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Fleming ... Ian Fleming


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The James Bond novels of Ian Lancaster Fleming invaded my consciousness when I was thirteen years old.

Fleming remains one of the most interesting yet least appreciated (for his knowledge, access, and influence) of Cold Warriors. Many of the Bond saga's plots and characters hint at the depth of their creator's knowledge of and insight into some of the deepest secrets of the period -- some of which are zealously protected to this day.

Take, for example, the KGB assassin "Red" Grant, who stalks 007 in From Russia with Love. In "Granitski," Fleming presents us with a lunar cycle serial killer whose predilections are observed, shaped, controlled, and utilized by what today we would describe as the Soviet's versions of MK/ULTRA and ARTICHOKE manipulators.

FRWL appeared on April 8, 1957!

(Note too that, when Grant assumes the cover of an MI6 officer sent to facilitate Bond's return from the USSR with the LEKTOR coding device, he uses the surname "Nash" -- which is the transliteration of the Russian slang for "one of ours." Fleming spoke Russian.)

Then there's the alliance between Bond/MI6 and the Corsican mob, as depicted in On Her Majesty's Secret Service. One suspects that the affection and respect displayed by 007 for Marc-Ange Draco, putative leader of the Union Corse, was inspired in Fleming by all too real relationships within the secret world.

And what to make of SPECTRE (the Special Executive for Counterintelligence, Terrorism, Revenge, and Extortion -- emphasis added), a private enterprise made up of former intelligence operatives and other criminals that routinely deals in false flag operations and is motivated solely by greed?

A tad familiar, perhaps?

Fleming, of course, was a noted journalist. And so the MOCKINGBIRD warbles and the Mighty Wurlitzer wails throughout his fictions.

We're not surprised, then, that newsman Richard Hughes does indeed equal Dikko Henderson in You Only Live Twice. And John le Carre didn't hesitate to transfigure Hughes into William Craw for The Honourable Schoolboy.

Kudos to Sterling Seagrave and Bill Kelly for understanding the other-than-literary significance of Fleming and noting it in the "Asian Connections" thread.

Sterling: Since you're but a single degree of separation from Fleming, we'd be most grateful for your input here.

you only live twice

once when you are born

once when you look death in the face

-- after Bassho, Japanese poet

Ian Fleming's last words are reported to have been, "It's all been a tremendous lark."

Perhaps it is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Charles Drago

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Guest David Guyatt

Fleming worked for British Naval intelligence during WWII, reaching the rank of Commander.

From Wikipedia:

Quote

In Naval Intelligence, Fleming conceived of Operation Ruthless, a plan – not executed – for capturing the German naval version of the Wehrmacht's Enigma communications encoder.

He also conceived of a plan to use British occultist Aleister Crowley to trick Rudolf Hess into attempting to contact a faux cell of anti-Churchill Englishmen in Britain, but this plan was not used because Rudolf Hess had flown to Scotland in an attempt to broker peace behind Hitler's back. Anthony Masters's book The Man Who Was M: The Life of Charles Henry Maxwell Knight asserts Fleming conceived the plan that lured Hess into flying to Scotland, in May 1941, to negotiate Anglo–German peace with Churchill, and resulted in Hess's capture: this claim has no other source.

Fleming also formulated Operation Goldeneye, a plan to maintain communication with Gibraltar as well as a plan of defence in the unlikely event that Spain joined the Axis Powers and, together with Germany, invaded the Mediterranean colony.

In June 1941 General William Donovan requested that Fleming write a memorandum describing the structure and functions of a secret service organisation; for that, Fleming was rewarded with a .38 Police Positive Colt revolver inscribed, "For Special Services." Parts of this memorandum were later used in the official charter for the OSS, which was dissolved in 1945 following the end of World War II; the OSS's successor, the Central Intelligence Agency, was created two years later.

In 1942 Fleming formed an Auxiliary Unit known as 30AU or 30 Assault Unit that he nicknamed his own "Red Indians"; it was specifically trained in lock-picking, safe-cracking, forms of unarmed combat, and other techniques and skills for collecting intelligence. He meticulously planned all their raids, alongside Patrick Dalzel-Job (one of the Inspirations for James Bond), going so far as to memorize aerial photographs so that their missions could be planned in detail; because of their successes in Sicily and Italy, 30AU was greatly enlarged and Fleming's direct control was increased before D-Day.

Fleming even visited 30AU in the field during and after Operation Overlord, especially after the Cherbourg attack, in which he felt that the unit had been incorrectly used as a frontline force rather than as an intelligence gathering unit, and from then on tactics were revised.

