 1 means highly significant and 3 means of low =

significance.</P><B>

<P>USMC (October 1956-September 1959) - </B>Allen R. Felde enlisted in =

the=20

Marine Corps at Milwaukee, WI in October 1956. He went to the San Diego =

for=20

basic training and there met Oswald as another recruit. Both of them =

were=20

assigned to Platoon 2060, Second Battalion. In January 1957 both Felde =

and=20

Oswald were transferred to Camp Pendleton for combat training. Felde and =

Oswald=20

were assigned to the same squad of eight men, all of whom shared the =

same tent.=20

While on leave once in Tijuana, Oswald left the squad and was not seen =

again=20

until everyone returned to Camp Pendleton. This was also true when the =

squad=20

went on weekend leaves to Los Angeles. Oswald would ride with the group =

to Los=20

Angeles in a bus but would separate from them at the bus depot and would =

not be=20

seen again until they returned to Camp Pendleton. </P>

<P>When combat training was over in May 1957, Oswald and Felde were =

transferred=20

to the A & P School at Jacksonville, Florida. In July 1957 they were =

sent to=20

Aviation Electronics School in Memphis, TN. In September 1957 Felde =

transferred=20

to the Marine Corps Air Station at Opa Locka, Florida and did not see =

Oswald=20

again. Felde recalled that Oswald continually discussed politics. Oswald =

was=20

argumentative and frequently took the opposite side of an argument just =

for the=20

sake of a debate. He was a good talker and had an excellent vocabulary. =

He was=20

also a voracious reader spending much of his time reading in base =

libraries as=20

well as in his quarters. He became unpopular, and his company was =

avoided if=20

possible. Oswald continually wrote to Senators in Washington about =

various left=20

wing issues. One senator in particular who was in receipt of a number of =

his=20

letters was Senator Strom Thurman. Oswald expressed dislike for people =

of wealth=20

and he championed the cause of the working man. He frequently found =

fault with=20

Eisenhower and Truman and had felt the US participation in the Korean =

War was=20

wrong, because a lot of men were killed in this war and nothing was=20

accomplished. Oswald also condemned Eisenhower for his poor use of =

armored units=20

at the time of the invasion of Europe.</P>

<P>Another Marine who remembered Oswald was Sherman Cooley. October 1956 =

was the=20

month when Cooley first met Oswald at the Marine Corps boot camp in San =

Diego. I=20

interviewed Cooley and asked him what he remembered about Oswald. One of =

the=20

most memorable things about Oswald was his inability to shoot a rifle. =

"He could=20

not hit the broad side of a barn with a twelve gauge shotgun," Cooley =

told me.=20

In March 1957 he and Oswald went to Jacksonville, Florida, where they =

were=20

enrolled in the same class at the Air Frame and Power (A&P) School. =

After=20

spending two months there, they were sent to Keesler, where they learned =

how to=20

be radar operators. They were transferred to Japan, but Cooley did not =

see=20

Oswald there, for they had been assigned to two widely separated bases. =

The next=20

time he saw him was in the Philippines towards the end of November 1957. =

In=20

fact, the picture of Oswald sitting among a group of Marines waiting to =

board an=20

LST was taken by Cooley himself. At the end of December Cooley went back =

to=20

Japan with a portion of the unit, while Oswald stayed with the rest of =

the unit=20

at Corregidor. They did not see one another again until the beginning of =

January=20

1959, when they were assigned to a radar unit in Santa Ana, California. =

Oswald=20

had mess duty, and Cooley used to see him every morning serving coffee =

to the=20

men.</P>

<P>I asked Cooley if he remembered Allen Felde. He said that he never =

heard of=20

him, but that is not significant, since there were hundreds of men going =

through=20

training. Then I read Felde's statement over the phone. There was much =

in it=20

that Cooley confirmed to me was correct. The details regarding Oswald's=20

personality and interests, he said, described him "to a tee." Cooley =

also=20

confirmed to me that the unit they were in was the Second Recruit =

Battalion. So=20

far, so good. But we start running into problems with the platoon =

numbers. There=20

were three platoons in every company. Cooley was in platoon 1068, and =

Oswald was=20

in either 1069 or 1070. I asked him if he can explain what Felde meant, =

when he=20

said that he and Oswald were in platoon 2060. Cooley said it is possible =

that=20

Oswald had been held back and put in a platoon that was sequentially =

later. The=20

20 series of platoons followed the 10 series of platoons by a week. =

Sometimes=20

the Marines will do that to guys who cannot get with the program. They =

give them=20

extra time in boot camp. I then asked about Felde's statement that he =

and Oswald=20

went to the A&P School in Jacksonville from May to July. Cooley said =

he does=20

not know why Felde would say that, since he remembered Oswald at the =

A&P=20

School from March to May. He also does not understand how Oswald could =

have been=20

at the Aviation Electronics School in Memphis. Cooley is quite familiar =

with=20

that school, for he had a son who went there. It is a place where they =

train jet=20

and helicopter mechanics. But Oswald was not in Memphis, he was at =

Keesler,=20

learning radar. In fact, Cooley used to have a picture of the graduation =

class=20

at Keesler and he and Oswald were in it. (He had loaned this photo to =

researcher=20

Henry Hurt in the 1970's, when he was writing his book <I>Reasonable =

Doubt</I>,=20

but it has not been returned.)</P>

<P>So there are a few anomalies in Felde's statement that do not fit the =

overall=20

picture of Oswald's career in the Marines. John Armstrong had found a =

list of=20

those who were in the Aviation Fundamentals class and both Felde and =

Oswald were=20

in that class. The time when the class started was March, not May =

1958,as stated=20

in the FBI report of an interview with Felde. </P>

<P></P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>Allen Felde=92s version bears some similarity to the =

