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WC testimony of George Bouhe (8H355 plus)

http://jfkassassination.net/russ/testimony/bouhe.htm

Then I added, "Well, I would like to hear how you get along," which is a standard statement I would ask anybody.
And for 2 or 3---or possibly 5 days thereafter he would call me at 6 o'clock, I guess when he finished his work, and say, "I am doing fine. Bye."
Mr. LIEBELER - That would be the extent of his conversation with you on the telephone?
Mr. BOUHE - Yes.
Mr. LIEBELER - He didn't tell you anything of the details of his work?
Mr. BOUHE - I did not ask.
Mr. LIEBELER - Did you know where----

366

Mr. BOUHE - Wait a second, maybe I did ask and, well, he said it was some photographic process in the lithographic business, but I don't know what that means.

In her Chronologies, Mary Ferrell has the following notes, but these may be based on George Bouhe's WC testimony:

October 12, 1962 Oswald calls George Bouhe at 6:00 PM and says “Im fine”.

October 15, 1962 Oswald calls George Bouhe at 6:00 PM and says,“I'm fine.”

October 16, 1962 Oswald calls George Bouhe and says, “Im fine.”

October 17, 1962 Oswald calls George Bouhe at 6:00 PM and says, “Im fine.”

October 18, 1962 Oswald calls George Bouhe at 6:00 PM and says, “I'm fine.”

On October 19th the calls stop. Oswald checks out of the YMCA and disappears for two weeks. He is working at Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall, but noone knows where he is living. Not his wife, not his bosses at JCS, not his co-workers, not his acquaintances.

According to the WC testimonies of Alexandra de Mohrenschildt and George Bouhe, it is a room somewhere in the Oak Cliff section of Dallas. George de Mohrenschildt said that Oswald “found himself a place to live.”

Does Oswald call "precisely" at 6:00 PM?

Is he reporting in?

Is he receiving instructions?

Is he waiting for something? Information before he can act?

Are the calls innocent?

Steve Thomas

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FBI - HSCA Subject File: Lydia Dymitruk (page 9 in the file, page 7 of the Report)

 

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=129757&search=Alexander_Kleinlerer#relPageId=9&tab=page

 

On December 3, 1968 the FBI interviewed a George Bloodworth, who was a Warrant Officer Candidate in the U.S. Army Helicopter School in Mineral Wells, Texas. He met George Bouhe in the apartment of Alexander Kleinlerer. Bloodworth had formerly been in the Marines and had been stationed at the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia. He was very security conscious. Kleinlerer left the apartment to buy some food at a delicatessen, and Bloodworth and Bouhe got to talking. While they were talking, Bloodworth got the impression that Bouhe was “one of us”, meaning an Army Intelligence Agent.

 

I was looking around for something else and stumbled on this.

A couple of things:

1) Please excuse the gibberish. This is the OCR ASCII text rendering. I tried to clean it up, but got tired.

2) I have read before that Lydia Dymitruk was suspected by some as being a Soviet Agent. See how closely her biography parallels Marina Oswald's. 

3)  Is George Bouhe a double agent or was he just testing Bloodworth? Is there another reason that Bouhe and Max Clark took the Oswalds under their wings?

4) The concern Bouhe expresses over the radio. I got the feeling that Oswald was very protective of a radio when he moved into Mary Bledsoe's house. Was it the same kind of radio?

5) George Bouhe knew that Oswald had moved into the house on Elsbeth as early as November, 1962. James Hosty said he didn't learn of that fact until March, 1963.

Bouhe is way out ahead of Hosty.

 

https://archive.org/stream/JFKNovember32017Release/docid-32263534_djvu.txt

 

HSCA 

180-10110-10129 
SECURITY CLASSIFIED FILES 
JFK-163 

ORIGINATOR: DOD 

FROM: 

TO: 


TITLE: 


Document Information 
Released under the John 
F. Kennedy Assassination Records 
Collection Act of 1992 
(44 USC 2107 Note). 

Case#:NW 54756 Date: 
10-31-2017 _ 
AGENT REPORT 

For use of this form, see FM 30-17(C); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. 

1. NAME..OF SU&IEST OR TITLE OF INCIDENT 
1 SAEDA (U) I Munich, FRG 
2. DATE SUBMITTED: 12 February 1977 
3. CONTROL SYMBOL OS FILE NUMBER:  28 Sep 76 

4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 

 

C) Between August and October 1968, Source (George Bloodworth), was a flight student at the US Army Flight Center (USAFC), Fort Wolters, Texas. On one occasion during this period (nfi), Source and his wife, Vivianne, visited a casual acquaintance at this individual’s apartment in Dallas, Texas, address not remembered. Source initially met this individual at a Jewish seminar held at Fort Wolters and was subsequently invited to visit him at his apartment in Dallas. Bloodworth commented that although he knew that this individual was French he could not remember any further identifying data concerning him at this time. During the 
cited visit. Source and his wife accompanied the Frenchman to another apartment, 
address unknown, of an unidentified elderly Russian couple (nfi) and introduced 
them. Later in the evening, the Frenchman and Source's wife left the apartment 
to purchase some items at a local delicatessen (nfi), leaving Source alone with 
the Russian couple. 

The Russian male prepared Source two cocktails mixed from a powder which Source was told was Tom Collins mix. 
Source felt no effect from the first drink; however, shortly after consuming the second, he became semi-conscious and mentally confused 
as though he had been drugged. He recalled that during this time the Russian couple asked him several questions concerning the performance
capabilities of US Army tactical aircraft. Source does not recall the specific questions and in his confused state could not recall 
his responses. 

When Bloodworth's wife and the Frenchman returned from the delicatessen. Source 
insisted that they leave immediately. Because of his physical and mental condition,  Source's wife was forced to drive from Dallas to 
Fort Wolters. The following morning Source related the incident to US Army Intelligence (USAI) officials at Fort Wolters. Approximately 
one week after reporting the incident to USAI, Source was questioned by an unidentified special agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI) and once again provided the details of the incident at the Russian couple's apartment. Several days later. Source was again contacted 
by the special agent, who assured Source that he had nothing to worry about because the individuals were already under investigation by the FBI. The agent 
mentioned that the Russian couple was known to be acquainted with the wife of Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of former President
John F. Kennedy. Source felt that this incident and Tismer's request for a photograph of him when he was younger may have been related. 

AGENT REPORT 

^For use of this form, see FM 30- 17{C); A R 381-130; the proponent agency is the Offi ce of the A s si s tan t Ch i ef of Staff for Inteligence. 

