Jump to content
The Education Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Rob Clark

Best of the Year 2019?

Recommended Posts

Just wondering what the members considered the best revelation, best research, or the best book that was released or came to light in 2019 would be in their opinion?

12.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Rob Clark said:

Just wondering what the members considered the best revelation, best research, or the best book that was released or came to light in 2019 would be in their opinion?

12.jpg

The Larry Hancock/David Boylan work on Wheaton Names, focusing attention on Carl Jenkins and Rafael Quintero

The Malcolm Blunt/Bart Kamp release of FBI SA James Hosty’s notes on Oswald’s interview in custody, underlining his alibi that he went outside to watch the “P. parade.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cliff Varnell said:

The Malcolm Blunt/Bart Kamp release of FBI SA James Hosty’s notes on Oswald’s interview in custody, underlining his alibi that he went outside to watch the “P. parade.”

I wholeheartedly agree...matching this with Fritz's notes as well, it's clear he stated he had an alibi that they deep-sixed. After he was dead, it was never mentioned or explored again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mal Hyman's Burying The Lead was pretty wide ranging and deep regarding the MSM and the JFK assassination.  Well documented.  Chaos by Tom O'Neil was informative regarding possible MKULTRA involvement in the Manson murders and possibly RFK's, that needs more probing.  Poisoner In Chief by Stephen Kizner, if taken with a grain of salt regarding JFK ignorance is very informative regarding Gottlieb and MKULTRA.   Last, my thread on here about Two Oswald's In the Texas Theater went way deeper than I ever imagined.  Educating me immensely.  Thanks to all who participated.  Happy New Year.      

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Ron Bulman said:

Last, my thread on here about Two Oswald's In the Texas Theater went way deeper than I ever imagined.  Educating me immensely.  Thanks to all who participated.  Happy New Year.      

Thank you for those Ron! Can you post a link to that thread? I'd love to peruse...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I was thinking on the lines of what Ron said re: books.

Media: Mal Hyman, Burying the Lead and Matt Taibbi, Hate, Inc.

Manson/Bugliosi: Tom O'Neill, Chaos

Watergate: Ray Locker, Haig's Coup is a masterwork and deserves to be somewhere near the top of Watergate works (and I was going to add Shane O' Sullivan's Dirty Tricks, but I checked the copyright and it was 2018. Same with Pease on RFK).

Film: Joseph McBride, Frankly: Unmasking Frank Capra

Misc History/Conspiracy: Donald Jeffries, Crimes and Cover Ups, 1776-1963

And, agreed with the above folks who gave thumbs up to Bart Kamp/Malcolm Blunt and their continuing work. I also very much enjoyed the return of "The Lone Gunman Podcast" in 2019, the work being done at KennedysandKing.com, and the work I'm blessed to read and include at garrison. For Twitter follows, Caitlin Johnstone, Aaron Mate, Matt Taibbi, Max Blumenthal, and Elizabeth Vos all had a strong 2019. For Facebook, David Talbot and Jim Hougan continue to write some really good stuff, which needs to be archived. 

Not sure what 2020 will bring, but Whitney Webb is finalizing her book on Epstein, Nikolas Schreck should finally release (sooner than later) the updated Manson File, and we will embark on year two of garrison.: The Journal of History & Deep Politics. I'm sure there will be many more good books in 2020, as we are blessed to have so many good people and good writers working on these issues and stories. Have a good 2020, everyone!

 

Edited by S.T. Patrick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Rob Clark said:

Thank you for those Ron! Can you post a link to that thread? I'd love to peruse...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Tom O'Neill's book was a real achievement.   

In two senses.  First in what he unearthed about that case in and of itself. Especially with regards to Atkins and Melcher.  I mean it shows what real research is. I mean how did all those reviewers swallow Helter Skelter whole?  I mean i read it once and I understood that, "Hey there is something wrong about this book."

Secondly, it tells us a lot about Bugliosi pre JFK.  I mean all that sound and fury about Jim Garrison, which ended up signifying nothing.  Yet, Tom does some real digging into this guy and it really is relevant.

The Hyman book gets honorable mention.

The smaller scale point I agree would be the Hosty notes about Oswald saying where he actually was.

Edited by James DiEugenio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

BTW, I should add that I like Matt T. but  I cannot in good conscience endorse any book that uses Noam Chomsky.

I have come to the conclusion that the man is an intellectual fraud and hypocrite who is supported by the MSM and the left establishment.

I argue my case here:

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/the-deceptions-and-disguises-of-noam-chomsky

Edited by James DiEugenio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The Hosty notes are not notes per se, but are a first draft of a report. His actual notes were published in his book, and have long been available on the Lancer site. 