official=20

record of Oswald's military career, e.g. basic training in San Diego and =

advanced training in Jacksonville, yet it verves off from the official =

version=20

in such details as the Aviation Electronics School in Memphis. Armstrong =

has=20

found corroboration for this twist in Oswald's training path in a list =

of those=20

who were in the Aviation Fundamentals. Data rating: 1. </P>

<P>Felde's observations are strong evidence that there were two Oswalds =

in the=20

Marine Corps at the same time. Significance rating: 1.</P></I><B>

<P>New Orleans, Louisiana (fall 1957 through spring 1958) - =

</B>According to the=20

official records and other witnesses, Oswald had been in the Marine =

Corps from=20

October 1956 to September 1959. In August 1957 he was sent overseas to =

serve as=20

a radar operator in Japan and the Philippines. He did not come back =

until=20

November 1958, when he was sent to California. Yet there is strong =

evidence that=20

a Second Oswald had been working in New Orleans during that same time =

period at=20

the Pfisterer Dental Laboratory.</P>

<P>Sometime in the fall of 1957, Lee Harvey Oswald came to work for =

Pfisterer.=20

As a dental messenger, he gave satisfactory service to his employers. He =

was=20

called by his first name "Lee." Whenever there was a delivery to make, =

Mr.=20

Williamson would call him up to the counter and give him a small =

cardboard box=20

with a new set of dentures and some paperwork. He put the box in a tote =

bag=20

(something which all the dental messengers had) and proceeded to make =

the=20

delivery.</P>

<P>There were four other messengers, but the one who talked with him the =

most=20

was Palmer McBride. He and Oswald discussed what was happening around =

the world.=20

However, the two subjects that Oswald really cared about was communism =

and the=20

Soviet Union. When it came to personal matters, he was quiet and =

reserved,=20

giving very few details. He did say that he was a native of New Orleans =

and that=20

he went to Beauregard Junior High and Warren Easton High School. He also =

said=20

that he was living with his mother in the Senator Hotel directly across =

the=20

street. He never said a word about having any brothers, living in New =

York or=20

Texas, being in the military, or having an interest in firearms. Neither =

did he=20

say anything about being in the Civil Air Patrol. This was a =

particularly odd=20

omission, for he was quite aware that aviation was one of McBride's =

favorite=20

subjects.</P>

<P>McBride and Oswald often talked about space exploration. Oswald loved =

to=20

gloat about Russian space achievements. To him the launching of the =

Sputnik=20

satellite on October 4, 1957 was proof of the superiority of communism =

over=20

capitalism. On January 31, 1958, when a rocket from Cape Canaveral =

launched=20

America's first satellite into space, Oswald was not impressed. He =

scorned the=20

satellite as a mere toy of only 31 pounds compared to the Sputnik which =

was 184=20

pounds and the Sputnik II which was 1120 pounds.</P>

<P>McBride invited Oswald to come to an astronomy club meeting. Oswald =

was=20

interested and called up the president of the club, William Wulf. Wulf =

invited=20

him to his house, so they could talk about him becoming a member. =

McBride would=20

be there too, for he often went to Wulf's house to look through the =

eight-inch=20

telescope.</P>

<P>When work was over at 5:00, and before going to Wulf's house, Oswald =

told=20

McBride he needed to go to the hotel to let his mother know where he was =

going.=20

He asked McBride to come along, for he wanted to show him something. =

They=20

crossed the street and went up the hotel staircase to the second floor. =

They=20

entered his apartment, which was clean and tidy but not plush. They saw =

Oswald's=20

mother who was on her way out. She was going to the store to get some =

groceries.=20

She was identical to the woman seen in Dallas in November 1963. </P>

<P>After she left, Oswald went to the bookcase and pulled out two books. =

One of=20

them was <I>Das Kapital</I> by Karl Marx and the other was the =

<I>Communist=20

Manifesto </I>by Marx and Engels. He handed them to McBride and said =

that he got=20

them from the public library. He was obviously proud to show them. They =

went=20

outside again and caught the Jackson Street bus to the street where =

McBride=20

lived. They walked into the house and were greeted by McBride's mother. =

When=20

dinner was over, there was still some time left before they had to go to =

Wulf's=20

house. Since both shared a love for classical music, they went to =

McBride's room=20

and listened to a Beethoven record, the Fifth Symphony.</P>

<P>While listening to the music, they talked again about the Soviet =

Union and=20

the United States. Oswald said that he liked Khrushchev and thought that =

he was=20

sincere in his efforts to improve the lot of the workers in Russia. =

McBride said=20

that he liked Eisenhower. In spite of his advanced age and military =

background,=20

he was doing a pretty good job at maintaining peace between the =

superpowers. His=20

only failing as far as McBride could see was his lethargy regarding the =

space=20

program. To these generally favorable remarks, McBride expected Oswald =

to=20

counter with his usual sarcastic retorts. What came out instead was =

utterly=20

astounding. Oswald said that Eisenhower deserved to be killed, for he =

was=20

exploiting the working people. Then he made a statement to the effect =

that he=20

would like to kill the President himself. In spite of the earnestness by =

which=20

this threat was made, McBride did not take it seriously. It seemed to be =

an=20

isolated outburst of pent-up frustration, an overly emphatic way of =

expressing a=20

strong opinion. </P>

<P>Later that evening they took the bus to Wulf's house. The three =

talked about=20

astronomy in general, and Wulf was surprised by how little Oswald knew =

about the=20

subject. He told him that his ignorance would hamper him in the club, =

for he=20

would not know what was going on. But Oswald persisted in his desire to =

join the=20

club. </P>

<P>At the next meeting at Wulf's house, Oswald was in attendance =

listening=20

quietly. When it was over and as the members of the club were leaving to =

go=20

home, Oswald went to the bookcase to look at the history books. Since =

Wulf was=20

also interested in history, the two struck up a conversation. McBride, =

who was=20

standing by, listened in. This discussion turned into an argument that =

lasted=20

three hours. Oswald's political and economic views were to "the left of=20

Socialism." He sympathized with the Red Chinese and favored the =

admission of=20

China into the United Nations. The transition to communism in Russia was =

inevitable and he glorified the virtues of the Soviet Union. He claimed =

that the=20

United States was not telling the truth about the Russian way of life. =

To this=20

Wulf asked sarcastically, "If you like Russia so much, why don't you go =

over=20

there?"</P>

<P>At this point, Mr. Wulf, William's father, came into the room. Mr. =

Wulf, a=20

former tank commander in the German army who fought on the Russian front =

during=20

World War II, interrupted Oswald to tell him that he did not want him to =

make=20

such remarks. He could well remember all the trouble the Communists =

caused in=20

Germany during the 1920's. To this Oswald asked, "And what is so wrong =

with=20

communism?" The impudence of this question touched off a big shouting =

match=20

between Mr. Wulf and Oswald. Finally Mr. Wulf took Oswald by the arm, =

led him to=20

the door and told him to get out. After he was gone, he warned his son =

never to=20

bring that boy back to the house again.</P>

<P>Subsequently, McBride decided to curtail his association with Oswald. =

He=20

still got into discussions with him at work, but he no longer invited =

him out=20

for social activities.</P>

<P>Sometime during the spring of 1958, Oswald said he would be moving to =

Fort=20

Worth with his mother. He gave his employers a two-week notice.</P>

<P>About a month after he left, a letter from Oswald came to the =

Pfisterer=20

Dental Laboratory. Mr. Williamson read the letter to all the employees. =

The=20

letter said that he had found a job in Fort Worth as a shoe salesman. It =

also=20

mentioned that he got into trouble at a disturbance on a high school =

campus=20

regarding Negroes or Communists. That was the last time McBride heard =

anything=20

about him until November 22, 1963. </P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>It is obvious that Oswald made a big impression on =

