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John Simkin

Bernard (Macho) Barker

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Is anyone convinced that Bernard (Macho) Barker was involved in the assassination of JFK? He had a real estate business in Miami, Florida (I think he still has it). He also worked for the CIA and took part in the Bay of Pigs operation. Barker was also associated with Mafia boss, Santos Trafficante.

According to Dallas detective, Seymour Weitzman, Barker was the man on the Grassy Knoll who was showing Secret Service identification and ordering people out of the area.

Barker also took part in Watergate and according to one source he was seen paying money to Arthur Bremer before he attempted to kill Nixon.

Barker still has real estate business in Miami, Florida. Maybe Tim Gratz should interview him? :lol:

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Namebase entry for Bernard Barker:

http://www.namebase.org/main1/Bernard-L-Barker.html

Back Channels 1993-SU (14)

Blumenthal,S. Yazijian,H. Government by Gunplay. 1976 (129)

Borosage,R. Marks,J. The CIA File. 1976 (97)

Bradlee,B. A Good Life. 1995 (328)

CounterSpy 1973-F (23)

CounterSpy 1975-SU (45)

Covert Action Quarterly 2002-#72 (19-20)

Davis,J. Mafia Kingfish. 1989 (401-2, 410)

Ellsberg,D. Secrets. 2002 (442-5, 451)

Escalante,F. The Secret War. 1995 (36, 38, 43)

Fensterwald,B. Coincidence or Conspiracy? 1977 (511-3)

Fonzi,G. The Last Investigation. 1993 (37, 40, 78)

Frazier,H. Uncloaking the CIA. 1978 (63)

Freed,D. Death in Washington. 1980 (67)

Furiati,C. ZR Rifle. 1994 (14, 111)

Groden,R. Livingstone,H. High Treason. 1990 (320)

Hinckle,W. Turner,W. The Fish is Red. 1981 (55, 295-6, 301, 306)

Hougan,J. Secret Agenda. 1984 (27-8)

Hunt,H. Give Us This Day. 1973 (10-1, 61-3)

Inquiry Magazine 1979-03-05 (17-9)

Jaworski,L. The Right and the Power. 1977 (340-1, 351-2)

Lieber,J. Rats in the Grain. 2000 (85-6)

Lobster Magazine (Britain) 1986-#12 (5)

Marchetti,V. Marks,J. The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence. 1974 (243)

Marrs,J. Crossfire. 1990 (147)

McCord,J. A Piece of Tape. 1974 (23)

Myerson,M. Watergate: Crime in the Suites. 1973 (108-9)

New York Magazine 1976-08-16 (31)

Powers,T. The Man Who Kept the Secrets. 1981 (328, 337)

Scott,P.D... The Assassinations: Dallas and Beyond. 1976 (363, 373-4, 394-6)

Summers,A. The Arrogance of Power. 2000 (431)

Tackwood,L. The Glass House Tapes. 1973 (175-9)

Tarpley,W.G. Chaitkin,A. George Bush. 1992 (245, 263)

Washington Times 1992-06-16 (E5)

Weissman,S. Big Brother and the Holding Company. 1974 (81, 125, 167, 289)

Wise,D. The American Police State. 1978 (157-8, 179, 182, 196, 235)

Wyden,P. Bay of Pigs. 1979 (32-3)

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According to Dallas detective, Seymour Weitzman, Barker was the man on the Grassy Knoll who was showing Secret Service identification and ordering people out of the area.

It should be borne in mind, however, that Weitzman said this while under medical care for paranoid schizophrenia, and while (according to his doctor) he would tell people things that they wanted to hear (in this case Michael Canfield, who showed him a photo of Barker) so they would go away happy, or at least go away.

Ron

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For those who are interested, here is a piece on Barker.

http://www.amigospais-guaracabuya.org/oagmf023.php

Thank you for the link. Hopefully this is the type of thing that will happen to all the links that I have started on individuals involved in the assassination (see Index).

This is what Timothy W. Maier, (Insight on the News, 14th December, 1998) had to say about the connections between Barker and the Bremer case.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_..._14/ai_53409132

In 1974 Wallace told United Press International that "he hoped the Watergate investigation would turn up the man who paid the money to have him shot." Wallace later said he mis-spoke but privately told reporters he believed the White House plumbers unit might have been involved.

