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Gregory Carlin

Going head-to-head over skirts

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A cautionary detail to be considered is the fact that we have yet to see a court of law play with the issue by way of solid precedent.

The EOC advised they had arranged or negotiated guidance on a DfES website. I then dutifully asked the DfES to confirm that they had indeed arrived at the conclusion suggested by the EOC.

From the EOC

At the Equal Opportunities Commission our position is that there should be a choice whether girls wear a skirt or trousers, and that it should not be prescribed one way or another. This is reflected in the amendment we secured in the Department for Education and Skills guidance, part of which I am including below:

"Schools should ensure that their uniform policy does not discriminate on grounds of gender, for example, girls should normally be allowed to wear trousers. Uniform rules should not disadvantage one gender compared with the other" (DfES Guidelines).

From the DfES

"Current guidance on equal opportunities gives an example of girls being "allowed to wear trousers where they wish to do so" - the implication being that they should also be allowed to wear skirts."

"Just a quick addition to confirm the EOC advice you received , i.e. that the DfES has not sought to encourage the prohibition of skirts (or any other item of clothing for that matter) in school uniforms."

Edited by Gregory Carlin

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What is happening in the World? A prominent Australian politician has spoken out against head scarves. That was followed by a round of comments that showed this was contrary to Australian legislation to discriminate against any groups.

Doesn't Royalty wear skirts on official occassions? Do clotes really "maketh the man" or are we able to look past external ornaments to the person?

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What is happening in the World?  A prominent Australian politician has spoken out against head scarves.  That was followed by a round of comments that showed this was contrary to Australian legislation to discriminate against any groups.

Doesn't Royalty wear skirts on official occassions?  Do clotes really "maketh the man" or are we able to look past external ornaments to the person?

I have always found that trivial obedience to contrived dress codes has always been important to many of my colleagues but never to me.

It is of supreme and hopefully lasting indifference to me what my students wear. I am much more concerned by their brains than their dress.... I tentatively suggest that this is as it should be :D

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What is happening in the World?  A prominent Australian politician has spoken out against head scarves.  That was followed by a round of comments that showed this was contrary to Australian legislation to discriminate against any groups.

Doesn't Royalty wear skirts on official occassions?  Do clotes really "maketh the man" or are we able to look past external ornaments to the person?

The skirt issue was complicated by the DfES not feeling able to immediately and clearly agree that there was a precise understanding with the EOC.

"Current guidance on equal opportunities gives an example of girls being "allowed to wear trousers where they wish to do so" - the implication being that they should also be allowed to wear skirts." & "Just a quick addition to confirm the EOC advice you received , i.e. that the DfES has not sought to encourage the prohibition of skirts (or any other item of clothing for that matter) in school uniforms."

It took several weeks to obtain a statement (which could be made public) from the DfES symmetrical to the the EOC understanding of the DfES/EOC dialogue.

Edited by Gregory Carlin

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What is happening in the World?  A prominent Australian politician has spoken out against head scarves.  That was followed by a round of comments that showed this was contrary to Australian legislation to discriminate against any groups.

Doesn't Royalty wear skirts on official occassions?  Do clotes really "maketh the man" or are we able to look past external ornaments to the person?

I have always found that trivial obedience to contrived dress codes has always been important to many of my colleagues but never to me.

It is of supreme and hopefully lasting indifference to me what my students wear. I am much more concerned by their brains than their dress.... I tentatively suggest that this is as it should be :o

The imposition of a shalwar kameez style of dress code in Britain was inevitable because eccentricity has more friends than commonsense.

Modesty precautions should eschew the banning of traditional schoolgirl attire such as skirts. The 'gender free' policy was an arrogant imposition

The DfES have been urged by the courts to offer proper advice in relation to the SDA and Human Rights Act, the DfES does not want to do so.

Edited by Gregory Carlin

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