McBride,=20

and McBride remembers a considerable amount of detail about him. He also =

has a=20

very good grasp of dates and is positive that he knew Oswald after =

Sputnik=20

(October 1957). His friend William Wulf, when questioned by the Warren=20

Commission, said he knew Oswald in 1956 (before the Marine Corps =

period).=20

Armstrong and Robert Groden visited Wulf not long ago and asked him to=20

reconstruct chronologically his years of 1956 through 1958. Wulf =

acknowledged at=20

that time that he would have to have known Oswald in the year 1958 =

(during the=20

Marine Corps period). Whether or not we accept this statement that =

contradicts=20

what he said to the Warren Commission in 1964, at the very least it =

neutralizes=20

a key source for the contention that Oswald was at Pfisterer in 1956. =

</P>

<P>Another source indicating that Oswald was at Pfisterer in 1956 is a =

W-2=20

recovered from Ruth Paine's house. However, this W-2 is fraudulent =

because the=20

employee identification number that appears on it could not have been =

issued=20

until January 1964. The fact that someone had resorted to forged =

documents not=20

only negates the second main source for the contention that Oswald was =

at=20

Pfisterer in 1956 but it further bolsters the truth of McBride's claim =

that he=20

knew Oswald in 1957 and 1958. Data rating: 1. </P>

<P>McBride's information clearly shows that there was one Oswald in New =

Orleans=20

while another Oswald was in the Marine Corps at the same time. Armstrong =

is=20

therefore right in declaring that McBride is the most significant =

witness in=20

establishing the case for two Oswalds. Significance rating: =

1.</P></I><B>

<P>Monterrey, Mexico (September 1962) </B>- Donald P. Norton first told =

Jim=20

Garrison about his contacts with Lee Harvey Oswald in July 1967. Born in =

1932=20

and educated in Georgia, Norton entered the Air Force in 1949 to be a =

musician=20

in the Air Force Band in Washington, D.C. Personal indiscretions led to =

his=20

being discharged in 1952. In 1957 he got a job playing at the officers =

club at=20

Fort Benning, Georgia. </P>

<P>It was at this time that a CIA man recruited Norton to spy on =

generals and=20

other high officials who attended parties at which he played and point =

out any=20

homosexuals among them. </P>

<P>In 1958, he was given the assignment to contact a man named Hugh =

Pharris. The=20

meeting took place at the airport in Atlanta, at which time Pharris gave =

Norton=20

a sum of money to transport to Cuba. Pharris was an alias for David =

Ferrie, a=20

man who knew Lee Harvey Oswald, Guy Bannister and Clay Shaw. Ferrie was =

wearing=20

sunglasses and wore a very sloppy wig. He gave Norton a sample case of=20

phonograph records, which he wanted Norton to take to Carlo Media, a =

Cuban TV=20

star. Media was also working for the CIA at this time against the =

Batista=20

regime. Ferrie said "it" was in the case, meaning $150,000 that he was =

to=20

deliver to Media. After he made the delivery, he returned to Atlanta and =

reported to his CIA contact. </P>

<P>In 1960 Norton went to New Orleans and saw Ferrie a second time at a =

club=20

with a reputation of being a homosexual hangout. </P>

<P>Another assignment took him to the Hotel Yamajel in Monterrey, Mexico =

in=20

September of 1962. As soon as he registered at the hotel, in his own =

name, he=20

was immediately met by a man named Harvey Lee. They went into the bar =

and had a=20

couple of beers. Harvey Lee was slight in build and casually dressed. He =

refused=20

to look Norton in the eye. He said he came from New Orleans. Harvey Lee =

was=20

identical to Lee Harvey Oswald except his hair was not as thin as the =

Oswald=20

displayed by the Dallas police after the assassination of President =

Kennedy.=20

Norton turned over $50,000 to Oswald for revolutionary activities =

against=20

Castro. In return Oswald gave Norton a case of documents contained in =

manila=20

envelopes, the nature of which Norton did not know. Norton then drove =

from=20

Monterey to Calgary, Alberta, where he became a TV personality. </P>

<P>Norton also knew Clay Shaw. In 1965, Norton went to Albany, GA, where =

he was=20

contacted by his CIA friend. It was in Albany, that he saw Shaw talking =

with=20

James A. Gray, an extreme right-winger, at a country club known as the =

Double=20

Gate Country Club. After speaking with Shaw, Gray spoke with Norton and =

offered=20

to get Norton established in Albany by lending him $6,000. Norton took =

the loan,=20

which was paid back for him by way of a surreptitious payment, =

presumably the=20

CIA. </P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>The only source for establishing the fact that Oswald =

was in=20

Monterrey in September 1962 is Norton, a CIA agent. Since intelligence =

agents of=20

all sorts are notoriously unreliable, this reduces the quality of the =

data of=20

this episode. It does appear that Norton was trying to get out of the =

CIA and by=20

doing so he had to expose himself as a homosexual, a hazardous thing to =

do at=20

that time. This fact would justify including him in this catalog. Data =

rating:=20

3.</P>

<P>At the time Norton encountered Oswald, records show that Oswald was =

working=20

in Fort Worth for the Leslie Welding Company. It is possible that Oswald =

may=20

have taken a weekend to conduct some spy business with Norton. Of course =

Marina=20

Oswald may say that Oswald was at home every weekend, yet her statements =

cannot=20

be trusted. Thus this episode has low significance in establishing two =

Oswalds.=20

Significance rating: 3.</P></I>

<P></P><B>

<P>Sparta, Wisconsin (March 29, 1963) - </B>The town of Sparta, =

Wisconsin is=20

over nine hundred miles from the city of Dallas, Texas, yet it was here =

that Lee=20

Harvey Oswald went into John Abbott=92s barbershop on March 29, 1963. =

</P>

<P>Between 6:00 and 6:30 pm, a man came in and said he wanted a haircut =

and a=20

shave. He had about two days' of hair growth on his face. John Abbott =

introduced=20

himself and asked the man by what name he could address him. He said his =

name=20

was Lee Harvey Oswald. He was from Texas and he had arrived in Sparta by =

the=20

westbound train. He had a wife in Dallas, whom he had deceived into =

thinking=20

that he was still in Texas looking for a job. He had intended to go to =

La=20

Crosse, but he mistakenly got off the train in Sparta thinking he had =

reached=20

his destination. The next train to La Crosse would not arrive until the =

next=20

day, so Oswald decided to find a room for the night at the Nicolet =

Hotel. </P>

<P>Being in Sparta reminded him of an acquaintance in Dallas, who used =

to live=20

in this town. He asked the barber if he knew anyone by the name of =

Philip=20

Hemstock? Abbott was surprised to hear that name, for Hemstock had been =

one of=20

his closest friends, ever since they were small boys in a nearby town =

called=20

Cataract. After they had grown up, Hemstock moved down to Texas. Over =

the years,=20

the two friends had lost touch with one another. </P>

<P>While speaking about the town, Abbott said that it was a decent place =

to live=20

and that there was a lot of pretty countryside to be seen around there. =

Oswald=20

refused to agree to this. He had been in Russia and said that there was =

not one=20

inch of landscape in the entire United States that can compare with that =

of=20

Russia. Abbott asked him how he happened to go to Russia, and he said =

that he=20

was sent over there at his request by the U.S. government. He liked the=20

philosophy of the Russians, and would have remained there, but he was=20

disappointed and angry by their treatment of him. He expected to get the =

red=20

carpet treatment and maybe some big, important job. Instead they gave =

him some=20

menial job in a factory. Rather than endure this humiliation, he decided =

to come=20

back to the United States.</P>

<P>When he was asked how he happened to be traveling in Wisconsin, he =

said that=20

he had people to see. In fact, his overnight stay in Sparta was making =

him miss=20

a speech by one of these "people" in Wausau that very night. By way of=20

explanation, the "people" he was referring to was the President and the=20

Governors of the States. He would follow them around and listen to their =

speeches.</P>

<P>Abbott was curious how he could travel around the country and still =

have=20

money to spend. Oswald told him that he got his money by blackmailing a =

Texas=20

nightclub operator, for whom he had previously worked. Each time he made =

a=20

contact with this man, he would get fifty dollars. (He never gave the =

name of=20

the nightclub operator.) The money he obtained would be used to cover =

his=20

traveling expenses. Whenever he was ready to embark on a journey, he =

would first=20

plan out all the places where he wanted to go. He then went to the =

Western Union=20

office, and purchased money orders which he would mail to himself in =

various=20

cities. Whenever he came to one of his destinations, he would go to the =

local=20

Western Union office and pick up his money. In this way, he always had =

cash=20

wherever he went. To prevent anyone from following this paper trail, he =

would=20

use a combination of different signatures and aliases. He boasted that =

he was=20

capable of writing seventeen different signatures. </P>

<P>As Abbott was cutting his hair, he noticed a scar behind the left =

ear. It was=20

a mastoidectomy scar. He happened to notice it because as a barber he =

used the=20

mastoid bone as a guide, and he recalled that its absence required him =

to work=20

around it. When he had finished cutting his hair and began to shave his =

face, he=20

noticed a second scar on the left jaw, a narrow scar about an inch long =

that ran=20

along the jaw line, about midway between the front of the chin and the =

ear. Its=20

slightly raised surface area required a little more care with the razor =

to avoid=20

nicking it, and he made the comment "Oh man, you must have hurt yourself =

bad,=20

when you got this scar." Oswald said that he got it when he was in the =

military.=20

He was in the process of loading an airplane, when the hatch came down =

on him=20

and "busted" his jaw. It had been a compound fracture, broken in two =

places. He=20

was angry at the U.S. government for "defacing" him, and someday he was =

going to=20

initiate a lawsuit. To Abbott's eyes, he did not think it was enough of =

a=20

disfigurement to make a lawsuit worthwhile.</P>

<P>When the barber was finished, Oswald paid for his haircut and shave =

and left=20

the shop. He was seen going in the direction of the hotel entrance, =

where=20

presumably he spent the night.</P>

<P>Two days later, according to an FBI report, Abbott happened to stop =

by Max's=20

Cafe, where he saw Philip Hemstock's mother, Iris Thompson, who worked =

as a cook=20

in the restaurant. (She is now deceased.) Abbott told her about an =

unsavory=20

character, who came into his shop on Friday and said that he knew her =

son. Mrs.=20

Thompson saw him too, and she said that she did not like the kind of =

person her=20

son had for a friend.</P>

<P>On Friday November 29, after the assassination, Abbott got a surprise =

visit=20

at his barbershop. His old friend Philip Hemstock was back in town. He =

was=20

accompanied by his son Kelly, and they came to the barbershop to have =

Abbott cut=20

their hair. Philip said that he came to Sparta to see his mother for=20

Thanksgiving. He left Dallas by car with his wife and children the =

previous=20

Saturday, which was the day after the President was killed. The Hemstock =

family=20

left the following day. </P>

<P>On December 4 Hemstock was approached by two FBI agents in Dallas, =

who wanted=20

to ask him three questions. First, why did he leave Dallas to go to =

Sparta the=20

day after the assassination? Second, what did he talk about with John =

Abbott?=20

Lastly, did he ever know Oswald? In reply to these questions, he said =

that he=20

went up to Wisconsin to see his mother. When he was in the barbershop, =

he and=20

Abbott talked about the assassination, but no mention was made about =

Oswald=20

coming to Sparta. Finally, he said that he never knew Oswald, nor heard =

his name=20

until after the assassination.</P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>John Abbott is the main source of information on this =

