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Steve Thomas

Allen Dulles

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I am just posting this for idle curiosity's sake.

 

The Military Intelligence Story: A Photographic History. Second Edition

by John P. Finnegan

 

http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/virtual_disk_library/index.cgi/1383026/FID3217/IACS_MH/MISTORY.PDF

page 10 of the book. Page 25 of the pdf file.

The man seated is Col. Ralph M. Van Deman

Standing above him is a very young Allen Dulles.

image.thumb.png.f65cd8788885f0884d346d9bc1d02c4a.png

 

Steve Thomas

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Who's Dulles looking to? would be a question.  That guy below him smacks of the fading past.

Thanks for the book.

Edited by David Andrews

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Allen Dulles was always an odd, psychopathic bird.

One of the creepiest passages in David Talbot's biography, The Devil's Chessboard, was the story (told by a sister) about young Allen Dulles standing motionless on the shore of a lake in upstate New York while his younger sister was drowning.

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10 minutes ago, W. Niederhut said:

Allen Dulles was always an odd, psychopathic bird.

One of the creepiest passages in David Talbot's biography, The Devil's Chessboard, was the story (told by a sister) about young Allen Dulles standing motionless on the shore of a lake in upstate New York while his younger sister was drowning.

Is that drowning sister/no reaction Dulles story true? If so...Dear God!

Kind of reminds me of the story of Barbara Bush and what she put young George through after his sister died.

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7 hours ago, Joe Bauer said:

Is that drowning sister/no reaction Dulles story true? If so...Dear God!

Kind of reminds me of the story of Barbara Bush and what she put young George through after his sister died.

I could be having a "senior" moment, but I recall reading that story in The Devil's Chessboard.  Fortunately, Dulles's younger sister was rescued, and did not drown-- no thanks to young Master Allen.

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9 hours ago, Joe Bauer said:

Is that drowning sister/no reaction Dulles story true? If so...Dear God!

Kind of reminds me of the story of Barbara Bush and what she put young George through after his sister died.

Yes Joe it's true.  You've not read the book?  About liking watching the look in the eye of the mice just before the trap breaks their neck?  About turning over his contact/date/girlfriend(?) to fellow intelligence associates to never be seen or heard from again? 

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Ruthless  and capable of making even the wily serpent in the Garden of Eden blush @ Allen Welsh Dulles.

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Thanks to Malcolm Blunt
 
malcol28.jpg
malcol29.jpg
I Like this one
 
img_8311.jpg
Edited by Bart Kamp

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RE the telegram.  Imagine that.  A Cabell of Dallas kissing up to Dulles, the "former" boss of a couple of them.  A month before the assassination.  Was he one himself?

This takes us back to the fact that Dulles was in Dallas for only like the second time in his life, a month before the assassination.

Who laughed about what the public would think about the connections.  Ruth Hyde Paine, Ruth Forbes Young, Mary Bancrofft, Ruth Forbes Paine.  Michael Paine.  Henry Cabot Lodge.  Blue blood Boston Brahmins, no use for the new money Kennedy's. 

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The Cabells themselves are old money from Virginia. Big family with lots of branches that connect to New England families. Ann Cabell Standish married Robert Swan Mueller III. (She was distantly related to Charles Pearre Cabell & Earle.) RSM3 is first cousin once removed to Richard Bissell (fired along with Dulles & Charles that same day in ‘61.)

Charles and Earle Cabell had a brother Benjamin. He died in March 1964. I don’t know how he died or if it was suspicious (age about 65.) I’m still looking for an Obit.

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On 2/12/2019 at 4:27 AM, Bart Kamp said:
Thanks to Malcolm Blunt
 
 
 
I Like this one
 
img_8311.jpg

Bart,

 

I need to pay more attention to the Dallas Council on World Affairs.

https://www.dfwworld.org/President-CEO

 

“In October of 1951, the Dallas Morning News reported on the founding of the Dallas Council on World Affairs. H. Neil Mallon, president of Dresser Industries and the Council's first president, was quoted on why he organized it: "The end purpose of the DCWA is to ask ourselves 'What can we do?" then to educate ourselves and understand." The newspaper said Mr. Mallon told the board of directors that "Dallas needed such a council because Dallas people must keep up with foreign affairs, which are becoming of greater importance daily."”

 

https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/dod04

Handbook of Texas Online

Dresser Industries by Darwin Payne

 

“H. Neil Mallon was selected as president and chief executive officer (of Dresser Industries); he held that position until his retirement in 1962. Under Mallon, a Cincinnati native and Yale graduate whose earlier experience had been in the canning industry, Dresser took advantage of its strong cash position to launch a program of acquisitions designed to survive a new threat to its coupling business-the introduction of welding for joining pipes together. Between 1930 and the entry of the United States into World War II, Dresser acquired various companies that manufactured valves, heaters, pumps, and engines and compressors.

After the war, expansion continued, as the company diversified into such products as oil derricks, blowers, drill bits, refractories, and drilling mud. Dresser was energetic in following new oil and gas markets around the world, even behind the Iron Curtain. Future United States president George Bush worked for the company in several positions after the war. His father, Prescott Bush, had been a W. A. Harriman and Company executive who had been involved in the conversion of Dresser to a public company, and he served on the board of directors for twenty-two years. In 1950 the company headquarters were transferred to Dallas to be near the nation's major oil and gas fields and also to take advantage of the central location for managing what by then had become a far-flung empire....

To comply with federal antitrust regulations, Dresser sold off its interest in M-I Drilling Fluids Company and Western Atlas International. Upon completion of the Baroid merger, Dresser became the third-largest oil-services company in the world.”

 

Steve Thomas

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