Jump to content
The Education Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Greg Burnham

Looking at the Tippit Case from a Different Angle

Recommended Posts

Looking at the Tippit Case from a Different Angle

A Theory

by Staffan H Westerberg and Pete Engwall

The killing of Dallas police officer JD Tippit is one of the undying questions in the JFK research community. To think one could solve the murder is perhaps a bit optimistic after all these years. Tippits death has always been surrounded with mystery and disinformation: Did a jealous husband kill him, or was it a random killing that happened by accident? JD Tippit as a narcotics dealer or a getaway driver for Oswald to the Red Bird Airport? The murder on 10th and Patton is not short of theories, but we think that the Dallas policeman had an important function that day – he was scheduled to die with the sole purpose of becoming the vehicle with which JFK’s killer was to be caught. As it were, before Tippits death the Dallas Police didn’t have any hard evidence to be able to explain to the American people how they were able to arrest Oswald for the murder of the President.

Read more

Edited by Greg Burnham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the Tippit Case from a Different Angle

A Theory

by Staffan H Westerberg and Pete Engwall

The killing of Dallas police officer JD Tippit is one of the undying questions in the JFK research community. To think one could solve the murder is perhaps a bit optimistic after all these years. Tippits death has always been surrounded with mystery and disinformation: Did a jealous husband kill him, or was it a random killing that happened by accident? JD Tippit as a narcotics dealer or a getaway driver for Oswald to the Red Bird Airport? The murder on 10th and Patton is not short of theories, but we think that the Dallas policeman had an important function that day – he was scheduled to die with the sole purpose of becoming the vehicle with which JFK’s killer was to be caught. As it were, before Tippits death the Dallas Police didn’t have any hard evidence to be able to explain to the American people how they were able to arrest Oswald for the murder of the President.

Read more

Oswald's going home that afternoon to get his gun and then on to the Texas Theater to meet someone unknown to him argues for his being an intelligence agent who had been told to go to the Theater that particular afternoon (on some unknown-to-us "secret mission") but who realized that he had probably been set up as The Patsy and therefore wanted to have his sidearm with him for protection.

The fact that Oswald didn't take his revolver to work with him that morning, to use in any post-assassination getaway attempt, suggests his innocence in the assassination of JFK.

Any theory which says that some imposter went to Oswald's rooming house to make it look like Oswald himself had gone there to get his gun and jacket overlooks this fact and over complicates things, IMHO.

If the bad guys planned to kill Tippit and have Oswald take the blame for it, why not just shoot Tippit and plant the murder weapon on Oswald when he was arrested at the Texas Theater, especially if what the authors claim is true, i.e. that John Armstrong has "proved" that Oswald didn't own the revolver he was allegedly arrested with, anyway?

--Tommy :sun

PS The authors' grammar and spelling mistakes are chocking (sic), absolutely chocking !

LOL

Edited by Thomas Graves

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out the book by Wean called "There's a Fish in the Courthouse". It contains a Panicked Texas Senator John Tower getting war hero Audie Murphy what went down. Murphy was a big Dallas Mason and Mason John Tower needed some insurance, in case the killers came after him.

There you find the real deal, that Ruby was assigned to shoot Oswald and become the big Hero for killing the guy that shot JFK..

But as luck might have it, Tippit spotted Ruby and Oswald and Ruby fired on Tippet and killed him and LHO ran to the Live Drop meet-up at the Texas Theater.

Turns out that the Mason that owned the Texas Theater go Masont Audie Murphie his start in Hollywood.

Ruby worked for Marcello and Marcello wanted to frame up LHO. It would have been the perfect frame-up, if Tippit had not appeared.


After that shooting, Ruby was having a panic attack and closed his club because he still had to kill LHO. So, Ruby stalked LHO and eventually connected in the Basement of the Police station.

Ruby already had a Murder 1 for shooting Tippit, and if could play the Hero bit again, he might get off on killing LHO. The mob pushed Ruby because he was a ZIonist Jew that if LHO told who shoot Tippit, then the Zionist Jew Ruby would be all over the Newspapers as part of the JFK hit.


