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James DiEugenio

The Mysterious Life and Death of James McCord

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Joe:

1. I am pretty sure from the context that this is about space aliens and UFO's.  On that level its about as credible as the whole JFK and MJ 12 papers imbroglio.

2. The idea that anyone could predict Trump in 1973, or CV 19, is quite dubious. In fact, the first story ever published in the NYT about Trump was in 1973.

3.  Nixon  suspected Dean days after the break in? Dean was actually writing a report for Nixon on the whole Watergate affair at the time he left.

4. The allegedly grandiose goals that Nixon had were pretty simple: to get re-elected and then get Vietnam off the front pages.  With what we know today about him, the attempt to make Nixon into some kind of grand statesman on the order of Hammarskjold is ludicrous. Dr. Jeffrey Kimball listened to the declassified tapes and looked at the papers at the Nixon Library.  He then wrote two good books on the subject: Nixon's Vietnam War (1998), and The Vietnam War Files (2004). These both expose Nixon and Kissinger as the John Foster Dulles type Cold Warriors that they were.

5.  The idea that Nixon was the equivalent of Oswald is fruity.  Oswald was framed for a crime he did not commit, and could not have committed.  The best one could say about Tricky Dick is that he was caught up in a battle with Helms and the CIA.  I mean we have on tape now that Nixon himself suggested the fire bombing of Brookings to cover up his sabotage of a Vietnam settlement in the Anna Chennault affair, and he was the one who suggested the formation of a group of agents like Hunt to do it with.  So please, the idea the two men are equivalent is unfounded at best and kind of repugnant at worst.

Edited by James DiEugenio

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Trump spent a weekend with Trump in March 1989. Maybe they spoke about Aliens. I doubt it though since Aliens are a "throw." Like when some important news is about to come out, Doug Caddy (or someone like him) yells, "look at the alien over there", and the real news gets swept under the rug.

If I had to guess, Nixon said to Trump that if he ever becomes President, look out for who is on your transition team, that's how the CIA gets their guys into the White House.

A few Ehrlichman subordinates seemed to be pretty tight with that White Russian community that always is on the periphery of various plots; but who cares on this board; too easily distracted by aliens. Then there is George T. Bell; the guy who wrote the enemies list and conveniently died before the public hearings.

Bell should ring a bell since he worked for Bell.

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7 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

Joe:

1. I am pretty sure from the context that this is about space aliens and UFO's.  On that level its about as credible as the whole JFK and MJ 12 papers imbroglio.

2. The idea that anyone could predict Trump in 1973, or CV 19, is quite dubious. In fact, the first story ever published in the NYT about Trump was in 1973.

3.  Nixon  suspected Dean days after the break in? Dean was actually writing a report for Nixon on the whole Watergate affair at the time he left.

4. The allegedly grandiose goals that Nixon had were pretty simple: to get re-elected and then get Vietnam off the front pages.  With what we know today about him, the attempt to make Nixon into some kind of grand statesman on the order of Hammarskjold is ludicrous. Dr. Jeffrey Kimball listened to the declassified tapes and looked at the papers at the Nixon Library.  He then wrote two good books on the subject: Nixon's Vietnam War (1998), and The Vietnam War Files (2004). These both expose Nixon and Kissinger as the John Foster Dulles type Cold Warriors that they were.

5.  The idea that Nixon was the equivalent of Oswald is fruity.  Oswald was framed for a crime he did not commit, and could not have committed.  The best one could say about Tricky Dick is that he was caught up in a battle with Helms and the CIA.  I mean we have on tape now that Nixon himself suggested the fire bombing of Brookings to cover up his sabotage of a Vietnam settlement in the Anna Chennault affair, and he was the one who suggested the formation of a group of agents like Hunt to do it with.  So please, the idea the two men are equivalent is unfounded at best and kind of repugnant at worst.

 

Here are my responses to Jim’s five assertions:

WATERGATE, TRUMP’S SPACE FORCE AND 2020

 

Who in 1972 when Watergate broke could have foreseen that the scandal eventually would lead back to President Trump’s uncle John G.Trump, an eminent scientist at MIT in the 1940’s who was delegated by the government among other classified tasks with reading Tesla’s secret files after his death and investigating the UFO phenomenon and then into the next century to Donald Trump inside the White House in a titanic struggle for control of the universe? Only one person foresaw this: President Richard Nixon who 47 years ago predicted that next year, 2020, would be cataclysmic not only for America but for the whole planet and who 32 years ago predicted that Trump one day would be president.

 

Assertion #2: Note that I never said that Nixon in 1973 predicted that Trump would be president. What I did say was Nixon predicted 32 years ago that Trump one day would be president.” I posted this topic in 2019. So when did Nixon made his prediction about Trump?