1 ~NAME OF SUBJECT OR TITLE Of INCIDENT:  SAEDA (U) Munich FRG 
2. DATE SUBMITTED:   2 May 1977
3 CONTROL SYMBOL or file number:  23 Sep’.76 

4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 

On 2 May 1977, a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) report, dated 
31 December 1968, was reviewed concerning an incident involving SSG George C. 
Bloodworth, a former member of Headquarters, 66th Military Intelligence Group 
(MIG), McGraw Kaseme (Barracks), Munich (PU9135), Federal Republic of Germany 
(FRG), APO New York 09108, which occurred in October 1968 while he was assigned V 
to Fort Wolters, Texas. The review of the FBI report revealed substantially 
the following pertinent Information: ... 

On 3 December 1968, George C. Bloodworth and his wife, Vivians Astrid 
Bloodworth, nee: Hayoun, who resided at 516 Southwest 17th Street, Mineral Wells, 
Texas, were interviewed by a Special Agent of the FBI. Bloodworth, then a 
Warrant Officer Candidate, was assigned to the 10th Warrant Officer Candidate 
Company, US Army Primary Helicopter School, Fort Wolters. 

Bloodworth stated that on 5 October 1963, he and his wife met Alexander 
Kleinlerer at an unidentified Jewish Synagogue in Fort Worth. Bloodworth and his 
wife accompanied Kleinlerer to his apartment located at 3542 Kent Street, Fort 
Worth to give Kleinlerer various unidentified articles, which he was to deliver 
to Mrs. Bloodworth's mother who resided in Paris (nca), France, while on a 
business trip (nfi). 

I (S) Upon their arrival at Kleinlerer's residence, Bloodworth and his wife met George Bouhe and Lydia Dymitruk. Bouhe allegedly 
resided in Dallas, Texas and Dymitruk resided in the apartment next door to Kleinlerer's apartment. Later 
that evening, as Bloodworth and his wife were preparing to depart Kleinlerer's 
apartment, Kleinlerer told Mrs. Bloodworth that a good delicatessen was located 
near his apartment and Mrs. Bloodworth would be able to purchase food items which 
she would not ordinarily be able to find In "this country". At Kleinlerer's 
suggestion, he and Mrs. Bloodworth went to the delicatessen to purchase some of 
the food prior to Mrs. Bloodworth and her husband's return to Fort Wolters. 

George Bloodworth, who was having a drink, remained at the apartment with Bouhe 
and Dymitruk. 

(S) Bloodworth became engaged in general conversation with Bouhe and Dymitruk 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth about his duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Bouhe further 
asked Bloodworth his opinion concerning the U.S. commitment to Vietnam. During the 
conversation with Bouhe, Bloodworth stated that he had served in Vietnam as a 
"gunner" on helicopters. Bouhe then asked Bloodworth questions concerning the 
types of helicopters used by the US and the armament capabilities of these 
helicopters. Bloodworth initially thought Bouhe might have been an Army Intelli¬ 
gence Officer, and was testing Bloodworth's security consciousness, and therefore 
Bloodworth was very careful in answering Bouhe’s questions. However, Bloodworth 
also believed that Bouhe was possibly a foreign intelligence officer, although 
Bouhe gave Bloodworth no indication of this, either by action or word. Only 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth questions. During lulls in the conversation, Bouhe and 
Dymitruk conversed in the Russian language. 

(S) Kleinlerer and Mrs. Bloodworth returned to the apartment approximately 
30 minutes after they had departed. Upon their return to the apartment, the 
conversation drifted off to normal conversation. Bouhe observed a radio in the 
apartment and asked Dymitruk why Kleinlerer had to purchase a new radio when the 
one that he had given Kleinlerer would receive Moscow. Because of the conversa¬ 
tion, Bloodworth became suspicious of Bouhe, and as such felt that the conversa¬ 
tion should be reported. Bloodworth believed that the answers to the questions 
asked by Bouhe could have been obtained through the news media and aviation 
magazines, and may have been used as a lead-in for later questions. Bloodworth 
and his wife were invited to visit Bouhe in Dallas, but had not done so at the 
time of their interview by the FBI. 

(S) Based on information provided by Bloodworth, the FBI conducted investi¬ 
gations concerning Dymitruk, Bouhe and Kleinlerer. The results of the FBI 
investigation are summarized below: 

(S) A coded government agency which conducted security type investigations 
revealed to the FBI that Lydia Dymitruk was born on33 April .1926 in Rostov USSR. In approximately 1942, she was deported by the Germans
to a work camp in Germany. When the war ended, she entered a camp for displaced persons in 
Duesseldorf, Germany, where she met and married Karel Lodwi.jk Verhelst, 
Belgian citizen ^nfi). On an unknown date, she entered Belgium with her husband 
nd resided In Antwerp (nca), Belgium. She was alleged to be a member of the  
Union of Soviet Patriots in Belgium from 1948 to 1952. In 1952, while still 
married to Verhelst, she began living with Vasiliy Gavrilovich, also known as 
Pavel Kostenko, in Brussels (nca), Belgium. She was divorced by Verhelst in 
November 1953, and continued living with Gavrilovich until late 1954 or 1955. 
Gavrilovich was allegedly born on 5 September 1922 In Tula (nca), USSR. He served 
n the Soviet Army in World War II prior to joining the "Vlassov Forces" in 
fighting on the side of the Germans against the Soviets. After the war, he lived 
in Germany and Belgium and was active in several anti-communist Russian emigre 
organizations including the National Labor Alliance (NTS). In 1955, Gavrilovich " 
was identified as a Soviet agent in clandestine contact with the Soviet Embassy 
in Brussels. In February 1957, he was expelled from the NTS and left Brussels 
for Moscow (nca) on 20 August 1957. Prior to leaving Belgium for the USSR, 
Gavrilovich reportedly revealed that he had worked for Soviet intelligence 
since 1942 and that he was trained in the Soviet Union for intelligence work and 
dispatched to the West as a Soviet agent (nfi). In a radio broadcast from East 
Berlin (UU9220), on 17 September 1957, sponsored by the Soviet Committee for 
Return to the Homeland, Gavrilovich bitterly attacked Russian emigre organizations 
in the West. 


(S) On 27 June 1956, in Ixelles, a suburb of Brussels, Lydia Dymitruk 
married Pavel Dymitruk, who was born on 28 February 1924 in Stariye-Dorohl (nca), 
USSR. On an unknown date, possibly prior to his marriage to Lydia, Pavel 
Dymitruk immigrated to the US. It was reported that in July 1957, he returned 
to Belgium to attempt to expedite a visa for Lydia to join him in the US. 



(S) A coded government agency which conducted security type investigations, 
revealed to the FBI that Lydia Dymitruk, nee: Berdjanskaja, was married to Pavel 
Dymitruk on 13 July 1956. Pavel Dymitruk was born on 28 February 1924 in the 
USSR. Lydia Dymitruk was formerly married to Karel L. Verelst and that marriage 
was terminated by divorce on 10 June 1953. From April 1952 until October or 
November 1955, Lydia Dymitruk lived with "Vasiliy Kostenko". Kostenko was a 
known Soviet agent. 