incident. He is corroborated by his brother David, who also worked in =

the=20

barbershop. The strange behavior of his friend Philip Hemstock also =

provides=20

confirmation of the reality of this incident. Data rating: 1.</P><B></B>

<P>This incident in Sparta may have involved a second Oswald, perhaps =

Lee,=20

because Harvey was still working at Jaggers, Chiles, Stovall (JCS). On =

March 29,=20

he came into work at 8:00 am and left at 5:45 pm. He worked the next =

day,=20

Saturday, March 30, from 7:45 am to 4:30 pm. Also his paycheck for that =

week=20

shows that he worked the hours that he had recorded on his timecards. =

However,=20

Dr. Jerry Rose pointed out some irregularities with his paychecks. It is =

also=20

known that JCS is somewhat spooky, doing work for the Army Mapping =

Service.=20

Although paychecks normally constitute solid evidence, in the case of =

JCS there=20

are reasons to question documentation stemming from that company. </P>

<P>If it is true that Oswald was in Sparta, Wisconsin while at the same =

time=20

working for JCS, then this would be a significant episode establishing =

the two=20

Oswalds. However, another explanation is that Oswald generated false =

timecards=20

with the blessing of the JCS management and was then allowed to go where =

he=20

chose to go. This possibility reduces the value of this episode in =

proving there=20

were two Oswalds. Significance rating: 2.</P></I><B>

<P>Montreal, Canada (Summer 1963) - </B>To dramatize the need to end the =

Cold=20

War by unilateral nuclear disarmament and also to reduce tensions with =

Cuba,=20

members of the Committee for Non-Violent Action (CNVA) had conceived the =

idea of=20

delivering its message via a walking tour from Canada to Cuba, beginning =

in=20

Quebec and proceeding to Washington, D.C. and on to Miami, Florida. From =

Miami,=20

they would take a boat to Havana, Cuba. From there they would walk 700 =

miles to=20

the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo and hold their final demonstration, =

calling=20

for the closure of the base. Covering an average of 15 miles a day, they =

would=20

stop at various towns or cities along the way, where they would give =

speeches or=20

pass out leaflets. They carried signs, which bore the peace symbol - an=20

upside-down broken cross within a circle - and messages such as "Your =

conscience=20

demands it - REFUSE to serve in the ARMED FORCES." Other signs reflected =

a=20

concern for the problem of Cuba: "Soviet Troops and U.S. Marines: Leave =

Cuba"=20

and "Demand Freedom to Visit Cuba." Anyone sympathetic to the cause =

would be=20

invited to join the walk as far as they wanted.</P>

<P>The project started in Quebec City on May 26. By June 9 they were in=20

Montreal, where they spent several days doing demonstrations. It was =

here that=20

the walkers had Oswald among them for the first time. Oswald was among =

those who=20

paraded in front of the U.S. Consulate in a "ban-the-bomb" =

demonstration.=20

Aurilien Chasse, the senior U.S. Customs Representative said that his =

office was=20

contacted by several persons who saw Oswald, wearing a U.S. Navy =

uniform,=20

distributing pamphlets for the Fair Play for Cuba Committee (FPCC) at a =

small=20

park on the corner of St. Jacques and McGill Streets. One person who =

reported to=20

Chasse was an investigator for Customs and Excise named Jean Paul =

Tremblay. He=20

had a special reason to be interested in Oswald because he was working =

on cases=20

involving Cuba at the time. He saw Oswald with two men of about the same =

age and=20

height as Oswald, one being a little taller with a freckled face. A =

third person=20

with Oswald was a short, homely woman who took unusually long strides =

when she=20

walked. Tremblay contacted Oswald and received a pamphlet from him. =

According to=20

one citizen in Seattle, Oswald was seen with the head of the FPCC in=20

Montreal.</P>

<P>In an attempt to counter Chasse's letter regarding the Oswald =

sighting in=20

Montreal, an April 8, 1964 letter was written to the Warren Commission =

from J.=20

Edgar Hoover, which said: "For your information, the records of the =

William=20

Reilly and Company, Incorporated, New Orleans, Louisiana, reflect that =

Oswald=20

was on the job Monday through Friday of the week June 3 through 7, 1963, =

and=20

that he was also on the job all of the following week, June 10 through =

14,=20

1963." </P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>There seems to be some confusion about when Oswald =