30 years ago today Richard Nixon wrote a letter to Trump predicting success in politics

by Daniel Chaitin

 December 21, 2017

 

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/30-years-ago-today-richard-nixon-wrote-a-letter-to-trump-predicting-success-in-politics

Note: President Trump keeps Nixon’s letter in a frame on the Oval Office wall.

 

Jim’s assertion nos. 1, 3, 4 and 5 are covered in this excerpt from my post in the Watergate topic:

 Merritt’s third and final meeting with Nixon took place in the second week of July 1972, three weeks after Watergate broke. The Secret Service agent picked him up around 1 a.m. He was driven in a heavy black sedan that looked like it was bullet-proof. The vehicle arrived at the Executive Office Building (EOB) that is adjacent to the White House. Upon a signal the guard inside let them in the front door. They walked into a small elevator that when moving did so smoothly one could not tell it was moving at all. The elevator opened somewhere deep underneath EOB or White House. They walked a short distance and went down a short stairwell to a corridor. They then walked down the corridor and through three doors and then to fourth door. They walked a short distance and the agent told Merritt to enter an office. Inside they found President Nixon distraught with some tears rolling down his checks. Nixon asked secret service agent to leave and to stand at end of corridor.

Merritt asked Nixon why he was crying. Nixon pointed to an article about the Watergate case in the early edition of the Washington Post lying on top of his desk. He said he was being destroyed, his presidency was over.

Once Nixon composed himself and made some small talk, he reviewed the Watergate affair. He said that he had been betrayed by many in White House who were motivated by power and money. He could trust no one in the White House; he could only trust on Kissinger and Merritt. He said Dean was a traitor and that he had small elite group of detectives that monitored and taped Dean and others. The group discovered Dean had visited Nixon’s enemies on Capitol Hill before and during Watergate. He singled out by name General Alexander Haig, Carl Shoffler, T.D. (Shoffler’s police buddy) and Captain Edmund Chung as traitors.

The President again acknowledged that he knew of the general idea of a break-in at the Democratic National Committee being planned under the Huston Plan but had  known nothing of its details. He expressed remorse for not taking more seriously the information that Merritt had provided him at their prior meeting about the burglars’ break-in plan that his enemies had discussed in a telephone conversation overheard by Rita Reed. He said that the CIA had hijacked the break-in plan and had purposely sabotaged it, resulting in the arrests of the burglars. He was especially incensed at the role played by Military Intelligence directing Shoffler to set up an entrapment scheme to catch the burglars. Nixon blamed the NSA, FBI, CIA and Military Intelligence for wanting him destroyed and implied that he had been set up for a fall because of his sponsoring the Huston Plan that encroached upon the powers of these government agencies.

Nixon knew of Rita Reed’s disappearance after she had told Merritt on June 1that Nixon’s enemies would use the break-in to end his presidency. The President told Merritt that he must assume Rita was dead.

Nixon regularly received raw intelligence reports from Washington Metropolitan Police Department’s Intelligence Division. Merritt surmised these came from Officer Dixie Gildon, who knew Nixon. These reports showed Merritt regretted his role in alerting Shoffler of the planned break-in based on the information given to him by Rita Reed because he did not want to see Nixon hurt, that he admired Nixon. Nixon said he knew that from these reports and from Merritt faithfully carrying out his Huston Plan assignments that he could trust Merritt.

Merritt told him that since their last meeting he had begun to carry out his assignments given to him at that time. The President broke in and said that the plans to bomb the Institute for Policy Studies and to assassinate the professor of history at American University had to be cancelled. Such violent events in the wake of the burglars’ arrests at Watergate would likely focus attention on the activities of the White House.

The President spoke about the goals of his presidency that were now in jeopardy. He said it might be years before the historians would realize what he had hoped to accomplish, which was to assure the security and well being of Americans alive and those of future generations.

Then the President swore Merritt to secrecy. Once Merritt had assured him of this the President said that he had prepared a document that would explain why and what he had done to assure national and international security. The document was his “Message to the American People.” He had hidden this historical document inside the White House in a secret location where it might be many decades before it was discovered. He informed Merritt of the secret location and told him that if the time came when Merritt was still alive and believed it was the right time for the document to be revealed he was giving permission to Merritt to reveal its secret location. 

Nixon disclosed that he had prepared research dossiers on the FBI, CIA, Military Intelligence and one other that Merritt cannot remember. Nixon criticized all the agencies, declaring that should the country be attacked in a nuclear war these agencies would not be up to the task of defending the country. He said he was tired of reading reports from these agencies that were composed with the primary intention of the agencies’ claiming questionable accomplishments designed to make themselves look good.

