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Mr Caddy, According to news articles in New Orleans papers, you were active with or knew Leander Perez, Kent Courtney, and Guy W. Banister in the late 1950’s anti- communist movement. Courtney was a political reporter; Banister was a former FBI man, and Perez a powerful political boss in La.. What was the organizational pecking order between these men, within the movement? How familiar were you with these individuals, and could you give us some insights about them, like how they related to each other, who was the major domo?

Thanks, Bill

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Mr Caddy, According to news articles in New Orleans papers, you were active with or knew Leander Perez, Kent Courtney, and Guy W. Banister in the late 1950’s anti- communist movement. Courtney was a political reporter; Banister was a former FBI man, and Perez a powerful political boss in La.. What was the organizational pecking order between these men, within the movement? How familiar were you with these individuals, and could you give us some insights about them, like how they related to each other, who was the major domo?

Thanks, Bill

I attended Alcee Fortier High School in New Orleans from 1954 to 1956, the latter year being when I was graduated from that educational institution.

While in high school I became active in politics. I first met Kent Courtney in 1954 when he and his wife, Phoebe, sponsored a public meeting in Audubon Park to mobilize support for Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was then threatened with being censured by the U.S. Senate. I erected a card table in front of St. Louis Cathedral in the French Quarter and collected signatures on petitions of persons who supported the cause of Senator McCarthy. These petitions were then forwarded to General Bonner Fellers, who headed the national pro-McCarthy movement.

It was about this time that Kent and Phoebe Courtney founded Free Men Speak, a monthly newspaper that reprinted editorials from conservative newspapers around the country (such as the Chicago Tribune and the Manchester (N.H.) Union-Leader.) I worked after school in a voluntary position in helping to publish the newspaper. Their publication later changed its name to The Independent American.

I was introduced to Guy Banister by Kent Courtney at a public meeting sponsored by the Kohn Crime Commission, a semi-public entity set up to combat organized crime in New Orleans. I seem to remember attending a meeting in Guy Banister’s office some time later but do not recollect the subject of the meeting. That was the extent of my relationship with Guy Bannister.

I never met or knew Leander Perez, who was the king-pin leader of Plaquemines Parish, which adjoins New Orleans.

If there were an organizational pecking order among these persons, it never came to my attention.

All these events occurred when I was between 16 and 18 years of age.

After being graduated from high school, I left New Orleans permanently, having enrolled in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. I had no further contact with the Courtneys or with Guy Banister.

While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. A year later, in 1960, I help found Young Americans for Freedom, which was organized at the family estate of William F. Buckley.

The above is a capsule history of how the mass conservative movement began.

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Mr Caddy, According to news articles in New Orleans papers, you were active with or knew Leander Perez, Kent Courtney, and Guy W. Banister in the late 1950’s anti- communist movement. Courtney was a political reporter; Banister was a former FBI man, and Perez a powerful political boss in La.. What was the organizational pecking order between these men, within the movement? How familiar were you with these individuals, and could you give us some insights about them, like how they related to each other, who was the major domo?

Thanks, Bill

I attended Alcee Fortier High School in New Orleans from 1954 to 1956, the latter year being when I was graduated from that educational institution.

While in high school I became active in politics. I first met Kent Courtney in 1954 when he and his wife, Phoebe, sponsored a public meeting in Audubon Park to mobilize support for Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was then threatened with being censured by the U.S. Senate. I erected a card table in front of St. Louis Cathedral in the French Quarter and collected signatures on petitions of persons who supported the cause of Senator McCarthy. These petitions were then forwarded to General Bonner Fellers, who headed the national pro-McCarthy movement.

It was about this time that Kent and Phoebe Courtney founded Free Men Speak, a monthly newspaper that reprinted editorials from conservative newspapers around the country (such as the Chicago Tribune and the Manchester (N.H.) Union-Leader.) I worked after school in a voluntary position in helping to publish the newspaper. Their publication later changed its name to The Independent American.