was in=20

Montreal. According to the Hoover letter, it would appear that Oswald =

was there=20

in June when the peace walkers were there. However, other sources put =

Tremblay=92s=20

encounter with Oswald in August.</P>

<P>The sources mentioned above who saw Oswald were working for the =

government.=20

Tremblay and Chaisse may have had their own agenda for reporting =

Oswald=92s=20

presence in Montreal, especially Tremblay who was dealing with cases =

involving=20

Cuba. Such government involvement in an Oswald sighting decreases the =

quality of=20

the data. Data rating: 2.</P>

<P>If it is true that Oswald was in Montreal while at the same time =

working for=20

Reilly, then this would be a significant episode establishing the two =

Oswalds.=20

However, as in the case of JCS, Reilly was a spooky company where false=20

documentation can be generated in service of intelligence organizations. =

Oswald=20

could have generated false timecards with the approval of Reilly =

management and=20

was then allowed to go where he wanted. This possibility reduces the =

value of=20

this episode in proving there were two Oswalds. Significance rating:=20

2.</P></I><B>

<P>Rhinelander, Wisconsin (July 15, 1963) - </B>Rhinelander is north of =

Sparta,=20

within a scenic area filled with lakes and streams. On July 15, 1963 =

Oswald was=20

seen was at a two-story wooden frame building located on the northeast =

corner of=20

Brown Street and Frederick. The main business establishment occupying =

the=20

building was Onson's Restaurant. Upstairs on the second floor were a =

number of=20

apartments, which Mr. Onson rented out to summer residents staying in =

town. Next=20

to the restaurant on the Frederick Street side of the building was a =

taxi=20

station. Also in the same building at 62 N. Brown Street was Budreau's =

Music and=20

Appliance Store. </P>

<P>It was a warm, bright Monday morning in July when Candy Tetzlaff =

heard the=20

jingling of the bell over the door. She looked up and saw a slender =

young man,=20

in his early twenties, neatly groomed and dressed. He seemed to be in a =

hurry,=20

for his manner was brisk and straight-to-business. He said that he =

wanted to buy=20

a radio.</P>

<P>Since Candy did not know how to handle the paperwork of audio =

equipment=20

sales, she called for her employer, Margaret Budreau, who was then =

working in=20

the back part of the store. When Mrs. Budreau came up to the counter, =

she asked=20

the man how she could be of service to him. He said that he would like =

to buy a=20

portable radio.</P>

<P>Mrs. Budreau brought out a Motorola model and put it on the counter. =

The man=20

wanted to hear how it sounded, so a set of batteries was placed inside =

and the=20

power was turned on. Having satisfied himself with its functional =

performance,=20

he was still not ready to purchase it. He said he needed to bring in his =

wife to=20

get her opinion.</P>

<P>He went outside and soon came back in, leading his wife into the =

store. She=20

was a few inches shorter than the man and she was obviously pregnant. =

She wore a=20

maternity-style dress and, like the man, was neatly groomed and=20

respectable-looking. When she began speaking to the man, she used words =

that=20

were completely unintelligible to Mrs. Budreau. The man responded in =

kind. They=20

were not speaking English, but rather they were using some =

unrecognizable=20

foreign language. As the man spoke, he apparently was showing the woman =

how to=20

turn on the radio and adjust the volume control by rotating a knob. Then =

he=20

demonstrated how she could tune into different radio stations by =

adjusting=20

another knob. After this brief lesson, she spoke some words that sounded =

like=20

approval, turned around and casually ambled back to the front door. She =

opened=20

it and went outside.</P>

<P>The man turned to Mrs. Budreau and said that he was ready to buy the =

radio.=20

Mrs. Budreau then wrote out a sales slip. The total price was $47.33, =

which=20

included sales tax and the cost of one dollar for a set of batteries. To =

complete the paperwork, Mrs. Budreau needed the man's name and address =

for the=20

ninety-day warranty. When she asked him for this information, she was =

surprised=20

by his adamant refusal. He said that he did not want to give his name =

and=20

address and that he did not want the warranty. Mrs. Budreau told him =

that the=20

warranty was for his own protection. If the radio was faulty, he could =

return it=20

to the store and get another one or get his money back. The man became =

indignant=20

and said that the warranty would be no good to him, for he was not a =

resident of=20

Rhinelander, he was just a traveler passing through the area; therefore =

he would=20

not be able to return it to the store, should there be a problem with =

it. Mrs.=20

Budreau patiently told him that it was a Motorola policy to have a =

record of=20

warranty on every radio that the store sold. At this he finally said, =

"My name=20

is Homer Walker,( ??) Jr. and I'm from Texas and that's =

enough."</P>

<P></P>

<P>Mrs. Budreau duly noted down this information on the sales slip. The =

next=20

procedure would have been to put the radio back in its box along with a =

copy of=20

the sales slip. But the man did not want to bother with the box. He took =

the=20

radio and the sales slip, headed for the front door and was gone. This =

however=20

would not be the last time he would be in the store.</P>

<P>After he left, Margaret went to the back room where her son and her =

husband=20

were working. They had not seen the couple, but they had heard the whole =

conversation. The three of them had a discussion concerning the language =

that=20

the couple used. It was definitely not French or German, for they would =

have=20

recognized those languages. Could the language have been eastern =

European? Or=20

was it possibly Russian?</P>

<P>Sometime in the early afternoon, Margaret undertook the job of =

re-decorating=20

the shop windows. She hardly began working on this project, when she =

looked=20

through the window and had her attention drawn to a car parked in front =

of the=20

store in one of the angle parking spaces that ran along the sidewalk =

curb. It=20

was a solid-colored, deep blue sedan, possibly a Buick, made in the late =

1950's.=20

Sitting in the front seat and clearly visible through the front =

windshield was=20

the pregnant wife of the man who bought the radio. There was also a =

little girl=20

in the car, about one or two years old. She was a very active child, =

bouncing up=20

and down on the seat, and crawling from the front seat to the rear seat =

and then=20

back to the front seat again.</P>

<P>Mrs. Budreau then wondered where the man was. Perhaps there was =

something=20

wrong with the car and he had gone somewhere looking for help. This =

possibility=20

became less likely as the afternoon hours wore on - 1:00, 2:00, 3:00. =

The man=20

still had not returned. During that whole time the woman and the little =

girl did=20

not leave the car. Or rather, almost the whole time, for there were two =

or three=20

times when they got out of the car and went into the restaurant next =

door. A few=20

moments later they returned to the car and got back inside. Presumably =

they went=20

inside only to use the restroom facilities. Their movements from the car =

to the=20

restaurant and then from restaurant to the car were noiseless and =

inconspicuous;=20

it seemed as if the woman was trying to keep people from noticing them. =

It was=20

curious that she would rather be cooped up inside the car with her bored =

little=20

daughter, when she could be out doing something, such as window shopping =

or even=20

just walking around the block to get some exercise.</P>

<P>Margaret Budreau's curiosity about this family began to change into=20

suspicion. Having finished with the windows, she went inside and =

retrieved the=20

Motorola X51 sales slip. Upon it she wrote the number of the car.</P>

<P>With other business to occupy her, she paid no more attention to the =

woman=20

and the little girl sitting in the car. The late afternoon hours passed =

by one=20

by one, until it came time to close the store at 5:00. One of the last =

things=20

Margaret Budreau had to do was to count the cash in the cash register. A =

few=20

minutes before closing time, she heard the bell over the door and looked =

up to=20

see the man who claimed to be Homer Wyley ( ?? see above b.m.) come =

inside. In=20

his hand was the radio he bought that morning. Mrs. Budreau saw that she =

could=20

not avoid the prospect of staying overtime with a customer who had =

previously=20

manifested a disagreeable attitude. When she saw the man put the radio =

on the=20

counter, she asked him if there was something wrong with it. No, he =

said, there=20

was nothing wrong with it. He just came in to purchase an extra set of=20

batteries. That was all he wanted. Mrs. Budreau got the batteries and =

put them=20

into a sack. The man paid a dollar for them, took the sack and the =

radio, and=20

left the store.</P>

<P>The Budreaus thought no more about him until four months later, when =

the=20

President had been killed. They learned that the man's name was Lee =

Harvey=20

Oswald and his wife was named Marina. The little girl was their daughter =

June. A=20

second daughter was born to Marina on October 20, and she was given the =

name=20

Rachel.</P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation: </B>The witnesses who establish that this incident =