It is often reported, and perpetuated by Fleming, that he travelled to Whitby, Ontario to train at Camp X, a top secret training school for Allied forces. However, this is most likely untrue, as no evidence of Fleming having been at Camp X has ever been uncovered, nor do any of the staff recall Fleming ever having been there.[2]

Unquote

On Union Corse, Colonel Lucien Conein of the CIA (and close friend of Colonel Edward Lansdale) helped overthrow President Diem in Vietnam in 1963 had earlier, as an OSS officer worked with the French Resistance during WWII. When Conien left Vietname, his Corsican Union Corse friends presented him with a heavy gold medallion bearing the Napoleonic Eagle and the Corsican crest. On it back were the words “Per Tu Amicu Conein” (For your friendship, Conein). The gold medallion was always worn by Union Corse bosses and served as an identification for secret meetings, narcotics drops and the like. It was the Union Corse who were responsible for refining the morphine base shipped from Saigon to Marseilles that later came to be known as the “French Connection”. (paraphrased from McCoy's Politics of Heroin)

There was a novel written about Conein (in a novelised form anyway) the name of which presently escapes me.

He was thr author of the childrens book "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang".

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Earlier Thread on this subject, which isn't off topic because it was JFK's appointment of Michael Straight to a government Arts post that led to the CI investigation that unraveled the Cambridge spy ring.

Fleming's choice of American ornithologist James Bond as his 007 hero, and Bond's real intelligence connections, along with E. Howard Hunt's attempt to duplicate Fleming's literary/propaganda, make me think the name Mockingbird wasn't a random choice of operational codex, but dovetails with a flock of such programs.

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...&hl=Fleming

Edited by William Kelly
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Fleming factoids:

I think it was Dulles who was a Bond fan who continued for some time to contribute as a irregualar writer for Life? I fairly recently read an early Bond (50's?), the name escapes me, (Casino? Golfinger?) but in it is a statement that '"so and so"(baby?) needs new shoes".

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Guest David Guyatt

Interesting thought, William.

There was a group of intelligence and DoD agents operating in the sphere of mind control and UFO's (in other words exotic stuff) who had the collective group name of "The Aviary" and each member had their own distinct bird name. John B Alexander was "Penguin" (when's a bird not a bird?), C.B.Jones was "Falcon", Ron Pandolphi was "Pelican", Hal Putoff was "Owl", Jack Verona was "Raven", Dr. Christopher Green was "Bluejay" -- amongst others.

Nor do I believe this is off topic for the JFK forum, although I can well imagine it may be seen that way. Personally, I particularly liked "Owl".

David

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Peter Levenda goes into greath depth on The Aviary in his Sinister Forces trilogy.

The Fleming canon is riddled with "in jokes," if you will. These references were simultaneously benign (meant to tickle his colleagues and others in the know) and bellicose (signals sent to the enemy camp). Don't doubt for a nanosecond that the Bond books were read closely by the enemies of Fleming's friends -- East and West.

The few "serious" literary analyses of the Bond books (Kingsley Amis's The James Bond Dossier is at the head of a small pack) fail to exhibit anything approaching a sophisticated understanding of the secret milieu from which Fleming emerged and whose ends he often served. Much is made of the fact that the first -- if memory serves -- twelve chapters of From Russia with Love are almost exclusively focused on the innermost workings of the KBG's most secret department. But these reviews are just about exclusively related to the novelistic functions and semiotic meanings of the settings, characters, and operational inner workings.

What message was Fleming sending to Redland (one of his wonderful terms) with his published topographies of its supposedly well hidden territories?

So much to see ... so little time.

As far as the Bond books are concerned, the same view never palls.

Charles

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Fleming factoids:

I think it was Dulles who was a Bond fan who continued for some time to contribute as a irregualar writer for Life? I fairly recently read an early Bond (50's?), the name escapes me, (Casino? Golfinger?) but in it is a statement that '"so and so"(baby?) needs new shoes".

John,

The "baby needs a new pair of shoes" quote doesn't immediately ring a Fleming bell. But since the term is related to gambling and is American in nature, I'm thinking either Live and Let Die or Diamonds are Forever -- both of which are set for the most part in the US and within a criminal and/or gambling milieu.

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The latest would-be heir to Ian Fleming's literary legacy has been named.

Sebastian Faulks is the author of Devil May Care, the new James Bond novel that will be published on May 28, 2008 by Penguin Books (UK) and Doubleday (US).