The WalShot Files say Wallace had received a letter from Bernard Barker, one of the men caught in the Watergate break-in. The alleged letter is said to have claimed Bremer was paid by G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt for shooting Wallace. All deny the allegation. According to the WalShot Files, the FBI and Barker claim the letter is a fraud, and agents charged the ailing Wallace was after sympathy to support a third run at the presidency.

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One of the things that has always intrigued me is the large number of mistakes that were made during the Watergate operation. This is in direct contrast to other Nixon dirty tricks campaigns. Some people have speculated that there were individuals inside the operation who wanted to do harm to Nixon. I thought it might be a good idea to list these 24 “mistakes” to see if we can identify these individuals. Could it have been Bernard Barker?

(1) The money to pay for the Watergate operation came from CREEP. It would have been possible to have found a way of transferring this money to the Watergate burglars without it being traceable back to CREEP. For example, see how Tony Ulasewicz got his money from Nixon. As counsel for the Finance Committee to Re-Elect the President, Gordon Liddy, acquired two cheques that amounted to $114,000. This money came from an illegal U.S. corporate contribution laundered in Mexico and Dwayne Andreas, a Democrat who was a secret Nixon supporter. Liddy handed these cheques to E. Howard Hunt. He then gave these cheques to Bernard Barker who paid them into his own bank account. In this way it was possible to link Nixon with a Watergate burglar.

(2) On 22nd May, 1972, James McCord booked Alfred Baldwin and himself into the Howard Johnson Motor Inn opposite the Watergate building (room 419). The room was booked in the name of McCord’s company. During his stay in this room Baldwin made several long-distance phone calls to his parents. This information was later used during the trial of the Watergate burglars.

(3) On the eve of the first Watergate break-in the team had a meeting in the Howard Johnson Motor Inn’s Continental Room. The booking was made on the stationary of a Miami firm that included Bernard Barker among its directors. Again, this was easily traceable.

(4) In the first Watergate break-in the target was Larry O’Brien’s office. In fact, they actually entered the office of Spencer Oliver, the chairman of the association of Democratic state chairman. Two bugs were placed in two phones in order to record the telephone conversations of O’Brien. In fact, O’Brien never used this office telephone.

(5) E. Howard Hunt was in charge of photographing documents found in the DNC offices. The two rolls of film were supposed to be developed by a friend of James McCord. This did not happen and eventually Hunt took the film to Miami for Bernard Barker to deal with. Barker had them developed by Rich’s Camera Shop. Once again the conspirators were providing evidence of being involved in the Watergate break-in.

(6) The developed prints showed gloved hands holding them down and a shag rug in the background. There was no shag rug in the DNC offices. Therefore it seems the Democratic Party documents must have been taken away from the office to be photographed. McCord later claimed that he cannot remember details of the photographing of the documents. Liddy and Jeb Magruder saw them before being put in John Mitchell’s desk (they were shredded during the cover-up operation).

(7) After the break-in Alfred Baldwin and James McCord moved to room 723 of the Howard Johnson Motor Inn in order to get a better view of the DNC offices. It became Baldwin’s job to eavesdrop the phone calls. Over the next 20 days Baldwin listened to over 200 phone calls. These were not recorded. Baldwin made notes and typed up summaries. Nor did Baldwin listen to all phone calls coming in. For example, he took his meals outside his room. Any phone calls taking place at this time would have been missed.

(8) It soon became clear that the bug on one of the phones installed by McCord was not working. As a result of the defective bug, McCord decided that they would have to break-in to the Watergate office. He also heard that a representative of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War had a desk at the DNC. McCord argued that it was worth going in to see what they could discover about the anti-war activists. Liddy later claimed that the real reason for the second break-in was “to find out what O’Brien had of a derogatory nature about us, not for us to get something on him.”

(9) Liddy drove his distinctive Buick-powered green Jeep into Washington on the night of the second Watergate break-in. He was stopped by a policeman after jumping a yellow light. He was let off with a warning. He parked his car right outside the Watergate building.

