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Wade Frazier

Energy and the Human Journey: Where We Have Been; Where We Can Go

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Hi:

This post will be a little break from wrapping up my lessons learned posts, and this will be on music, musicians, and me.  I was precocious in many ways, and when I was about ten, my parents had me take piano lessons from a private teacher.  They also bought me a trumpet, and I took lessons at school.  As I recall, my parents seemed to prime my piano teacher to think that she might have had some kind of musical prodigy on her hands, but it quickly became clear that I had no musical ability.  After a year, I was mercifully relieved of taking piano lessons (baseball, basketball, bowling, and later, golf, were my pastimes, and I ended up being in collegiate track, using those hunter-gatherer large muscle groups, while women’s nimble fingers reflect their gathering-duty co-evolution), and when grammar school ended, so did my trumpet days.  That trumpet became a family relic, and I don’t recall what ever became of it.  

My mother’s sisters and parents were all virtuoso musicians, in singing, piano, the violin, and other instruments.  My grandmother and aunt sang in their church’s choir almost continuously for nearly a century, and my aunt may still today.  On my father’s side, my aunts were also virtuoso singers and musicians.  But those genes totally eluded me.  I became an athlete, with a world-class throwing arm that I got my from father, but I have typical autism-spectrum poor small-motor control, and more than 40 years after my first typing class and working on keyboards for most of my waking hours, I have never been able to type as you are supposed to, partly because I have trouble using my little fingers.  That poor small motor control alone disqualified me from making music with my hands, and I can’t carry a note with my voice.  Even my wife has musician siblings.  It is kind of funny to me that I call my little effort building a choir.

In my home, my redneck father could not get enough country-and-western music, and all that I heard while growing up was Hank Williams, Jim Reeves, and the like.  At age 12, I walked out of Let it Be, as I did not even know who those hippies were.  That is an example of how musically isolated my home was back then.  I almost never listen to country-and-western music today.  :)  

It was not until my high school years that I “woke up” to popular music, and when I was 20, my stepmother bought me a gift certificate to a music store.  I had never bought a record before, and the gift certificate could buy two albums.  I remember spending an hour in the store, making sure that I was getting bang-for-the-buck with what might be my only music purchase ever.  I finally settled on Boston’s debut album and Queen’s A Night at the Opera.  Little did I know what I was getting into.  Within a year, I became an audiophile.  I had the most money that I ever had until only within the past decade, and spent thousands of dollars on albums and equipment, putting records on cassette tapes, which I still have in a box in the attic, I believe.  

I also began to damage my hearing and have been going deaf since the 1980s, and have worn hearing aids for the past decade, at my wife’s insistence.  With no musical ability, I somehow became an avid music fan, and listen to music for most of my waking hours.  My digitized collection has more than 20,000 tracks in it.  Before I really began my career, I lived with a close relative who was a professional musician, a Frank Sinatra sound-alike who was passed off as Frank on one of Frank’s albums, and every day for months, I would come home to the big band sound that he incessantly played.  I grew to like it, and still listen to it regularly.  When I began my career in LA, one of my roommates was an aspiring musician, and he made some pretty good stuff, but LA is full of aspiring musicians, and the music stories were like the writing/acting/directing/producing stories that I heard from my pals – it is a shark tank!  One of my closest friends was Michael Sembello’s manager, and he said that he could have retired on just one of the royalty checks that Michael received when he had his big hit.  He is the same person who was crippled by a hit-and-run incident on his motorcycle.  

That friend also introduced me to a man channeling Seth in LA, who was also a professional musician, and I went twice a month for two years.  One brother became an aspiring saxophone player, I ended up financially supporting his years of practice.  Due to some recent interactions, I decided to look up a boy who grew up two doors from me, whom I babysat when I was a teenager.  I heard that he became a music producer in LA.  I just discovered that he became famous, but died a decade ago.  He did not even make it to 40.  My father hired his father for his first professional job.  That father was raised in Montana and never saw the ocean until he moved to Ventura.  He instantly became an avid scuba diver, but met a typical scuba diver’s fate when he did not come up one day, and he was not yet 50.  Too young!

During my years of attending Seth’s amazing sessions, I befriended some regulars, some of whom were musicians.  Attending channeling sessions around 1990 was quite the thing to do in LA.  I recall Elizabeth Perkins attending once, and I did not even notice her.  My future wife had to tell me later that she attended, as one of twenty people or so, with her regular attendee pal, who was an aspiring Hollywood actress who I don’t think ever made it bigger than some soap operas.  Hollywood stars generally do not like playing stars when living their lives, try to be inconspicuous, and I always left them alone.  I encountered them all the time in my LA days, especially in Westwood and Hollywood, when I went to the movies, which was my primary recreation in my LA days.