(S) The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), Dallas, Texas, 
advised the FBI that their records reflect that on 3 December 1958, Lydia Dymitruk 
I submitted an application to enter the US. Dymitruk gave her address as 56 Rue 
1 Americane, Ixelles, Belgium. The INS file further reflected that Visa Petition 
I Number 825385 pertaining to Lydia Dymitruk had been approved by the INS, Detroit, 

I Michigan on 7 January 1957. The petition was made by her husband. Lydia Dymitruk 
had a Belgium passport number C033463/6572, issued on 28 September 1956. On 29 
January 1959, she was granted Immigration Visa Number 1044 under the USSR quota 
by the US Consulate in Antwerp, Belgium. Lydia Dymitruk entered the US on 4 March 

1 1959 at New York City, New York. . ; • 

(S'). The Domestic Relations Court, Dallas County, Texas, advised the FBI 
that on 15 December 1960, Lydia Berdjanskaja Dymitruk filed a divorce suit 
against Paul (Pavel) Dymitruk. The divorce petition reflected that they were 
married on 27 June 1956 in Brussels, Belgium. The petition further reflected 
that they had resided in Dallas for more than one year and had separated on 13 
December 1960. There were no children as a result of this marriage. On 12 May 
1961, Judge Beth Wright of the Domestic Relations Court, Dallas County, Texas, 
granted the divorce. .. 

5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 

DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 


Page 3 of 4 Pages 


6. ^SIGNATURE Of.SPEClAL AGENT 
 AGENT REPORT 1 

, l4 Tor 1 use. 5 f this form, see FM 30-17(G); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence 
1 NAME OF SUBJECT OR TITLE OF INCIDENT:  SAEDA (U) Munich, FRG
2 DATE SUBMITTED: 28 Sep 76 

4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 


The INS, Dallas, Texas advised the FBI that George Alexandrovich Bouhe 
was born on 24 February 1904 at St. Petersburg (nca), Russia. He became a 
naturalized citizen of the US on 30 September 1935 at Mew York. Bouhe was 
interviewed by agents of the FBI during the investigation into the assassination 
of President John F. Kennedy, concerning his knowledge of Lee Harvey Oswald and 
Marina Oswald. Bouhe willingly admitted his acquaintance with the Oswalds. 

(S) Alexander Kleinlerer was interviewed by an agent of the FBI on 3 December 1963 at Fort Worth, Texas. Kleinlerer advised that his address
 was 3542 Kent Street, Fort Worth, Texas, arid that he was employed as a foreign representative of Loma Industries, Inc., Fort Worth. 
Kleinlerer met the Oswalds through an unidentified friend in 1962. Kleinlerer further advised that he had not seen the Oswalds after 
November 1963. Kleinlerer stated that he was a native of France and came to the US on 7 May 1956, and that he was now a naturalized citizen. 

(C) AGENT'S NOTES: Reference Agent Report dated 1 October 1976, subject as 
above, prepared by S/AHHorn, 66th MI Group, wherein it was. reflected that SFC 
James E. White reported a SAEDA incident in which Helga Tismer, a German citizen, 
was the principal. Reference Agent Report dated 10 February 1977, subject as 
above, prepared by S/A Benner, 66th MI Group,, wherein it was reported that SSG 
George C. Bloodworth had been initially interviewed concerning his knowledge of 
Helga Tismer. Reference Agent Report dated 12 February 1977, subject as above, 
prepared by S/A Benner, 66th MI Group, wherein it was reported that during an 
interview of George C. Bloodworth, he indicated that he., had been involved in a 
possible SAEDA incident which he reported to US Army Intelligence and about which 
he had been interviewed by an unidentified special agent of. the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. Reference Agent Report dated 23 March ,1977, subject as above, 
prepared by S/A Horn, 66th MI Group, wherein the results of a review of the US 
Army Investigative Records Repository Dossier pertaining to George C. Bloodworth 
were reported. ... 


Page 4 of 4 Pages 


5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 

DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 

CONFIDENTIAL 


AGENT REPORT 

For use of this form, see FM 30- 17(C); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence 
I. NAME OF SUBJECT OR TITLE OP INCIDENT: SAEDA (U) Munich FRG 
2. DATE SUBMITTED:  23 March 1977
3 * CONTROL SYMBOL OR File number: 28 Sep’76 

4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 

On 23 March 1977, the US Army Investigative Records Repository Dossier 
Number AC657474, was examined and revealed the following pertinent information 
concerning George C. Bloodworth, formerly a SSG assigned to Headquarters, 66th 
Military Intelligence Group (MIG), McGraw Kaserne (Barracks), Munich (PU9135), 
Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), APO New York 09108: 

(C) On 8 October 1968 Bloodworth, then a Warrant Officer Candidate (WOC) 
(E-5), assigned to the 10th Warrant Officer Candidate Company, US Army Primary 
Helicopter Center/School, Fort Wolters, Texas, was interviewed by a Special , 
Agent of the 112th MIG, Fort Wolters, concerning an incident of possible intelli¬ 
gence interest which occurred on 5 October 1968 in Fort Worth, Texas. Bloodworth 
was married to the former Viviane Astrid Hayoun, whose mother, a terminal cancer 
patient, was residing in Paris (nca), France. Bloodworth's wife had visited her 
mother on two occasions, once in December 1966 and again in May 1967. 

(C) On 2 October 1968 Bloodworth and his wife attended services at a Jewish 
Synagogue near Harris Memorial Hospital in Fort Worth, where they met Alexander 
Kleinlerer, a Frenchman. The Bloodworths were introduced to Kleinlerer by an 
unidentified man in the congregation who was described by Bloodworth as having 
a large beard which covered most of his face, 35 years of age, approximately 70 
inches in height, 180 pounds, and very friendly toward everyone at the congrega¬ 
tion. The unidentified man seemed to know almost everyone in the congregation. 
Bloodworth could provide no further information concerning this individual. 
Kleinlerer was immediately attracted to Bloodworth and his wife when he learned 
that Mrs. Bloodworth's mother resided in Paris. Kleinlerer, who stated that he 
made frequent trips to Paris, and was planning to visit Paris during the week of 
14 October 1968, stated that he would try to visit Mrs. Bloodworth's mother. 

At Mrs. Bloodworth's request, Kleinlerer agreed to deliver a few articles to 
Mrs. Bloodworth's mother. The articles consisted of clothing and a small souvenir 
type camera. Kleinlerer told Bloodworth and his wife to bring the articles to his apartment on 5 October 1968. Bloodworth believed 
Kleinlerer's address to be 3052 Kent Street, Fort Worth.


(C) Upon the Bloodworth's arrival at Kleinlerer's apartment on 5 October 
1968, they were introduced to George Bouhe and Lydia LNU. Bouhe stated that he 
was a resident of Dallas, Texas. Lydia LNU stated that she was a friend of 
Kleinlerer and resided next door to him. Bloodworth, his wife, Kleinlerer, Bouhe 
and Lydia had a casual conversation which lasted approximately two hours. 