(10) The burglars then met up in room 214 before the break-in. Liddy gave each man between $200 and $800 in $100 bills with serial numbers close in sequence. McCord gave out six walkie-talkies. Two of these did not work (dead batteries).

(11) McCord taped the 6th, 8th and 9th floor stairwell doors and the garage level door. Later it was reported that the tape on the garage–level lock was gone. Hunt argued that a guard must have done this and suggested the operation should be aborted. Liddy and McCord argued that the operation must continue. McCord then went back an re-taped the garage-level door. Later the police pointed out that there was no need to tape the door as it opened from that side without a key. The tape served only as a sign to the police that there had been a break-in.

(12) McCord later claimed that after the break-in he removed the tape on all the doors. This was not true and soon after midnight the security guard, Frank Wills, discovered that several doors had been taped to stay unlocked. He told his superior about this but it was not until 1.47 a.m. that he notified the police.

(13) The burglars heard footsteps coming up the stairwell. Bernard Barker turned off the walkie-talkie (it was making a slight noise). Alfred Baldwin was watching events from his hotel room. When he saw the police walking up the stairwell steps he radioed a warning. However, as the walkie-talkie was turned off, the burglars remained unaware of the arrival of the police.

(14) When arrested Bernard Barker had his hotel key in his pocket (314). This enabled the police to find traceable material in Barker’s hotel room.

(15) When Hunt and Liddy realised that the burglars had been arrested, they attempted to remove traceable material from their hotel room (214). However, they left a briefcase containing $4,600. The money was in hundred dollar bills in sequential serial numbers that linked to the money found on the Watergate burglars.

(16) When Hunt arrived at Baldwin’s hotel room he made a phone call to Douglas Caddy, a lawyer who had worked with him at Mullen Company (a CIA front organization). Baldwin heard him discussing money, bail and bonds.

(17) Hunt told Baldwin to load McCord’s van with the listening post equipment and the Gemstone file and drive it to McCord’s house in Rockville. Surprisingly, the FBI did not order a search of McCord’s home and so they did not discover the contents of the van.

(18) It was vitally important to get McCord’s release from prison before it was discovered his links with the CIA. However, Hunt or Liddy made no attempt to contact people like Mitchell who could have organized this via Robert Mardian or Richard Kleindienst. Hunt later blamed Liddy for this as he assumed he would have phoned the White House or the Justice Department who would in turn have contacted the D.C. police chief in order to get the men released.

(19) Hunt went to his White House office where he placed a collection of incriminating materials (McCord’s electronic gear, address books, notebooks, etc.) in his safe. The safe also contained a revolver and documents on Daniel Ellsberg, Edward Kennedy and State Department memos. Hunt once again phoned Caddy from his office.

(20) Liddy eventually contacts Magruder via the White House switchboard. This was later used to link Liddy and Magruder to the break-in.

(21) Later that day Jeb Magruder told Hugh Sloan, the FCRP treasurer, that: “Our boys got caught last night. It was my mistake and I used someone from here, something I told them I’d never do.”

(22) Police took an address book from Bernard Barker. It contained the notation “WH HH” and Howard Hunt’s telephone number.

(23) Police took an address book from Eugenio Martinez. It contained the notation “H. Hunt WH” and Howard Hunt’s telephone number. He also had cheque for $6.36 signed by E. Howard Hunt.

(24) Alfred Baldwin told his story to a lawyer called John Cassidento, a strong supporter of the Democratic Party. He did not tell the authorities but did pass this information onto Larry O’Brien. The Democrats now knew that people like E. Howard Hunt and Gordon Liddy were involved in the Watergate break-in.

Several individuals seem to have made a lot of mistakes. The biggest offenders were Hunt (8), McCord (7), Liddy (6), Barker (6) and Baldwin (3). McCord’s mistakes were the most serious. He was also the one who first confessed to what had taken place at Watergate.

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John

Great list of mistakes made by the Watergate burglars.

I have always been most struck by the fact that Frank Sturgis resorted to loud hammering to break down the door.

It seems these experienced "tradecraft" professionals failed to use their skills while working for CREEP....would they have bungled a job so badly if their CIA case officers had been overseeing them? Probably not.