In about 1990, technology had improved to the point where aspiring musicians could make their own albums without record company patronage or investing their life’s savings.  One of those Seth session musicians made an album in those days and I attended one of his shows.  A track from his album has a prominent place in my New Age playlist today.  For many years, I thought about him, and although we did not keep in touch, he was on my list to contact after I published my big essay.  I thought that he might be receptive to my work and might even be choir material, but when I contacted him a couple of years ago, he blew me off in one email.  That was not long after receiving Peter Ward’s reaction to my big essay, and that musician’s reaction is almost the point of this post.  I know that I am looking for needles in haystacks, and that reaction from that musician is only one of many like it from my social circles.

Where I work today, one of my closest colleagues began his career as a musician.  He was a composer who played piano with a symphony behind him, playing his music.  After a decade of that, and working in Hollywood a lot, he decided that his career was going nowhere.  He then had an experience not far removed from mine, which led him into accounting.  He has a concert Steinway in his home, which he plays once every few months, and he amazingly can’t casually listen to music.  With his background, when he hears music, he involuntarily begins deconstructing it.  He can’t just listen to music and enjoy it.  He is ruined for music listening, with his composer’s background.  I think about that, me with no talent who can hardly get through the day without listening, while a composer can’t stand it.  For me, music is a great way to ground my emotions and balance my mind.  I’ll do it until I can’t hear anymore, and then it might be just playing that music in my head.  

Part of the reason for this post is that my public writings have also attracted musicians.  What is that all about?  Well, I’ll buy Joya Pope’s reading of me as an Old Artisan.  Before that reading, the last role that I thought that I might be was an Artisan.  We can’t read ourselves, mostly because our egos get in the way.  I thought that I was maybe a Server, Warrior, or Scholar, serving probable Kings like Dennis.  But after Joya’s reading, I thought about my life, and my only possessions of note were my music collection, my growing library, and visual art, prints of paintings, mostly, especially Vinny V.  I was in the middle of doing a lot of system design at my day job, and I was a talented actor when young, saw classmates trying to break into Hollywood when I was in high school, and I did more than one Hollywood audition.  I was also just beginning my writing “career” then, and soon after Joya’s reading, I said, “Duh!”  :) How obvious, in retrospect.

My big essay and site in general is a classic Old Artisan undertaking.  So, what about this music thread that has run through my life?  If I am an Old Artisan, I must have had quite a few musical lifetimes, and I strongly suspect that my soul blocked that ability in this lifetime, but left me a window so that I could enjoy what I had spent many lifetimes involved with, but as a consumer/spectator/patron.  I think that the basket of gifts and challenges handed to me when I was born was intended to shape the trajectory that my life took, and I could have easily been “distracted” by pursuing careers in music, acting, painting, etc.  So, I was purposely handicapped, to help ensure that I accomplished my mission.  I certainly cannot prove that to anybody, but I slowly received that impression over many years.  No complaints, but seeing that invisible hand at work can be both reassuring and unnerving, especially when I can tell that my “friends” are not finished with me in this lifetime.  It is mixed bag to be “chosen” in this way, but I have no regrets.  I am listening to Dan Fogelberg as I write this.  :)  

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier

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Hi:

This will be one of those “statement” posts that I make periodically.  The past few days have seen my reading include Keith Otterbein’s masterpiece, The Anthropology of War, and I attached an image that I made after one of his, a version of which will go in my big essay revision.  His slim volume is the most succinct summary that I have seen on the issue.

Otterbein called himself a structuralist, stating that social and political organization decides why there are wars, but as you can see in that diagram, his structuralist political and social theories ride on top of the economic situation.  The extinction of large game led to the Agricultural Revolution.  When women brought in more calories than the men did, those societies often became matrilineal, and those are what Otterbein called “Type B” societies, and they are the most peaceful preindustrial societies.  Type A societies are dominated by male gangs (AKA “Fraternal Interest Groups”) and are exceedingly violent.

There are certainly variations to those generalizations, but not very significant ones, and I found that explanations of human social and political organization lose their punch when they stray from evolutionary and economic dynamics.  All human societies circle in a close orbit to those realities.  And evolution and economics are all about energy, at their root.  The level of energy surplus defines the wellbeing of individuals, species, and societies, without exception.  Each Epoch of the human journey was based upon that Epoch’s level of energy surplus, again without exception.  

Sociality is an adaptive response of animals and even plants, for survival.  Human sociality is a pre-sentient phenomenon, and is largely about creating in-groups and outgroups, and early human societies and religions were conditioned by warfare with their neighbors.  In times of war and external pressure, in-group pressure to conform is at its high, which I saw in the USA after 9/11.  The American people were almost effortlessly convinced to cheer the invasion of a nation that had nothing whatsoever to do with 9/11 and was not a threat to anybody.  Sentience was hard to find in those days.

