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Please document this RFK quote on the JFK assassination - Thanks!


Guest Robert Morrow

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Guest Robert Morrow

"I now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death."

—Robert Kennedy, June 3, 1968, two days before he was assassinated

Folks, what book or article did this RFK quote come from? Could you give me a book and a page number. Or an article, column title, date, source?

Do you know the context of Robert Kennedy making this quote (very probably on the campaign trail right before the June, 1968 Democratic primary)?

Thank-you.

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"I now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death."

—Robert Kennedy, June 3, 1968, two days before he was assassinated

Folks, what book or article did this RFK quote come from? Could you give me a book and a page number. Or an article, column title, date, source?

Do you know the context of Robert Kennedy making this quote (very probably on the campaign trail right before the June, 1968 Democratic primary)?

Thank-you.

It was stated in California a few days before the primary election and his assassination.

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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I don't trust Pat Lampert's disclaimer as she may have been in the same room but did not hear all of the conversations.

As for Jim D's request for citation, here's what I have:

In "Robert Kennedy and His Times", Arthur Schlesinger, p. 664 (paperback), Schlesinger cites his own "Author's Journal, December 9, 1963" for the following from Robert Kennedy on December 9, 1963: "The FBI thought he (Oswald) had done it by himself, but McCone thought there were two people involved in the shooting".

Journals 1952-2000 Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr

Penguin Press 2007

Diary entry December 9, 1963 page 184

Schlesinger journal entry: Schlesinger and Robert Kennedy discussion "I asked him, perhaps tactlessly about Oswald. He said there could be no serious doubt that he was guilty, but there still was argument whether he did it by himself or as a part of a larger plot, whether organized by Castro or by gangsters. He said the FBI people thought he had done it by himself, but that McCone thought there were two people involved in the shooting."

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OK, I guess I will have to go through every McCone citation in the hard cover then to find it.

But Bill, its not a matter of trusting Lambert. Lifton got a couple of things wrong in that e mail. RFK was not personally antagonistic to the JG inquiry. Sheridan was, but clearly RFK did not buy Sheridan's view in 1968 as evidenced by the Mort Sahl anecdote in my book. And also other contacts with the Garrison inquiry, through Weisberg for example.

But on the main point, whether RFK said this at CSUN (then SFV College), he is correct. There is no corroboration for Davis. So its not a matter of trusting Lambert. Its a matter of trusting a guy like Davis--who, the less said about the better--or buying the hard to buy fact that there is no trace of this in the media at the time.

Now, the RFK primary campaign in California was one of the most wall to wall covered primaries in modern history. Not just in America but from abroad. It defies logic that a quote as explosive at that one would not be recorded by the contemporary press.

That is quite a large negative to prove.

I had a few drinks with John Davis in Dallas during the ASK conference, and while he's a bad drunk, I tend to believe what he wrote.

I don't disbelieve Lampert, I'm sure she didn't hear RFK say what he is quoted as saying, she may have been in the audience of hundreds or thousands, and RFK may have been asked that question in the hall way by someone not part of the regular program.

I'm not calling anyone a xxxx, I am just saying that Lampert could't have known everything that was said that day.

And Jim, I don't have the book or the page citation for the Schlesinger bio of RFK but I do know the citation footnotes the Journal - Dec. 9, 1963 p. 184.

BK

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"I now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death."

—Robert Kennedy, June 3, 1968, two days before he was assassinated

Folks, what book or article did this RFK quote come from? Could you give me a book and a page number. Or an article, column title, date, source?

Do you know the context of Robert Kennedy making this quote (very probably on the campaign trail right before the June, 1968 Democratic primary)?

Thank-you.

This is pure urban legend.

At San Fernando Valley College, RFK was asked about the Warren Report. He said he believed the Warren Report and would not re-open the matter.

These remarks were broadcast repeatedly that day. I made a tape of them, and was thoroughly disgusted at the time.

In the years after RFK's assassination, a myth grew about what he said that day.

At one point, I had a tape of his remarks, and would play it. I am sure it was reported accurately in the local press.

Once Bobby was assassinated, not only were his public remarks distorted, but it was also then alleged that Bobby sent an emissary to Garrison saying something along these lines.

