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James DiEugenio

Eugene Dinkin: The Saga of an Unsung Hero

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To address the posts above, I think, yes, that it is good to stay "a little careful" of the Dinkin legend, as it is to stay careful of that of Richard Case Nagell.

It's somewhat difficult to see how Dinkin could have deduced the assassination date or the "communist or negro" assassin from the type of info in the one "demonstration" offered in the Redmond article.  Reproducing more of Dinkin's demonstrations would have been helpful, on several levels.

I'm wondering if Dinkin didn't spot clues from several sources - some closer to the surface, such as Stars and Stripes rhetoric, and some from clandestine traffic.  Some may quibble about Dinkin's clearances or skills - but is It possible that Dinkin did not work alone, and reported intelligence gained from other servicemen?

Edited by David Andrews

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3 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

Paul,

 

I tend to agree with your theory in its broad outline, but I think I'd be a little careful with the Dinkin angle for a couple of reasons.

And Jim DiEugenio, I'm sorry, but I don't find Ronald Redmon's article thorough at all for the same reasons.

 

1) Maybe my research has been sloppy, but I've tried in vain to find some record, or even mention of the "599th Ordnance Group" anywhere.

My mind would be eased if someone could answer me the simple question, Who was the Commanding Officer of the 599th Ordnance Group?

 

2) Mr. Redmond's article says that "Regular Army Private First Class Dinkin was serving in Metz, Germany..."

There is no Metz, Germany. Metz was occupied by the Germans from 1940-1944 and was liberated at the end of WWII. Metz is in France.

 

3) Redmond's article says, "Dinkin was transferred to the Army Depot in Metz, France, where his duties did not require a secret clearance."

If Dinkin was already in Metz, how could he be transferred to Metz?

 

4)

This web page: https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=8407#relPageId=2&tab=page

gives Dinkin's military ID number as: Serial number RA-76710292.

Is this even a valid military ID? I didn't serve in the military, so I don't know. Do the armed forces issue military personnel, serial numbers? And/or numbers that start with RA?

Has any armed forces veteran in this, or any other research forum ever tried to run this number through the National Archives or VA, or anywhere else?

 

Paul I'd be a little careful with the OAS angle on this. For all intents and purposes, the OAS was splintered in 1962 following the Evian Peace Accords in March. They even disavowed any involvement in the Petit Clamart attack against DeGaulle in August of that year. Most of the leadership had been captured or killed by 1963, and the remaining members for the most part were scattered to the winds and became mercenaries in somebody else's wars.

If Dinkin was intercepting OAS communications, I'd like to know whose traffic he was intercepting. I have never seen the product of what that communication was. How was it intercepted? Was somebody's phone tapped? Whose? Was it telegraph? Shortwave radio? What language was it in? English, French? German? Portugese?

Is there any indication that Dinkin knew any of these?

 

Needless to say, I'm pretty skeptical.

 

Steve Thomas

 

 

 

Steve, 

i noticed the same irregularities in the article. And I agree that Dinkins' story is not a necessary part of a theory about military involvement and outsourced European assassins. It's hard to let go if the OAS angle because DeGaulle himself thought JFK had been killed by the same forces that tried to kill him. I'll take that as pointing his finger at CIA

Jason Ward pointed out that there isn't a lot to go on when it comes to the question of whether or not Dinkins warned of the plot before Nov. 22. I have the same problem accepting Walker's claim that he knew Oswald shot at him very soon after the incident.

David - Nagell's case does seem somewhat similar. I've never been able to accept his story, even with what appear to me weird supporting docs. 

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21 hours ago, Paul Brancato said:

Do you understand French Mathias?