occurred were=20

Margaret Budreau, Candy Tetzlaff, Chet Budreau, and Chet Budreau, Jr. =

There is=20

no reason to doubt the credibility of these witnesses. Data rating: =

1.</P>

<P>The incident in Rhinelander may have involved a second Oswald because =

on July=20

15, Oswald was working for the William Reilly Coffee Company in New =

Orleans, as=20

a maintenance man, oiling and greasing the machinery for making coffee. =

On July=20

15, he came into work at 8:19 in the morning and he left at 5:00 in the =

evening.=20

Maintenance records in Oswald's handwriting showed that he was there =

that day.=20

</P>

<P>If it is true that Oswald was in Rhinelander while at the same time =

working=20

for Reilly, then this would be a significant episode establishing the =

two=20

Oswalds. However, another explanation is that Oswald generated false =

timecards=20

with the approval of Reilly management and was then allowed to go where =

he=20

wanted. This possibility reduces the value of this episode in proving =

there were=20

two Oswalds. Significance rating: 2.</P></I><B>

<P>Scranton, Pennsylvania (July 22 through 25, 1963) - </B>After the =

peace=20

walkers left Montreal, they reached the border of the United States by =

the=20

latter part of June. They reached Scranton, Pennsylvania on July 22 and =

spent=20

several days there doing demonstrations on a street corner of Courthouse =

Square.=20

A 47-year-old minister named Irwin Tucker had been listening to the=20

demonstrators, because he was interested in hearing their views. Oswald =

was=20

among this group passing out leaflets. Tucker remembered him in =

particular, for=20

he got into a heated discussion with him. Oswald kept "running down the =

country"=20

and he was arguing that "President Kennedy was not doing right by Cuba." =

Tucker=20

lost his patience with this unpatriotic tirade and told the young man =

(whom he=20

later identified as Oswald after November 22) that if liked Castro's =

Cuba so=20

much, he ought to move over there.</P>

<P>The Warren Commission was aware of these peace walkers for during the =

hearings Wesley Liebeler asked Michael Paine if he knew anything about =

George=20

Lakey or Dennis Jamieson or the Committee for Non-Violent Action. Paine =

gave a=20

vague and contradictory response, saying he was familiar with these =

people but=20

then he changed his mind and said he was not familiar with them. George =

Lakey=20

was the executive secretary of the Friends Peace Committee and he served =

as the=20

principal host for the peace walkers during their stay in Philadelphia. =

Dennis=20

Jamieson was the chairman of the Friends Peace Committee and he served =

as chief=20

publicist for the march as it went through Pennsylvania. In a Scranton =

news=20

article, a photo of a group of peace walkers on the steps of the YMCA, =

Jamieson=20

can be seen holding a sign that read "Quebec-Washington-Guantanamo Walk =

for=20

Peace."</P><I><B>

<P>Evaluation:</B> Irwin Tucker is the main source for the information =

of this=20

incident. The news reports mentioned Anthony Batsavage, Superintendent =

of Police=20

in Scranton, who vouched for Tucker's veracity. Data rating: 1.</P>

<P>This incident in Scranton may have involved a second Oswald for at =

the time=20

Oswald was supposed to be in New Orleans, although unemployed. It is =

possible=20

that the Oswald who was supposed to be in New Orleans made an otherwise =

unknown=20

trip to Scranton in order to promote his views on Cuba. This possibility =

reduces=20

the value of this episode in proving there were two Oswalds. =

Significance=20

rating: 3.</P></I><B>

<P>San Antonio, Texas (September 5, 1963) -</B>Oswald along with his =

wife Marina=20

made an appearance at the terminal building of the San Antonio =

International=20

Airport on Thursday, September 5, 1963. Inside the glass and concrete =

structure=20

were four different airlines: American, Eastern, Continental, and =

Braniff. Out=20

front was a big parking lot which in 1963 was free to the public. Off to =

one=20

side of the building was a covered, open-air baggage area, where =

travelers could=20

pick up their suitcases and bags. Nearby and parked along the curb were =

four to=20

six taxicabs of the Yellow Cab Company. A taxicab dispatch office =

occupied a=20

section of the terminal building. Near the dispatch office was another =

office=20

with a sign out front that said "Car Rentals" followed by an arrow.</P>

<P>The car rental office was tiny. It had a glass front and two glass =

doors.=20

Inside was a counter about twenty-one feet long, divided by two plastic=20

partitions. Above the counter hung three signs. As customers came in, =

they would=20

see from left to right: Avis, National Car, and Hertz. Behind the =

counter and=20

sitting on stools were three women, each wearing the cap and uniform of =

the=20

company she was representing. The two bigger companies, Avis and Hertz, =

each had=20

counter space of about eight feet, whereas National Car was sandwiched =

in with=20

five feet. Behind the counter was a distance of six feet to the back =

wall. In=20

front of the counter was a narrow space of only three feet. Not many =

people=20

could get inside the office, but that was hardly ever a problem. Usually =

only=20

one or two customers would be renting cars at any one time. Most people =

who came=20

in were airline travelers who already had reservations. Walk-in =

customers formed=20

but a small fraction of the business.</P>

<P>The afternoon of Thursday, September 5, was hot and sunny. The =

temperature=20

was well into the 90's. The date was an unforgettable one for the Hertz =

agent,=20

Martha J. Doyle, for it happened to be her birthday. She started her =

shift at=20

3:00 pm, and she was glad to get into an air-conditioned office. Also =

starting=20

at the same time were Joanne Dunsmore, who worked for National Car, and =

Linda=20

Meyers, who worked for Avis. The three women were good friends, even =

though the=20

companies they worked for were highly competitive. </P>

<P>It was about 5:00 in the afternoon when Martha noticed through the =

front=20

glass a couple approaching from the right. This direction meant =

something to=20

her, for people coming from the right hardly ever stopped in. The big =

parking=20

lot was to the right and anyone coming from that direction usually had =

their own=20

means of transportation. Those who came from the left were airline =

travelers=20

just getting off the planes. </P>

<P>Martha watched as the man opened the door nearest the Hertz side of =

the=20

counter and allowed his wife to pass through. Draped on her folded arms =

was a=20

blanket, and cradled in the blanket was a baby girl. The man and the =

woman were=20

a seedy-looking pair, dressed in shabby clothing - an odd contrast to =

the=20

well-groomed clientele which usually came in to rent cars. Judging by =

their=20

appearance alone, Martha was certain that she did not want to do =

business with=20

them. Nevertheless, for politeness sake, she would treat them in the =

same way=20

that she treated all her walk-in customers.</P>

<P>The man was about 27 years old, had light brown hair, weighed 140 to =

150=20

pounds and stood about five feet, eight inches tall. He was wearing a=20

long-sleeve shirt that must have been white at one time but now had a =

dingy=20

grayish tint to it. He was definitely the dominant one, for he did all =

the=20

talking. The woman said not a single word. She had a big smile on her =

face,=20

which never changed or relaxed and grew more disturbing as the minutes =

went by.=20

At close range, this odd smile gave Martha an inescapable view of some=20

ugly-looking teeth. She noticed a brownish stain on them, probably due =

to a=20

smoking habit, and the two upper front teeth were slightly chipped. The =

woman=20

was about the same age as the man, stood about three inches shorter, and =

weighed=20

about 125 pounds. Her hair was almost black in color, parted in the =

middle, and=20

combed in a severely tight fashion toward the back. Martha could not see =

how it=20

was arranged behind her head, but it was probably tied into a bun. She =

wore a=20

white blouse and a dark skirt. The skirt went halfway between the knees =

and=20

ankles and the material looked too heavy for the hot weather. Her =

overall=20

appearance was that of foreigner who had just entered the country.</P>

<P>The baby in her arms was fast asleep. She was about three months old, =

and she=20

was wearing a short summer outfit, which left her legs uncovered. Martha =

thought=20

she looked beautiful. Her complexion was fair, and her hair was light =

blonde.=20

Indeed her hair was so blonde that Martha could scarcely believe that =

the=20

dark-haired woman could be her mother. Then Martha glanced at the light =

brownish=20

color of the man's hair and satisfied herself that the hair color must =

have come=20

from his side.</P>

<P>The man said he wanted to rent a car. He did not have any =

identification.=20

Without identification, Martha told him, he could not rent a car. She =

then asked=20

him what kind of work he did. He said he was in the publishing =

business.</P>

<P>"Do you mean magazines?" Martha asked politely.</P>

<P>"No, schoolbooks." </P>

<P>At the mention of schoolbooks, Martha almost reconsidered her initial =

decision to turn down his request to rent a car. There was after all a =

great=20

deal of money in that line of work. However, in spite of the =

lucrativeness of=20

the schoolbook business, she turned him down.</P>

<P>The man accepted this decision without a word of complaint. He turned =

and=20

opened the door. He went outside, holding the door open as his wife =

followed him=20

out. After they were gone, they became a topic of conversation between =

Martha=20

and Joanne. A few minutes later, they saw the strange couple through the =

window.=20

The man took a pacifier out of the baby's mouth and put it in his own =

mouth.=20

This increased Martha's curiosity to such an extent, that she felt =

compelled to=20

go outside to see what else he was going to do. But getting outside was =

a not a=20

straightforward thing to do. Even though the front door was almost =

within her=20

reach, there was no way of getting around the counter. She had to go =

through the=20

back door. She opened it and went into a hallway, turning right. She =

walked to=20

the end of the hallway and opened a door on the right hand side leading =

into the=20

taxicab dispatch office. She went through the office and opened the =

front door.=20

When she finally reached the baggage area, the family was nowhere to be =

seen.=20

Perhaps one of the cab drivers had seen something. She went up to a =

passenger=20

side window and leaned her head in and asked if he saw the couple. He =

did. He=20

noticed that the man putting a pacifier in his mouth, then took it out =

and threw=20

it on the ground.</P>

<P>Martha learned nothing more about this man until two and a half =

months later=20

when she saw his picture in the newspaper after the assassination. =

</P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation:</B> This incident was observed by three women in the car =