CLASSIFIED BY: Para-4b. AR SSI-12, 180ct74 
EXEMPT FF.Cv.5 GL: ;i';AL DECLASSIFICATION 
SCHEDULE C C : LCLTIVE C.'iOER 11652 
EXEMPTION CATEGORY X 
DECLASSIFY UPON NOTIFICATION OF ACS1, DA 


(continued) 


5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 

DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 


6.. SIGNATURE Of/SPECIAL AGENT 
CONFIDENTIAL 


AGENT REPORT 

For use of this form, see F M 30-f7(C); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Stoff for Intelligence. 

1 NAME Of SUEJECT OR FILE OF INCIDENT: SAEDA (U) Munich, FRG 
28 Sep 76 

2 DATE SUBMITTED: 23 March 1977

4 REPORT OP FINDINGS 


Kleinlerer and Mrs. Bloodworth then went to a delicatessen to purchase some 
items, and were absent from the apartment approximately 45 minutes. During 
this time Bouhe and Lydia asked Bloodworth numerous questions concerning the 
types of helicopters in use by the US and about the armament capabilities of 
these helicopters. During the questioning, Bouhe and Lydia also engaged in 
conversations between themselves in a language other than English. In response 
to Bloodworth's questions, they informed him that they were speaking in the 
Russian language. Bouhe asked Bloodworth what he thought about the Vietnam War 
and how long he thought it would take before the war ended. Bloodworth thought 
it strange that two civilians would be asking questions about helicopter armament 
and only answered their questions when he knew the information was unclassified 
and could be read in any aviation magazine or newspaper. Bloodworth was not 
questioned about his background. Bloodworth overheard Bouhe and Lydia talking 
about two radios that were located in the apartment. Lydia stated that Kleinlerer 
had bought another radio and Bouhe immediately asked why, because he (Bouhe) had 
given Kleinlerer a radio that would receive "Moscow." Bloodworth noticed two 
radios located on a table in the rear of Kleinlerer’s apartment, however could 
provide no positive identifying data on the radios because they were encased. 

When Kleinlerer and Mrs. Bloodworth returned to the apartment, Bouhe stated 
that he knew some French and Tunisian people residing in Dallas whom he would 
like Bloodworth and his wife to meet. Bouhe wrote his name and the phone number 
TA1-3244 on a piece of paper and gave it to Bloodworth, stating that Bloodworth 
and his wife should visit him in Dallas. Bloodworth provided the following 
description of Kleinlerer and Lydia LNU: 


a. Name: Alexander Kleinlerer 


Weight: 150 pounds 
40 to 45 years 
Height: 67 inches 
Facial Features: Large moustache 

Miscellaneous: 


Fort Worth, Texas resident for past 12 years; French descent, currently US citizen; employed by Loma Industries, Fort Worth, Texas 


a. Name: Lydia LNU 

b. Age: Approximately 40 years 

c. Hair: Brown, shoulder length 

Page 2 of 7 Pages 


5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 

6 SIGNATU86 Of SPECIAL AGENT: DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 

CONFIDENTAL 
AGENT REPORT 

For use of this form, see FM 30-17(C); AR 331-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. 

I. NAME OF SUBJECT OR TITLE OF INCIDENT 
I SAFDA (U) Munich, FRG 

2. DATE SUBMITTED:   23 March 1977 

3. CONTROL SYMBOL OR FILE NUMBER 28 Sep 76 

4. REPOST OF FINDINGS 

Lydia Dymitruk 


d. Weight: 130 pounds 

e. Height: 65 inches 

Miscellaneous: 


Speaks with slight German and Russian accent; very fluent in English language; lives in apartment next door to Kleinlerer; unmarried; 
Russian descent, non-US citizen; entered US on Belgian passport; Greek Orthodox religion. 


(C) On 8 October 1968 the records of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI), Dallas Mercantile Building, Dallas, Texas, were examined and revealed the 
following information concerning George Alexandrovich Bouhe: 


(C) Bouhe first came to the attention of the FBI in 1953, when he was 
reported to the FBI as a foreigner who sent packages to Europe and made frequent 
trips to Europe. Bouhe's file contained no information concerning a follow-up 
of this report. Shortly thereafter, the FBI received an inquiry from the Immi¬ 
gration and Naturalization Service (INS), to determine if Bouhe was in any way 
connected with subversive elements. The results of the INS investigation were 
not indicated. The INS inquiry indicated that Bouhe was born on 24 February 
1904 in St. Petersburg (nca), Russia, and was naturalized as a US citizen in 
New York on 30 September 1935. Bouhe was employed in March 1952 by the American 
Liberty Oil Company, Dallas, Texas. 


(C) Bouhe next came to the attention of the FBI during the investigation 
of the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy. In November 1963 
Bouhe was interviewed by the FBI concerning his alleged contact with Lee Harvey 
and Marina Oswald. Bouhe stated that he had read of Oswald's return from the 
Soviet Union in 1962, in a Fort Worth newspaper, and expressed an interest in 
meeting Marina Oswald because she might have been from his area of Russia. A 
man named Gregory, not further identified (nfi), had invited Bouhe to a dinner 
for Oswald, where Bouhe became acquainted with the Oswalds. Bouhe later visited 
the Oswald's apartment and found that they were almost destitute. Bouhe pro¬ 
vided the Oswalds with groceries, baby clothes and a baby crib. Bouhe did not 
see Oswald after December 1962. Bouhe's name appeared many times in the files 
of the Oswald case because he was an acquaintance of Marina and Lee Harvey Oswald 
and because of his having been born in Russia. The FBI interviewed Bouhe in late 
1963 to determine the reason for his recent trip to Mexico. He explained the 
trip as a vacation to the satisfaction of the FBI. 


Page 3 of 7 Pages 


5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 


DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 


6./SIGNATURE Of SPECIAL AGENT 

CONFIDENTIAL 


AGENT REPORT 

j. ,-p or use c f t kj s f orm see FM 30-17(C); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. 

1 NAME Or SUBJECT OR TITLE Of INCIDENT 

SAEDA (U) 

Munich, FRG 

28 Sep 76 

2. DATE: March 1 1977 

3. CONTROL SYMBOL OR FILE NUMBER 


4. REPOST OF FINDINGS 

(C) On 9 October 1968, Bloodworth was re-interviewed for the purpose of 
clarifying and expanding the information he provided during an interview 
conducted on 8 October 1968. Bloodworth provided substantially the following 
information: 

(C) Bloodworth was assigned to Fort Wolters on 3 August 1968 and resided 
with his wife and two children at 416 S. W. 17th Street, Mineral Wells, Texas. 
Mrs. Bloodworth's mother, a terminal cancer patient, resided in Paris, France. 