Pretty simple----and some Masons in Texas did talk and it was captured in the Wean book's accoun.



 

Hi Pres. Trump,
 
I think JFK found being Pres was harder than he thought also!
 
Our Pal Roger Stone has pretty much figured out that Jack Ruby, Mac Wallace, and Jim Braden were the directors for the JFK hit, and they used Chicago Mafia shooters in the Dal-Tex, TSBD, and GN to kill JFK, all while LHO was on the front steps to the TSBD.
 
LHO was ratting out a bunch of rogue CIA and Mafia types and he had to be silenced. It is pretty easy as Braden was Dallas' Murchison/Hunt hired gun, Ruby was LBJ Mafia hit man stalking LHO around the TSBD and DPD, and Mac Wallace was LBJ's well known killer that left his finger prints in the TSBD.
 
Such is well known now thanks to Roger Stone and lots of others that dug out the facts.
 
So, please do admit what happened officially on the JFK hit, so the world can learn and work for peace and transparency to make all Safer. imho


 

Edited by Jim Phelps
spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Read all the dirty details shared by Masons that got the real story in Wean's book, Chapter 44. This is a very expensive book these days because it is so pivotal in explaining the JFK hit and the LHO hit.


http://www.iamthewitness.com/books/Gareth.L.Wean/There's.a.FISH.in.the.COURTHOUSE.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PS The authors' grammar and spelling mistakes are chocking (sic), absolutely chocking !

LOL

The authors live in Sweden and English is not their first language. Feel free to proof read their article and resubmit it to me, as I can't proof read for grammar 100% of the time. I'm sure they would appreciate it. It's only a few thousand words long.

As for the remainder of your post, feel free to raise your concerns at the forum. Staffan and Pete are quite affable and open to discussion:

http://forum.assassinationofjfk.net/index.php/topic/346-staffan-westerberg-pete-engwalls-new-article/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg - I think its a brilliant analysis. I wonder whether the authors have thought of an explanation for Tippit's frantic actions prior to his death. McBride points out in his excellent research on Tippit that he was a marksman. The Glaco gas station, where Tippit was reliably identified at about 12:40 pm, was less than 2 miles from Dealey Plaza, and the witness who claimed Tippit answered a call to his retail business 10 minutes prior to the assassination only came forward years later, and his story is not corroborated by police records. We are supposed to believe that Tippit was searching for JFK's assassin as a result of a radio call from police dispatch to be on the lookout for a man whose physical description fit Oswald's, but what it really fits is the false physical description of Oswald planted by Angleton in his compartmentalized CIA file dangled by him to see where that false description might later appear. No way Tippit had an accurate description of Oswald at 12:40 pm. But his actions would appear to show a desperate man. Surely one possible explanation is that he was on the grassy knoll at 12:30 in police uniform.

I think the authors are right to mention Jack Crichton and Operation 40, along with George Bush, whose family was the direct beneficiary of the destruction of the Kennedy clan. Hoover's infamous George Bush memo, uncovered by McBride, seems to be the real smoking gun. Can anyone here point to another instance where Hoover named a CIA agent in a memo? Does anyone here believe that the 'George Bush of the CIA' was not our future president? So why did Hoover write this memo, and what does it tell us? First, that George Bush was indeed working for the CIA in 1963, and probably much earlier, and it tells us that Hoover knew that. In my opinion it also implies that Hoover knew who the plotters were, and that he wanted the plotters to know that he knew, and that he had the goods and was therefore untouchable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg:

Thanks for posting this theory. It is thought-provoking, and comes at the Tippit legend from a different angle. It is this kind of thinking (challenging the long-held facts) that brings the plot into better focus. Earlene Roberts' testimony and deposition is one of the more pivotal (and questionable) pieces of evidence in the entire case... and the way she and her story were handled was very questionable. I used to hold open the idea that Tippit's murder could've been a part of the plan gone bad... but McBride's book and this analysis tells me he was indeed sacrificed and perhaps something else. If in fact he were a Knoll player, what a convenient way to eliminate one of the mechanics. I am reminded of one researcher's comment (can't recall who) that none of the actual shooters would likely be left alive a year later.