This draft is important but not for the reason most believe. He mentions in this draft that he confronted Oswald about contacting the Soviet Embassy. He wasn't supposed to ask Oswald about this because the only way he could have known about this at the time was if he'd been told the FBI had been reading the embassy's mail--which was a closely guarded secret. This put the FBI in deep.

Well, lo and behold, the very next day Mrs. Paine presents Hosty with a copy she'd supposedly made of Oswald's letter to the embassy. This got Hosty off the hook. The commission would then proceed to pretend the FBI found out about Oswald's letter through Mrs. Paine, and the Soviets themselves. If I recall, it would be decades before anyone realized Hosty knew about Oswald's letter BEFORE the assassination. 

So...the timing of all this makes Mrs. Paine's withholding of the letter from the DPD, and then handing it over to Hosty, INCREDIBLY suspicious. She was almost certainly working as an informant, IMO. I suspect Hosty asked her to pretend she'd copied Oswald's letter, and she did as he requested.

And it also draws a spotlight back on Hosty's report on the initial interrogation of Oswald. There was no report. Instead, there was a joint report written on this interrogation--supposedly by Bookhout and Hosty, even though Bookhout also submitted a separate report, as I recall. Well, this indicates Hosty's report was thrown in the circular filing cabinet, or, more likely, shredded, and that a bogus HQ-generated Bookhout/Hosty report was submitted instead. 

Edited by Pat Speer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But Pat, how does Hosty's knowledge of the letter indicate he knew about it before the assassination?

Could it not have been given to him immediately after?  As a way to pressure Oswald?

I  do agree that Ruth Paine giving him the letter almost right after is really interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

But Pat, how does Hosty's knowledge of the letter indicate he knew about it before the assassination?

Could it not have been given to him immediately after?  As a way to pressure Oswald?

I  do agree that Ruth Paine giving him the letter almost right after is really interesting.

From re-reading what I've previously written on this issue, I realize that Hosty returned to his desk after the shooting (but before he'd interviewed Oswald) and found a memo regarding Oswald's writing the embassy...and that after confronting Oswald on this he went back to his office only to discover that the memo was missing and that he was in trouble for mentioning it to Oswald. 

I suspect, then, that he turned to Ruth Paine for help and asked her to copy the letter and give the FBI cover for their mail-opening operation.  

From chapter 1 at patspeer.com:

In 1996, James Hosty, the FBI agent tasked with keeping tabs on Oswald in Dallas, published Assignment: Oswald, his take on the assassination of President Kennedy. There, he acknowledged that, as soon as he heard of Oswald's arrest, around 2:15 on November 22nd, he rushed to take a look at Oswald's file, and found a one-page communique summarizing an 11-9-63 letter from Oswald to the Soviet Embassy in Washington D.C.  This letter began: "Dear Sirs. This is to inform you of recent events since my meetings with Comrade Kostin in the Embassy of the Soviet Union, Mexico City, Mexico." Oswald then complained about an FBI Agent "Hasty", who he claimed was harassing his wife. (Note: while I have not been able to find a copy of this communique, or even an acknowledgement it still exists, an 11-23-63 FBI memo from Roy Jevons to Ivan Conrad reports that this typed-up letter had been intercepted and copied by the FBI's Washington Field Office on the 18th, and that the FBI had since ID'ed the signature on the letter as Oswald's signature.)

In any event, after reading this communique, Agent Hosty rushed over to Dallas Police headquarters, to observe and assist Capt. Will Fritz in his interrogation of Oswald. After Hosty introduced himself, Oswald became quite upset. You see, the "Hasty" in the letter--the agent Oswald believed was harassing his wife--was actually Agent Hosty. 

No blood was shed. After Oswald calmed down, so it goes, he apologized to Hosty, not only for getting so upset, but for leaving an unsigned note at Hosty's office on the 12th. This note, according to Hosty, had said "If you want to talk to me, you should talk to me to my face. Stop harassing my wife, and stop trying to ask her about me. You have no right to harass her." (Note: none of the reports of those in attendance at this interview made any reference to Oswald's discussion of this note. In fact, word of this note did not leak out for more than a decade, and only then because the former FBI secretary who took the note from Oswald told a reporter for the Dallas-Times Herald that the note had said Oswald was gonna blow up the FBI's Dallas office if Hosty wouldn't leave his wife alone.)

And from there things only got stranger for Hosty. At one point in the interrogation, he thought about the communique he'd just read and an earlier communique from the CIA in which Oswald's trip to Mexico was discussed, and asked Capt. Fritz to ask Oswald if he'd been to Mexico City. According to everyone present, Oswald denied having visited Mexico City. They then adjourned so that Oswald could be placed in a line-up. 