 Nixon expressed grudging admiration for columnist Jack Anderson whom he said was brilliant and take could a slight hint and develop it into the real story. It was as if Anderson had his own crystal ball. He said that Bob Woodward was not a reporter but instead was a skilled intelligence agent trained in all aspects of that craft. He wondered aloud whether John Dean had been brought into his administration to bring him down as it was Dean who decided the Watergate burglars would be White House men and issued the order for the June 18 break-in that was later moved up to June 17 by Shoffler in one of his wiretapping schemes that fooled the burglars so that it would take place on his birthday.

Nixon knew he was doomed. He said “it is done. His hope was that there would be some way he would yet survive and somehow serve a third term despite the law that limited the president to two terms.

Nixon talked about a physicist named Samuel Cohen whom he described as brilliant. He said Cohen was the inventor of the Neutron Bomb that when employed emitted neutrons that killed people by destroying their nervous system but left the physical structures and surroundings intact and unchanged.

Nixon then produced a letter-size briefcase and withdrew a handwritten letter of three pages. HH He told Merritt that this was the most important document he had ever prepared. He stated that he alone had written with assistance from no one.

He said it was addressed to Henry Kissinger. He told Merritt that he was going to give the letter to Merritt to deliver to Kissinger in person or by mail. He told Merritt to remain quiet and not say a word as he read the letter out loud. Merritt wondered if Nixon was secretly taping what he was reading out loud.

In essence, Nixon talked about “life as we do not know it.” He said that during the previous twenty years Knowledge had been obtained that could make the human race on Earth “the supreme beings in the universe.” This Knowledge came in part from helpful information provided from an extra-terrestrial being from Planet X, Nibiro, who was in a secure location in a building in the U.S.  Nixon said the Knowledge came as the result of discovery made by scientists working at the Los Alamos Laboratories in New Mexico who studied the extraterrestrial being’s information.  Nixon said, “This all important Knowledge that we possess came from our discovery.”

Nixon declared whoever possessed this Knowledge could be the most important person in the world. All would bow down to whoever possessed this Knowledge. The Knowledge was “astronomical, nefarious and devastating.”

Nixon said that possession of the Knowledge had to be structured so that it was used only for the good of mankind.  His fear was that a small group seeking power would get hold of it and utilize it to the group’s evil benefit only.

Nixon said this ultimate Knowledge was contained in two lines in the letter.

In his letter Nixon instructed Kissinger to deliver his letter only to a president of the U.S. who succeeded him whom Kissinger believed could be trusted with the Knowledge. He also instructed Kissinger to devise a precautionary means for trusted persons to deliver the letter to such a successive president should Kissinger die naturally or unexpectedly.

Nixon closed the letter by saying his fate as president was sealed, that “they finally got me.” He had kind words of friendship for Kissinger whom he trusted implicitly. Merritt got the impression that Nixon and Kissinger had previously discussed the Knowledge.

After reading the letter out loud, Nixon asked Merritt to come around to his side of the desk so that he could show him the two lines in the letter that spelled out the formula/code/equation for the supreme Knowledge. Merritt of course was unable to comprehend the intrinsic meaning of the two lines that were written in red ink.

Merritt returned to his seat. The president took the handwritten letter with a folded note attached and two small cassette tapes that were in small individual padded envelopes and put these in a larger envelope, which he sealed and taped and placed a scrawled signature across the tape and seal. He then placed a handwritten note on the back of that envelope that directed Kissinger to contact Merritt upon receiving the letter to acknowledge its receipt. He then placed that envelope into a second larger envelope and sealed that with tape. The second envelope was addressed to Kissinger at his home address. It had stamps on it and had the appearance of an ordinary business mail solicitation.

The president then rose and approached Merritt and grabbed his wrist and squeezed it hard and asked “Can I trust you to deliver this letter to Kissinger?” Merritt assured him he would. Nixon said he believed him and stressed that under no conditions could the envelope be surrendered to the FBI.

He then asked Merritt to raise his shirt. Using hospital-type tape Nixon then taped the envelope to Kissinger on Merritt’s stomach so that the Secret Service agent who drove Merritt home would be unaware of the envelope’s existence. He then handed Merritt a small envelope that contained a typewriter ribbon that had been cut into small pieces. He told Merritt to dispose of the ribbon pieces in a secure manner. Merritt put the small envelop in his pants pocket.

The President reiterated to Merritt that the contents of the letter were vital to the security of the nation. He remarked that if Merritt were to open the envelopes and offer its contents for sale he could make millions of dollars. However, Merritt’s record of past performance had convinced the President that he could be trusted to deliver the envelope. Nixon reiterated his trust in Merritt and said that Merritt’s ability in carrying out assignments exceeded in some ways that done by the best FBI agents because Merritt was street wise and knew how to get something done better even when in doing so he violated the directions he had been given. He praised Merritt as being a “Super Plumber,” better than any member of the White House Plumbers Unit. He said that he knew Merritt never graduated from high school but that he was bright and had a good mind.