I am continually approached by people who are stuck in social consciousness, and proselyting to their social circles is typical for free energy newcomers.  Heck, I did more than that, and no tale of ostracism would surprise me.  My own mother campaigned against me.  

I seek people who have raised their games far above social consciousness, and I know that they are needles in haystacks.  Psychopaths have in-groups of one.  Most people’s social circles are no more than 250 people or so, which are, to one degree or another, their in-groups, but when times get tough, their in-groups quickly shrink to their immediate families.  In hard winters, the Inuit could even eat their children, as people can justify anything.  I imagine that when hunger returned after dining on their children, the parents began looking at each other as food.

The people I seek see all life on Earth as their in-group.  What my fellow travelers had in common was the honesty to see through their in-group’s lies, but they always drank the Kool-Aid, first.  Then they awoke to the lies.  

Part of that awakening process is seeing through the scarcity-based ideologies that dominate their cultures, and those I am familiar with the West are all based on fear, scarcity, and they are egocentric.  None of them will survive into the Fifth Epoch.  

Money is a meaningless abstraction, yet Westerners treat it as something real, and economists have abetted that delusion, as they ignored the real world in favor of social theories.  My work is about understanding how our world really works, not the social consciousness version of it. 

Best,

Wade

war2.JPG

Edited by Wade Frazier

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Hi:

I was driven from my sleep recently, by what was kind of a nightmare, seemingly triggered about recent reading on the Permian extinction and thinking about our current ice age.  This will take a little telling.  That recent paper that is being trumpeted by Global Warming deniers highlights several important issues.  The Capitanian and Permian extinctions coincided with huge volcanic events, and the ultimate cause was the formation of Pangea.  The volcanic events ultimately ended a 100-million year ice age, and continued volcanism led to a 200-million-year greenhouse Earth that the dinosaurs thrived in.  The formation of Pangea exposed 90% of the continental shelves, which is the abode of most marine life.  A brief ice age would have exposed even more of the shelves, and it appears that a hydrogen sulfide event accompanied it, which was a coup de grace for marine life, and perhaps also on land.  Did a wild swing in the chaos of that ending ice age do in most marine life?  Wild swings also characterized the snowball Earth that preceded the eon of complex life, which was also a time of a supercontinent.  The wild swings likely have a lot to do with mass extinctions (and warming has been implicated more than once, although cooling seems to be implicated more often), as conditions change faster than life can adapt to them.  There are some winners, while most lose.

Humanity is causing the latest wild swing, mostly due to extracting and burning Earth’s hydrocarbon deposits, essentially creating an artificial global volcano, which I will contribute to in a few minutes when I drive to work.  But my quasi-nightmare was around the current ice age that we are in.  The last glacial interval had radically different vegetation than today.  I have read people lauding our polluting ways, as it may have already delayed the next glacial interval by 50,000 years or so.  But the human saga will be resolved very soon.  We are going to get over the hump of integrity and sentience required to get into the Fifth Epoch, or we are going to precipitate a mass extinction that may take us with it.  The ice age that we are in the midst of will not affect that outcome.  The return of the ice sheets is way too far off to matter. And if humanity attains the Fifth Epoch, there is going to be a radically different relationship with Earth and her ecosystems.  It could look a lot like that heavenly Roads world.  And then we will see if returning ice sheets are in the cards, or if they will even matter.  

Best,

Wade

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Hi Freeknowledge:

Good to see you doing your homework.  Yes, I like to think that we are going down the bonobo path.  I am putting Sex at Dawn on my list.

Yesterday, while in my crazy work environment, an idea for a new table in my big essay popped into my head.  It will be a when, where, who, what, how, and why table on the Epochal Events.  The gist of it will be…


The first event: c. 2.5 mya to 1.0 mya, East or South Africa, australopiths/Homo habilis/Homo erectus, stone tools/fire, upright apes learned to make stone tools and control fire, manual dexterity and increasing intelligence, forced to leave the trees, learned to walk upright, and intelligently used hands to develop new energy technologies.

The second event: c. 60 kya, East Africa, behaviorally modern humans, super-predation, humanity conquered all ecosystems, primarily fueled by Earth’s large terrestrial animals, and a likely crisis at home drove the Founder Group to leave Africa.

The third event: c. 11 kya, Fertile Crescent, women, domesticating plants, plants with edible energy stores were cultivated, large animals rendered extinct in region where plants could be successfully cultivated.

The fourth event: 1709-1710, England, Abraham Darby and Thomas Newcomen, use of coal for smelting metal and powering engines, controlled burning of coal in new applications, centuries after a deforested England turned to coal, and those inventions founded a new Epoch.

