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Greg Parker

LHOCW VOL 2 now available

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Greg,

My question is whether Oswald, in your opinion, reveled in the adventure fantasy promoted by 1950s mens magazines and by JFK's interest in special forces.

Thomas Graves: I ask Greg the question largely because of Oswald's alleged fascination with Herbert Philbrick.

Vanessa: The sorts of magazines to which I refer were men's adventure magazines. It's a genre popular in the 1950s, almost gone by 1970. The magazines had lurid art in many cases but weren't obscene.

Edited by Jon G. Tidd

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Greg,

My question is whether Oswald, in your opinion, reveled in the adventure fantasy promoted by 1950s mens magazines and by JFK's interest in special forces.

Thomas Graves: I ask Greg the question largely because of Oswald's alleged fascination with Herbert Philbrick.

Vanessa: The sorts of magazines to which I refer were men's adventure magazines. It's a genre popular in the 1950s, almost gone by 1970. The magazines had lurid art in many cases but weren't obscene.

Jon,

he talks about watching TV and reading magazines all day while truanting in NYC. The specifics regarding the magazines are never mentioned. I have always taken it to mean comic books. Whether he read the type of magazines you refer to when a bit older, I don't know. He could have been exposed to them in the brief periods Robert lived at home, or while working at Tujagues, or later in the Marines.

The question about the alleged fascination with Philbrick fascinates me.

He liked comics, therefore he had fantasies of power and revenge.

He may have opened a gun magazine once. That makes him a gun nut.

He may have liked spy books and tv shows. He was therefore drawn to emulate.

He may have seen 7 days in May and so was influenced to assassinate Kennedy.

In any case -- you haven't even specified who you're talking about. Lee Oswald or Marina's husband?

Get with the program, Jon.

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Greg,

Thanks. I have a collection of 1950s mens magazines. Adventure and fantasy art.

Guys like Gerry Hemming were adventurers. I was to an extent. Adventure was an American theme in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

I wonder whether Oswald was an adventurer.

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...

...

The question about the alleged fascination with Philbrick fascinates me.

as did the rest of the USofA TV audience, Greg. Most were fascinated with I LED THREE LIVES

"He (Philbrick) went on to write an autobiographical book, I Led Three Lives: Citizen, 'Communist', Counterspy, which was made into a movie. In addition, a television series called I Led Three Lives, starring Richard Carlson and Ed Hinton, loosely based on Philbrick's experiences, aired in syndication for three years during the 1950s.

It's worthy to note Philbrick's work with the Communist Party was at the behest of the FBI...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Philbrick

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Greg,

My question is whether Oswald, in your opinion, reveled in the adventure fantasy promoted by 1950s mens magazines and by JFK's interest in special forces.

Thomas Graves: I ask Greg the question largely because of Oswald's alleged fascination with Herbert Philbrick.

Vanessa: The sorts of magazines to which I refer were men's adventure magazines. It's a genre popular in the 1950s, almost gone by 1970. The magazines had lurid art in many cases but weren't obscene.

Jon,

he talks about watching TV and reading magazines all day while truanting in NYC. The specifics regarding the magazines are never mentioned. I have always taken it to mean comic books. Whether he read the type of magazines you refer to when a bit older, I don't know. He could have been exposed to them in the brief periods Robert lived at home, or while working at Tujagues, or later in the Marines.

The question about the alleged fascination with Philbrick fascinates me.

He liked comics, therefore he had fantasies of power and revenge.

He may have opened a gun magazine once. That makes him a gun nut.

He may have liked spy books and tv shows. He was therefore drawn to emulate.

He may have seen 7 days in May and so was influenced to assassinate Kennedy.

In any case -- you haven't even specified who you're talking about. Lee Oswald or Marina's husband?

Get with the program, Jon.

Greg,

Dang it! We already know that "Lee" was a macho, bull-necked bully, and that "Harvey" was a wimpy little kid of Hungarian ancestry (Hungarian isn't an Indo-European language and is therefore very different from Russian, and English, too, for that matter) who was interested in astronomy and reading. (Or was that "Lee"? -- I get so confused.) Anyway, I'm betting it was "Harvey" who watched "I Led Three Lives" and read "True Men" as a way to --- well, compensate for his inadequacies.

