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Good Morning!  I was wanting to get the opinions of those who do not believe LHO was a shooter in the plot to assassinate JFK.

There are many names tossed about.  The names I'm confident about are:

1. Lucien Sarti and three other Corsican shooters because of E. Howard Hunt's deathbed confession.

2.  Malcolm Wallace because he had performed many murders for LBJ and he was fiercely loyal.  Also, his fingerprint was found on a box in the TSBD.

3.  Jack Lawrence because Johnny Roselli bragged that he had men in the sewer drain and on the grassy knoll.

4. Frank Sturgis (I can't remember why his name sticks out in my mind).

If for some reason you think there were others, please list their names and say why you believe they were part of the plot.  If you don't like one of the names on my list, let me know why you don't.

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Rich - I’m not familiar with #3. 

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2 hours ago, Rich Pope said:

The names I'm confident about are:...

4. Frank Sturgis (I can't remember why his name sticks out in my mind).

 

 

You're "confident about" Sturgis but you "can't remember why"?

 

 

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1 hour ago, David Josephs said:

Per R. Craig, wasn't Weatherford on a roof with a scoped rifle?  Something Craig wasn't supposed to let be known....

68-08-15 Harry Weatherford threatens Roger Craig years later as Craig gave up Weatherford's position on 11-22 on the county records building roof.pdf

Craig became a "corporation judge"? 

What is a corporation judge? A judge owned by the corporations? That makes sense, but I Googled "corporation judge" and found nothing.

As for Weatherford being on the roof with a rifle, this was confirmed later by a police dispatcher from that day whose name I don't recall. 

 

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2 hours ago, Paul Brancato said:

Rich - I’m not familiar with #3. 

He was in the sewer on Elm Street.  He escaped to the Trinity River, was arrested by police but then let go.  He immediately skipped town.

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2 hours ago, David Josephs said:

Richard Cain was supposed to be the mob connected shooter on 6th floor... No?

1943580484_JFKRichardCainR2.jpg.4bb0450e150daa93ace3bd8fd4152b82.jpg

My impression was that Malcolm Wallace was on the 6th floor of the TSBD.

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8 minutes ago, Ron Ecker said:

 

You're "confident about" Sturgis but you "can't remember why"?

 

 

Ron, meaning...I had previously read reasons why Sturgis was one of the shooters and I remember agreeing with the source but I can't remember where I got the information.

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6 hours ago, Rich Pope said:

He was in the sewer on Elm Street.  He escaped to the Trinity River, was arrested by police but then let go.  He immediately skipped town.

Many are familiar with the Jack Lawrence story.  But I've never read of Roselli bragging he had a shooter in the drain.

 

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Joan Mellen pretty much destroys the idea Mac Wallace was a shooter in the TSBD for LBJ.  Some still argue about the methodology and expertise of the years later identification of the one partial print possibly identified as his out of the thousands not identified as anyone suspicious in the assassination - including Oswald.  By 1963 LBJ had not been associated with Wallace in over ten years.  He had become an alcoholic working in California at an aerospace company in procurement, and, if I recall right was eventually fired because of the drinking.  Ms. Mellen interviewed his son, who grew up to go into law enforcement and was a devout Christian - FWIW.  He said his dad came home from work that evening in Califorinia and remembered this because of the assassination.  Personally, I never could see LBJ putting someone - not known for his rifle ~ distance shooting ability, that could be traced back to him in a position to be possibly identified or caught.

https://www.amazon.com/Faustian-Bargains-Johnson-Wallace-Culture/dp/1620408066

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Below is the Frank Sturgis section from my (unfinished) essay on Hunt's confession:

Frank Sturgis gained brief fame during the Watergate scandal by being one of the burglars, but he was also involved in CIA exploits much earlier – in the 1950’s and 60’s.  Sturgis (born Frank Fiorini) was born in Norfolk, Virginia and served in the Pacific as a Marine during the Second World War.  He did a stint in the Norfolk Police Department and U.S. Army before moving to Latin America in the mid-50’s.  Sometime in 1958, Sturgis made contact with the CIA through the U.S. consulate in Santiago and went on to become to a contract agent and informant in the intelligence world for the next 12 years. 

Unlike most of the other conspirators named by Hunt, Sturgis was never an actual CIA agent.  The best word to describe Sturgis’ role would be that of a mercenary.  Indeed during his time working as an intelligence asset, Frank was involved in gun running and had well known mob connections.  In 1958, he was arrested for illegal possession of arms in Cuba but was released without charge.  He went on to become Castro’s gambling czar in the nascent communist state before gambling was outlawed and Castro was revealed to be a communist.  Subsequent to these revelations, Sturgis formed the Anti-Communist Brigade, which was funded in large part by gambling interests and hotel owners linked to Batista.  It was around this time it was alleged that Sturgis became a member of Operation 40, a Richard Nixon-backed CIA in-house assassination program to dispose of unfriendly leaders around the world.  As part of this work, he became involved with Marita Lorenz, a 19 year old American who was having an affair with Fidel Castro.  In January 1960, Sturgis passed along poison to Lorenz in an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Castro.  Lorenz would later accuse Sturgis and Hunt of being involved in a plot to kill President Kennedy, which will be covered at greater length later in this essay. 