I have reason to believe that Watergate burglars Eugenio Martinez, Bernard Barker and Virgilio Gonzales were involved in the assassination of President Kennedy.... They are unlikely to talk, because of the threatening presence of other "enforcers" in Miami today, the same men whose names are sometimes suppressed by the search engines..........

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Shanet wrote:

I have reason to believe that Watergate burglars Eugenio Martinez, Bernard Barker and Virgilio Gonzales were involved in the assassination of President Kennedy

Alright, Shanet, let's have the benefit of your "reasoning" process.

Cite your reasons. I am sick and tired of you accusing people of murder (or conspiracy to murder) with no basis for it.

Compared to you, Joe McCarthy is a model of civility and discretion.

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"Macho" Barker would not have missed the JFK hit for the world. This guy owned "Keyes Realty" in South Florida and it might still exist today. After the JFK assassination, the "For Rent" sign went up in front of the house where people like E. Howard Hunt, Frank Fiorini Strugis, Jack Ruby and Gerald "Patrick" Hemming, and other unidentified individuals, were seen over the course of a few years as I was growing up in the Grapeland Heights section of Miami. Barker's entre into the world of Maj. Gen. Charles Willoughby was via Sturgis' association with Alex Rorke in the Anti-Communist Liaison Committee of Correspondence. This group included Brig. Gen. Bonner "Fighting Frank" Fellers, Sarah ("C.O.P.A.") McClendon, Rev. "Billy" James Hargis, and Edward "Brainwashed" Hunter. Willoughby, Fellers and Hunter also were in ManCand by Richard Condon as early as 1959.

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How substantial is the information that the White House motive for the second burglary was to uncover or steal documents linking Nixon, nefariously and financially, to Howard Hughes?

As I recall, that's the tale told in Howard Hughes: His Life and Madness, by Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele.

Edited by David Andrews

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This is a partially transcribed document re Bernard Barker

BARKER, Jr. BERNARD LEON

TYPIC/OPERATIONAL AMCLATTER-1 QUERY ON CITIZENSHIP

c. Identity C Mr. Spears was very sympathetic and arranged to have my suit for reinstament taken by Identity D Dr. Mario Lazo which handled most ODYOKE legal business locally. In 1951 Dr. Mario Lazo referred my case to a ZRMETAL law firm

law firm whose name I cannot recall

AMTHUG-1

d. In 1959 Identity D

e. In the summer of 1961

f. In March 1962

g. I wish to make the record clear........

2.

3. For your information copies of four identity items in AMCLATTER-1’s possession are also forwarded under separate cover.

Identity A The Cuban Police Department, under Col Jose Carames of the Prio administration

Identity B Mr. FNU Spears, legal attache at the Embassy

Identity C Mr. FNU Webster vice-consul at the U.S. Embassy

Identity D Dr. Mario Lazo of the Cuban law firm of Cuba-Lazo

Identity E Mrs Ruth B. Shipley

Identity F [ 03 ]

Identity G [ 03 ]

Identity H Mr Bernard Reichardt

Identity I Mr Howard Hunt

Identity J [ 03 ]

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

Edited by Robert Howard

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One of the things that has always intrigued me is the large number of mistakes that were made during the Watergate operation. This is in direct contrast to other Nixon dirty tricks campaigns. Some people have speculated that there were individuals inside the operation who wanted to do harm to Nixon. I thought it might be a good idea to list these 24 “mistakes” to see if we can identify these individuals. Could it have been Bernard Barker?

(1) The money to pay for the Watergate operation came from CREEP. It would have been possible to have found a way of transferring this money to the Watergate burglars without it being traceable back to CREEP. For example, see how Tony Ulasewicz got his money from Nixon. As counsel for the Finance Committee to Re-Elect the President, Gordon Liddy, acquired two cheques that amounted to $114,000. This money came from an illegal U.S. corporate contribution laundered in Mexico and Dwayne Andreas, a Democrat who was a secret Nixon supporter. Liddy handed these cheques to E. Howard Hunt. He then gave these cheques to Bernard Barker who paid them into his own bank account. In this way it was possible to link Nixon with a Watergate burglar.