When Hosty returned to his office, however, he found that he was the one in trouble. Not only were his superiors upset he'd brought up Mexico City during Oswald's interrogation, but they had found the unsigned note from Oswald in his desk! While Hosty was originally told the secretary who'd received the note from Oswald had recognized him on TV, and had told Hosty's superiors about the note, Assistant Special Agent-in-Charge Kyle Clark later told Hosty a different story, one Hosty came to believe. In this story, Assistant FBI Director William Sullivan--the man tasked with investigating the significance of Oswald's contact with the Soviets--called up the Dallas office while Hosty was with Oswald and told them to make sure Hosty didn't see the communique regarding Oswald's letter to the Soviet Embassy. (Presumably, Sullivan was afraid Hosty would ask Oswald about the letter, or, at the very least, give some other sign that the letter had been intercepted--such as asking Oswald why he'd complained about Hosty to the Soviets--and thereby compromise the security of the FBI's letter-opening operation in Washington. Note that this not only explains Sullivan's call about the communique, but the subsequent concern of Hosty's superiors over Hosty's asking Oswald about Mexico...) 

In any event, in Clark's version of the story (the one Hosty came to believe), Hosty's superiors came across the note from Oswald while digging through his desk looking for his copy of the communiques discussing Oswald's trip to Mexico. They then discussed what to do with this note, but made no final decision other than to move it to Special Agent-in-Charge J. Gordon Shanklin's "Do Not File" drawer. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2020 at 12:18 PM, S.T. Patrick said:

I was thinking on the lines of what Ron said re: books.

Media: Mal Hyman, Burying the Lead and Matt Taibbi, Hate, Inc.

Manson/Bugliosi: Tom O'Neill, Chaos

Watergate: Ray Locker, Haig's Coup is a masterwork and deserves to be somewhere near the top of Watergate works (and I was going to add Shane O' Sullivan's Dirty Tricks, but I checked the copyright and it was 2018. Same with Pease on RFK).

Film: Joseph McBride, Frankly: Unmasking Frank Capra

Misc History/Conspiracy: Donald Jeffries, Crimes and Cover Ups, 1776-1963

And, agreed with the above folks who gave thumbs up to Bart Kamp/Malcolm Blunt and their continuing work. I also very much enjoyed the return of "The Lone Gunman Podcast" in 2019, the work being done at KennedysandKing.com, and the work I'm blessed to read and include at garrison. For Twitter follows, Caitlin Johnstone, Aaron Mate, Matt Taibbi, Max Blumenthal, and Elizabeth Vos all had a strong 2019. For Facebook, David Talbot and Jim Hougan continue to write some really good stuff, which needs to be archived. 

Not sure what 2020 will bring, but Whitney Webb is finalizing her book on Epstein, Nikolas Schreck should finally release (sooner than later) the updated Manson File, and we will embark on year two of garrison.: The Journal of History & Deep Politics. I'm sure there will be many more good books in 2020, as we are blessed to have so many good people and good writers working on these issues and stories. Have a good 2020, everyone!

 

Regarding 2020 I've finally ordered H P Albarelli's A Secret Order trying to catch up in anticipation of the release of his Coup In Dallas in February.  May he R.I.P.

I'm also hoping Oliver Stone and Jim DiEugenio's film will come out this year though I've seen nothing about a release date. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding books from last year I stumbled across this title.  It looks interesting to me, I had heard of Forrestal and his "suicide" but was unaware he as anti Israel.  Wondering if maybe anyone else on here might have read it and offer an opinion.  The reviews are pretty well all positive but when it's recommended by Phillip Nelson and Fetzer I have to wonder.  For nine bucks I may take a gander.

https://www.amazon.com/Assassination-James-Forrestal-David-Martin/dp/0967352126/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3UTZX5H3JRC9P&keywords=the+assassination+of+james+forrestal&qid=1578608259&s=books&sprefix=the+assassination+of+%2Cstripbooks%2C177&sr=1-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ron Bulman said:

Regarding books from last year I stumbled across this title.  It looks interesting to me, I had heard of Forrestal and his "suicide" but was unaware he as anti Israel.  Wondering if maybe anyone else on here might have read it and offer an opinion.  The reviews are pretty well all positive but when it's recommended by Phillip Nelson and Fetzer I have to wonder.  For nine bucks I may take a gander.

https://www.amazon.com/Assassination-James-Forrestal-David-Martin/dp/0967352126/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3UTZX5H3JRC9P&keywords=the+assassination+of+james+forrestal&qid=1578608259&s=books&sprefix=the+assassination+of+%2Cstripbooks%2C177&sr=1-1

Is this the same David Martin of CBS who wrote Wilderness of Mirrors?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...