As the authors emphasize, the planners had way too much that depended on Oswald being perceived to have picked up a gun and a jacket in his room. They could not leave that to chance, and the vagaries of his post-assassination travels. Oswald at the boarding house had to be a “sure thing”. I concur that they couldn’t rely on Oswald’s actions to promptly play the part; they must have had an imposter to follow a script ... the only way to be sure they could blame Oswald for the crime. Curtain rods and employment at TSBD weren't enough at that point. And I firmly believe (as they state) that nothing happened by accident.

The authors make some very good practical points: something very peculiar was going on when a ticket cashier could call the police at a moment when the phone lines to the Dallas Police must have been overloaded, only to have them send between 20-30 cops to a movie theatre because a suspicious person walked in without paying for a ticket. Chief Curry's thin statements about how the general description leads to an arrest, the implausible timing of it all, the weak sounding TSBD head count, Oswald's arrest ... the authors connect the dots in a convincing way.

When I first jumped into this black hole of disinformation many years ago, I was mainly struck by one implausible fact: Oswald was identified as a suspect very early on - based on a vague description whose provenance was unclear (even today) and a questionable Baker/Truly interaction - and then arrested within 90 minutes. The author's make their case well by challenging the implausible sequence of events, and logically connect Tippit's sacrifice to Oswald's incrimination. Bigger picture, consider the dichodemy: The century's most controversial murder was solved in world record time!

Gene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg - I think its a brilliant analysis. I wonder whether the authors have thought of an explanation for Tippit's frantic actions prior to his death. McBride points out in his excellent research on Tippit that he was a marksman. The Glaco gas station, where Tippit was reliably identified at about 12:40 pm, was less than 2 miles from Dealey Plaza, and the witness who claimed Tippit answered a call to his retail business 10 minutes prior to the assassination only came forward years later, and his story is not corroborated by police records. We are supposed to believe that Tippit was searching for JFK's assassin as a result of a radio call from police dispatch to be on the lookout for a man whose physical description fit Oswald's, but what it really fits is the false physical description of Oswald planted by Angleton in his compartmentalized CIA file dangled by him to see where that false description might later appear. No way Tippit had an accurate description of Oswald at 12:40 pm. But his actions would appear to show a desperate man. Surely one possible explanation is that he was on the grassy knoll at 12:30 in police uniform.

I think the authors are right to mention Jack Crichton and Operation 40, along with George Bush, whose family was the direct beneficiary of the destruction of the Kennedy clan. Hoover's infamous George Bush memo, uncovered by McBride, seems to be the real smoking gun. Can anyone here point to another instance where Hoover named a CIA agent in a memo? Does anyone here believe that the 'George Bush of the CIA' was not our future president? So why did Hoover write this memo, and what does it tell us? First, that George Bush was indeed working for the CIA in 1963, and probably much earlier, and it tells us that Hoover knew that. In my opinion it also implies that Hoover knew who the plotters were, and that he wanted the plotters to know that he knew, and that he had the goods and was therefore untouchable.

Paul I encourage you to ask the authors that question on my forum yourself rather than me be the go-between. I'm sure that any discussion that comes of it will add to the clarity of the analysis. Thanks--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg:

Thanks for posting this theory. It is thought-provoking, and comes at the Tippit legend from a different angle. It is this kind of thinking (challenging the long-held facts) that brings the plot into better focus. Earlene Roberts' testimony and deposition is one of the more pivotal (and questionable) pieces of evidence in the entire case... and the way she and her story were handled was very questionable. I used to hold open the idea that Tippit's murder could've been a part of the plan gone bad... but McBride's book and this analysis tells me he was indeed sacrificed and perhaps something else. If in fact he were a Knoll player, what a convenient way to eliminate one of the mechanics. I am reminded of one researcher's comment (can't recall who) that none of the actual shooters would likely be left alive a year later.