In December 1966 and May 1967, Mrs. Bloodworth traveled to Paris to visit her 
mother. This travel was accomplished on a space available basis via Military 
Airlift Transport planes on orders published by United States Marine Corps, 

Paris Island, South Carolina. 

(C) At the time Bloodworth met Kleinlerer, Bloodworth was attired in his US Army uniform as WOCs were not authorized to wear civilian clothing
 while in training. During the conversation which Bloodworth had with Bouhe and Lydia LNU on 5 October 1968, Bouhe asked Bloodworth numerous 
questions. The conversation centered upon Bloodworth's recent tour of duty in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN). When Bloodworth stated that he 
had worked with helicopters in RVN, Bouhe began asking questions about the armament, guns, rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, carried by
helicopters. To the questions on rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, Bloodworth replied that he knew nothing about this equipment. 
Bloodworth did, however, answer questions concerning the machine guns used on helicopters, which was public knowledge and appeared in various
publications. 

(C) Bloodworth learned from his wife that Kleinlerer did a great deal of 
traveling for Loma Industries, Fort Worth, where he was employed as a research 
engineer. Kleinlerer had told Mrs. Bloodworth that he did not particularly want 
to make his upcoming trip to France, and appeared to be worried about something,. 
Kleinlerer further told Mrs. Bloodworth that he had two passports, one for the 
USA and one for France, and that while in France, he traveled under a different 
name (nfi). 

(U) On 9 October 1968 a check of the 1967 edition of the Coles Criss Cross 
Directory, Fort Worth, Texas, revealed that Alexander Kleinlerer resided at 3542 
1/2 Kent Street, Fort Worth. This check also reflected that Lydia Dymitruk 
resided at 3542 Kent Street, Fort Worth. 

(U) On 9 October 1968 a check of the 1967 edition of Polk's City Directory, 
Fort Worth, Texas, revealed no record of Alexander Kleinlerer. This check re¬ 
vealed that Lydia Dymitruk was employed as a clerk for Neiman-Marcus Company. 


Page 4 of 7 Pages 


5. TYRED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 


DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 

AGENT REPORT 

For use of this form, see FM 30-17(C); AR 381-130; the proponent ogency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. 

1. NAME OF SUBJECT OR TITLE OF INCIDENT 

SAEDA (U) 
Munich, F.RG 

2. DATE SUBMITTED: 23 March 1977 

3. CONTROL SYMBOL OR FILE NUMBER 8 

28 Sep 76 



4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 


(U) On 9 October 1968 the records of the Intelligence Division, Fort Worth 
Police Department, Fort Worth, Texas, were examined and revealed no information 
pertaining to Alexander Kleinlerer or Lydia Dymitruk.- 

(C) On 9 October 1968 the records of the FBI, Dallas, Texas, were examined 
and revealed the following information concerning Lydia Dymitruk: 

(C) Dymitruk was born Lydia Berdjanskaja on 3 April 1926 in Rostov (nca), 
Russia. In approximately 1942, she was captured by the German Army and sent 
to Germany to work. In a Displaced Persons Center, she met a Belgian man (nfi) 
whom she married and with whom she went to Belgium. From 1948 to 1952 she was a 
member of an organization known as the Union of Soviet Patriots. In Brussels, 
Belgium, she began living with another man, not her husband, and was fined for 
adultery and divorced. In 1954 or 1955 she married Pavel Dymitruk, DPOB: 28 
February 1924, at an unknown location in Russia. On 3 December 1958 she applied 
for entry to the United States. She was admitted to the United States on an 
unknown date between 1958 and 12 May 1961. On 12 May 1961 she was divorced 
from Pavel Dymitruk in the Domestic Relations Court of Judge Beth Wright, Dallas, 
Texas. As of 1964, Pavel Dymitruk resided at 3784 Legendary Lane, Apartment 123, 
Dallas, Texas, at which time he was interviewed by the FBI concerning Lee Harvey 
Oswald. Lydia Dymitruk was also interviewed concerning her knowledge of Lee 
Harvey Oswald. She met Marina Oswald in October 1962, and through her met Lee 
Harvey Oswald. An interview with George Bouhe, concerning Lydia Dymitruk, re¬ 
vealed that Bouhe had met Dymitruk shortly after her arrival in the US, and that 
he found her a job at Titche's Department Store in Dallas. Bouhe stated that 
she was simple, unintelligent, harmless and too stupid to be a subversive. 

(U) On 10 October 1968 the records of the Intelligence Division, Dallas 
Police Department, Dallas, Texas, were examined and contained no information 
concerning George Bouhe, Lydia Dymitruk, Alexander Kleinlerer, George Bloodworth 
or Viviane Astrid Bloodworth nee Hayoun. 

(U) On 10 October 1968 the records of the INS, Room 608, Mayflower Building, 
411 North Akard Street, Dallas, Texas, were examined to locate records pertaining 
to George Bouhe, Lydia Dymitruk and Viviane Astrid Bloodworth nee Hayoun. This 
search met with negative results. The check did however provide the following 
information concerning Alexander Kleinlerer: 

(U) Kleinlerer's file contained no documents substantiating his origin 
prior to 12 June 1945. On 8 November 1954 Kleinlerer submitted an application 
for immigration to the United States to the US Embassy, Paris, France. This 
application included a statement of sponsorship from Abraham Isaac Goldberg, M.D., 


Page 5 of 7 Pages 


5. TYPED NAME AND ORGANIZATION OF SPECIAL AGENT 

DAVID R. HORN, 66th MI Group 


SIGNATURE OF SPECIAL AGENT 

FORM 
I APR 52 
„ p or use .of this form, see FM 30-17(C); AR 381-130; the proponent agency is the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence. 

2. DATE SUBMITTED: 23 March 1977 
3. NAME Or SUBJECT OR TITLE Of INCIDENT ~ . 

SAEDA (U) 

Munich, FRG 
28 Sep 76 

4. REPORT OF FINDINGS 

DPOB: 10 May 1910, Baltimore, Maryland, with residence at 1937 Forest Park 
Avenue, Fort Worth, Texas. This statement was co-signed by Eli Kahn, The 
Jewish Federation, Fort Worth, and further endorsed by the United HIAS Services, 
Incorporated. Kleinlerer's application contained the following information 
pertaining to himself: 


a. DOB: 3 May 1923 
b. POB: Lodz, Poland 
c. Ethnic Origin: Polish 
d. Nationality: Stateless, formerly Polish
e. Address; 17 Rue de Sommerard, Paris, France
f. Relatives: Mrs. F. Goldstein, 9 Rue Orfila, Paris (sister)

Residence since birth; 
Birth - March 1943: Lodz, Poland 
March 1943 - September 1945: Germany 
May 1945 - September 1946: Czechoslovakia (CSSR) 
September 1946 - May 1956: France 


Reason for Immigration: 


"I am an escapee from Poland because of my opposition to the Communist Government and to avoid persecution." 