(2) On 22nd May, 1972, James McCord booked Alfred Baldwin and himself into the Howard Johnson Motor Inn opposite the Watergate building (room 419). The room was booked in the name of McCord’s company. During his stay in this room Baldwin made several long-distance phone calls to his parents. This information was later used during the trial of the Watergate burglars.

(3) On the eve of the first Watergate break-in the team had a meeting in the Howard Johnson Motor Inn’s Continental Room. The booking was made on the stationary of a Miami firm that included Bernard Barker among its directors. Again, this was easily traceable.

(4) In the first Watergate break-in the target was Larry O’Brien’s office. In fact, they actually entered the office of Spencer Oliver, the chairman of the association of Democratic state chairman. Two bugs were placed in two phones in order to record the telephone conversations of O’Brien. In fact, O’Brien never used this office telephone.

(5) E. Howard Hunt was in charge of photographing documents found in the DNC offices. The two rolls of film were supposed to be developed by a friend of James McCord. This did not happen and eventually Hunt took the film to Miami for Bernard Barker to deal with. Barker had them developed by Rich’s Camera Shop. Once again the conspirators were providing evidence of being involved in the Watergate break-in.

(6) The developed prints showed gloved hands holding them down and a shag rug in the background. There was no shag rug in the DNC offices. Therefore it seems the Democratic Party documents must have been taken away from the office to be photographed. McCord later claimed that he cannot remember details of the photographing of the documents. Liddy and Jeb Magruder saw them before being put in John Mitchell’s desk (they were shredded during the cover-up operation).

(7) After the break-in Alfred Baldwin and James McCord moved to room 723 of the Howard Johnson Motor Inn in order to get a better view of the DNC offices. It became Baldwin’s job to eavesdrop the phone calls. Over the next 20 days Baldwin listened to over 200 phone calls. These were not recorded. Baldwin made notes and typed up summaries. Nor did Baldwin listen to all phone calls coming in. For example, he took his meals outside his room. Any phone calls taking place at this time would have been missed.

(8) It soon became clear that the bug on one of the phones installed by McCord was not working. As a result of the defective bug, McCord decided that they would have to break-in to the Watergate office. He also heard that a representative of the Vietnam Veterans Against the War had a desk at the DNC. McCord argued that it was worth going in to see what they could discover about the anti-war activists. Liddy later claimed that the real reason for the second break-in was “to find out what O’Brien had of a derogatory nature about us, not for us to get something on him.”

(9) Liddy drove his distinctive Buick-powered green Jeep into Washington on the night of the second Watergate break-in. He was stopped by a policeman after jumping a yellow light. He was let off with a warning. He parked his car right outside the Watergate building.

(10) The burglars then met up in room 214 before the break-in. Liddy gave each man between $200 and $800 in $100 bills with serial numbers close in sequence. McCord gave out six walkie-talkies. Two of these did not work (dead batteries).

(11) McCord taped the 6th, 8th and 9th floor stairwell doors and the garage level door. Later it was reported that the tape on the garage–level lock was gone. Hunt argued that a guard must have done this and suggested the operation should be aborted. Liddy and McCord argued that the operation must continue. McCord then went back an re-taped the garage-level door. Later the police pointed out that there was no need to tape the door as it opened from that side without a key. The tape served only as a sign to the police that there had been a break-in.

(12) McCord later claimed that after the break-in he removed the tape on all the doors. This was not true and soon after midnight the security guard, Frank Wills, discovered that several doors had been taped to stay unlocked. He told his superior about this but it was not until 1.47 a.m. that he notified the police.

(13) The burglars heard footsteps coming up the stairwell. Bernard Barker turned off the walkie-talkie (it was making a slight noise). Alfred Baldwin was watching events from his hotel room. When he saw the police walking up the stairwell steps he radioed a warning. However, as the walkie-talkie was turned off, the burglars remained unaware of the arrival of the police.

(14) When arrested Bernard Barker had his hotel key in his pocket (314). This enabled the police to find traceable material in Barker’s hotel room.

