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Roy Huggins

Developing Interactive Teaching Styles using an IWB

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As a long-term IWB sceptic, I have recently enjoyed a number of IWB Damascus moments in my new position of teaching without the (enormous) benefits of a laptop classroom. I was considering my conversion to SmartBoard pedagogy might be worthy of some e-Help time.

Good luck with the research, hopefully we can discuss it in Bratislava.

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As a long-term IWB sceptic, I have recently enjoyed a number of IWB Damascus moments in my new position of teaching without the (enormous) benefits of a laptop classroom. I was considering my conversion to SmartBoard pedagogy might be worthy of some e-Help time.

Good luck with the research, hopefully we can discuss it in Bratislava.

May we expect you then with "40 meg of stuff to make your eyes water.... makes it come alive doesn't it Richard lad" (to be said in northern accent for full effect) :lol:

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Hi Andy,

Well done on getting the funding for your research. Please feel free to incorporate the ideas in this thread..

You may also want to include some of the resources / feedback that have been made about the new History in Progress series published by Pearsons / Heinemann in your research. The above ideas have been successfully used in the new CD / VLE pack for the whole KS3 series. The key concept was to create an interactive textbook which included IWB activities that could also be linked into a teacher's markbook. Students could then complete them on laptops, PDAs, IWB slates as well as their home PCs or other media devices. Initial sales figures are very promising as the new CDs have already broken their sales targets!

I'm also currently working on the new AQA & OCR interactivities for the new GCSE specifications which should hopefully be released in the Spring of 2009. If you use these on a trial basis with one of your classes you should then be able to do a controlled test against nationally assessed exams. However, if the 'free market' is a good indication of success then the interactive teaching styles championed in this thread have been a success.

Once again,many thanks to e-Help for the support and help provided in promoting interactive teaching styles using ICT.

Kind Regards

Roy :lol:

Edited by Roy Huggins

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I thought Roy's seminar was great, with lots of good examples of how whiteboards might be used by history teachers, but I think there is still an argument to be had about whether whiteboards or wireless would be a better investment in ICT. There are still many history teachers (and probably I include myself in this list), who think that whiteboards give you lots of 'eye-candy' stuff - little tricks and gimmicks to aid pupil engagement (not in itself a bad or unnecessary thing), but that wireless gives easier access to the whole wealth of history resources on the internet, a much more valuable resource. I know whiteboards can also have internet access, but the point I am trying to make is that it is classroom internet access that is 'the big prize' for history teachers, not the facility to annotate pictures etc, and IWBs are expensive compared to data projector plus wireless. Am I on my own and something of a Luddite on this, or are there others in the history education community who have reservations about the rush to whiteboards?

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I thought Roy's seminar was great, with lots of good examples of how whiteboards might be used by history teachers, but I think there is still an argument to be had about whether whiteboards or wireless would be a better investment in ICT. There are still many history teachers (and probably I include myself in this list), who think that whiteboards give you lots of 'eye-candy' stuff - little tricks and gimmicks to aid pupil engagement (not in itself a bad or unnecessary thing), but that wireless gives easier access to the whole wealth of history resources on the internet, a much more valuable resource. I know whiteboards can also have internet access, but the point I am trying to make is that it is classroom internet access that is 'the big prize' for history teachers, not the facility to annotate pictures etc, and IWBs are expensive compared to data projector plus wireless. Am I on my own and something of a Luddite on this, or are there others in the history education community who have reservations about the rush to whiteboards?

In my research for the TDA I have observed that IWB's are especially powerful when used interactively with primary school students. Primary teachers appear much better trained than secondary teachers in their use. On arriving at secondary the teaching mode seems to turn into 'big screen as tele prompter' and children no longer get the opportunities to use the board themselves.

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Hi Guys,

I think that you are both right. The problem with any tool is that its only as good as the person who is using it. I've seen some briliant uses of IWB as well as some pretty poor ones. At the end of the day it comes down to giving proper training and advice to people, which is of course one of the main purposes of E-help is meant to help facilitate.

Kind Regards

Roy B)

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