I was introduced to Guy Banister by Kent Courtney at a public meeting sponsored by the Kohn Crime Commission, a semi-public entity set up to combat organized crime in New Orleans. I seem to remember attending a meeting in Guy Banister’s office some time later but do not recollect the subject of the meeting. That was the extent of my relationship with Guy Bannister.

I never met or knew Leander Perez, who was the king-pin leader of Plaquemines Parish, which adjoins New Orleans.

If there were an organizational pecking order among these persons, it never came to my attention.

All these events occurred when I was between 16 and 18 years of age.

After being graduated from high school, I left New Orleans permanently, having enrolled in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. I had no further contact with the Courtneys or with Guy Banister.

While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. A year later, in 1960, I help found Young Americans for Freedom, which was organized at the family estate of William F. Buckley.

The above is a capsule history of how the mass conservative movement began.

Mr. Caddy , Thanks for your reply, I didn't realize you were that young then. What year did you meet Mr. Banister ?

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Mr Caddy, According to news articles in New Orleans papers, you were active with or knew Leander Perez, Kent Courtney, and Guy W. Banister in the late 1950’s anti- communist movement. Courtney was a political reporter; Banister was a former FBI man, and Perez a powerful political boss in La.. What was the organizational pecking order between these men, within the movement? How familiar were you with these individuals, and could you give us some insights about them, like how they related to each other, who was the major domo?

Thanks, Bill

I attended Alcee Fortier High School in New Orleans from 1954 to 1956, the latter year being when I was graduated from that educational institution.

While in high school I became active in politics. I first met Kent Courtney in 1954 when he and his wife, Phoebe, sponsored a public meeting in Audubon Park to mobilize support for Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was then threatened with being censured by the U.S. Senate. I erected a card table in front of St. Louis Cathedral in the French Quarter and collected signatures on petitions of persons who supported the cause of Senator McCarthy. These petitions were then forwarded to General Bonner Fellers, who headed the national pro-McCarthy movement.

It was about this time that Kent and Phoebe Courtney founded Free Men Speak, a monthly newspaper that reprinted editorials from conservative newspapers around the country (such as the Chicago Tribune and the Manchester (N.H.) Union-Leader.) I worked after school in a voluntary position in helping to publish the newspaper. Their publication later changed its name to The Independent American.

I was introduced to Guy Banister by Kent Courtney at a public meeting sponsored by the Kohn Crime Commission, a semi-public entity set up to combat organized crime in New Orleans. I seem to remember attending a meeting in Guy Banister’s office some time later but do not recollect the subject of the meeting. That was the extent of my relationship with Guy Bannister.

I never met or knew Leander Perez, who was the king-pin leader of Plaquemines Parish, which adjoins New Orleans.

If there were an organizational pecking order among these persons, it never came to my attention.

All these events occurred when I was between 16 and 18 years of age.

After being graduated from high school, I left New Orleans permanently, having enrolled in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. I had no further contact with the Courtneys or with Guy Banister.

While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. A year later, in 1960, I help found Young Americans for Freedom, which was organized at the family estate of William F. Buckley.

The above is a capsule history of how the mass conservative movement began.

Mr. Caddy , Thanks for your reply, I didn't realize you were that young then. What year did you meet Mr. Banister ?

It would be impossible to state with certainty due to the lapse of time but I think that I first met Guy Banister in 1955.

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While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. (Douglas Caddy)

Douglas,

Thanks for sharing some information in this thread. Interesting indeed.

Regarding the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, I believe a loyalty oath and a non-subversive affidavit were required if students were to receive benefits under the National Defense Education Act. Do you know if John Kennedy as a Senator actually introduced a bill to repeal the requirements?

James

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John , I knew this would set you off. You are way ahead of the curve,

Hopefuly Mr. Caddy will not be offended by further questions, tho I wish he would voluteer some broader insights as to that period in NO's.

Thanks for the response you have given, Douglas.

