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Diana Death: New Witness


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I've wondered the same thing. How can they not know the royals killed their mother, and how can they not care?

Myra,

Why not ask Caroline, Joe, Kerry, Bobby, Jr. ... ?

Why can't we ask John, Jr.?

Why was accessory-after-the-fact to murder Gerald Ford awarded a Profile in Courage lantern?

Why did U.S. Representative Patrick Kennedy publicly declare that Castro killed JFK?

Why is Kerry McCarthy sent to Lancer research conferences?

Blood may be thicker than water, but it's thinner than Flav-r-Ade.

Sadly,

Charles

I don't know that Kerry McCarthy is "sent" to conferences. I met her in Dallas 97 and she told me she believed there was a conspiracy and that was why she was there. She also told me that JFK Jr was well read on the subject . (In response to a question I asked her on this). But you could be right. I had a private converstaion with her and took her at her word.

Dawn

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Guest David Guyatt
I'm surprised how many references to her (likely/possible...) murder there are in this article:

Diana remembered at memorial service

By ROBERT BARR, Associated Press Writer Fri Aug 31, 10:33 AM ET

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070831/ap_on_...ana_anniversary

LONDON - Princess Diana's family solemnly marked the 10th anniversary of her death Friday, with her younger son eulogizing her as "the best mother in the world."

ADVERTISEMENT

The bishop of London used his sermon at a memorial service to call for an end to the sniping between Diana's fans and detractors, and a priest who has led an annual remembrance said it may now be time to let go.

"To lose a parent so suddenly at such a young age, as others have experienced, is indescribably shocking and sad," Prince Harry said at the memorial service at the Guards' Chapel near Buckingham Palace.

"It was an event which changed our lives forever, as it must have done for everyone who lost someone that night," said Harry, who was 12 when Diana died.

"But what is far more important to us now and into the future is that we remember our mother as she would wish to be remembered, as she was: fun-loving, generous, down to earth and entirely genuine," he said.

Diana's admirers, many of them suspicious of the cause of her death and resentful of Prince Charles, tied bouquets, poems and portraits to the gates of her former home.

Friday was a day for broadcasting video snippets of her wedding and funeral, for rehashing the rights and wrongs of her failed marriage.

It was one more day for dredging up questions about how Diana came to die in a car crash in Paris with her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, and for the Daily Telegraph to publish an essay explaining "why we were right to weep for Diana."

For Harry and his older brother, Prince William, it was a simple tribute to an adored mother.

"To us, just two loving children, she was quite simply the best mother in the world," Harry said. "When she was alive, we completely took for granted her unrivaled love of life, laughter, fun and folly.

"She was our guardian, friend and protector," Harry said. "She never once allowed her unfaltering love for us to go unspoken or undemonstrated."

Harry and William were credited with organizing the noontime service, but Charles was blamed by many for the furor over an invitation to his current wife.

Camilla, whom Diana blamed for breaking up her marriage, decided to stay home. That decision followed quickly after the Mail on Sunday published a commentary by Diana's friend, Rosa Monckton, saying the princess would have been "astonished" that Camilla was invited.

"Actually, she would have been astonished to learn that her former husband had married his longtime mistress," Monckton wrote.

...

"She reached our lives deeply, even in America. She brought life to the palace and warmth, and that's what the monarchy needed," said Arlene Fitch, 54, of Boston.

...

Eileen Neathey, 56, of London, recalled a chance encounter with Diana at a hospital, where Neathey's mother was a patient.

"I had been up all night and was very upset, and when I bumped into Diana, I burst into tears," said Neathey, outside Kensington Palace. "She put her arm round me and comforted me — that's the way she was."

John Loughrey, 52, had painted "Diana" on his forehead and "the truth?" on his cheek. "We must get to the bottom of how she died," he said.

...

Mohamed al Fayed, who accused Prince Philip of masterminding a plot to kill Diana and Dodi Fayed, was not on the guest list. He observed his own two minutes of silence at Harrods, his department store, an hour before the memorial service. However, his daughter, Camilla al Fayed, did attend the official service.

"There's definitely something more to it than meets the eye, and I think Mr. al Fayed is probably right that the government were involved," said Alison Wormall, 46, who traveled from central England to join the observance at Harrods.

In Paris, dozens of emotional visitors came stopped by a gold-colored statue of a flame over the bustling roadway tunnel where Diana died.

"I came to pray for her," said artist Francine Reulier, 56, who knelt quietly for several minutes at the base of the statue, which has become a makeshift shrine.