The fifth event has not happened yet, at least for public consumption.  If it happens and the whole story can be told, the summary will look something like this: 20th century, United States of America, various inventors and private/governmental interests, technologies developed that harvest energy from the zero-point field, the technologies generally relied on magnetics, the mastery of electricity, some extraterrestrial assistance and captured technologies, and late-20th century energy crises, as fossil fuels became depleted, and the sequestering of those technologies by the global elite was finally overcome.  


Time for another long day.

Best,

Wade

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Hi Freeknowledge:

I spent a long time in analysis of Mr. Mentor’s engine and Dennis’s heat pump.  Both are amazing technologies, and could they work together to produce FE?  I don’t know.  We were trying to find out when we got the boom lowered on us.  In the entire history of FE attempts, it is one of the more tantalizing, although I am also the first to admit that what Sparky had blew those technologies away, and what my friend was shown was the 35th generation or so beyond what Sparky and others like him developed in their shops and garages.  Fischer’s engine was also very interesting, and Dennis ultimately spent a few fruitless years trying to develop it before Fischer took the money and ran, in typical inventor style.  

I will take a minute before rushing off to work and another 70-80 hour week, and repeat a theme that I have discussed before, of grounding.  A big reason for my big essay’s long, slow journey through the history of life on Earth and humanity’s Epochs is to ground the energy issue with my readers, and when they reach the FE issue, they can perhaps stay grounded and not fly off into the numerous unproductive directions that I have witnessed over the years.  Staying grounded while merely thinking about the biggest event in the human journey is not easy.  I constantly encounter people who want to rush out and “do something,” and I have yet to see even one of them who was not heading straight toward disaster.  This has to be a long, slow journey, taken by people who are grounded, or it will not go anywhere or will become a flaming catastrophe.  I have lived through enough of those for one lifetime.  

As an aside, if you look at my recent post on humanity’s epochs, some kind of energy crisis likely contributed to each one.  It was necessity and survival, not a sense of adventure.  

The homework that Freeknowledge is doing is part of my curriculum, and helps people stay grounded.  

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier

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Hi:

Real briefly, before I go to work, I may put up my own “fake news” post one day, but it will mostly be about the fake news in the mainstream media.  I was spurred to write this from an article in Scientific American that I read yesterday.  It really helps to know the bias and ideological commitments of any media, as they all have them.  Even a great publication like Z Magazine is not immune.  Every issue has pictures of protestors holding up their hand-made signs, and Z Magazine’s founder openly admits that he is all about coercing the elites to relinquish their power via protest.  But he is ideologically opposed to the very idea of how much influence those elites might have.  Those disjointed stances took me many years to understand.  

In the April 2017 issue of Scientific American was an article about online conspiracy theories, how they spread, who subscribes to them, and how to fight them.  While pointing out some important aspects of the conspiracist “echo chamber,” the authors uncritically worshipped the Establishment, although they seemed oblivious to the fact that they were.  Anybody who challenges vaccination has a screw loose, although the editor of Lancet himself said that up to half of all medical research was worthless due to conflicts of interest, and you will be hard-pressed to find an enlightened doctor who believes in vaccination, just like enlightened dentists don’t believe in fluoridation.  But in the eyes of those conspiracist analysts, they see no problem with such medical interventions, although the conflicts of interest can be mind-boggling.  They literally framed the issue as “conspiracy versus science,” which is about the baldest formulation of their ideology that I have seen.  There is no such thing as conscious collusion in their worldview.  Elites cannot influence events, and other mainstream fairy tales, and those hardnosed scientists cannot seem to fathom why there might be at least some truth to conspiracist lore.  

It just highlights the naïveté of scientists, and hardly an issue of Scientific American fails to include a materialist sermon, often delivered by materialist zealot Michael Shermer.  I am not saying that Scientific American is worthless – far from it - but as with any media, its bias is important to know, if the pursuit of the truth is your goal.  You are not going to find unbiased information, anywhere on Earth.  

One reason for my very human rendering of my journey is so that my readers can tell what my biases might be.  

Best,

Wade

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Hi Chris:

Oh, the notes you hit.  Very astute.  I could have penned a lengthy reply before my day began, but the electricity in my town was out for some hours this morning.  Ah, the energy game.  The local electric company is still messing with me:)  

Yes, psychological projection is a human universal, as people measure each other in the light of their own motivation.  The New Testament’s Jesus remarked on it, on how people with crime in their hearts see everybody else as criminals.  Everybody, to one degree or another, is guilty of it, but the free energy pursuit has been great for helping me escape that state, if only fitfully.  The masses and elites are wrapped up in their egocentric games, and neither has been any help for manifesting the Fifth Epoch, and neither is very likely to.  Both have been greater hindrances than help.  I regularly get free energy newbies who begin to grasp the magnitude of free energy, and they have a hard time believing that Godzilla would not want to let humanity have it (just like they think that their social circles will immediately “wake up” when free energy and abundance is even mentioned).  I then have to try to explain to them that Godzilla does not think like “normal” people do, as power and control are the lights that he steers by, and he would rather destroy the planet than give up his perceived “power.”