"Lee"? He didn't need to. He was livin' the life, baby, playin' hooky, livin' above a bar in the French Quarter, hangin' with Dave Ferrie and all.

(Or was that "Lee"? -- I get so confused.)

--Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves

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Greg,

My question is whether Oswald, in your opinion, reveled in the adventure fantasy promoted by 1950s mens magazines and by JFK's interest in special forces.

Thomas Graves: I ask Greg the question largely because of Oswald's alleged fascination with Herbert Philbrick.

Vanessa: The sorts of magazines to which I refer were men's adventure magazines. It's a genre popular in the 1950s, almost gone by 1970. The magazines had lurid art in many cases but weren't obscene.

Greg,

My question is whether Oswald, in your opinion, reveled in the adventure fantasy promoted by 1950s mens magazines and by JFK's interest in special forces.

Thomas Graves: I ask Greg the question largely because of Oswald's alleged fascination with Herbert Philbrick.

Vanessa: The sorts of magazines to which I refer were men's adventure magazines. It's a genre popular in the 1950s, almost gone by 1970. The magazines had lurid art in many cases but weren't obscene.

Apologies Mr Tidd, I'm woefully ignorant about these men's adventure magazines.

So tell me, what sort of adventures did they have in Playboy?

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Greg,

Thanks. I have a collection of 1950s mens magazines. Adventure and fantasy art.

Guys like Gerry Hemming were adventurers. I was to an extent. Adventure was an American theme in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

I wonder whether Oswald was an adventurer.

Jon,

Nelson Delgado stated during his testimony about how he and Oswald talked about emulating William Morgan.

But this is all old hat for me. I wrote about it ages ago at the forum you don't like to visit

http://reopenkennedycase.forumotion.net/t59-william-morgan-lee-oswald

So as a one-time only gesture, I'll copy and past the original post from the thread here

Morgan had served in the army in Japan and received a dishonorable discharge. Oswald served in the Marines in Japan and received an dishonorable undesirable discharge.

Morgan went to Cuba to join the revolution in late 1957. Oswald went to Russia in late 1959 threatening to provide radar information to the Soviets.

Morgan stated in mid 1959 that he would "kill any American Marines" who attempted to invade Cuba or to interfere with Castro's objectives. Oswald wrote to his brother Robert that same year from Moscow that "In the event of war I would kill any American who put a uniform on in defense of the American Government – Any American."

A novel was written based on Morgan's exploits called "The Great American". A novel was written based on Oswald's exploits prior to the assassination called "The Idle Warriors"

Morgan is generally accepted as having been an agent of the CIA when he went to Cuba.

Cute, huh?

But it gets better -- Morgan was in Cuba with another CIA agent named John Spiritto. Spiritto ended up in a Cuban jail and confessed to the CIA assassination of Jorge Gaitan in Bogota in 1948 while he (Spiritto) was down there infiltrating student unions.

And Oswald also wanted to be Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway blew his brains out after being given shock treatment and god knows what else by CIA psychiatrist Dr Rome. Rome was later employed by the Warren Commission to try and discern a motive from Oswald's writings.

Then we have Oswald listing the archetypal man's man, Jack London as one of his 3 favorite authors on his Albert Schweitzer College application - despite no evidence he ever read any of his books. London's politics, like Lee's, were somewhat fuzzy at times. Funny thing is, the 3 authors he named were all beloved of the Unitarian Church which ran the college... but since the college never advertised and was all but invisible even to the Swiss authorities where it was located, how Oswald knew just what to write is a mystery.

Cue Arlo Guthrie... and you can get anything you want at Langley's One Stop Shop...

How deep do you want to go with this, Jon. I'm just getting warmed up...