(15) When Hunt and Liddy realised that the burglars had been arrested, they attempted to remove traceable material from their hotel room (214). However, they left a briefcase containing $4,600. The money was in hundred dollar bills in sequential serial numbers that linked to the money found on the Watergate burglars.

(16) When Hunt arrived at Baldwin’s hotel room he made a phone call to Douglas Caddy, a lawyer who had worked with him at Mullen Company (a CIA front organization). Baldwin heard him discussing money, bail and bonds.

(17) Hunt told Baldwin to load McCord’s van with the listening post equipment and the Gemstone file and drive it to McCord’s house in Rockville. Surprisingly, the FBI did not order a search of McCord’s home and so they did not discover the contents of the van.

(18) It was vitally important to get McCord’s release from prison before it was discovered his links with the CIA. However, Hunt or Liddy made no attempt to contact people like Mitchell who could have organized this via Robert Mardian or Richard Kleindienst. Hunt later blamed Liddy for this as he assumed he would have phoned the White House or the Justice Department who would in turn have contacted the D.C. police chief in order to get the men released.

(19) Hunt went to his White House office where he placed a collection of incriminating materials (McCord’s electronic gear, address books, notebooks, etc.) in his safe. The safe also contained a revolver and documents on Daniel Ellsberg, Edward Kennedy and State Department memos. Hunt once again phoned Caddy from his office.

(20) Liddy eventually contacts Magruder via the White House switchboard. This was later used to link Liddy and Magruder to the break-in.

(21) Later that day Jeb Magruder told Hugh Sloan, the FCRP treasurer, that: “Our boys got caught last night. It was my mistake and I used someone from here, something I told them I’d never do.”

(22) Police took an address book from Bernard Barker. It contained the notation “WH HH” and Howard Hunt’s telephone number.

(23) Police took an address book from Eugenio Martinez. It contained the notation “H. Hunt WH” and Howard Hunt’s telephone number. He also had cheque for $6.36 signed by E. Howard Hunt.

(24) Alfred Baldwin told his story to a lawyer called John Cassidento, a strong supporter of the Democratic Party. He did not tell the authorities but did pass this information onto Larry O’Brien. The Democrats now knew that people like E. Howard Hunt and Gordon Liddy were involved in the Watergate break-in.

Several individuals seem to have made a lot of mistakes. The biggest offenders were Hunt (8), McCord (7), Liddy (6), Barker (6) and Baldwin (3). McCord’s mistakes were the most serious. He was also the one who first confessed to what had taken place at Watergate.

(5) E. Howard Hunt was in charge of photographing documents found in the DNC offices. The two rolls of film were supposed to be developed by a friend of James McCord. This did not happen and eventually Hunt took the film to Miami for Bernard Barker to deal with. Barker had them developed by Rich’s Camera Shop. Once again the conspirators were providing evidence of being involved in the Watergate break-in
.

Facts, three people went to Rich's photos to have the film developed, Mr. Richardson himself, described three people at his store, and said Barker paid him $40.00 as a service charge plus $.085 cents per print , which was $32.30 for 38 prints. "And gave him a $10.00 tip"." The trio departed in a late-model green Chevrolet, (my father's car). Richardson said that Sturgis was driving, Barker was riding shotgun and the third man was in the back seat.

Richardson described the third man as probably Cuban, 33 to 35 years old 5'ft 8" to 5'ft-10" lanky and wiry, 150 to 160 pounds- and with strawberry blonde hair, "curly, almost kinky-type hair." All three were speaking Spanish and English combined right outside the back of the shop, said Richardson, he said, however, the third man spoke Spanish very poorly, However, Richardson said, "I understand only a few words, habla poco".

Agents in the Miami area immediately traced Barker's bank records and telephone calls, presumably the information went to a Federal Grand Jury in Washington, but in July, the Justice Department in Washington cooled the Miami FBI investigation, assigning any leads to be pursued on a request to "need to know basis only".

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On 7/14/2005 at 11:01 AM, John Simkin said:

Is anyone convinced that Bernard (Macho) Barker was involved in the assassination of JFK? 

**IF**'he was involved in the assassination of JFK, THEN, I am convinced that he was used to blackmail Nixon; a' la, Watergate.

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