The masses cannot even distinguish the psychopaths from the saints, which I first saw when Dennis had his company stolen in Seattle, and over the next three years, I learned that lesson in no uncertain terms.  But even saints such as Ralph McGehee don’t yet understand.  Ralph thought that if all Americans had access to the information and experiences that he did, that they would collectively call off the imperial dogs.  No way.  Nearly all Americans prefer to not know about the awesome imperial crimes that keep the chips flowing the USA’s way.  Orwell remarked on that long ago.  

Yes, the White Hats coming forward and giving their goodies to some group like the choir might happen, but we can’t count on that.  Our effort has to be prepared to do it the hard way.  But an abundance choir has never been heard on Earth before, and who knows what the harmonic effects might be?  

On windmills and the like, they are too little, too late, and will far short of any kind of Epochal change.  Brian O eventually realized it.  Those are the small-ball “solutions” that are bandied about, and hard to get excited about any of them.  

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier

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Hi:

It will be long hours at the day job for the next week or so, but I’ll sneak in a post or two.  I am finishing up Frans de Waal’s Our Inner Ape, and there is plenty of good stuff in it, on chimps and bonobos in particular.  He has written so many books that they can become repetitive, and I am about done with my de Waal phase for now.  One nugget from the book is how very little primate behavior is “hardwired,” and he gave an example of an experiment that he performed with rhesus macaques and stump-tailed macaques.  Rhesus macaques are highly hierarchical and harsh in their politics, while stump-tails are more easy-going.  The stump-tails are larger, and dominate rhesus macaques if put together, and de Wall did just that with juveniles of both species.  The rhesus macaques initially fled to a corner and threatened the stump-tails, who ignored their threats.  After five months, however, the rhesus macaques were acting largely like the easy-going stump-tails and sleeping with them in piles.  After the experiment concluded and the rhesus macaques were again isolated, they kept acting nicely.  The stump-tails had “trained” them in more positive social behaviors, and de Waal’s team called them their “New and improved” rhesus macaques.

Virtually all differences in human societies today are because of nurture, not nature.  Human nature has not appreciably changed for at least 50,000 years, and perhaps for far longer.  With each Epoch of the human journey, as humanity’s surplus energy increased, societies became increasingly more humane.  Killing strangers on sight in the Second Epoch gave way to “only” slavery in the Third Epoch to “only” wage slavery in the Fourth Epoch.  In the Fifth Epoch, working for a living, or “enjoying” short lives of homelessness and starvation, will go the way of slavery and other barbarities.  

The people in Roads’s nightmarish and heavenly worlds had nearly the same biological equipment.  Human “nature” had almost nothing to do with the differences between those two worlds.  While one was full of psychopaths, none existed in the other one.  It all derived from human choice and the available economic surplus, which always derives from the energy surplus.  The nightmare world was steeply hierarchical, literally, while the other would have had no hierarchy at all, especially economically, politically, or socially, and all lived in abundance and had a harmony with nature that most people today find hard to believe.  But for those of us who choose love, that reality, or one very like it, is not far off, and how many people on Earth today do you think would choose that nightmare reality to live in, seeking to become the Rockefellers of their reality?  

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

I finished de Waal’s Our Inner Ape, and have a few observations to make, which are germane to my work.  The primary thrust of his book was how humans are a cross between chimps and bonobos.  Chimps can literally be bloodthirsty, as they drink the blood of the neighboring chimps that they murder.  Bonobos, on the other hand, have never been observed to kill each other, and life is one big orgy for them, as they settle everything with sex, and in the most casual ways.  They engage in sexual activity on par with how humans say “good morning,” “thank you,” and other innocuous social interactions.  

The prominent speculation about how they became so different was that when some chimps became isolated by the Congo River’s formation about two million years ago, and there were no gorillas in their range, they could then eat gorilla forage, mainly leaves, and could thus have large and stable foraging parties, unlike chimps, who walk miles each day between fruit trees, and whose parties fluctuate continually between two and nine, whereas bonobo parties are nearly twenty and stable.

This had several impacts.  One of which is that chimps usually forage alone, but generally within earshot of their party, and chimps murder each other by finding lone foraging males in their raids into neighboring territory, and then gang up and murder them.  And just like how women have been human war booty since time immemorial, the conquering chimps would kill off all the males and acquire the females and the territory of the former chimp band.  And in a typical primate practice, the chimps would then murder all of the infants of the conquered band.  The selfish gene hypothesis has been proposed to explain it, and something similar is surely why.  If a chimp can avoid it, he would rather not raise somebody else’s offspring.  Echoes of this behavior are also seen in humans.  