Frank Sturgis was associated with some unsavory characters in the anti-Castro Cuban community around the time of JFK’s murder including Felipe Vidal Santiago, Virgilio Gonzalez (future Watergate co-conspirator), Felix Rodriguez (of Iran Contra fame), Nestor Sanchez, Rafael Quintero, and John Martino.  These same cast of characters would become of interest to researchers as potentially involved in the JFK assassination.  Other soldiers of fortune Sturgis worked with, including Roy Hargraves and Gerry Patrick Hemming, were interviewed by the FBI following the assassination as potential suspects and we now know their names were actually in the Secret Service Protective Research File.  Sturgis himself was questioned by the FBI two weeks following Kennedy’s murder over a December 4th article in the Florida Sun Sentinel claiming he had met Lee Harvey Oswald in Miami shortly prior to the assassination.  Its author, Jim Buchanan, also claimed Oswald had tried to infiltrate the Anti-Communist Brigade, both of which claims Sturgis denied. 

One of the people with whom Sturgis worked extensively around the time of the assassination was Bernard Barker.  Barker, who would also later turn up at the Watergate, was a Cuban American who worked as an undercover FBI agent and later as a CIA agent responsible for recruiting Cubans who eventually took part in the Bay of Pigs invasion.  He was also Sturgis’ case officer during the time immediately prior to the assassination.  Barker’s boss in 1962 was E. Howard Hunt.  During the Watergate trials, Hunt denied knowing Sturgis prior to 1971 when they became acquainted as part of the ‘plumbers unit.’  This is almost certainly false, given Barker’s close connection to Sturgis as well as Hunt’s prominence in the anti-Castro Cuban community, where he was known as Eduardo.  Interestingly, in Hunt’s 1949 novel Bimini Run, the main character’s name is Hank Sturgis whose biography closely mirrors the early adventures of Frank Sturgis. 

When assessing Sturgis’ possible involvement in the conspiracy, it is important to note that David Morales didn’t trust Sturgis or Barker to not gossip about big missions and questioned their competency in paramilitary operations.  In fact, Morales didn’t even trust Hunt, a career CIA officer.  It is therefore hard to imagine a cautious operator and senior officer like Morales working alongside Sturgis on something as sensitive as killing a sitting president.  Furthermore, knowing the names of some of the conspirators and their seniority in the CIA, one can reasonably infer a chain of command and how a plot might materialize.  In this light, a soldier of fortune and low level informant bringing in a top CIA assassinations expert to an existing plot is comical at best.  As is Sturgis and Morales purportedly offering Hunt a role in the plot, which he turned down and walked away with no consequence.  The CIA as an institution was skeptical of Sturgis and in internal documents doubt some of the information he relayed, and in others expressed concern over his Mafia connections. 

Nevertheless, Sturgis was undeniably involved in some very serious activities throughout his career.  It is possible that Sturgis may have played some role in the assassination, given his contacts in the early 1960’s.  It is unlikely that he played the role described by Hunt, however.  It is important to note that in Hunt’s audio confession, he names Frank as a conspirator but in American Spy he said Sturgis was too simple minded to be trusted to be part of any conspiracy. 

Sturgis was among those in the immediate aftermath of the assassination to push the story that Lee Harvey Oswald was a Castro agent, which he continued to do throughout the 1970’s and 80’s up until his death.  In John Martino’s confession to a journalist, he named someone who “wasn’t well known at the time but would become famous years later,” implying that someone was Sturgis.  Whenever Kennedy was mentioned in Frank’s presence, he liked to joke, “You mean that guy I killed?”  Notoriously unreliable, Sturgis liked to tell wild stories but by the 1980’s he was reportedly making outrageous claims in the hopes a journalist would publish them so he could turn around and sue the publication under libel laws.  Sturgis died in 1993.

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I think that "knowing" the names of the actual shooters might be satisfying on a visceral level but I've always thought if we know the why we'll know the who.

In a totally different venue I was doing some training for some federal folks and got them to understand if we took the guy alive who was wearing the suicide vest we would not get a lot of intell since he wouldn't be part of the inner circle if the leaders were content to  let himself be a two legged bomb.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/6/2018 at 11:47 AM, David Josephs said:

Per R. Craig, wasn't Weatherford on a roof with a scoped rifle?  Something Craig wasn't supposed to let be known....

68-08-15 Harry Weatherford threatens Roger Craig years later as Craig gave up Weatherford's position on 11-22 on the county records building roof.pdf

David,

Your article reminded me of one of 4 additional bullet casings found in the area, the one found on the roof of the Dal-Tex building in 1977.  There is an essay on this topic, available here: https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/silencers-sniper-rifles-the-cia

Edited by Rick McTague
Edit on article posting

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