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Honestly given Angleton's mental state that would be hard to say...we now know that he secretly traveled (secret from the CIA itself) to Europe to pursue leads on major foreign government figures he felt were Soviet agents, that he did break ins on his own, that he kept things in his own isolated files that the CIA itself destroyed as they went through them after his departure.  I'd say that by 63 he was probably certifiable, certainly he was at the end of his career.  From what I can gather at that point he was simply wondering around HQ, visiting with only senior officers he trusted from years past and rambling on about things that worried him....then just walking out. He may well have started something without fully realizing it.  

As to Barnes, we also now know that he literally lied to everyone above and below him in regard to the Cuban landings, that he became virtually unhinged after they failed and that he was moved into domestic ops to more or less just keep him out of further trouble since busing him would have meant acknowledging what really happened at the BOP.   Given that if there was any CIA monitoring of Oswald or contact with him in 63 inside the US it would have fallen under domestic ops that makes things interesting.  And as a side note those familiar with him admit that he developed an intense personal hate for JFK over the BOP ...again almost certifiable given his total and adamant rejection of his own failure.  And of course Barnes would have known all the Cuba operation players from 1960/61...which included Hecksher, Morales, Robertson et al.

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Larry

What stays with me is your deep suspicion and interest in Henry Hecksher.  He was 79 years old when he died in 1990 in Princeton NJ.   Hecksher was born in Hamburg, Germany, and was a lawyer and a judge there before emigrating to the United States in 1938. He joined the Army, rising to the rank of captain, took part in the Normandy invasion, and was wounded in Antwerp. He later became an intelligence officer and interrogated some of the top Nazi leaders. He joined the Office of Strategic Services and in 1946 became head of its counterintelligence section in Berlin. He remained with the agency when it became the CIA and later served with the State Department in Laos, Indonesia, Japan and Chile.  His pseudonyms were Nelson L. Raynock and also James D. Zaboth and Henry Boysen.  He seems connected with Carl Jenkins and Morales.  He was the station chief in Santiago, Chile when they overthrew Allende.  Hecksher retired in 1971. Any luck in further deconstructing his involvement?

Gene

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Gene,

Not to answer for Larry,, but  we've discovered thatJames Zaboth was Carl Jenkins. Jenkins was second to Hecksher at AMWORLD. Jenkins/Zaboth remained Artime's case officer from 1964-66.

They went back to pre-BOP. Jenkins was working with Artime's Infil team.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by David Boylan

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To elaborate a bit,  the longer backstory on Hecksher is important since he was Station Chief in Laos, was reassigned to work with independent nationalist troop formations working drugs in the golden triangle - troops that  were being recruited as anti-Communist insurgents in Laos, before CIA shifted there attention to the Hmong.  Then Hecksher became station chief in Japan during the time Oswald and Nagell were there, came back for the first Cuba project, was in Mexico City on a highly secret assignment when Nagell was there and I suspect Hecksher was "Bob" (for Berlin Operating Base where he had been chief) as described by Nagell.   His role in 63 is more interesting in terms of the individuals he had high level authority over like Jenkins and Quintero - which leads...well which leads to what David and I have been doing that I will present in Dallas next month.  More on that after the conference.

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1 hour ago, Larry Hancock said:

To elaborate a bit,  the longer backstory on Hecksher is important since he was Station Chief in Laos, was reassigned to work with independent nationalist troop formations working drugs in the golden triangle - troops that  were being recruited as anti-Communist insurgents in Laos, before CIA shifted there attention to the Hmong.  Then Hecksher became station chief in Japan during the time Oswald and Nagell were there, came back for the first Cuba project, was in Mexico City on a highly secret assignment when Nagell was there and I suspect Hecksher was "Bob" (for Berlin Operating Base where he had been chief) as described by Nagell.   His role in 63 is more interesting in terms of the individuals he had high level authority over like Jenkins and Quintero - which leads...well which leads to what David and I have been doing that I will present in Dallas next month.  More on that after the conference.

How long was he stationed in Berlin?

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2 hours ago, Larry Hancock said:

To elaborate a bit,  the longer backstory on Hecksher is important since he was Station Chief in Laos, was reassigned to work with independent nationalist troop formations working drugs in the golden triangle - troops that  were being recruited as anti-Communist insurgents in Laos, before CIA shifted there attention to the Hmong.  Then Hecksher became station chief in Japan during the time Oswald and Nagell were there, came back for the first Cuba project, was in Mexico City on a highly secret assignment when Nagell was there and I suspect Hecksher was "Bob" (for Berlin Operating Base where he had been chief) as described by Nagell.   His role in 63 is more interesting in terms of the individuals he had high level authority over like Jenkins and Quintero - which leads...well which leads to what David and I have been doing that I will present in Dallas next month.  More on that after the conference.

I've read some threads elsewhere in recent years discounting Nagell, and Russell's work.  If he was possibly crossing path's with Hecksher in Mexico City in the early 60's that would lend credence to some of his statements.  Interesting recent post's.  Thanks gentlemen for educating me. 

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Hecksher was not just stationed in Berlin, he actually became station chief prior to Harvey.  Would have to look it up for the exact time period.  Both he and Morales moved into PB/SUCCESS in Guatemala from Berlin Station.

As to Hecksher in Mexico City,  some of the strongest confirmation comes from Australian researchers who managed to dig up his air travel records which show his travel to Mexico City after this assignment to the first Cuba project.

 

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On ‎10‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 3:56 PM, Mathias Baumann said:

A question to all members of the forum: What do you think is the dark area above Morales' eyebrow that can be seen in the photos linked above?

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