When what became bonobos suddenly had a new economic situation, they made many adaptations to it.  While females still left their natal groups to mate, the primary social glue among bonobos is female-on-female sex, which established a sisterhood of dominant females.  Wild female chimps have almost no social bonds, and they virtually disappear for years when they have an offspring, partly so that no male chimp will murder it.  But bonobos, with their dominant sisterhood, eliminated infanticide, and any bonobo that gives the faintest hint of threatening an infant will have the entire society come down hard on him, no matter what his mother’s rank might be.

While chimps make war, bonobos make love, and de Waal took pains to inform his readers that bonobos were not some saints, but made the best of their situation, and engineered societies in which violence nearly did not exist (only those who violated the generous social code received it), and they live in peace and plenty.  Mr. de Waal has spent a career observing chimps, and noted that captive chimp populations quickly began traveling the bonobo path, as females began forming social bonds, which wild chimps don’t do.

As he began studying a captive chimp colony in his home nation of the Netherlands, the behaviors he saw were so sophisticated that he began reading Machiavelli, to help him understand what he was seeing.  In the end, de Waal says that for all of humanity’s prowess with toolmaking and feats of rationality, chimp social intelligence is equivalent to human social intelligence.  Mr. de Waal has also studied capuchins, macaques, and other primates, and they also have high social intelligence, but chimps and bonobos have the most sophisticated social intelligence that he has seen, and a primary hypothesis of his is that morality grew out of sociality, which is standard among evolutionary anthropologists.

Being a scientist, however, de Waal showed himself to be naïve at times, and when I began reading his The Age of Empathy, I was surprised at his naïveté that humans would react to the financial crisis of 2008 by leveling the economic playing field.  The opposite has happened.  

The great social changes were a result of great economic changes, not the other way around.  We can’t use sociality to make big economic changes.  It has never worked that way and never will.  Some bout of conscience out of nowhere did not end slavery: the rising standards of living of industrialization did, just like they liberated women.  Bonobos would have never started down their path if they didn’t have their food supply double when gorillas left the area and never returned.  

This is why the social circle approach is completely useless for epochal change, and the arrival of free energy will be the most epochal of the epochal events.  Again, I learned this the hard way, being a key member of five different mass movement approaches before I was finally cured of the idea that the social approach was going to work.  It won’t work for epochal change.  Sociality is pre-sentient behavior, and all that it is good for is the survival of the social group, AKA the in-group, and all out-groups have been fair game for as long as there have been social animals.  When people are focused on a common goal, social maneuvering takes a back seat.  That is my approach, and I know that I seek needles in haystacks.  

For the naiveté that de Wall displayed at times, more often, he was a fount of wisdom.  What behavioral scientists like him readily admit is that humans are far less rational than we like to believe, making emotional decisions and then rationalizing them later.  Humans can rationalize anything, even eating their children.  

After five years of playing the Paul Revere of Free Energy, and all that he received from his colleagues, who hailed from the tops of the world’s governmental, academic, scientific, and “progressive” institutions, was denial and fear, Brian O began openly wondering if humanity was a sentient species, and I sadly understood.  

All out-groups being fair game directly relates to my journey’s primary lesson, that personal integrity is the world’s scarcest commodity.  People simply don’t care about anybody outside of their perceived in-group.  Somewhere around 1% of Americans know or care about the millions of children that our great nation has murdered in the past generation.  The greatest force of evil on the planet today is the American military, and most Americans worship it.  Indeed, I saw a poll just the other day, and funding the military is the American voter’s highest priority.  We are now playing with igniting World War III, and one astute American critic finished his article on the USA’s preparations for an offensive nuclear war with, “And so apparently do the American people, a population stupid beyond all belief.”  I understand the sentiment, which is why Americans have not been my target audience for more than a decade.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier

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Hi:

Here is a short post on the contrasts of my vision and the usual vision that I have been seeing and hearing for a generation or more.  One is positive, and one is negative.  The vision that I have seen for many years is that one day, everybody is going to wake up to the failures of our systems and will jointly build something new.  Mine is that something new will come onto the scene, which will be immediately used, and the old ways will simply become obsolete.  Epochal change has never happened because the masses one day realized how the current methods are unworkable, unsustainable, and even evil.  What instead happened was that a literal or relative handful of people invented the means of the next Epoch, the obvious advantages had everybody climb aboard, and the old methods became obsolete.  Nobody would use the old ways unless they had to, and with a superior alternative, why use the old way?

When the campfire was invented, or stone tools, the previous methods became obsolete, and nobody wanted to go back.  When plants were domesticated, it was a one-way ticket to civilization.  Nobody voluntarily gave up domesticated plants and animals once they had them, and the hunter-gatherer lifestyle simply disappeared wherever crops and herds could be raised.  Similarly, industrialization ended slavery and the subjugation of women, not some bout of conscience over the evils of slavery or how women had been reduced to mere broodmares of agrarian economies.  Many civilizations have collapsed as they doggedly pursued their unsustainable methods until the bitter end.  Humanity is doing the same thing today.

