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Pat Speer

Bob Dylan tackles the Kennedy assassination: Murder Most Foul

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2 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

That is really funny about her manager saying you got to do Cavett, forget Woodstock 

       I don't know if it was David Geffen, but it has to rank among the worst managerial blunders in music history.  And what's worse -- the Jefferson Airplane was the lead act on that episode of the Dick Cavett Show.  Joni Mitchell sort of got lost in the shuffle-- instead of starring at Woodstock.

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BTW, Rob Couteau has now just about certified that the last film Kennedy saw was TomJones, not in Washington but in Palm Beach.

Dylan really knows his stuff.  

 

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37 minutes ago, David Andrews said:

Ride the Pink Horse, 1957

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039768/

Goodbye, Charlie, 1964 (previously a Broadway play)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058154/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

Goodbye Charlie is also a song, written by Cruz Contreras, that is about the war in Vietnam and  contains the lyrics:

I'm sitting up here like a cat in a tree

Waiting for Charlie, gonna set him free

Uncle Sam said I'm the man

Goodbye Charlie

https://youtu.be/ZMP-TaxdufA

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I know Jim Di and Salon's David Talbot aren't on the same sympatico page, but this review of Dylan's new song by Salon's David Masciotra seems fairly worthy and interesting imo.

 
David Masciotra. April 4, 2020 4:00PM (UTC). Bob Dylan's new song, "Murder Most Foul," arrives in the mailbox like a postcard from the apocalypse.

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5 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

BTW, Rob Couteau has now just about certified that the last film Kennedy saw was TomJones, not in Washington but in Palm Beach.

Dylan really knows his stuff.  

 

Well, somewhat.  The limo was not black, it was Midnight Blue...

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, David Andrews said:

Ride the Pink Horse, 1957 1947

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0039768/

Goodbye, Charlie, 1964 (previously a Broadway play)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058154/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

There's only one possible referent for "Ride the pink horse," so let's milk it.

In this film noir (which is 1947 - I typed the wrong date), Robert Montgomery plays an Army vet who goes to a Mexican town to find out why his buddy was killed there.  It turns out his buddy had gotten on the wrong side of a crime syndicate, and they shoot Montgomery and leave him for dead.  For most of the picture, Montgomery staggers around half-alive, trying to get the goods on the bad guys with the help of some sympathetic villagers.  He succeeds, but dies in the end.  I saw the picture in the 1990s, but remember little else.  Dylan may have seen it in his childhood.  It may have stimulated his sense of social justice.  As Sam Spade said, "When a man's partner is killed, he's supposed to do something about it."

"Goodbye, Charlie" was a popular mid-century catchphrase meaning, "Oops, you've had it."  The play and movie titled with this phrase involve a small-time hood and womanizer who is shot and killed by a wronged woman.  Immediately reincarnated in a female body for his sins, s/he has to convince his/her best pal that s/he's really Charlie, and needs help retrieving hidden Mob money.  Meanwhile, gangsters are closing in.  It's a comedy.

Edited by David Andrews

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On 4/4/2020 at 6:01 AM, James DiEugenio said:

Did anyone know this?

Dylan lived in Woodstock in 1969.

He turned down an offer to play there. 

Instead he did the Isle of Wight festival..  

the festival was in bethel originally was to be at woodstock but you know how that goes.  dylan had been going up there for several years and staying at his manager's before he bought a place. Big Pink was up there. dylan couldn't handle the hippies he drew to Woodstock

 

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On 3/28/2020 at 10:22 PM, Ron Bulman said:

Speaking of Scorcese, I figure Rolling Thunder Revue was a direct reference to LBJ's Operation Rolling Thunder by Dylan.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=rolling+thunder+revue&docid=608029040670084704&mid=4C8C13247ED12BEE2B4B4C8C13247ED12BEE2B4B&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

it was named for a native american medicine man.

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On 4/4/2020 at 4:49 PM, James DiEugenio said:

BTW, Rob Couteau has now just about certified that the last film Kennedy saw was TomJones, not in Washington but in Palm Beach.

Dylan really knows his stuff.  

tom jones also sang the theme to what's new pussycat movie

 

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On 4/3/2020 at 9:11 AM, W. Niederhut said:

       I noticed that A.J. Weberman's paperback, Homothug, is listed at $898.87 on Amazon.  That has to be some kind of an Amazon record price for a paperback.  Must be a bad joke.

       Meanwhile, although I generally deplore violence, I kind of admire Bob Dylan for personally kicking the crap out of Weberman in the Bowery.  🤪

The 1971 Rolling Stone article makes it clear Dylan was trying to accommodate a (very) over zealous fan.  Weberman took advantage of that, in addition to digging through his trash, bringing his students to Dylan's door, accusing him of being a heroin junkie.  Maybe Dylan should have called the police previously about harassment, sought a restraining order.  Which would likely have brought unwanted publicity in this respect.  AJ just kept pushing.  Dylan reached his breaking point.  Poetic justice?  From the poet?

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12 minutes ago, Ron Bulman said:

The 1971 Rolling Stone article makes it clear Dylan was trying to accommodate a (very) over zealous fan.  Weberman took advantage of that, in addition to digging through his trash, bringing his students to Dylan's door, accusing him of being a heroin junkie.  Maybe Dylan should have called the police previously about harassment, sought a restraining order.  Which would likely have brought unwanted publicity in this respect.  AJ just kept pushing.  Dylan reached his breaking point.  Poetic justice?  From the poet?

         I'd call it poetic folk justice.   I don't agree with Dylan pounding the guy's head on the sidewalk-- which can cause a traumatic brain injury or even death--but some guys deserve to get their asses kicked, especially if they harass or threaten someone's wife.

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Posted (edited)

One under-appreciated fact of Dylan's career was his 1965 anticipations of major musical genres which blossomed in the late 70's.

The first rap song:

 

The first public performance of punk rock -- fast beat, snarling vocals, confrontational lyrics, short-sharp guitar leads:

 

In an article published in the New American Review in the early 70's Dylan was asked who was his favorite current musician.  "Johnny Thunders," he said.  The author of the article wasn't familiar with the name of the lead guitarist for the proto-punk New York Dolls and speculated Dylan was saying he was thunderously glad to be alive or some such nonsense.

It's said by veterans of the Cuckoo's Nest -- the notoriously violent Costa Mesa CA punk rock nightclub '80'/81 -- that it wasn't unusual to see this little old guy standing in the back.  Dylan, no one messed with him.

One thing for sure, Dylan didn't view his mid-60's work as "folk rock" (See his vehement dismissal in Scorsese's No Direction Home --"It wasn't folk-rock!"  Full Dylan sneer.)

 

Edited by Cliff Varnell

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