Edited by Greg Parker

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What I consider to be the main points of information from vol 2

  • John Donovan told the basic truth during his WC testimony. He was got to after that and lied through to his teeth to anyone silly enough to listen. His purpose was to use broad stroke language allowing listeners to conclude that Oswald was recruited by Communists in Japan.
  • Nelson Delgado's testimony needs to be taken seriously. Seriously, why has everyone fallen for the WC's interpretation of his testimony instead of what Nelson actually said?
  • Oswald hot date, Rosaleen Quinn was herself a CIA agent preparing for a mission somewhere in the Eastern Bloc.
  • Oswald's recruiter was David Ferrie
  • What Ferrie recruited Oswald into was a CAP program with large flags pointing to domestic and foreign components. The foreign component was the birth of the false defector program.
  • Ruth Paine's sister, Sylvia Hoke, is well known to have worked for the CIA as a psychologist under military cover. Not known until this book was the nature of that work. She was employed as part of a dedicated team looking at recruitment of people for the FICON program. FICON was the precursor to the U2 program. And this was all leading up to Oswald joining the Marines. Bear in mind that in book one, a lot of circumstantial evidence was laid out for the case that Edwin Ekdahl knew the Hyde clam while both he and they lived in NYC through a mutual interest in Norman Thomas and the cooperative movement. Ekdahl's sister even wrote a book on the subject.

For the nitty gritty details on all this, the book is available through all online sellers. Here is the amazon link:

http://www.amazon.com/Harvey-Oswalds-Cold-Assassination-Reinvestigated-ebook/dp/B014KJPNBW/ref=pd_sim_351_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=189S5JSBF5JPY9MCNTXB&dpSrc=sims&dpST=_AC_UL320_SR200%2C320_

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Vanessa,

Thanks for your question about 1950s-1960s men's magazines. The ones to which I refer, and there were a bunch of them, were unlike the slick Playboy. They were about adventure. WW II was a major subset. Many such mags featured well-done, lurid art involving Nazis. One theme was a Nazi femme fatale tormenting American POWs. Another theme in this subset was American soldiers rescuing scantily clad young women from Nazi tormenters. These "themes" were just the cover stories. Other stories might have related to gays, college students, soldiers of fortune, other countries and their possibilities.

Another subset included pure adventure magazines such as True. These magazines often focused on hunting, fishing, mountain climbing, wild predators, and adventures in other countries.

If you're interested in exploring this whole genre, I urge you to dial up ebay and enter "1950s men's adventure magazines" in the search window. You'll find a mixed bag. Definitely unlike Playboy and reflective of a male desire for adventure, every kind of adventure.

I ask Greg Parker about Oswald and these sorts of mags because the mags appealed to a sense of adventure. Marina's husband seems to me to have been a man of adventure. That was a particular sort of man. The sort of man who explored out of the mainstream. The sort of man whom a straight-laced society could have judged as deviant, dangerous.

Edited by Jon G. Tidd

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The sort of man whom a straight-laced society

It was the "straight-laced" guys who read those. But they just kept them out of sight.

Probably under their Playboy mags.

Anyhow, you got your answer from me. What do you make of it?

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Greg,

I'm talking American young male society ca. 1950s.

I knew about Playboy as a teen. Playboy is overblown. Yes, it was important. But its articles were highbrow. Like the interviews of Garrison and Castro. The magazines to which I refer reached low brow readers. Oswald was low-brow.

Apologies. I've looked for your comment and can't find it.

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Jon,

sorry. You need to read between the lines.

The answer is that it doesn't matter if he read those magazines or not, He clearly was adventurous.

If you're looking for the keys, you won't find them among the ads in True Crime.

Ekdahl/CAP/Marines/Langley/GWU -- they're good starting places for the genesis of Oswald's (that's Lee Harvey - aka Marina's husband) "adventurous" spirit.

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Vanessa,

Thanks for your question about 1950s-1960s men's magazines. The ones to which I refer, and there were a bunch of them, were unlike the slick Playboy. They were about adventure. WW II was a major subset. Many such mags featured well-done, lurid art involving Nazis. One theme was a Nazi femme fatale tormenting American POWs. Another theme in this subset was American soldiers rescuing scantily clad young women from Nazi tormenters. These "themes" were just the cover stories. Other stories might have related to gays, college students, soldiers of fortune, other countries and their possibilities.