Faulks' French trilogy (The Girl at the Lion d'Or, Birdsong and Charlotte Gray) are the best known of his novels. The latter was made into a film starring Kate Blanchett.

His most recent novel is Engleby, published this year to some acclaim.

Faulks was a journalist (as was Fleming, who worked for the Sunday Times and Reuters) and the Literary Editor of the Independent.

Early word has it that Devil May Care will present James Bond as an aging and wounded man, whose ways with the ladies have not diminished.

Against my better judgment, I have a very good feeling about this.

Charles

Edited by Charles Drago
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Interesting thought, William.

There was a group of intelligence and DoD agents operating in the sphere of mind control and UFO's (in other words exotic stuff) who had the collective group name of "The Aviary" and each member had their own distinct bird name. John B Alexander was "Penguin" (when's a bird not a bird?), C.B.Jones was "Falcon", Ron Pandolphi was "Pelican", Hal Putoff was "Owl", Jack Verona was "Raven", Dr. Christopher Green was "Bluejay" -- amongst others.

Nor do I believe this is off topic for the JFK forum, although I can well imagine it may be seen that way. Personally, I particularly liked "Owl".

David

David,

The John Alexander mentioned, is that the same guy who was befriended by Gordon Novel?

James

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Fleming factoids:

I think it was Dulles who was a Bond fan who continued for some time to contribute as a irregualar writer for Life? I fairly recently read an early Bond (50's?), the name escapes me, (Casino? Golfinger?) but in it is a statement that '"so and so"(baby?) needs new shoes".

John,

The "baby needs a new pair of shoes" quote doesn't immediately ring a Fleming bell. But since the term is related to gambling and is American in nature, I'm thinking either Live and Let Die or Diamonds are Forever -- both of which are set for the most part in the US and within a criminal and/or gambling milieu.

Yes, that's the one, Charles: "Diamonds are Forever". Thank's. Diamond smuggling, murders, gambling mafia, and all the usual.

Edited by John Dolva
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Guest David Guyatt

David,

The John Alexander mentioned, is that the same guy who was befriended by Gordon Novel?

James

Yes, James. Thanks for pointing that out. The very same Colonel John B of Jedi knight fame.

I've just Googled the name and see that Colonel John is credited with once threatening researcher Martin Cannon. I used to be in contact with Martin but he suddenly dropped out of researching these subjects, so maybe the threat worked? Cannon is best remembered, I think, for his very interesting essay "The Controllers" in which he suggests that alien "abductions" are not alien at all, but rather soem other down-to-earth types engaging in mind control manipulations.

Charles mentioned above Peter Levenda's trilogy Sinister Forces, and in Book One I was interested to read that Sirhan Sirhan - who is widey regarded to have been mind manipulated - returned from a visit to Pasadena with a burning interest in the occult. Pasadena, of course, is home to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and was home to the long departed Jack Parsons, head of the Crowleyian O T O "Agape" occult lodge. For me, this was a more than interesting lead because Parson was the JPL (Jack Parsons Laboratory according to some). Of course, NASA had more than a few former ardent Nazis working in it, many of whom held curious occult beliefs. Not least, the O T O is German in origin.

And blow me down if Ian Fleming wasn't working with Aleister Crowley during WWII.

Operation Paperclip, Nazis, nazi saucers, nazi mind control techniques, David Ferrie, occultist extraordinaire, Guy Bannister who was involved in the FBI X files... appears to be some mighty interesting connections here.

I also see he has connections to the affair at Waco. How strange. I once watched a BBC documentary about the deployment at Waco of a strange mind-reading device directed at David Koresh. Keywords flashed on the screen of the TV receiver. Included was the word "alien". I later tried to get a copy of the BBC World Service transmission but it had gorn and joined the ranks of the "desaparecidos".

Small world is noir, don't you think?

David

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David,

The John Alexander mentioned, is that the same guy who was befriended by Gordon Novel?

James

Yes, James. Thanks for pointing that out. The very same Colonel John B of Jedi knight fame.

I've just Googled the name and see that Colonel John is credited with once threatening researcher Martin Cannon. I used to be in contact with Martin but he suddenly dropped out of researching these subjects, so maybe the threat worked? Cannon is best remembered, I think, for his very interesting essay "The Controllers" in which he suggests that alien "abductions" are not alien at all, but rather soem other down-to-earth types engaging in mind control manipulations.