Attached to Kleinlerer's immigration application was a travel permit issued at 
Karlovy Vary on 12 June 1945 by the Czechoslovakian Repatriations Committee, 
granting Alexander Kleinlerer permission to travel to Poland. Appearing on 
this document in different type was "#83837 Buchenwald," (nfi). Kleinlerer's 
US immigration application was approved, and he was granted visa number 3691 on 
20 January 1956. He arrived in New York on 7 May 1956 aboard the ship SS United 
States. On 5 September 1957 Kleinlerer submitted an application for permission 
to depart the United States for a period of six to 12 months for the purpose of 
"attending the University of Paris and settle family affairs." The application 
was approved and permission granted on 5 September 1957, valid to 5 September 
1958. Kleinlerer departed the United States on 5 November 1957. The INS 
received a letter from Kleinlerer dated 25 August 1958, giving his address as 
47 Avenue Verdier, Montrouge/Seine (nca), France, and requesting that permission 
to remain abroad be extended. INS then received correspondence with appropriate 
forms from Loma Plastics, Incorporated, stating that Kleinlerer had traveled to 
Germany, Belgium, Holland, England and France as "Foreign Plastics " 
INS approved Kleinlerer s extension to 5 September 1959. Kleinlerer returned to the US on 25 August 1959. Kleinlerer returned to Europe on 1 
November 1959, traveled to France, England and Italy, and returned to the United States on 15 June 1960. During this stay in Europe, 
Congressman Jim Wright wrote a personal letter to General 0. M. Swing, Regional Commissioner, INS,requesting a special waiver of residence
requirements to enable Kleinlerer to be a naturalized P without meeting usual requirements. This letter, was contained in the file.
 Kleinlerer began taking trips to Europe without Permission of INS. He was in Europe from 11 January to 7 March 1961, from 14 April 1961 to
13 May 1961, and from 10 July to 1 August 1961. During the period of 1 August 1961 to October 1968, Kleinlerer traveled to Europe and returned
to the United States approximately 30 times. 

(U) On 8 March 1962, Special Bill, H. R. 10644 was introduced to the 2nd 
r occ 4 nn P7fh fnnaress proposing to grant Kleinlerer 1 s time in Europe as residence in the US for naturalization purposes.
At about the sametime, Kleinlerer began listing his nationality as "Naturalized French or Naturalized Citizen of France" or as "France." 
On 17 May 1963 Kleinlerer was issued Certificate of Naturalization Number 8503463 by the US District Court of Northern District of Texas at Fort Worth, 
and his file was closed by INS. 

1 (C) AGENT’S NOTES: Reference Agent Report prepared by S/A David R. Horn, dated 1 October 1976, subject as above, wherein it was reflected 
that SFC James E White reported a SAEDA incident in which Helga Tismer,a German National was the  principal. Reference Agent Report prepared by
S/A Claude G Rpnne? Jr 66th MI Group, dated 31 January 1977, subject as above, wherein it was reported that during an authorized surveillance of
Tismer she was observed in the company of SSG George C. Bloodworth, 66 th M! Group. Reference Report prepared by S/A Claude G. Benner, Jr.,
66th MI j^oup, dated W February 

S Ref -nee Agent Report 

information concerning a possible SAEDA approach while he was a flight student 
at the US Army Flight Center, Fort Wolters, Texas.

Steve Thomas

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Steve,

Saw this in a DOD doc page 26:

"Bloodworth initially thought Bouhe might have been an Army Intelligence Officer, and was testing Bloodworth's security consciousness, and therefore Bloodworth was very careful in answering Bouhe's questions. however, Bloodworth also believed that Bouhe \rJas possibly a foreign intelligence officer, although Bouhe gave Bloodworth no indication of this, either by action or word. Only Bouhe asked Bloodworth questions. During lulls in the conversation, Bouhe and Dymitruk conversed in the Russian language. "

http://documents.theblackvault.com/documents/jfk/NARA-Oct2017/NARA-Nov-2017/docid-32263534.pdf

 

And this headscratcher at the end:

d. NIS dossier #D38-67-41 relates to Lee Harvey Oswald. Contents of this file have been the subject of various letters and memoranda in connection with HSCA requests. 


It has been standard operating procedures for the Navy to interview returning defectors when of interest to and under the jurisdiction of the Navy

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8 hours ago, David Boylan said:

Steve,

Saw this in a DOD doc page 26:

"Bloodworth initially thought Bouhe might have been an Army Intelligence Officer, and was testing Bloodworth's security consciousness, and therefore Bloodworth was very careful in answering Bouhe's questions. however, Bloodworth also believed that Bouhe \rJas possibly a foreign intelligence officer, although Bouhe gave Bloodworth no indication of this, either by action or word. Only Bouhe asked Bloodworth questions. During lulls in the conversation, Bouhe and Dymitruk conversed in the Russian language. "

http://documents.theblackvault.com/documents/jfk/NARA-Oct2017/NARA-Nov-2017/docid-32263534.pdf

 

And this headscratcher at the end:

d. NIS dossier #D38-67-41 relates to Lee Harvey Oswald. Contents of this file have been the subject of various letters and memoranda in connection with HSCA requests. 


It has been standard operating procedures for the Navy to interview returning defectors when of interest to and under the jurisdiction of the Navy

David,

 

Thanks. For some reason, my browser does not want to pull up that blackvault pdf. Could you copy and paste that page 26? It's probably more of the same as what I posted earlier though.

Bouhe has become a very suspicious character in my mind. Why is he keeping files on everybody? Why is he asking questions about Bell helicopter armaments? Why is he concerned about  radios that are capable of "receiving Moscow"

NIS dossier# D38-67-41 would have been interesting to read. It was probably destroyed along with the other military files on Oswald.

 

Steve Thomas

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(S) Kleinlerer and Mrs. Bloodworth returned to the apartment approximately 30 minutes after they had departed. Upon their return to the apartment, the conversation drifted off to normal conversation. Bouhe observed a radio in the apartment and asked Dymitruk why Kleinlerer had to purchase a new radio when the one that he had·given Kleinlerer would receive Moscow. Because of the conversation, Bloodworth became suspicious of Bouhe, and as such felt that the conversation should be reported. Bloodworth believed that the answers to the questions asked by Bouhe could have been obtained through the news media and aviation magazines, and may have been used as a lead-in for later questions. Bloodworth and his wife were invited to visit Bouhe in Dallas, but had not done so at the time of their interview by the FBI.