As the authors emphasize, the planners had way too much that depended on Oswald being perceived to have picked up a gun and a jacket in his room. They could not leave that to chance, and the vagaries of his post-assassination travels. Oswald at the boarding house had to be a “sure thing”. I concur that they couldn’t rely on Oswald’s actions to promptly play the part; they must have had an imposter to follow a script ... the only way to be sure they could blame Oswald for the crime. Curtain rods and employment at TSBD weren't enough at that point. And I firmly believe (as they state) that nothing happened by accident.

The authors make some very good practical points: something very peculiar was going on when a ticket cashier could call the police at a moment when the phone lines to the Dallas Police must have been overloaded, only to have them send between 20-30 cops to a movie theatre because a suspicious person walked in without paying for a ticket. Chief Curry's thin statements about how the general description leads to an arrest, the implausible timing of it all, the weak sounding TSBD head count, Oswald's arrest ... the authors connect the dots in a convincing way.

When I first jumped into this black hole of disinformation many years ago, I was mainly struck by one implausible fact: Oswald was identified as a suspect very early on - based on a vague description whose provenance was unclear (even today) and a questionable Baker/Truly interaction - and then arrested within 90 minutes. The author's make their case well by challenging the implausible sequence of events, and logically connect Tippit's sacrifice to Oswald's incrimination. Bigger picture, consider the dichodemy: The century's most controversial murder was solved in world record time!

Gene

You're welcome, Gene.

I agree with your observations about the jammed phone lines at the DPD and the haste with which a "suspected non-paying movie goer" was apprehended, quite a distance from the Crime of the Century, when the President's murderer was still on the loose!

Stan posted this on my forum:

----------------------------------

Lee Harvey Oswald Draws a Crowd

Never, ever think of sneaking into a movie theater without paying for your ticket.

spot_386_899.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this-makes me examine the Tippit angle from a whole new light

You're welcome, Harvey.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg:

I will visit your forum, and look forward to interacting with the authors. The Tippit story has become a real centerpiece for me on the entire case. Joe McBride's book was welcome information and opens up this chapter to some healthy re-examination (beyond Dale Meyers), as has been the work Duke Lane has done on this Forum. I'd like to ask you a few points about the Tippit affair, starting with two individuals who greatly peak my suspicion as persons of interest: Sgt. Gerald Hill and Capt. William Westbrook. What is your view of them, and their roles?

Gene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to seeing you there, Gene.

As for Gerald Hill...he was just about everywhere that day, huh?

I've often wondered why? Wasn't he in personnel that day at City Hall? Wasn't he vetting police officer applicants that day? There is something very "interesting" about his whole story. It starts with his not being able to remember if he climbed the steps from the 5th floor to the 6th floor of the TSBD that day? Right? When Belin first asks him about the elevator, he can't remember for sure if he took the steps to the top or not. That is extremely suspect. He would HAVE to remember that because it is memorable. Eventually he seems to "fill that part in" but his memory lapse is curious. There is a lot to consider about his story, too much to cover here. He was everywhere that Lee Harvey Oswald was supposed to have been that day following the assassination.

Plus he supplied transportation for the reporter, Jim Ewell, who hitched a ride with him to both the original "crime scene" at the TSBD and then to the Tippit crime scene in Oak Cliff! It's interesting that during Hill's Warren Commission testimony, the report misspelled the name as Jim E. Well when the reporter was hitching a ride to the TSBD with Hill, but spelled it correctly as Jim Ewell, when the reporter was hitching a ride to the the Tippit crime scene in Oak Cliff.

And since when does a police officer provide "courtesy" transportation to a reporter while the officer is in the middle of performing his law enforcement duties immediately following the commission of a crime--particularly a homicide--where the perpetrator(s) must be considered armed and dangerous? Police officers are notorious for limiting access to reporters because oftentimes reporters can inadvertently interfere with an investigation if allowed to roam freely. Inevitably reporters must be allowed to do their job, but not to the detriment of the investigation, and more importantly, not to the detriment of the apprehension of the suspected perpetrators in the immediate wake of the commission of a capital crime. I haven't even mentioned the safety of the reporter! Police tend to limit reporters' access for as long as legally possible. They do not tend to aid a reporter in getting a story in any manner including offering transportation especially while in pursuit of the perp.