Another subset included pure adventure magazines such as True. These magazines often focused on hunting, fishing, mountain climbing, wild predators, and adventures in other countries.

If you're interested in exploring this whole genre, I urge you to dial up ebay and enter "1950s men's adventure magazines" in the search window. You'll find a mixed bag. Definitely unlike Playboy and reflective of a male desire for adventure, every kind of adventure.

I ask Greg Parker about Oswald and these sorts of mags because the mags appealed to a sense of adventure. Marina's husband seems to me to have been a man of adventure. That was a particular sort of man. The sort of man who explored out of the mainstream. The sort of man whom a straight-laced society could have judged as deviant, dangerous.

Oh Mr Tidd, I fear you are digging yourself in deeper.

But thanks for clarifying that about the scantily clad femme fatale nazi magazines not being about sex at all.

Although I’m very interested in WWII I haven’t really explored that aspect of it and I’m not sure my reading will ever take me to that niche. Thanks for the heads up about ebay though.

I didn’t realise Playboy had such interesting articles either. Now I understand why it’s so popular with the menfolk.

In terms of Oswald it's probably best if we stick with the things we know he did read or watch (like his library books and "I led 3 lives").

I agree with Mr Parker that there is no question that Oswald was adventurous. He'd only just turned 24 when he died and if there were any other men his age that had led the extraordinary life he did up to that date then I'd be very surprised.

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Vanessa,

Thanks for your question about 1950s-1960s men's magazines. The ones to which I refer, and there were a bunch of them, were unlike the slick Playboy. They were about adventure. WW II was a major subset. Many such mags featured well-done, lurid art involving Nazis. One theme was a Nazi femme fatale tormenting American POWs. Another theme in this subset was American soldiers rescuing scantily clad young women from Nazi tormenters. These "themes" were just the cover stories. Other stories might have related to gays, college students, soldiers of fortune, other countries and their possibilities.

Another subset included pure adventure magazines such as True. These magazines often focused on hunting, fishing, mountain climbing, wild predators, and adventures in other countries.

If you're interested in exploring this whole genre, I urge you to dial up ebay and enter "1950s men's adventure magazines" in the search window. You'll find a mixed bag. Definitely unlike Playboy and reflective of a male desire for adventure, every kind of adventure.

I ask Greg Parker about Oswald and these sorts of mags because the mags appealed to a sense of adventure. Marina's husband seems to me to have been a man of adventure. That was a particular sort of man. The sort of man who explored out of the mainstream. The sort of man whom a straight-laced society could have judged as deviant, dangerous.

Oh Mr Tidd, I fear you are digging yourself in deeper.

But thanks for clarifying that about the scantily clad femme fatale nazi magazines not being about sex at all.

Although I’m very interested in WWII I haven’t really explored that aspect of it and I’m not sure my reading will ever take me to that niche. Thanks for the heads up about ebay though.

I didn’t realise Playboy had such interesting articles either. Now I understand why it’s so popular with the menfolk.

In terms of Oswald it's probably best if we stick with the things we know he did read or watch (like his library books and "I led 3 lives").

I agree with Mr Parker that there is no question that Oswald was adventurous. He'd only just turned 24 when he died and if there were any other men his age that had led the extraordinary life he did up to that date then I'd be very surprised.

Heck yes, Vanessa.

It took me until forty-eight to reach that point (at which age I owned a bar in the Czech Republic and had already, many years earlier, hitch-hiked from La Jolla to Alaska and worked in fish (crab) canneries on Kodiak all winter, started surfing at Windansea (q.v.) in La Jolla, gone to law school, found my biological parents, etc, etc.). But Jon is right, Playboy has always been known to have good, interesting, occasionally even "intellectual" articles. You should check it out sometime.

BTW, I have never ever ever even glanced at the foldouts, even when I was living in that crowded bunkhouse on Middle Bay, Kodiak (q.v.). I do wish I'd had these two great book by Greg Parker with me. But then again, that was way back in 1973. Or was it 1974?

--Tommy :sun

Edited by Thomas Graves

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