(S) Based on information provided by Bloodworth, the FBI conducted investigations concerning Dymitruk, Bouhe and Kleinlerer. The results of the FBI investigation are surmmarized below:

(S) A coded government agency which conducted security type investigations revealed to the FBI that Lydia Dymitruk was born on April .1926 in Rostov (nca), SSR. In -approximately 1942 she was deported by the Germans to a work camp in Germany. When the war ended, she entered a camp for displaced persons in Duesseldorf (LB4577}, Germany, where she met and married Pavel Lodwijk Verhelst, Belgian citizen (nfi ) 

On an unknown date, she entered Belgium with her husband and resided in Antwerp (nca). Belgium. She was alleged to be a member of the Union of Soviet Patriots in Belgium from 1948 to 1952. In 1952, while still married to Verhelst, she began living with Vasiliy Gavrilovich,. also known as a vel Kostenko, in Brussels (nca), Belgium. She was divorced by Verhelst in November 1953 and continued living with Gavrilovich until late J954 or 1955. C]avrilovich was allegedly born on 5 September 1922 in Tula {nca), USSR.· He served in the Soviet Anny in World War II prior to joining the "Vlassov Forces" in fighting on the side of the Germans against the Soviets. After the War, he lived in Germany and Belgium and was active in several anti-communist Russian emigre organizations including the National Labor Alliance (NTS). In 1955, .Gavrilovich was identified as a Soviet agent in clandestine contact with the Soviet Embassy in Brussels. In February 1957, he was expelled from the NTS and left Brussels for Moscow (nca) on 20 August 1957. Prior to leaving Belgium for the USSR, Gavrilovich reportedly revealed that he had worked for Soviet intelligence since 1942 and that he was trained in the Soviet Union for intelligence work and dispatched to the west as a Soviet agent (nfi). In a radio broadcast from East Berlin (UU9220), on 17 September 1957, sponsored by the Soviet Committee for  Return to the Homeland, Gavrilovich bitterly attacked Russian emigre organizations in the West.

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5 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

David,

 

Thanks. For some reason, my browser does not want to pull up that blackvault pdf. Could you copy and paste that page 26? It's probably more of the same as what I posted earlier though.

Bouhe has become a very suspicious character in my mind. Why is he keeping files on everybody? Why is he asking questions about Bell helicopter armaments? Why is he concerned about  radios that are capable of "receiving Moscow"

NIS dossier# D38-67-41 would have been interesting to read. It was probably destroyed along with the other military files on Oswald.

 

Steve Thomas

I agree Bouhe is ‘suspicious’. I’m not sure what you think his role was, but I’m pretty convinced he was a White Russian making sure that no Soviet agents were infiltrating the Russian community in Dallas. An Army Intelligence Officer wonders about him because he keeps files and questions the replacement of a radio which can get Moscow. The officer reports this to the 112th MI group. What comes of that inquiry is hidden because files are destroyed or deep sixed. I think I have this right but please correct me if I don’t.

i think what we are seeing is the deep cover operations of ACSI, which Prouty calls a black operation inside the Pentagon. Bouhe is their agent. One of the areas that ACSI is surely involved in is Eastern Europe immigration. Matlack is Hungarian, as is Brandstetter, who openly states he reports to ACSI for 19 years. I think our Army Intel agent stumbles on this Solidarist Network and reports it, but nothing comes of it from outward appearances. 

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31 minutes ago, Paul Brancato said:

I agree Bouhe is ‘suspicious’. I’m not sure what you think his role was, but I’m pretty convinced he was a White Russian making sure that no Soviet agents were infiltrating the Russian community in Dallas. An Army Intelligence Officer wonders about him because he keeps files and questions the replacement of a radio which can get Moscow. The officer reports this to the 112th MI group. What comes of that inquiry is hidden because files are destroyed or deep sixed. I think I have this right but please correct me if I don’t.

i think what we are seeing is the deep cover operations of ACSI, which Prouty calls a black operation inside the Pentagon. Bouhe is their agent. One of the areas that ACSI is surely involved in is Eastern Europe immigration. Matlack is Hungarian, as is Brandstetter, who openly states he reports to ACSI for 19 years. I think our Army Intel agent stumbles on this Solidarist Network and reports it, but nothing comes of it from outward appearances. 

Paul,

 

It was the 66th MI.

 

What's this about Bloodworth being drugged? Why is Boue asking him about the American's commitment to Vietnam? Why the questions about the Bell helicopters capabilities and armaments? Why are Bouhe and Lydia conversing in Russian when both were fluent in English?

(S) Bloodworth became engaged in general conversation with Bouhe and Dymitruk 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth about his duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Bouhe further 
asked Bloodworth his opinion concerning the U.S. commitment to Vietnam. During the 
conversation with Bouhe, Bloodworth stated that he had served in Vietnam as a 
"gunner" on helicopters. Bouhe then asked Bloodworth questions concerning the 
types of helicopters used by the US and the armament capabilities of these 
helicopters. Bloodworth initially thought Bouhe might have been an Army Intelli¬ 
gence Officer, and was testing Bloodworth's security consciousness, and therefore 
Bloodworth was very careful in answering Bouhe’s questions. However, Bloodworth 
also believed that Bouhe was possibly a foreign intelligence officer, although 
Bouhe gave Bloodworth no indication of this, either by action or word. Only 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth questions. During lulls in the conversation, Bouhe and 
Dymitruk conversed in the Russian language. 

 

Bouhe may not have given Bloodworth any indication that he was a foreign agent, but a good agent wouldn't.

Why is Oswald calling Bouhe at a pre-arranged time every day and saying, "I'm fine"? Is is just because that's when Oswald got off work, or is this some kind of code, as in, "Everything's going according to plan" as he goes about his work at JCS?

Why the concern about a radio "receiving Moscow"? Just what kind of radio is this anyway? shortwave? ham? Were there possibly coded instructions coming down over the airwaves?

 

So many questions.

 

Steve Thomas

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49 minutes ago, Steve Thomas said:

Paul,

 

It was the 66th MI.

 

What's this about Bloodworth being drugged? Why is Boue asking him about the American's commitment to Vietnam? Why the questions about the Bell helicopters capabilities and armaments? Why are Bouhe and Lydia conversing in Russian when both were fluent in English?


(S) Bloodworth became engaged in general conversation with Bouhe and Dymitruk 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth about his duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Bouhe further 
asked Bloodworth his opinion concerning the U.S. commitment to Vietnam. During the 
conversation with Bouhe, Bloodworth stated that he had served in Vietnam as a 
"gunner" on helicopters. Bouhe then asked Bloodworth questions concerning the 
types of helicopters used by the US and the armament capabilities of these 
helicopters. Bloodworth initially thought Bouhe might have been an Army Intelli¬ 
gence Officer, and was testing Bloodworth's security consciousness, and therefore 
Bloodworth was very careful in answering Bouhe’s questions. However, Bloodworth 
also believed that Bouhe was possibly a foreign intelligence officer, although 
Bouhe gave Bloodworth no indication of this, either by action or word. Only 
Bouhe asked Bloodworth questions. During lulls in the conversation, Bouhe and 
Dymitruk conversed in the Russian language. 

 

Bouhe may not have given Bloodworth any indication that he was a foreign agent, but a good agent wouldn't.

