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Michael Clark

The challenge to and for researchers: Bill Simpich

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from the above story:

@Stephanie Goldberg I thought this might interest you.

 

Documents Need To Be Accessible and Searchable

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The biggest problem is to digest and analyze the documents that we now have. The MFF (Mary Ferrell Foundation) site has the documents that are the easiest to access — but only 20–30 percent of the JFK files are uploaded to the site, and not all of them are searchable.

Many of the important facts residing in the MFF database are subtle and have to be teased out. When located, these hidden treasures need thoughtful care to integrate and organize. Suppose, for example, you wanted to research the activities of the US ultra-right. Here is what you might find on your line if you went fishing on your own — a convoluted cluster of facts strung together on a long string that ties in eventually with the Kennedy assassination. 

But try to follow all this: 

Documents released in the 1990s reveal that Marcos Diaz Lanz was AMOT-6 (one of the leading members of a group trained by David Morales to be a new Cuban intelligence service once Castro had been ousted), Marcos Diaz Lanz used the alias Pedro Garcia, was active with the Minutemen under the alias “Pedro Garcia”, and threatened to engage in armed insurrection with the Minutemen when President Lyndon B. Johnson defeated Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-AZ). 

Also: Marcos’s brother Pedro Diaz Lanz (AMOT-5) was active with the ultra-right-wing evangelist Billy Jean Hargis’s Christian Crusade.  

These facts don’t seem that significant until you consider that Pedro Diaz Lanz was the former chief of the Cuban Air Force … and was smuggled out of Cuba by the CIA’s aforementioned chief of operations in Miami, David Morales. 

As stated earlier, Morales has been quoted by several in his intimate circle as admitting a role in the Kennedy assassination. 

Another document shows that Morales’s frequent partner Tony Sforza was the case officer for Marcos Diaz Lanz/AMOT-6.  

Other documents expand the story of KMFORGET — revealed by the New York Timesin 1977 as a program where “stories planted by the agency in one country would be clipped and mailed to media in other countries, and ‘such efforts enhanced the likelihood that the stories would be seen by an American correspondent and transmitted home.’” (Also see Jim DiEugenio & Lisa Pease, The Assassinations, p. 301.) 

Releases from the 90s show that this “gray propaganda” technique was employed to get around a government ban on using published material by US government agencies created for foreign audiences and aiming them at American audiences. The ban was in place from the 1970s till July 2013. Gray propaganda is seen in situations when “the source may or may not be correctly identified, and the accuracy of information is uncertain.” (Garth S. Jowett & Victoria O’Donnell, Propaganda and Persuasion, (Sage Publications, 2006))

The National Archives are missing JFK records from military intelligence, NSA, and the Secret Service. Photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from National Archives / Wikimedia) and Justin Grimes / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

There are dozens of interviews with high intelligence officials within the 70–80 percent of the National Archives documents not yet available on MFF. MFF’s limited budget resources make it impossible to upload these documents at this time without outside assistance. 

The Dallas FBI file for the JFK assassination is a crucial source of information for the immediate hours and days after 12:30 PM on 11/22/63. 

The “Numbered Files” of the House Select Committee on Assassinations contain dozens of depositions of key CIA and FBI officials and other important discoveries. This is just some of the low-hanging fruit.

If we scan the relevant documents in the National Archives and elsewhere, we will have a far more powerful database. There are other key databases at the Harold Weisberg Archive site, the National Security ArchivesMuckRockWhoWhatWhy’s JFK project, the Assassinations Archives Research Center, the presidential libraries, and elsewhere, but the importance of scanning new documents and increasing the ability to scan cannot be overemphasized.

Some Powerful Ways to Step Up the Pace of Discovery 

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It is critical for all researchers and authors to support this effort by setting up websites, coming together in small groups whenever possible, scanning their work, and placing their research and archives online. Many of our best researchers will “age out” in the next 10–20 years — their discoveries should not be lost. Previous discoveries that need to be unearthed can be found at the archives of Penn JonesJohn Armstrong, and other researchers, located at the Poage Legislative Library and full-text searchable. Although Poage is not accepting new archives at the present time, there are a myriad of ways to get it done. Holding on to this material for proprietary reasons is a bad idea and holds the work back.

Legal action will probably be required to obtain hundreds of thousands of relevant NSA, Secret Service, and military intelligence files that were never submitted to the Archives as mandated by the JFK Act. Document review shows that the number of these records provided to the National Archives are miniscule when compared to the CIA and FBI submissions. Former intelligence officer John Newman refers to what needs to be done as “Research – Analyze – Review – Repeat … just like the intelligence agencies do it.”  

Researcher Bill Kelly suggests that the JFK research community is a citizen-based counterintelligence operation, responding to the work of the intelligence operations.

When we strengthen our analysis of the new and recent JFK revelations, we come together as a vital force ready to take on our nation’s history and the challenges of the modern era.

 

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I had not seen that article, Michael.  Thanks for thinking of me!  This topic has been on my mind the last few weeks.

