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Denis Morissette

Dallas TV and radio Personalities Active on November 22, 1963

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8 hours ago, Denis Morissette said:

Ken, I’m grateful for the info. Do you mind my including in my blog?

 

Denis,

I'm fine with that.  Both you and Gayle Nix Jackson have publicly, on your websites, kept the mystery of Tom Craven and his film alive for a number of years.  I've just been waiting for the right time to jump in and tell what I know, and the time, I believe, is now.  Finally.  That wait has been a long one.  Fifty-six years this November 22.  For those who really want to take this investigation to a whole, new level: Craven and his film, along with the film of James Underwood, will break this case wide open.  But don't expect any help from the so-called "research community" on this.  It's going to be a fight, trust me on that.  These people just don't want to go there. Why?  How could that be?  This is a story that cries out for investigation every time the photographic record pops up.  I couldn't help but chuckle when I saw Tom Craven on the cover of Joseph McBride's book, "Into the Nightmare."  Yes, follow Craven and you will definitely be taken down the road into the nightmare of the Kennedy assassination cover-up. I feel good about Mr. McBride.  We'll see how he responds to all this.  And take note of those on the forum who don't participate in this discussion.  That will tell you a lot.  Meanwhile, I'll be responding to your question about Henk Dewit and the processing of Craven's film sometime over the next few days.

Ken

 

Edited by Ken Rheberg

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On 9/4/2019 at 5:25 PM, Denis Morissette said:

I mention the water (pressure?) damage in my blog about the Craven Film. One or two reels were allegedly ruined. Back to you. How do you know that It came through the developing process in pristine condition?

https://jfkassassinationfiles.wordpress.com/2016/05/14/the-destroyed-craven-film-taken-in-dealey-plaza/

Gary Mack told me about it. 

Email 1: 

“Tom Craven’s film never got on the air; it was damaged during processing at CBS’s Dallas affiliate, KRLD-TV.  I interviewed the station’s film processor operator, Henk Dewitt, who said a few reels were damaged early that afternoon due to low water pressure at the building.  Craven’s film was apparently one of them”

Email 2:

Craven’s film was apparently misidentified.  Some years ago, Henk DeWitt, the man who operated KRLD’s film processor, told me he had mechanical problems that day and the first one or two reels were ruined.  There was a problem with very low water pressure and the heat of the dryer or something damaged the films. 

 

Denis,

The claim, by anyone, that Tom Craven's film was lost in the developing process at KRLD is incorrect and easy to disprove.

In Gary Mack's Email 1, KRLD processor operator Henk Dewit (correct spelling) told Gary a few reels of film were damaged early that afternoon during processing at KRLD.

So, Gary concluded, Craven's film was apparently one of them.

Then in Gary's Email 2, Gary expanded on what Henk had said.  Early that afternoon, the first one or two reels of film were ruined while being processed.

But Craven's film wasn't one of the first one or two reels of film to find its way in to KRLD that day.  Craven's two rolls of film were among the last, if not the last, of the pre-Oswald films to show up.  They were finally in the studio and being developed around 2:30 pm Dallas time.  In fact, all of the early films were taken by KRLD photographers.

It's as simple as that.

There's more proof than this that the Craven film was not ruined, and Gary became aware of it before he passed away.

Of course, the above begs the question: Why did Craven's film take so long to arrive at KRLD, and how did it finally make its way there?  The answer should be obvious to anyone who really wants to get to the bottom of what happened in Dealey Plaza that Friday.

By the way, I also interviewed KRLD film chief Henk Dewit.  That was in 1999, twenty years ago, the year before he died.  Henk was the one who processed and saw up close all of those KRLD and CBS films.  It was an enlightening conversation to say the least.

Ken
 

 

Edited by Ken Rheberg

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