Yes, Paul, I do. I'll try to sum up the major points of the article:

It's about a Frenchman called Yves Guerin Serac. He'd fought in the Korean War, Indochina and later in Algeria before in 1962 he deserted the army and joined OAS. After Algeria became independent he fled first to Spain and then to Portugal, where he offered his services to the Portuguese Legion, which was involved in the regime's anti-guerrilla warfare in Africa. This is how he got into contact with Italian Fascists with whom he founded "Aginter Press". Under the cover of being a press agency this organisation spied on ideological adversaries and provided intelligence for false flag terror attacks, such as those carried out in Italy by Fascist Groups like Avanguardia Nazionale and others. The tactics they used were the same the French used in Algeria: indiscriminate killings to be blamed on the enemy. The idea was to create an atmosphere of chaos and destabilize democracy so the public would turn to right-wing politicians promising to restore law and order. Guerin Serac was found to be connected to a great number of Gladio operatives and US Army and Navy officers.

I don't think there's a direct link to the Kennedy assassination here. It's just an example to show how this kind of international terrorism operated. The Fascist regimes in Span and Portugal seem to have played an important role here, both as harbors and sponsors of foreign terrorists.

 

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30 minutes ago, Mathias Baumann said:

 I'll try to sum up the major points of the article:

It's about a Frenchman called Yves Guerin Serac. He'd fought in the Korean War, Indochina and later in Algeria before in 1962 he deserted the army and joined OAS. After Algeria became independent he fled first to Spain and then to Portugal, where he offered his services to the Portuguese Legion,

 

Mathias,

I was going to mention Portugal in my response to Paul.

 

Just as an aside, have you ever read any of Guerin Serac's writings?

Some scary stuff there.

 

Steve Thomas

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So this is the "evidence" that he had foreknowledge?

In September, 1963, Dinkin noticed material in the Army newspaper, Stars and Stripes, and other print publications, that was negative toward the president and his policies and implied that hewas a weak president in dealing with the Russians. The examples that he found became morenegative, the suggestion being that if he were removed as president it would be a good thing. By mid-October Dinkin had found enough information—some of it subliminal—that he was convinced that a plot was in the works. One driven by some high ranking members of the military, some right-wing economic groups, and with support by some national media outlets.

Sounds pretty dubious to me.

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Joe

You said ... "And the disinfo angle is preposteriously illogical. Too many suspicion creating and arousing doorways opened there".

Redmon should have done more to critically vet his own article. Sadly he did not.

He presents not one document after the fact that supports Dinkin's efforts to contact anyone about his "subconscious messages". BTW, would you believe someone who said to you ... my subconscious tells me the president is to be killed on 28 Nov 1963. I doubt anyone would.

The only supporting information after the fact that Redmon presents is the article written by Alex des Fontaines. He is a stringer ???? for TIME-LIFE. Whoa wait a minute. Is that the same LIFE that bought the Zapruder film? The same LIFE whose editor's wife is very fond of Allen Dulles and the CIA? Hmmmm

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Joe

Redmon says Dinkins used the "Stars and Strips" and other print publications to determine his subconscious messages on the assassination.

He doesn't name the other print publications. Why?

You won't find the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times or the Dallas Morning News in Metz, France. I never saw LOOK magazine on any of the army bases overseas where I was stationed. I was always interested in info from home but I wasn't able to find magazines from the states. I would be interested to find out whatother print publications Dinkins used. Redmon should dig a little deeper.

Edited by George Sawtelle

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He named a few in his original draft.  I cut some of them out since I thought once the demonstrations was made it need not be repeated.

And they were in mass circulation periodicals.

I would think Stars and Stripes would be key to get the military sucked in.

Edited by James DiEugenio

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Jim

Would you blame anyone for not believing Dinkins? Would you believe him if he had come to you before the assassination?

This guy's the perfect set-up. No one will believe him, then all his papers and notes are stolen by a mystery man. No one seems to have documented him coming to them except the TIME-LIFE stringer.

Although no one believed him in the beginning the Dinkins affair has received a lot of attention in the research community. It takes the heat off the CIA and places it on the radical right, the military and print media. And it came up again just before the HSCA. Was someone trying to influence? Come on it's obvious.

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George:

Did anyone believe any of the people who predicted JFK was going to be killed?  Did Fruge believe Cheramie at first? Oswald did not even believe Nagell when he told him he was being set up.