This says so much about what is currently frustrating (to me, at least) about trying to delve into research.  The facts are scattered about and remind me of that scene from the Wizard of Oz where the Scarecrow is torn to pieces.  (My legs are over there.  My chest is over here.) 

It's a good piece which says a lot, not just about the state of research but also the people working to put the pieces together.

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Hi Stephanie, I think that what I realized from this is that we can kick around theories all day, read great stuff that has been around for a while or stare at photos until we see something; but, there is a lot of work to be done, discoveries to be made by doing that work and an urgency to get it done. It’s going to be hard to motivate research by the coming generation, having been twice removed from living through it.

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1 hour ago, David Boylan said:

Bill and Gavin McDonald have been tireless in finding and expanding on new and old cryptonyms. You can explore the work that they (and Michael Clark!) have done here - https://www.maryferrell.org/php/cryptdb.php

I’m always amused when I look up QJWIN and see Jose Maria Mankel. The reason - because the only documents naming Mankel come from CIA. Who was Mankel? I’ve never seen any info on him from any other source than CIA. Does that seem like enough to positively state he was QJWIN?

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I think the folks at blackvault are also tireless in their sorting the documents making many of them searchable. It is terrible that files are unsorted, unnecessarily redacted, unorganized and unsearchable...

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15 hours ago, Michael Clark said:

Hi Stephanie, I think that what I realized from this is that we can kick around theories all day, read great stuff that has been around for a while or stare at photos until we see something; but, there is a lot of work to be done, discoveries to be made by doing that work and an urgency to get it done. It’s going to be hard to motivate research by the coming generation, having been twice removed from living through it.

Agreed.  It's too bad that I don't live near any of these places to help with scanning/transcribing/getting things online.  That would be a very worthwhile endeavor.

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10 hours ago, Paul Brancato said:

I’m always amused when I look up QJWIN and see Jose Maria Mankel. The reason - because the only documents naming Mankel come from CIA. Who was Mankel? I’ve never seen any info on him from any other source than CIA. Does that seem like enough to positively state he was QJWIN?

Some fun reading on Mankel.

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=189607&relPageId=2&search=mankel

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=16598&search=mankel#relPageId=2&tab=page

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=22245&relPageId=2&search=mankel

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=22312&search=mankel#relPageId=2&tab=page

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=148666&search=mankel#relPageId=2&tab=page

https://www.maryferrell.org/showDoc.html?docId=148666&search=mankel#relPageId=2&tab=page

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Posted (edited)
On 7/24/2019 at 10:33 PM, Stephanie Goldberg said:

Agreed.  It's too bad that I don't live near any of these places to help with scanning/transcribing/getting things online.  That would be a very worthwhile endeavor.

I understand that feeling. But I am going to move beyond that. I am going to find out what I can do. I need to shift gears a bit, consider efficiency and avoid a duplication of efforts. Sharing and collaboration are critical. I’ll be clear, here, that I am looking for tasks and would like to see a collection, a clearinghouse house of accomplishable tasks. Bill Simpich gave a few specific things that can be done in the posted article. Perhaps one of those tasks or something else will turn-out to be something I can put on my plate.

As I dig into the documents, specifically the cryptonyms, now, I see I am turning-over stones that have alepready been turned-over; and the inefficiency is becoming frustrating and the diminishing returns are a bit discouraging. My interest in Location Codes is, or appears to be, a less beaten path, closer to fearing fruit, and quite interesting to me. 

I do love doing it. Finding nuggets is addictive and exhilarating.

Edited by Michael Clark

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FWIW....  I’ve been going thru the recent release and adding detailed notes to each document I view....  over 4000 done so far, concentrating on the records with no date or source....  when finished maybe I can add the index to Poage Baylor.

Also, the more books that are digitized and searchable, the better....  I think Archive.org may be a helping hand....

The tougher part is identifying the red herrings from the tidbits of truth in the docs.

He can be filmed handing out leaflets, but knowledge of his buying and retrieving a 5 foot cartoon which should have been marked FIREARMS... eludes them....

Being that broken record...  the Evidence IS the Conspiracy, and not representative of the truth....  figuring which is which...

now that’s what I see as our task here... do we accept certain evidence or see it for what it was.

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13 hours ago, David Josephs said:

FWIW....  I’ve been going thru the recent release and adding detailed notes to each document I view....  over 4000 done so far, concentrating on the records with no date or source....  when finished maybe I can add the index to Poage Baylor.

Hi David,

Can you tell us more about Poage Baylor? The first theat I recall hearing of it is in the Simpich article.

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Well... Armstrong’s notebooks are what I go there to download....

Weisberg’s archive is amazing as well....

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The Archivist at the Pogue library welcomed JFK related documents during his tenure there; he is gone now.  He routinely presented on their collection at the Lancer conferences - as I recall he took in much of Gary Shaw's work among others - including materials from Penn Jones.  You should be able to find an index to the collection on line in a search.

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