Charles mentioned above Peter Levenda's trilogy Sinister Forces, and in Book One I was interested to read that Sirhan Sirhan - who is widey regarded to have been mind manipulated - returned from a visit to Pasadena with a burning interest in the occult. Pasadena, of course, is home to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and was home to the long departed Jack Parsons, head of the Crowleyian O T O "Agape" occult lodge. For me, this was a more than interesting lead because Parson was the JPL (Jack Parsons Laboratory according to some). Of course, NASA had more than a few former ardent Nazis working in it, many of whom held curious occult beliefs. Not least, the O T O is German in origin.

And blow me down if Ian Fleming wasn't working with Aleister Crowley during WWII.

Operation Paperclip, Nazis, nazi saucers, nazi mind control techniques, David Ferrie, occultist extraordinaire, Guy Bannister who was involved in the FBI X files... appears to be some mighty interesting connections here.

I also see he has connections to the affair at Waco. How strange. I once watched a BBC documentary about the deployment at Waco of a strange mind-reading device directed at David Koresh. Keywords flashed on the screen of the TV receiver. Included was the word "alien". I later tried to get a copy of the BBC World Service transmission but it had gorn and joined the ranks of the "desaparecidos".

Small world is noir, don't you think?

David

David,

Given your background on investigating Nazi gold, do you see any portholes of interest in Fleming's Goldfinger, and more significantly, his last story, Octopussy?

The story concerns a retired former British naval commander living in a beach house on the North Shore of Jamaica who is visited by James Bond, a government inspector investigating the theft of Nazi gold by British officers.

The man is given the option of being arrested, tried and his family and name ruined, or committing suicide, which he does by swimming in his private lagoon and getting stung by a poisonious sea creature.

While Fleming died of a heart attack while playing golf (There's another Conspiracy golf), his son Casper had a lot of problems, and I think he committed suicide at Goldeneye, Fleming's Jamacian beach house.

David, you can't not go there,

BK

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The James Bond novels of Ian Lancaster Fleming invaded my consciousness when I was thirteen years old.

Fleming remains one of the most interesting yet least appreciated (for his knowledge, access, and influence) of Cold Warriors. Many of the Bond saga's plots and characters hint at the depth of their creator's knowledge of and insight into some of the deepest secrets of the period -- some of which are zealously protected to this day.

Take, for example, the KGB assassin "Red" Grant, who stalks 007 in From Russia with Love. In "Granitski," Fleming presents us with a lunar cycle serial killer whose predilections are observed, shaped, controlled, and utilized by what today we would describe as the Soviet's versions of MK/ULTRA and ARTICHOKE manipulators.

FRWL appeared on April 8, 1957!

(Note too that, when Grant assumes the cover of an MI6 officer sent to facilitate Bond's return from the USSR with the LEKTOR coding device, he uses the surname "Nash" -- which is the transliteration of the Russian slang for "one of ours." Fleming spoke Russian.)

Then there's the alliance between Bond/MI6 and the Corsican mob, as depicted in On Her Majesty's Secret Service. One suspects that the affection and respect displayed by 007 for Marc-Ange Draco, putative leader of the Union Corse, was inspired in Fleming by all too real relationships within the secret world.

And what to make of SPECTRE (the Special Executive for Counterintelligence, Terrorism, Revenge, and Extortion -- emphasis added), a private enterprise made up of former intelligence operatives and other criminals that routinely deals in false flag operations and is motivated solely by greed?

A tad familiar, perhaps?

Fleming, of course, was a noted journalist. And so the MOCKINGBIRD warbles and the Mighty Wurlitzer wails throughout his fictions.

We're not surprised, then, that newsman Richard Hughes does indeed equal Dikko Henderson in You Only Live Twice. And John le Carre didn't hesitate to transfigure Hughes into William Craw for The Honourable Schoolboy.

Kudos to Sterling Seagrave and Bill Kelly for understanding the other-than-literary significance of Fleming and noting it in the "Asian Connections" thread.

Sterling: Since you're but a single degree of separation from Fleming, we'd be most grateful for your input here.

you only live twice

once when you are born

once when you look death in the face

-- after Bassho, Japanese poet

Ian Fleming's last words are reported to have been, "It's all been a tremendous lark."

Perhaps it is better to travel hopefully than to arrive.

Charles Drago

*************************************************************************

They've paved paradise and put up a parking lot.

It's now a resort! Originally built by Fleming and located in Oracabessa, pronounced as Or-rock-a-bay-sa. I love saying that name. Oracabessa. Oracabessa.

I love Jamaica. Stayed at the Sans Souci in Ocho Rios, pronounced as O-cho-chair-as by the locals.

Ter

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Deleted duplicate post by T. Mauro on 7-14-07 at 11:50 PDT

Edited by Terry Mauro
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