It was then that Nixon made a cryptic remark, apparently to emphasize the importance of the assignment that he had given Merritt. Nixon said, “I took my order from above and have followed it to the T.”

Merritt was taken aback by the remark and asked Nixon what he meant. Nixon did not reply directly but instead declared that “the year 2020 would be cataclysmic not only for America but for the world.”

Merritt asked Nixon how he knew this would happen. Nixon replied, “Think of me a prophet.”

Once all this was accomplished, Nixon asked Merritt if he had any questions. Merritt said he did. The first was could the scientists in Los Alamos be trusted with possession of the Knowledge? Nixon said that the scientists were the elite of the elite but were monitored at all times both by camera and by human eyes. All their movements were monitored closely.

Merritt asked if what was seen on Star Trek on television could be done such as beaming up a person. Nixon replied that the stuff on Star Trek was super antiquated and that we had moved far beyond anything imagined by the show.

Merritt then asked about the TV show Mission Impossible and the President said our capabilities would astound him.

Nixon told him this was their final meeting and that he was entrusting Merritt to carry out a mission of supreme importance in getting the envelope safely to Kissinger. There was no one in the White House he could trust. Merritt started crying and Nixon took his handkerchief, wiped the tears away and told Merritt to keep the handkerchief.

     Merritt never saw the President again. He remembers the occasion as one in which the president was distraught throughout.

     The Secret Service agent drove Merritt home. The next day Merritt went to Kissinger’s home where the maid told him Kissinger was not present. Merritt then deposited the envelope in a mail box at the street corner located outside Hartnett Hall where he lived and by coincidence across the street from where I lived. He burned the type ribbon’s pieces in a picnic area in nearby Rock Creek Park.

     A few days later he got a brief phone call from a woman who asked, “Is this Butch?” When he replied it was she said, “This is Nancy. Henry wants you to know that he received the envelope and wishes to thank you.” She then hung up.

     Merritt carried out all his assignments from Nixon that targeted anti-war individuals and organizations in the Dupont Circle area but when doing so always felt that someone clandestinely was monitoring his actions, someone likely under orders from the President.

     Merritt never told Shoffer of his meetings with President Nixon. He did not go public about the meetings until he told me in January 2018 so that I could include what took place in my forthcoming autobiography. Because I feared that Merritt might die due to his ill health before my book was published I arranged for him to be interviewed in February 2018 about the three meetings by Daniel Lizst on Dark Journalist. The interview’s title is, “Nixon’s ET Time Capsule UFO Disclosure Changes History.”

 

In conclusion, my post in the Watergate Topic of the Education Forum first warned the world on July 28, 2019, about Nixon's prediction of a cataclysmic event in 2020.

This was three months before U.S. Intelligence issued its warning:

Intelligence report warned of coronavirus crisis as early as November: Sources

"Analysts concluded it could be a cataclysmic event," a source says.

By Josh Margolin and

and

James Gordon Meek

 

‎April‎ ‎08‎, ‎2020‎ ‎3‎:‎01‎ ‎AM

 

"Analysts concluded it could be a cataclysmic event," one of the sources said of the NCMI’s report. "It was then briefed multiple times to" the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Pentagon’s Joint Staff and the White House.

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/intelligence-report-warned-coronavirus-crisis-early-november-sources/story?id=70031273

 

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Posted (edited)

Saying someone will be successful in politics does not mean you expect them to  be president.  

The rest of your reply seems to rely on Mr. Merritt.

I relied on declassified documents, and actual circumstances--Dean writing a report as assigned by Nixon-- for my assertions.

Edited by James DiEugenio

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

Saying someone will be successful in politics does not mean you expect them to  be president.  

The rest of your reply seems to rely on Mr. Merritt.

I relied on declassified documents, and actual circumstances--Dean writing a report as assigned by Nixon-- for my assertions.

I deal with the real world. You deal with declassified documents.

At their second meeting in 1972 Nixon told Merritt what he thought about agencies' classified documents:

Nixon disclosed that he had prepared research dossiers on the FBI, CIA, Military Intelligence and one other that Merritt cannot remember. Nixon criticized all the agencies, declaring that should the country be attacked in a nuclear war these agencies would not be up to the task of defending the country. He said he was tired of reading reports from these agencies that were composed with the primary intention of the agencies’ claiming questionable accomplishments designed to make themselves look good.

 

Edited by Douglas Caddy

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