rental=20

office. Data rating: 1.</P>

<P>At this time Lee and Marina were supposed to be in New Orleans, =

although it=20

is possible that they could have made a surreptitious trip together to =

San=20

Antonio. Significance rating: 2.</P></I><B>

<P>Dallas, Texas (October 23, 1963) - </B>Mrs. Walker said that she is =

convinced=20

that she spent two hours with Oswald between 8 and 10 pm on Thursday, =

about 7=20

days before Halloween. She was supposed to be out calling for her church =

on a=20

visitation program but a girl friend, Helen Sexton, wanted to run around =

so she=20

took her to the residence of Harold Zotch. </P>

<P>On this particular occasion Junior Biggs was at Zotch's house and =

introduced=20

her to Oswald Lee, who is identical with Lee Harvey Oswald. She stated =

that Lee=20

received a telephone call soon after she arrived and his only comment on =

the=20

telephone was "Yeah." Later, Lee told Walker he was working at either =

the Texas=20

Book Store or Taylor Book Store and he had been working there only 8 =

days.=20

Junior Biggs commented that Walker did not have to worry about Lee's =

wife, as=20

she lived in Irving, Texas, Lee stated he had a room in Oak Cliff. Later =

on some=20

mention was made of coffee and Biggs said Lee made real good coffee, and =

mentioned he had been to Lee's room. Walker asked Lee what nationality =

he was=20

and Biggs answered for him saying, "He is a Barbarian." Walker asked =

what=20

Barbarian was and Biggs replied, "You've read about the Romans, haven't =

you?"=20

Walker still did not know what he meant but dropped the inquiry. </P>

<P>During the evening, Biggs stated Lee was writing a book and would =

have it=20

finished by Thanksgiving. Lee told Walker the book was about life inside =

Russian=20

and he claimed to have been there. During this period, Lee was only =

drinking=20

coffee, while others were drinking beer and whiskey. During the later =

part of=20

the visit, Lee received another phone call and said, "It's about time, =

ain't=20

it?" Thereafter he was on the phone for 15 to 30 minutes, mostly =

listening, and=20

occasionally interjecting "Yeah." About 10 pm Lee left with a tall, =

dark-headed=20

young man who was driving an old model car. He had come for Lee. Walker =

could=20

not further describe him. </P>

<P>Walker described Oswald as 24 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches, 140 =

pounds,=20

medium complexion, dark eyes, dark brown hair slicked down, wearing old =

clothes,=20

clean and neat having a dagger-with-a-snake tattoo on his left forearm. =

She=20

asked him what this meant and he stated, "Don't tread on me." She then =

asked him=20

what he meant by "tread" and he said "you know, don't step on me." The =

man she=20

met looked younger than the man in the photo of Oswald at police =

station. She=20

asked Sexton if she recalled meeting Oswald, and Sexton replied that she =

was=20

getting a divorce and had not time to get mixed up in anything else. =

Walker also=20

asked Junior Biggs about this man and Junior claimed that that evening =

was the=20

first and last time he had ever seen Lee. He frequented Zotch's home =

from=20

February 1963 until Christmas 1963. He is originally from Michigan. She =

gives=20

the number and address of Zotch's house in Grand Prairie. </P>

<P>The man who picked up Oswald was probably Michael Paine who was =

driving an=20

old model Oldsmobile. That same evening Michael Paine was attending a =

meeting of=20

the John Birch Society. Stevenson was in Dallas for UN Day. </P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation:</B> Junior Biggs corroborated Mrs. Walker regarding the =