To recap: insofar as remarks made at San Fernando Valley College are concerned, It is all a bunch of baloney, and I wouldn't believe a word of it.

What I have found amazing about this incident is that what people really would like to believe --what they would really wish that Bobby had actually said--has been substituted for what he actually did say, and has acquired a life of its own.

One other thing--call this a "postscript" of sorts: I am not saying that Bobby Kennedy did not have a "private" position on the assassination. I believe he did. I'm simply stating that Robert Kennedu never said any such thing at Valley College, or in any other public forum.

DSL

1/19/13; 9:10 PM PST

Los Angeles, California

Edited by David Lifton
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Guest Robert Morrow

And honestly, under the glare of the spotlights of the 1968 presidential race, I don't think RFK would be publicly saying such "controversial" things. He might have ... but I doubt it.

Robert

I guess I can quite posting this all over the freaking internet now.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Ok. And what about the veracity and documentation of this quote?

In May of 1968, Richard Lubic, an aide to Robert Kennedy, called William Turner and told him, "After he's elected, Bobby's going to go. He's going to reopen the investigation."

I think William Turner has stated that.

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I believe the source of this quote may be Mark Lane, who gave a PBS television interview in New Orleans the day the California polls closed, before Robert was assassinated. He publically spoke about Kennedy's message, passed to him via Jim Garrison, that if he was elected President, he would open a new investigation and blow the whole case open.

Writer Jack Anderson was in the audience, a guest that same day, and asked Lane questions. Anderson later told Lane he had written a column about Lane's announcement, titled "Ominous Prophecy".

As far as Lane is aware, it went unpublished.

Lane wrote about this event in his recent book Last Word: My Indictment of the CIA in the Murder of JFK.

While this certainly doesn't count as a public statement by Robert Kennedy, (it's heresay the way it was passed on), the event's incredible timing- Lane giving the televised interview virtually as Kennedy is about to be shot, really left me gasping when I read it. I have to think Mark Lane felt dreadful and a bit guilty as well as very frightened at the time. Think about how it would make you feel, if you were the one deciding to spill the beans with such a disasterous thing happening immediately thereafter.

The book is an interesting read, as is his even more recent autobiography, Citizen Lane.

Edited by Patrick Block
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"I now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death."

—Robert Kennedy, June 3, 1968, two days before he was assassinated

Folks, what book or article did this RFK quote come from? Could you give me a book and a page number. Or an article, column title, date, source?

Do you know the context of Robert Kennedy making this quote (very probably on the campaign trail right before the June, 1968 Democratic primary)?

Thank-you.

This is pure urban legend.

At San Fernando Valley College, RFK was asked about the Warren Report. He said he believed the Warren Report and would not re-open the matter.

These remarks were broadcast repeatedly that day. I made a tape of them, and was thoroughly disgusted at the time.

In the years after RFK's assassination, a myth grew about what he said that day.

At one point, I had a tape of his remarks, and would play it. I am sure it was reported accurately in the local press.

Once Bobby was assassinated, not only were his public remarks distorted, but it was also then alleged that Bobby sent an emissary to Garrison saying something along these lines.

To recap: insofar as remarks made at San Fernando Valley College are concerned, It is all a bunch of baloney, and I wouldn't believe a word of it.

What I have found amazing about this incident is that what people really would like to believe --what they would really wish that Bobby had actually said--has been substituted for what he actually did say, and has acquired a life of its own.

One other thing--call this a "postscript" of sorts: I am not saying that Bobby Kennedy did not have a "private" position on the assassination. I believe he did. I'm simply stating that Robert Kennedu never said any such thing at Valley College, or in any other public forum.

DSL

1/19/13; 9:10 PM PST

Los Angeles, California

I believe you are right about this David, and I would not use that quote, I just answered the original question posed by RM as to when and where it was attributed.

BK

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Guest Robert Morrow

RFK SPEAKS OUT FOR THE FIRST TIME ON HIS INTEREST IN WHO WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DEATH OF JFK AND HIS QUESTIONS ABOUT THE WARREN COMMISSION.