If only Jim Ewell had a movie camera with him in the back seat. I can hear the song now: "Bad boys, bad boys, whatchya gonna do, whatchya gonna do when they come for you...bad boys bad boys..."

Edited by Greg Burnham

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed ... Hill's actions are right in the middle of everything important during that heightened period of 12:30 -1:55pm referred to by the authors. I think Hill was part of the "convoy" that Jim Garrison referred to in his work; the convoy that was escorting Oswald to the theatre, ferrying Lee from the TSBD to the roominghouse and beyond, and planting evidence all along the path from TSBD to Tippit scene to the Texas Theatre. He touched everything associated with the incrimination of Oswald including his arrest and transport to DPD headquarters... everything! What are the chances of that happening in such a high profile and fact-paced crime? If this was a movie, he'd be played by Bruce Willis... and given all of his actions/discoveries, you'd think he would've been singled-out by authorities, including the Warren Commission as a hero.

Westbrook had some unique and temporary group organized within the DPD, of which Hill was affiliated (both had only recently joined the force, or these groups, I believe). I think this reflects a common pattern, part of the standard game plan (CIA, plotters, cut-outs) to infiltrate the police ranks, control the evidence and manage/intimidate the witnesses. Total control of the entire crime scene, with perfect cover and plausible deniability... who would challenge the bona fides of a law enforcement officer under these circumstances?

We see the same modus operandi in RFK's murder at the Ambassador Hotel only 5 years later. In my reading of facts and details surrounding the Tippit murder, specifically the revolver and ballistics, one of the names that surfaced (I believe it was the transport of the revolver records or ballistics) is a fellow named Manuel Pena ... the same name of a notorius LAPD officer (another recent addition to the LAPD just before the murder) who controlled the police investigation and intimidated witnesses after the RFK murder. When I read this name, a warning light went on and my instincts were heightened. Pena was the trusted courier of key evidence being supplied to the FBI ... and he was affiliated with the same mercenaries and cut-outs used by JMWave operatives in various operations -- Saigon, El Salvador, Uraguay, Phoenix -- who were employed by cover with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Two mail-order houses were the centerpoints from which Oswald ordered his Smith and Wesson .38 revolver (Seaport Traders of Los Angeles) and his Mannlicher-Carcano rifle (Klein's of Chicago). Oswald ordered his pistol two days before Senator Christopher Dodd's subcommittee began hearings in January 1963. The subcommittee’s statistics later showed a purchase in Texas made from Seaport Traders. One of the groups being investigated for firearm purchases was one that Oswald had in his address book ... the American Nazi Party. An investigator looking into interstate firearms sales at this time was Manuel Pena, the Los Angeles police lieutenant who was later one of the officers investigating Robert Kennedy's assassination. It was Pena who traced Oswald's telescopic sight to a California gun shop. After the assassination, Senator Dodd helped a Senate Internal Security Subcommittee publish a story that Oswald bad been trained at a KGB assassination school in Minsk. At the time, Dodd was on the payroll of the American Security Council, a public group campaigning to use U.S. military force to oust Castro from Cuba and to escalate the war in Vietnam.

According to Shane o'Sullivan's work on the RFK murder, Lt. Manual Pena had been on detached duty with the CIA in Central and South America. Pena has an odd background; he served in the Navy during WWII and in the Army during the Korean War, and was a Counterintelligence officer in France. He spoke French and Spanish, and had connections with various intelligence agencies in several countries. Pena also served the CIA for a long time. In 1967, Pena "retired" from the LAPD, leaving to join AID, a cover for political operations in foreign countries. Roger LeJeunesse, an FBI agent who had been involved in the RFK assassination investigation, told William Turner that Pena had performed special assignments for the CIA for more than ten years. After his retirement from the LAPD (and a public farewell dinner) in November of 1967, Pena inexplicably returned to the LAPD in April 1968... just in time to head the LAPD group called Special Unit Senator that controlled the RFK investigation two months later.

Coincidence? I think not...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×