presence=20

of Oswald at Zotch=92s house. Data rating: 1.</P>

<P>The fact that Oswald had a tattoo on his arm is significant, for the =

Oswald=20

that was examined by Dr. Rose after his death at the hands of Jack Ruby =

had no=20

such tattoo. This would be strong evidence that there were indeed two =

Oswalds.=20

Significance rating: 1</P></I><B>

<P>Dallas, Texas (November 1963) - </B>James Markham lived with his =

mother Helen=20

at 328 E. Ninth Street. His mother worked as a waitress at the Eatwell =

Caf=E9 at=20

1404 Main Street. Jack Ruby and his friends George Senator and Jim =

Martin often=20

ate there. (Jim Martin would eventually become Marina's business =

representative,=20

with Marina staying at his house.) Helen Markham would take the bus at =

1:00 pm=20

in the afternoon which took her to the Eatwell. She left her son James =

to fend=20

for himself. </P>

<P>On Saturday, November 9 James went to a bowling alley on Jefferson =

Street=20

called Oak Cliff Lanes. There he met a man named Jerry Tolliver. He was =

a stout,=20

muscular man who appeared to be able to lift weights. He was about 27 or =

28=20

years old 5 ft 9 in tall, about 170 pounds. He had thinning black hair. =

</P>

<P>Three days later, on Tuesday, November 12, Markham was walking east =

on=20

Jefferson Blvd. A car pulled up to the curb beside him and Tolliver was =

at the=20

wheel. There was another man sitting on the passenger side. Tolliver =

leaned=20

towards the passenger window and asked Markham where he was going. "To =

the Oak=20

Cliff Grill" Markham replied. Tolliver told him to get in and he would =

take=20

Markham over there. Markham got in the rear seat. The other man was =

introduced=20

by Tolliver as "Ozzie" Several blocks later, Tolliver stopped the car at =

the Oak=20

Cliff Grill and Markham got out. Then Tolliver and Ozzie drove away. =

</P>

<P>On Saturday, November 16, Markham had gone to Kidd Springs Park in =

order to=20

do some fishing. Ozzie was at the park, who was alone just strolling =

through the=20

park. The two men chatted about trivial matters for a short period of =

time and=20

then they parted. </P>

<P>The following Monday James had gone to his brother William's house in =

the=20

afternoon. William was sharing an apartment. on the second floor at the =

Monte=20

Leon Apartment at 221 Lancaster Street. He loved to have parties and =

James would=20

often come over to participate. There were two girls at the apartment, =

one of=20

whom was named Barbara. William's roommate was also there, but William =

had not=20

arrived yet. James went to the rear of the apartment and there was a car =

back=20

there with four young men sitting in it, one of whom was Ozzie. The =

other three=20

men were complete strangers to Markham and he had never seen them since. =

Markham=20

talked with these persons. They asked Markham if there was way of making =

easy=20

money. Various burglary jobs were discussed, but no definite plans were =

made.=20

During this time Ozzie said nothing, after about an hour, Ozzie and the =

others=20

left. Ozzie was not driving. James went back into the apartment to =

resume the=20

party with the group there. </P>

<P>The following day, November 19, at about 3 pm Markham had walked =

alone to the=20

Texas Theater to see a movie. Inside the theater was Ozzie and Tolliver =

He did=20

not expect the pair to be there, but he did sit with them to see the =

movie.=20

Afterwards, the three men walked to the Beckley Club on Jefferson. The =

three men=20

sat in the club for about an hour, drinking soft drinks and chatting =

about=20

various things. Markham said he was not working, because he had just =

finished=20

serving time in prison. Ozzie asked Markham how he felt about that and =

Markham=20

replied that he was rather bitter. While speaking of these matters Ozzie =

asked=20

"How would you like to help me stun the nation?" By stunning the nation =

Ozzie=20

meant killing the President during his forthcoming visit to Dallas. =

Markham=20

thought Ozzie was just kidding around and paid no particular attention. =

They=20

left the Beckley Club and walked together for about a block. Markham =

invited=20

Tolliver and Ozzie to visit with him at his mother's house, sometime in =

the=20

afternoon after his mother had left the apartment to go to work. They =

said that=20

they would do so. They then split up with Markham walking in the =

direction of=20

his mother's house and Ozzie and Tolliver going in a different =

direction. That=20

was the last time that Markham saw Ozzie. </P>

<P>He was identical with Oswald. Markham did see Tolliver on two =

occasions after=20

the assassination. These were not pre-arranged meetings. Markham ran =

into=20

Tolliver by chance. On one of these occasions Markham asked Tolliver if =

had=20

killed the President and Tolliver just laughed and did not answer. James =

had two=20

friends who saw the Tippit shooting, William Arthur Smith and Jimmy =

Burt.=20

</P><B><I>

<P>Evaluation:</B> James Markham was a ne=92r-do-well who got drunk and =

got into=20

trouble with the law. However he was undeniably at the very heart of=20

pre-assassination activities, especially those who later became =

witnesses of the=20

Tippit shooting. Yet his statements remain uncorroborated. This is =

probably=20

because of the great fear that descended upon all those who knew =

anything=20

contrary to the official story of the Tippit shooting. Markham himself =

paid a=20

price for his outspokenness, namely being thrown out a second story =

window by=20

police officers who came to arrest him for a suspected robbery. His =

injuries=20

were such that he had to be taken to the hospital. These considerations =

earn=20

Markham a higher rating of credibility than he would normally deserve. =

Data=20

rating: 2.</P>

<P>Markham saw and spoke to Ozzie (Oswald) on four separate occasions, =

Tuesday=20

November 12, Saturday, November 16, Monday, November 18, and Tuesday, =

November=20

19. He may have encountered a Second Oswald, if we can trust the =

statements of=20

Ruth Paine and Marina Oswald as well as the employee attendance records =

of the=20

Texas School Book Depository. Since all three sources are questionable, =

these=20

lower the significance of this event. Significance rating: 2.</P></I><B>

<P>Conclusion: </B>From the foregoing, we see that the most significant =

episodes=20

in terms of establishing the case for the two Oswalds are before the =

Russian=20

period (1959-1962). I believe that these pre-1959 episodes are =

significant=20

enough to constitute proof that there were indeed two Oswalds. The =

problems in=20

finding significance in the later episodes probably reflect an =

intensification=20

of efforts to monitor the Oswald and keep anomalous episodes from =

popping up=20

that would alert people to their existence. Thus we the jury of the =

United=20

States of America must commend John Armstrong for his research and we =

must now=20

take it into consideration as we move ever closer to identifying the=20

perpetrators of the assassination and bring them to justice. The future =

of=20

democracy in America deserves nothing =

less.

Edited by Bernice Moore

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Hi B.

Yes, I am familiar with both Armstrong's work and Will Weston and appreciate both, but I don't believe there were just two Oswalds but that there were a number of individuals who can still be identified who impersonated him at various times. I think that these various incidents can be explained and the imposters identified.

BK

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Donald O. Norton, the guy Armstrong and Kathleen have been chasing,

I think I over reacted. Still, I always get the feeling you think I'm doing (or did) something reprehensible. We're trying to find Donald O. Norton's relationship to the Assassination. I've given up. Though I heard somewhere that John Armstrong is going to either publish or donate his papers on O. Norton

Thanks everybody.

Love,

Kathy C

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Donald O. Norton, the guy Armstrong and Kathleen have been chasing,

I think I over reacted. Still, I always get the feeling you think I'm doing (or did) something reprehensible. We're trying to find Donald O. Norton's relationship to the Assassination. I've given up. Though I heard somewhere that John Armstrong is going to either publish or donate his papers on O. Norton

Thanks everybody.

Love,

Kathy C

I don't know of any relationship Donald O. Norton had to the assassination other than Armstrong investigated him and you think so.

My only point in mentioning him was so the discussion could center around Donald P. Norton and we wouldn't waste any time on DON.

Apparently Armstrong has donated his papers to Baylor and other researchers are already digging into them, as Greg Parker has posted links to some of them on his blog.

BK

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From William Weston's piece on Two Oslwads:

Felde's observations are strong evidence that there were two Oswalds in the Marine Corps at the same time (October 1956-September 1959) . Significance rating: 1.

McBride's information clearly shows that there was one Oswald in New Orleans while another Oswald was in the Marine Corps at the same time. Armstrong is therefore right in declaring that McBride is the most significant witness in establishing the case for two Oswalds. Significance rating: 1.

Am I really the only person who can see the problem here? Does Weston and/or Armstrong support 2 Oswalds 3 Oswalds? 7? 127?

The use of the data continues to make me cringe.

Yet another example: The alleged trip to Sparta as told by John Abbott.

What is not mentioned in the analysis is that a key person in the story refuted claims made by Abbott while the Chief of Police told the FBI that Abbott is “a person who uses the truth rather loosely” while a sheriff and undersheriff stated that the Abbott family had a history of mental instability and although no records included John Abbott in that category, he was considered "peculiar" by most townspeople.

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=10437&relPageId=13

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=10437&relPageId=14

I am well aware of the FBI's proclivity for playing the mental health card when trying to trash a witness they don't like -- but there are two issues here: Firstly, did Armstrong mention those reports in his book? he was aware of them because they can be located in his collection. If he did not mention them, why not? And why hasn't Weston?

The other issue goes to the FBI and their questioning of mental health. It would be wrong to say that in each and every case, the FBI is lying, just as it would be absurd to suggest they are being truthful in every instance. Each time that mental elf jumps out of his box, he needs to be studied on a case by case basis.

In this instance, I believe the reports are accurate. But even if you believe they are false, is that any reason to leave them out of the discussion?

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From William Weston's piece on Two Oslwads:

Felde's observations are strong evidence that there were two Oswalds in the Marine Corps at the same time (October 1956-September 1959) . Significance rating: 1.

McBride's information clearly shows that there was one Oswald in New Orleans while another Oswald was in the Marine Corps at the same time. Armstrong is therefore right in declaring that McBride is the most significant witness in establishing the case for two Oswalds. Significance rating: 1.

Am I really the only person who can see the problem here? Does Weston and/or Armstrong support 2 Oswalds 3 Oswalds? 7? 127?

The use of the data continues to make me cringe.

Yet another example: The alleged trip to Sparta as told by John Abbott.

What is not mentioned in the analysis is that a key person in the story refuted claims made by Abbott while the Chief of Police told the FBI that Abbott is "a person who uses the truth rather loosely" while a sheriff and undersheriff stated that the Abbott family had a history of mental instability and although no records included John Abbott in that category, he was considered "peculiar" by most townspeople.

http://www.maryferre...37&relPageId=13

http://www.maryferre...37&relPageId=14

I am well aware of the FBI's proclivity for playing the mental health card when trying to trash a witness they don't like -- but there are two issues here: Firstly, did Armstrong mention those reports in his book? he was aware of them because they can be located in his collection. If he did not mention them, why not? And why hasn't Weston?

The other issue goes to the FBI and their questioning of mental health. It would be wrong to say that in each and every case, the FBI is lying, just as it would be absurd to suggest they are being truthful in every instance. Each time that mental elf jumps out of his box, he needs to be studied on a case by case basis.

In this instance, I believe the reports are accurate. But even if you believe they are false, is that any reason to leave them out of the discussion?

I'm as confused as you are, Greg. I know you have looked into William James Lowery before and I have recently started digging around this guy and most of the best stuff regarding him was in the Baylor Armstrong collection. Likewise there was some decent stuff concerning George Butler there as well.

When I went to the index of Harvey & Lee there was one mention of George Butler (related to his observations of Oswald when he took part in the interrogations) and William Lowery is not included in the book at all. And, from what I can gather, Armstrong was the only researcher who had the address of the Shoe Haven where Lowery worked (620 West Jefferson) as a shoe salesman. Three blocks from the Texas Theater.

To say that the fact he did nothing with this information surprised me would be an understatement.

Armstrong knew there was a connection between James Hosty and William Lowery. He also knew the connections of George Butler with Nestor Castellanos and also the fact that Castellenos was an informer who had a close relationship with Jack Revill.

I cannot fathom why this was ignored. And I fully understand the problems that you have with some of the other items that were withheld. Although I had a bit of a verbal scrap with David Lifton about Palmer McBride and the aggressive tactics he allegedly used to brow-beat witnesses as well as the fact he seemed to be more preoccupied with this guy as the ARRB was wrapping than anything of more significance, I do have a problem with McBride and his story.

Lee, I don't know if what WW wrote is a reflection of what is contained in Harvey and Lee, but I have to wonder whether William even realized what he was putting forth. If he only supports two Oswalds, then what he wrote contradicts that by making a case for three.

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Hi B.

Yes, I am familiar with both Armstrong's work and Will Weston and appreciate both, but I don't believe there were just two Oswalds but that there were a number of individuals who can still be identified who impersonated him at various times. I think that these various incidents can be explained and the imposters identified.

BK

Hi Bill; I agree with you re a number of dopelgangers running around, especially Dallas and more so shortly before the assassination, but imo..the military physical documents records, and placings show two distinct Oswalds in there at the same time..imo... b

Edited by Bernice Moore

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