(RFK at campaign rally at San Fernando Valley College --- now Cal State Northridge in Los Angeles CA on 3.25.68)

RFK said “Go ahead.” (to a woman and others repeated questions) “I’m sure as I have said before, the (JFK) archives will be open. (cheers) Can I just say and I haven’t answered this question before but there is no one who would be more interested in all of these matters as to uh, who was responsible for the death of uh, uh, President Kennedy than I would. I have seen all of the matters in the archives. If I become President of the United States, I would not, I, I would not re-open the Warren Commission Report. I think, ah, I stand by the Warren Commission Report. I’ve seen everything in the Archives. The Archives will be available at the appropriate time” (cheers)

This text is based on a KCLA radio recording now in KPFK’s archives and is published in David Talbot’s BROTHERS p. 358) 2007. Carl Greenberg also reported this in the LATimes 3.26.68)

RFK Press Secretary Frank Mankiewicz hearing this from RFK recalled “I remember I was stunned by the answer.” (Talbot p.358)

Days later in San Francisco Richard Lubic, a campaign consultant, asked RFK about his position on the Warren Commission. RFK told Lubic, “Subject to me getting elected, I would like to reopen the Warren Commission.” (Talbot p.359)

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Apparently RFK aides Richard Lubic (to Bill Turner) and Frank Mankiewicz (to David Talbot) confirm that RFK said something to that effect and the Boston Globe (March 26, 1968) published a reference to it. Thanks to Tom Scully for compiling this list of sources and links.

JFKCountercoup2: RFK's "Only the powers of the Presidency" Quote

The assassination please almanac - Page 148

"I now fully realize that only the powers of the presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death." —ROBERT F. KENNEDY to several students at San Fernando Valley State College, June 3, 1968

The fish is red: the story of the secret war against Castro - Page 198

Warren Hinckle, William W. Turner - 1981

now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death. — ROBERT KENNEDY, June j, 1968, two days before he was shot

Conspiracy - Page 526

Anthony Summers - 1981 - Former Attorney General Robert Kennedy was reported as saying, two days before his own assassination in 1968, "I now fully realize that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death."

https://deeppoliticsforum.com/forums/showthread.php?344-Questions-for-William-Turner-and-Mort-Sahl-in-re-a-Garrison-RFK-Meeting

Questions for William Turner and Mort Sahl in re a Garrison/RFK Meeting

As noted in an earlier thread:

In his presentation at "Making Sense of the Sixties," this year's Cyril Wecht-sponsored symposium at Duquesne, William Turner offered the following:

"In May 1968 RFK's California campaign aide, Richard Lubic, tracked me down by phone in [Jim] Garrison's office to advise, 'after he's elected, [bobby Kennedy] is going to go. He's going to reopen the investigation [of JFK's death].' When I conveyed the glad tidings Garrison broke into a Cheshire cat grin.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1014&pid=366478

.....Much of that research may be covered in the book "Farewell America: The Plot to Kill JFK". From the introduction to the book (by William Turner):

Farewell America: The Plot to Kill JFK - Page 16

James Hepburn - 2002 -... shot, RFK said, "I now fully realize that only the powers of the presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death.

Kennedy Drive Wins West Coast Cheers .

Milwaukee Journal - Mar 26, 1968

Robert Kennedy took his campaign to Oregon Tuesday, encouraged by cheers and ... An estimated 12000 stu dents and older persons jammed theSan Fernando ...

ROBERT F KENNEDY AT SAN FERNANDO VALLEY STATE ...

Robert F. Kennedy at San Fernando Valley State College, introduced by Jesse Unruh. Speech to students on campus during his Presidential campaign, shortly .

I suspect David Lifton is confusing his recollection of RFK's speech at San Fernando Valley State in March with comments attributed to RFK in early June,

only to a few San Fernando Valley students. Of course, McAdams loved the opportunity to push this.:

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/rfkclaim.txt

#: 20204 S4/Medical Evidence [JFK]

02-Apr-94 03:34:05

Sb: #18902-Gary, My Albatross

Fm: David S. Lifton 72303,2702

To: Alan Rogers 73040,2063

This is from memory, so pardon possible innaccuracies, but

here's what happened.