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Darn it, am I that predictable?

The intent, of course, is not to offend or divert. These are merely documents of interest. Douglas' comments and participation is much valued.

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Mr. Caddy,

You have told us that you had met Guy Bannister on a few occasion while your were living in New Orleans. Any chance that you knew or met any other individuals related to the JFK/Oswald discussions, such as David Ferrie, Dr. Ochsner, Dr. Sherman, Jim Garrison etc. If so, is there anything you could share with us, i.e. your impressions of them?

I believe you are roughly the same age as Lee Oswald would be today. Did you by chance ever meet or know any of his acquaintances, his brothers or him?

Thank you.

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Mr Caddy, According to news articles in New Orleans papers, you were active with or knew Leander Perez, Kent Courtney, and Guy W. Banister in the late 1950’s anti- communist movement. Courtney was a political reporter; Banister was a former FBI man, and Perez a powerful political boss in La.. What was the organizational pecking order between these men, within the movement? How familiar were you with these individuals, and could you give us some insights about them, like how they related to each other, who was the major domo?

Thanks, Bill

I attended Alcee Fortier High School in New Orleans from 1954 to 1956, the latter year being when I was graduated from that educational institution.

While in high school I became active in politics. I first met Kent Courtney in 1954 when he and his wife, Phoebe, sponsored a public meeting in Audubon Park to mobilize support for Senator Joseph McCarthy, who was then threatened with being censured by the U.S. Senate. I erected a card table in front of St. Louis Cathedral in the French Quarter and collected signatures on petitions of persons who supported the cause of Senator McCarthy. These petitions were then forwarded to General Bonner Fellers, who headed the national pro-McCarthy movement.

It was about this time that Kent and Phoebe Courtney founded Free Men Speak, a monthly newspaper that reprinted editorials from conservative newspapers around the country (such as the Chicago Tribune and the Manchester (N.H.) Union-Leader.) I worked after school in a voluntary position in helping to publish the newspaper. Their publication later changed its name to The Independent American.

I was introduced to Guy Banister by Kent Courtney at a public meeting sponsored by the Kohn Crime Commission, a semi-public entity set up to combat organized crime in New Orleans. I seem to remember attending a meeting in Guy Banister’s office some time later but do not recollect the subject of the meeting. That was the extent of my relationship with Guy Bannister.

I never met or knew Leander Perez, who was the king-pin leader of Plaquemines Parish, which adjoins New Orleans.

If there were an organizational pecking order among these persons, it never came to my attention.

All these events occurred when I was between 16 and 18 years of age.

After being graduated from high school, I left New Orleans permanently, having enrolled in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. I had no further contact with the Courtneys or with Guy Banister.

While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. A year later, in 1960, I help found Young Americans for Freedom, which was organized at the family estate of William F. Buckley.

The above is a capsule history of how the mass conservative movement began.

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Charter/Organization ID: 22901030D

Name: FREE MEN SPEAK, INC.

Type Entity: Business Corporation

Status: Not Active (Action by Secretary of State)

2007 Annual Report/Reinstatement form is required in order to reinstate Print Annual Report/Reinstatement Form For Filing

Mailing Address: NO STREET ADDRESS LISTED, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70150

Domicile Address: NO STREET ADDRESS LISTED, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70150

File Date: 01/11/1955

Registered Agent (Appointed 1/11/1955): KENT HARBINSON COURTNEY, 7314 ZIMPEL ST, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118

Registered Agent (Appointed 1/11/1955): PHOEBE GREENE, 7314 ZIMPEL ST, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118

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While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. A year later, in 1960, I help found Young Americans for Freedom, which was organized at the family estate of William F. Buckley.

The above is a capsule history of how the mass conservative movement began.

You clearly played an important role in establishing the “New Right” movement in 1960. I believe the main intention of the Young Americans for Freedom was to get Barry Goldwater elected as president.