Similarly, capitalism is not going to be given up one day via some mass awakening, or warfare, or the many evils of our current system.  Once the means of the new Epoch are delivered, the advantages will be so obvious that nobody will fail to avail themselves of them, and unlike the scarce pool of fossil fuels that made the Industrial Revolution possible, that abundant and clean energy will be available to all humans.  And then, and only then, will the masses begin to realize that the current system, in which greed is elevated to a virtue, in which national pride becomes a reason to beat one’s chest, and so on, simply does not make sense anymore.

People are not going to awaken because the current system is doomed to failure, but because they will begin to use a superior system, and the old system will be discarded, like children giving up dolls and toys as they grow up.  I am trying to amass that relative handful that will make the difference, and am not trying to awaken the masses with talk and writing.  That has never worked and never will.  
Wade


Best,

Wade

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Hi:

I cannot overemphasize the importance of a comprehensive perspective for what I am doing, and it takes work, a lot of work, to get there.  But, for me, it was fun work, and I think it would be for anybody who wants to understand how the world works.  From how the Sun works to how stars form to how Earth works to how life began to how complex life began to how humans appeared on the evolutionary scene, it is always primarily an energy story.  But developing a comprehensive perspective is not just about collecting facts and theories in a pile, but eventually understanding the similarities, the differences, and why things act like they do.  You can develop your own tools of assessment and develop a much better understanding of the process of science, of scholarship, and learn about what to take seriously and what to relegate to the gossip-bin or the “conflict of interest” bin or the highly speculative bin, and so on.  

I constantly see people without comprehensive perspectives advocate this and that path to change, and they are often stuck in social consciousness, thinking that some new social organization is the key to a healed planet, without understanding why the current social organization exists.  You can’t do it that way.  It is like thinking that agrarian peoples could have built a hay-powered rocket to the Moon.  Human social organization has always been dependent on its economic foundation, and its energy surplus in particular.  There are no exceptions in the human journey.  The end of slavery was unthinkable before the rising standards of living of industrialization and machines replacing people made the end of slavery feasible, and brute human labor became obsolete.  For every Jesus that rises above his Epoch, with a message from the godhead, millions and billions are mired in their spheres of self-interest, unwilling and unable to see the bigger picture.  

I continually encounter people who deny those realities as they propose some “novel” social approach to these issues, thinking that reshuffling the deck of scarcity will lead to abundance, thinking that retail politics is of any use at all, etc.  As Bucky said, good luck with that.  While scarcity and fear predominate, almost nobody on Earth is able or willing to raise their eyes above their daily survival.  And for those who “make it,” they are creatures of the system that garnered them their wealth and are not about to rock the boat.  They don’t even want to, and they play games of fake philanthropy and the like, and their relationship to free energy is like a vulture’s, as they plan to swoop in for the kill if an effort ever gets far along, so they can become the Bill Gates of Free Energy, but even they must know at some level that it would be Game Over for all elites if free energy was ever made publicly available.  

Those who look for heroes to save the day, some Messiah to follow, who want to chat up their social circles and the like, are not the people I seek.  I seek needles in haystacks and know it.  But it won’t take many of us.  I just read something on one of the most astute voices in economics, who argued that it is always some small group that initiates change, never the “slumbering” masses.  He understands.  Now, if I can only recruit people like him to my effort.  :) So far, no luck, and it will likely be up to my small and growing little band to make a dent in some way.  We will see how it goes over the next 30 years or so.   

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

As I have written plenty, my “layers of the free energy onion” were developed from thousands of reactions to the idea of free energy, both from what I received and what fellow travelers did.  There is nothing theoretical about that list.  Level 1 is the most naïve layer and by far the most common, and I rarely receive that kind of reaction anymore, as I am very careful about whom I talk about Wade’s World with.

I generally hide out in corporate America and do not talk about my free energy days.  I never broached the issue with my president at the trucking company or with the man who hired me at my longest held position of my career, at a software company.  But my closest peers would usually eventually hear about my past.  

But in my old age, with the end of my career looming, I bring up the subject more than I used to, with high-ranking colleagues, and I brought it up with five of my former CFOs.  Two I did it with after I no longer worked for them, one while he was still my peer, and the most recent instance was during the CFO’s last day on the job.  While rank-and-file members of American society generally react to my experiences with shock and disbelief, as my experiences destroy their cherished fantasies of the society they live in, of how the capitalist and nationalist systems really work, the reactions of those CFOs are very different.  