.....In 1984, John Davis book---THE KENNEDYS---appeared. His chapter 55 ("The Mysteries") closed with the following passage:

"Robert Kennedy's sense of guilt must have been overwhelming. There was no way he could expiate that guilt. However, if he were to become President, it was conceivable he could make up, at least in part, for what happened to Jack, and might even be in a position to uncover and punish those who were responsible for his brother's assassination. 'I now fully realize,' he told an audience of students at San Fernando State College on June 3, 1968, that only the powers of the Presidency will reveal the secrets of my brother's death.' Three days later he himself was dead, the victim also of an assassin's bullet." (pp. 602-603, paperback).

Oh really. Is that what RFK said? Well, Pat Lambert, my long time friend, was there, when the questioning of RFK occurred, and she didn't hear any such thing; and exactly the opposite was broadcast, repeatedly, by the media. And I can assure you that had RFK said any such thing, it would have been major news---major national news."

So....over a span of at least 19 years, David Lifton appears still able to confuse two descriptions of when and what was said by RFK, and still command an

audience for what appear to be his erroneous and confused recollection. He does qualify what he is about to say, but people read it and re-post it as if it is meaningful.

http://www.salon.com/2004/09/15/warren/

Wednesday, Sep 15, 2004 02:38 PM EDT

.....On March 25, during a presidential campaign rally at San Fernando Valley State College in California, Kennedy was dramatically confronted by a woman heckler, who called out, “We want to know who killed President Kennedy!” Kennedy responded by saying, “I stand by the Warren Commission Report.” But at a later campaign appearance, days before his assassination, Bobby Kennedy said the opposite, according to his former press spokesman Frank Mankiewicz. When asked if he would reopen the investigation into his brother’s death, he uttered a simple, one-word answer: “Yes.” Mankiewicz recalls today, “I remember that I was stunned by the answer. It was either like he was suddenly blurting out the truth, or it was a way to shut down the questioning — you know, ‘Yes, now let’s move on.’”

And Talbot is consistent with this.:

RFK Says 'False Pride' Killing GIs in Viet

Boston Globe - Mar 26, 1968

Robert F. Kennedy on Monday evoked cheers and thundering applause as he addressed a crowd of about 12000 at San Fernando Valley State College. ...time but that If became President would not reopen the Warren Report Nobody is more ...

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Guest Robert Morrow

Farewell America is most definitely not a disinformation tract. And I think the vast majority of credible JFK researchers will agree with me on that.

That is not say that everything in Farewell America is "correct."

The CIA is not going to put out a book such as "Farewell America" with a chapter all but saying Oswald is an agent of US intelligence or at least implying it. See the chapter titled "Spies." That pretty much is a prima facie proof that "Farewell America" is not a disinformation tract.

Nor would the FBI move heaven and earth to keep "Farewell America" from coming into the USA. That pretty much is a prima facie proof that "Farewell America" is not a disinformation tract.

Not only that, apparently govt. agents (or someone looking like them) were trying to prevent "Farewell America's" entrance into the USA as late as the 1980's.

What Farewell America does do is lead one to believe that both Texas oil executives AND US intelligence were involved in the JFK assassination.... and I think that is spot on.

Read "Farewell America: The Book and the Enigma" by Al Navis.

http://www.jfk-online.com/farewellnavis1.html

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In my opinion, John Davis' book is just a useless distraction, unless he gave a source. I do not own Davis' book and although a lot of The Kennedys is reproduced at Google Books, the key page is missing.

Maybe he did what a lot of authors do: Take something they read in another book and put it in theirs, using that book as their source, rather than going to the primary source.

As was noted in another post, Tom Miller's The Assassination Please Almanac contained the exact quote. Miller's book was published in 1977.

So that quote had been around for sixteen years before Davis' book.

Miller does not give a source, but he writes that Robert Kennedy made those comments "to several students at San Fernando Valley State College., June 3, 1968."

In other words, RFK did not make those comments during his speech, according to that account.

I looked carefully for that quote in Farewell America (1968), but could not find it. It certainly isn't on page 16.

Oddly, Hepburn's book starts with page 13, not page 1.

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