Why is Oswald calling Bouhe at a pre-arranged time every day and saying, "I'm fine"? Is is just because that's when Oswald got off work, or is this some kind of code, as in, "Everything's going according to plan" as he goes about his work at JCS?

Why the concern about a radio "receiving Moscow"? Just what kind of radio is this anyway? shortwave? ham? Were there possibly coded instructions coming down over the airwaves?

 

So many questions.

 

Steve Thomas

I agree - lots of interesting questions. Certainly not the way a Soviet agent would act. Would you agree? If so, who was Bouhe working for? The Oswald calls are the most telling, but of what? Any thoughts? Certainly looks like code, an assignment of some kind, a test perhaps of whether Oswald could be trusted? It’s hard to imagine they are ‘normal’. Give the FBI and Army enough credit not to allow an unfriendly agent to be operating in Dallas. Do you think otherwise? Your first sentence implies that Bloodworth smelled a rat without reason. But he had been given plenty of clues that Bouhe was up to something. I think you have dug up something important.

Edited by Paul Brancato

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On 10/17/2016 at 12:11 PM, Joe Bauer said:

I just read the entire Voshinin WC testimony transcript.

My God!

The intriguing questions it opens up are so numerous.

Just one:

The many trips ( every 4 weeks ) taken by the De Mohrenchilds to Houston ( the purpose of which the normally talkative George De Mohrenchilds wouldn't discuss when asked by Voshinin ) in late 1962 up until they left for Haiti in the Spring of 1963 begs a huge question...who were the De Mohrenchilds meeting there on a regular basis?

Anybody important in this story ( or a larger but related one? ) working out of Houston at that time?

Wasn't Poppy Bush running the Harris County Republican Party in Houston at that time? Happy Birthday to him by the way.

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1 hour ago, Andrew Prutsok said:

On second thought, it couldn't have been Poppy Bush because he was not connected to the CIA until being tapped to run it in 1976.

Think again. There are numerous reasons to think Bush was a CIA asset at least as far back as 1960

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WC testimony of George Bouhe:

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/bouhe.htm

 

Mr. BOUHE - For 9 1/2 years I was employed as a personal accountant of a very prominent Dallas geologist, and probably capitalist if you want to say it, Lewis W, MacNaughton, senior chairman of the board of the well-known geological and engineering firm of DeGolyer & MacNaughton, but I was MacNaughton's personal employee.

 

David J. Brown

http://obits.dallasnews.com/obituaries/dallasmorningnews/obituary.aspx?n=david-j-brown&pid=111341369

 

“He joined the United States Army in World War II. He served two years in the China-Burma-India Theatre. After he returned from the war, he graduated from SMU in January of 1947 with a BBA in professional accounting. He then went to work for DeGolyer and MacNaughton as a petroleum economist and served with Lewis W. MacNaughton as a petroleum economics consultant to the Finance Minister of the Saudi Arabian government from 1952 to 1954.”

 

http://www.demac.com/

 

DeGolyer and MacNaughton is one of the oldest and most respected names in the oil and gas industry. Since its formation in 1936, D&M has strived to be the leader in petroleum industry consulting services. With offices around the world, D&M employs over 180 petroleum professionals, including engineers, geologists, geophysicists, petrophysicists, statisticians, and economists who speak over 30 different languages. D&M provides a wide range of petroleum consulting services to clients worldwide and is consistently at the forefront of the industry in implementing innovative technologies.

 

As the leading independent consulting firm focused on the petroleum industry, DeGolyer and MacNaughton provides unbiased and informed answers to clients worldwide. D&M skillfully blends energy economics, engineering, and the earth sciences to help clients in more than 100 countries make the smartest decisions regarding exploration, recovery, and management of oil and gas resources.

"George Bloodworth, who was a Warrant Officer Candidate in the U.S. Army Helicopter School... Bouhe began asking questions about the armament, guns, rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, carried by helicopters."

 

Perhaps someone can explain to me why the personal accountant to one of the richest men in America is pumping Warrant Officer Candidate in a U.S. Army Helicopter School, George Bloodworth, for information about the "guns, rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, carried by helicopters."

 

Steve Thomas

 

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32 minutes ago, Steve Thomas said:

firm of DeGolyer

This outfit shared the same CIA Trust office building as the Locke Law firm that worked out the motorcade; Abe Zapruder, Neal Mallon of Dresser (and Bush) and George DeMorehschildt  also shared building space at this location (thanks to Bruce Campbell Adamson).

 

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37 minutes ago, Steve Thomas said:

WC testimony of George Bouhe:

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/testimony/bouhe.htm

 

Mr. BOUHE - For 9 1/2 years I was employed as a personal accountant of a very prominent Dallas geologist, and probably capitalist if you want to say it, Lewis W, MacNaughton, senior chairman of the board of the well-known geological and engineering firm of DeGolyer & MacNaughton, but I was MacNaughton's personal employee.

 

David J. Brown

http://obits.dallasnews.com/obituaries/dallasmorningnews/obituary.aspx?n=david-j-brown&pid=111341369

 

“He joined the United States Army in World War II. He served two years in the China-Burma-India Theatre. After he returned from the war, he graduated from SMU in January of 1947 with a BBA in professional accounting. He then went to work for DeGolyer and MacNaughton as a petroleum economist and served with Lewis W. MacNaughton as a petroleum economics consultant to the Finance Minister of the Saudi Arabian government from 1952 to 1954.”

 

http://www.demac.com/

 

DeGolyer and MacNaughton is one of the oldest and most respected names in the oil and gas industry. Since its formation in 1936, D&M has strived to be the leader in petroleum industry consulting services. With offices around the world, D&M employs over 180 petroleum professionals, including engineers, geologists, geophysicists, petrophysicists, statisticians, and economists who speak over 30 different languages. D&M provides a wide range of petroleum consulting services to clients worldwide and is consistently at the forefront of the industry in implementing innovative technologies.

 

As the leading independent consulting firm focused on the petroleum industry, DeGolyer and MacNaughton provides unbiased and informed answers to clients worldwide. D&M skillfully blends energy economics, engineering, and the earth sciences to help clients in more than 100 countries make the smartest decisions regarding exploration, recovery, and management of oil and gas resources.

"George Bloodworth, who was a Warrant Officer Candidate in the U.S. Army Helicopter School... Bouhe began asking questions about the armament, guns, rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, carried by helicopters."

 

Perhaps someone can explain to me why the personal accountant to one of the richest men in America is pumping Warrant Officer Candidate in a U.S. Army Helicopter School, George Bloodworth, for information about the "guns, rockets, guided missiles and mini guns, carried by helicopters."

 

Steve Thomas

 

What is your interpretation? 

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1 hour ago, Paul Brancato said:

Think again. There are numerous reasons to think Bush was a CIA asset at least as far back as 1960

I couldn't get the sarcasm font to work.

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