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William Turner

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About William Turner

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  1. It apparently has not sunk into Don Bohning that political labeling is passé---the new generation deals with facts. It was well known in Miami in the mid-1970s when I was researching Deadly Secrets that Bohning was a CIA media asset. As I published in the book, I interviewed Frank Sturgis extensively. Bohning may not have known about it but Frank did work for the CIA. His case officer was Joaquim Sanjenis, chief of Operation 40. When Sanjenis would call him, Frank would go to an airport and take off in a small plane. He would penetrate Cuban air space and set off electronic defenses. The sig
  2. I'm glad to hear that John Newman is at it again. I admire his work. My experience with CIA files is that their system is much like the FBI's. There would be the main 201 file in Langley fed by information from Miami and other stations. Only the more significant info would be forwarded, leaving unprocessed material in the station files. An officer of Angleton's rank certainly could access Oswald's file in Langley. There would be no need to control it since since the principles in his scheme were the ones that contributed to it to begin with. I see Phillips as the main action officer. Oswald w
  3. I think a lot of the reluctance of mainstream historians and journalists to take on conspiracies is a fear of being cut off of information by agencies and the various branches while their colleagues are fed the story. Also, the concern of being ridiculed as a "conspiracy theorist," which originated in the JFK case, has had its effect. There is always someone who is willing to talk, whether out of vanity or a change of heart. In 1972 I interviewed Ambassador William Pawley in Miami. When I called to seek an interview he issued a flat no since he had been involved up to his ears in the CIA secr
  4. There is always someone who is willing to talk, whether out of vanity or a change of heart. In 1972 I interviewed Ambassador William Pawley in Miami. When I called to seek an interview he issued a flat no since he had been involved up to his ears in the CIA secret war against Castro. I appealed to his vanity by telling him how important he was in the contemporary history of the Caribbean. He said okay, come over and I'll at least shake hands with you. A non-interview went on for close to two hours, and I came away with the information I wanted. I always try to double-source key information, an
  5. (1) I think a lot of the reluctance of mainstream historians and journalists to take on conspiracies is a fear of being cut off of information by agencies and the various branches while their colleagues are fed the story. Also, the concern of being ridiculed as a "conspiracy theorist," which originated in the JFK case, has had its effect. (2) There is always someone who is willing to talk, whether out of vanity or a change of heart. In 1972 I interviewed Ambassador William Pawley in Miami. When I called to seek an interview he issued a flat no since he had been involved up to his ears in th
  6. (1) I think a lot of the reluctance of mainstream historians and journalists to take on conspiracies is a fear of being cut off of information by agencies and the various branches while their colleagues are fed the story. Also, the concern of being ridiculed as a "conspiracy theorist," which originated in the JFK case, has had its effect. (2) There is always someone who is willing to talk, whether out of vanity or a change of heart. In 1972 I interviewed Ambassador William Pawley in Miami. When I called to seek an interview he issued a flat no since he had been involved up to his ears in th
  7. Writing on controversial topics surely has harmed my career. It limits the potential print-media market. My FBI file, obtained in 1978 under FOIA, consists of 17 volumes of 200 pages each. It reveals that the Bureau waged a relentless back-door campaign to dissuade publishers from books and articles, cut me off from electronic media interviews, blacklist me in the industry, and plant rebuttal articles with media collaborators.
  8. Writing on controversial topics surely has harmed my career. It limits the potential print-media market. My FBI file, obtained in 1978 under FOIA, consists of 17 volumes of 200 pages each. It reveals that the Bureau waged a relentless back-door campaign to dissuade publishers from books and articles, cut me off from electronic media interviews, blacklist me in the industry, and plant rebuttal articles with media collaborators.
  9. Commonly an investigative journalist conducts a contemporary probe, going out into the field to get the story. On the other hand, a historian must rely on records and oral histories, usually doing little field work. I decide on the basis of whether the story is something important that needs exposure or correction. It is not a consideration. Writing on controversial topics surely has harmed my career. It limits the potential print-media market. My FBI file, obtained in 1978 under FOIA, consists of 17 volumes of 200 pages each. It reveals that the Bureau waged a relentless back-door ca
  10. Commonly an investigative journalist conducts a contemporary probe, going out into the field to get the story. On the other hand, a historian must rely on records and oral histories, usually doing little field work. I decide on the basis of whether the story is something important that needs exposure or correction. It is not a consideration. Writing on controversial topics surely has harmed my career. It limits the potential print-media market. My FBI file, obtained in 1978 under FOIA, consists of 17 volumes of 200 pages each. It reveals that the Bureau waged a relentless back-door ca
  11. The decision to become an investigative journalist was the result of my experiences as an FBI agent from 1951 to 1961. I had worked criminal and counerespionage cases, and was appalled at J. Edgar Hoover's refusal to face up to organized crime and by running an arbitrary disciplinary machine forced out the brightest agents best equipped to cope with security threats. I wrote letters to Congress seeking a Congressional investigation of Hoover's conduct and priorities, thus becoming the Bureau's first whistle-blower. After decamping, I continued on the mission by writing a book, "Hoover's FBI,"
  12. The decision to become an investigative journalist was the result of my experiences as an FBI agent from 1951 to 1961. I had worked criminal and counerespionage cases, and was appalled at J. Edgar Hoover's refusal to face up to organized crime and by running an arbitrary disciplinary machine forced out the brightest agents best equipped to cope with security threats. I wrote letters to Congress seeking a Congressional investigation of Hoover's conduct and priorities, thus becoming the Bureau's first whistle-blower. After decamping, I continued on the mission by writing a book, "Hoover's FBI,"
  13. I have no documents on Gregg. But I have always thought he was the keeper of the crown jewels. Bush didn't stash him away as ambassador to South Korea because he looked good in striped pants.
  14. I have no documents on Gregg. But I have always thought he was the keeper of the crown jewels. Bush didn't stash him away as ambassador to South Korea because he looked good in striped pants.
  15. Schulman declined to repeat his contemporaneous account that he had seen the security guard fire because h was browbeaten by the LAPD like Sandy Serrano.
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