(1) Could you explain why you supported Barry Goldwater? Why aspects of John F. Kennedy did you disagree with? What do you think Goldwater would have done differently to LBJ if he had become president in 1964?

(2) I know that you no longer hold extreme right-wing views. When and why did you change your political views?

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Conservative

Society of

America

Confederate

States of

America

Just in case you "missed" that one John!

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While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. (Douglas Caddy)

Douglas,

Thanks for sharing some information in this thread. Interesting indeed.

Regarding the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, I believe a loyalty oath and a non-subversive affidavit were required if students were to receive benefits under the National Defense Education Act. Do you know if John Kennedy as a Senator actually introduced a bill to repeal the requirements?

James

James -- You are correct as to the intent of the loyalty oath. Senator John Kennedy was indeed sponsor of the bill to repeal the oath from the National Defense Education Act. Our organization was designed to uncover and recruit conservative youth around the nation. It was a strategic move to break away from the Young Republican National Federation by establishing a national conservative youth organization that would appeal to rank-and-file union members and residents of the South who normally would not identify with the GOP.

Upon being formed the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath received national publicity. Senator Style Bridges (R.-N.H.) praised the organization on the floor of the Senate as did Congressman H. R. Gross in the House of Representatives.

Of course, old line liberals were upset. Gerald Johnson wrote in The New Republic that our Committee was a plea of subservience to the state. In fact, we were just the opposite.

I never met Senator Kennedy. However, the Senator and Mrs. Kennedy lived on N St., NW, just a few blocks from the campus of Georgetown University. In my sophmore and junior years I served as editor the student publication, the Foreign Service Courier. To celebrate my birthday a few of the girls on the publication's staff baked a cake. While they were carrying the cake up the the campus to surprise me, Senator Kennedy emerged from his house and, upon being told of the special occasion, promptly stuck his finger into the cake, tasted it and pronounced to be superb. When the cake was presented to me, there was a general discussion of whether we should eat it or have it preserved somehow for posterity. We chose the former option.

Doug

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While at Georgetown University, in 1959 I founded the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, which evolved into Youth for Goldwater. (Douglas Caddy)

Douglas,

Thanks for sharing some information in this thread. Interesting indeed.

Regarding the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath, I believe a loyalty oath and a non-subversive affidavit were required if students were to receive benefits under the National Defense Education Act. Do you know if John Kennedy as a Senator actually introduced a bill to repeal the requirements?

James

James -- You are correct as to the intent of the loyalty oath. Senator John Kennedy was indeed sponsor of the bill to repeal the oath from the National Defense Education Act. Our organization was designed to uncover and recruit conservative youth around the nation. It was a strategic move to break away from the Young Republican National Federation by establishing a national conservative youth organization that would appeal to rank-and-file union members and residents of the South who normally would not identify with the GOP.

Upon being formed the National Student Committee for the Loyalty Oath received national publicity. Senator Style Bridges (R.-N.H.) praised the organization on the floor of the Senate as did Congressman H. R. Gross in the House of Representatives.

Of course, old line liberals were upset. Gerald Johnson wrote in The New Republic that our Committee was a plea of subservience to the state. In fact, we were just the opposite.

I never met Senator Kennedy. However, the Senator and Mrs. Kennedy lived on N St., NW, just a few blocks from the campus of Georgetown University. In my sophmore and junior years I served as editor the student publication, the Foreign Service Courier. To celebrate my birthday a few of the girls on the publication's staff baked a cake. While they were carrying the cake up the the campus to surprise me, Senator Kennedy emerged from his house and, upon being told of the special occasion, promptly stuck his finger into the cake, tasted it and pronounced to be superb. When the cake was presented to me, there was a general discussion of whether we should eat it or have it preserved somehow for posterity. We chose the former option.

Doug

Thanks, Douglas. I appreciate the background. Interesting indeed.

I love the cake story. I guess the old saying is correct that you can't have your cake and eat it too. :rolleyes:

James

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