When I describe how inventors are routinely stolen from in corporate America, or the kinds of organized suppression activities that we endured, their responses are along the lines of, “Sure, that is how it happens, and at the level you played at, it is no great surprise how you were treated.”  For those who play at the high levels of the capitalist system, there is little about my adventures that surprises them, although my friend’s little show, or Brian’s adventures, are eye-opening for even them.  But they never reacted with scoffing, partly because I had already proven myself a highly capable professional, which is why we had that conversation in the first place.  It is similar to Greer’s statement that his UFO briefings, to the White House, Pentagon, Vatican, Capitol Hill, United Nations, and the like were never met with scoffing reactions.  All recipients received the briefings with grave acknowledgment.  Those CFOs reacted the same way when I told them about the real story of the JFK hit.
 
But, there is also something in common with all of those reactions, which is that almost invariably, those people are all Level 8s.  While they don’t deny the reality of the organized suppression of free energy and the UFO/ET evidence, they never volunteered to help, either.  Their general reaction was that Godzilla is real, and they didn’t want to become his next meal.  So, while my tales, or Greer’s, can prove enlightening and even entertaining to such people, the last thing that they have in mind is challenging the evil structure of power on Earth.  They just want to live out their lives in their well-paid niches, hope that they die before it gets too bad, and leave “doing something” about the current state of affairs to fools such as Greer, me, and my pals.

Is that better than the denial reactions that comprise more than 99% of how the masses react?  At least, it is better than the vulture reactions by the world’s retail elite, as they play their fake philanthropy games.  I won’t get on the case of my former CFOs, as it is more sentient than the denial/fear reactions that the masses react with, or titillating tabloid conspiracism, but it is also a long way from wanting to help, which I certainly did not expect from them, and I consider them all my friends today.  Looking for needles

Best,

Wade

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Hi:

As an addendum to a recent post, if an American businessperson is the least bit worldly, what I survived is no great surprise.  An obvious implication is that those billionaires who swarmed Greer or Dennis were very well aware of the organized suppression.  Bill Gates and the other “philanthropists” have certainly been approached many times on the free energy issue, and you never hear a public peep on the issue from them.  Why do you think that is?  Quite a few reasons come to mind, but the bottom line, to me, is that they are well aware of the situation, but none of them has the courage to publicly admit the real situation, much less do anything about it, unless they can swoop in for the kill.  So, when I see Bill Gates advocating nuclear energy in China as some kind of “solution,” I have to shake my head.  

I admit that people such as Richard Stallman or the luminaries of the Left are simply naïve and ideologically opposed to the idea of free energy or that the global elite actually exist (and Bill Gates and David Rockefeller are/were not members of that club).  Those billionaires did not become rich by challenging the system that garnered them their wealth, they are well aware of who really runs the show, and it isn’t them.  The GCs see Bill Gates as a boy with his toys, and as long as he behaves himself with his inconsequential activities, he can play to his heart’s content.

This is just one of many reasons why it is delusional to go chasing after “philanthropists” and the like.  Once in a great while, the wealthy do come to the table to play the game, are quickly disabused of their bright ideas, and they go scurrying back to their mansions.  

The field is really wide open, as far as making a dent goes.  Virtually nobody on Earth has the right stuff to even try.  People don’t need money, influence, or even all that much talent or intelligence to help with what I am doing.  They just need to care, be awake, and be willing to do the work.  But there are not many of them on Earth, at least proportionally.  That is not a judgement; those are just the numbers, but I hear no end of free newcomers denying that reality as they go chat up their social circles and advocate all of those paths to failure.  They really don’t need much courage, either, but the crazy part is they almost all hide behind their “anonymity” on the Internet, thinking that that protects them somehow from Godzilla’s minions, but then they go chat up their social circles, which is where the danger is, not singing with me.  I get this all the time.  If they can refrain from proselytizing to their social circles, all will be well, and they will have nothing to fear from Godzilla, but they get the risks entirely backwards regarding what I am doing.  

It is time for a different approach, and Brian and Dennis instantly realized that I was doing something different.  We will see how it goes.  

Best,

Wade

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Posted (edited)

Hi:

Russia and China are today convinced that the USA is planning to wage an offensive nuclear war, and I can’t blame them.  The neocons that run Washington D.C. are being openly compared to Sauron, and I just read an article by the author of a book on the American Empire, in work that reads very much like mine does (and here is an article on the history of North Korea and the USA).  I just ordered his book, which is unusual for me on that subject, as I already wrote the book on it.  Last month, my American Empire essay was the second most popular on my site, after my big essay.  It is “interesting” to see my American Empire essay wax and wane in popularity over the past 15 years, depending on whether the USA is throwing around its imperial weight or not.  

While Hillary was openly McCarthy-esque in her anti-Russian ravings, Trump took a different tack, at least while he was campaigning, but he has been completely coopted by the evil-minded neocons.  The saber-rattling is a reaching a deafening crescendo these days.  Scary times.

Best,

Wade

Edited by Wade Frazier

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