As per Steve, Metz was part of Germany for almost fifty years from after the Franco Prussian War, to the end of WW 1.  And then during  WW2.  Easy error to make at that time because if you count the years from 1871 on, Metz spent longer in Germany than in France.

The 599th was part of the larger 18th artillery group.

Dinkin was not transferred to a different town but to a different area of the base.

In some form, the OAS lasted at least until 1964, some say 1965.  I mean what was Souetre doing in Dallas in November of 1963? Waiting around for the Cowboys game?  (BTW, they were playing in Cleveland that weekend.)

And Paul, to compare Nagell to DInkin?  I hope that was a momentary lapse by you.  Maybe due to PTSD caused by Trejo.

The difference in the two cases is that there has been a lot of material that has been printed up on Nagell in various publications.  I mean, Probe magazine even offered three volumes of records that the ARRB declassified on him.  There is also Russell's book (and to a lesser extent Hancock's book) and the Russell book names names as to those who interacted with Nagell and back up his story.  There is even the first interview that Garrison's ADA Martin had with Nagell, while he was in prison.  And then there are his relatives. No one should have any doubts about the central tenets of Nagell's story.

If one compares the amount of literature on DInkin vs that on Nagell, I mean the latter outweighs the former by a huge factor.  Which is why we printed this article.

 

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Steve:

I just visited Metz, while on a Viking river cruise.  Its a beautiful city on the banks of the Moselle River and strategically located near the so-called Schengen tri-point where the borders of France, Germany and Luxembourg meet ( presumably a good place for NSA "listeners").  Metz remained German until the end of World War I, when it reverted to France.  However, after the Battle of France during the Second World War, the city was annexed once more by the German Third Reich.  In 1944, the attack on the city by the U.S. Third Army freed the city from German rule and Metz reverted one more time to France after World War II.   Our tour guide explained that - when asked if they speak French or German - the answer is "Alsace" which is a mixture of the two.  The locals describe their grandparents as having changed their country allegiance so many times (French to German back to French) that they stopped claiming allegiance to either country, and refer to themselves as Alsatian. Websites describe Metz's population as historically impacted by "the vicissitudes of the wars and annexations involving the city, which have prevented continuous population growth".   So, I think its not unusual for someone to refer to the city alternately as in France or Germany.

Gene

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1 hour ago, James DiEugenio said:

The 599th was part of the larger 18th artillery group.

 

Jim,

 

Thank you for taking the time to respond.

 

I see where the 599th Field Artillery Battalion was part of the 18th Artillery Group, but not the 599th Ordnance Group.

I'm pretty sure these are different altogether.

https://www.usarmygermany.com/Sont.htm?https&&&www.usarmygermany.com/Units/FieldArtillery/USAREUR_18th Arty Group.htm

 

Steve Thomas

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Steve:

I dug into the Army information about ordnance groups, and found that they change both names and locations pretty frequently, for many reasons (e.g. to keep up with fast-moving tactical combat troops).  For example, the 599th Field Artillery Battalion changed its home station in Germany, moving from Schwäbisch Gmünd to Ferris Barracks, in Erlangen (near Nuremberg).  In February 1955, the 599th was re-designated as the 599th Armored Field Artillery Battalion. 

Gene

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Jim - thanks for the free pass regarding Nagell. Of course there are reams of info on him. But do you find his central story that he was working for the Soviets who feared that Oswald was part of a plot to kill JFK? Do I have that right?

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19 minutes ago, Gene Kelly said:

Steve:

I just visited Metz, while on a Viking river cruise.   So, I think its not unusual for someone to refer to the city alternately as in France or Germany.

Gene

Gene,

 

Boy do I envy you.

 

I'll concede the point, although grudgingly. That whole French/German frontier has been fluid for hundreds of years.

I still think it's kind of sloppy to refer to Metz as being German in a scholarly paper though.

Metz had been French for over 300 years before the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1871.

 

Steve Thomas

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