"Many of us in France feel a bit guilty for not having protected her," she said, remembering how she awoke to the news of Diana's death on her alarm-clock radio a decade ago. "I still get chills, I still cry about it — the raw horror of it all."

A poll commissioned by Channel 4 television in Britain found that 25 percent of the public believes Diana was murdered, but 59 percent thought it was an accident. The telephone poll of 1,016 adults conducted this week had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

The royal family, which clearly was caught by surprise by a national tidal wave of grief 10 years ago, had refrained from any public remembrance of the anniversary of the princess' death.

This year, however, William and Harry took the lead in organizing the memorial service, as well as a rock concert on Diana's birthday, July 1, which drew 70,000 paying fans.

IF, and big IF, true that 60% think it was an accident and the rest [one would presume] thinks it a murder or doesn't know what to think (or was afraid to say what they thought)....the Royals are starting (sic) to have a bit of a growing PR problem.....

To me, one of the prime hallmarks of a conspiratorial crime by those powerful is the subverted, controlled, very partial or NON-investigation. Garrison-subversion, WC, HSCA, 911 Report, and so forth.....the list is many hundreds long.

Peter, my sense of it is that these figures have been transposed. I would suggest that it is 60% (or even higher) who think she was murdered -- not the other way around.

Just bear in mind that we are now at the fourth judge in the Al Fayed/Diana inquest -- all the others having resigned or been replaced.-- including Butler-Schloss who's impartiality included being a grace and favour recipient of the Queen's largesse (a little but embarrassing fact tha lately seems to have disappeared from the internet).

Also, it is worth noting (if you didn't already) that Di's supposedly close friend Rosa Moncton is married to the Editor of the Sunday Telegraph newspaper (he was replaced two years ago). Richard Tomlinson, the former SIS officer turned whistleblower, blew the whistle on Dominick Lawson who he revealed was also MI6.

A very British affair was Diana's death.

David

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Guest David Guyatt
I'm surprised how many references to her (likely/possible...) murder there are in this article:

Diana remembered at memorial service

By ROBERT BARR, Associated Press Writer Fri Aug 31, 10:33 AM ET

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070831/ap_on_...ana_anniversary

LONDON - Princess Diana's family solemnly marked the 10th anniversary of her death Friday, with her younger son eulogizing her as "the best mother in the world."

ADVERTISEMENT

The bishop of London used his sermon at a memorial service to call for an end to the sniping between Diana's fans and detractors, and a priest who has led an annual remembrance said it may now be time to let go.

"To lose a parent so suddenly at such a young age, as others have experienced, is indescribably shocking and sad," Prince Harry said at the memorial service at the Guards' Chapel near Buckingham Palace.

"It was an event which changed our lives forever, as it must have done for everyone who lost someone that night," said Harry, who was 12 when Diana died.

"But what is far more important to us now and into the future is that we remember our mother as she would wish to be remembered, as she was: fun-loving, generous, down to earth and entirely genuine," he said.

Diana's admirers, many of them suspicious of the cause of her death and resentful of Prince Charles, tied bouquets, poems and portraits to the gates of her former home.

Friday was a day for broadcasting video snippets of her wedding and funeral, for rehashing the rights and wrongs of her failed marriage.

It was one more day for dredging up questions about how Diana came to die in a car crash in Paris with her boyfriend, Dodi Fayed, and for the Daily Telegraph to publish an essay explaining "why we were right to weep for Diana."

For Harry and his older brother, Prince William, it was a simple tribute to an adored mother.

"To us, just two loving children, she was quite simply the best mother in the world," Harry said. "When she was alive, we completely took for granted her unrivaled love of life, laughter, fun and folly.

"She was our guardian, friend and protector," Harry said. "She never once allowed her unfaltering love for us to go unspoken or undemonstrated."

Harry and William were credited with organizing the noontime service, but Charles was blamed by many for the furor over an invitation to his current wife.

Camilla, whom Diana blamed for breaking up her marriage, decided to stay home. That decision followed quickly after the Mail on Sunday published a commentary by Diana's friend, Rosa Monckton, saying the princess would have been "astonished" that Camilla was invited.

"Actually, she would have been astonished to learn that her former husband had married his longtime mistress," Monckton wrote.

...

"She reached our lives deeply, even in America. She brought life to the palace and warmth, and that's what the monarchy needed," said Arlene Fitch, 54, of Boston.

...

Eileen Neathey, 56, of London, recalled a chance encounter with Diana at a hospital, where Neathey's mother was a patient.

"I had been up all night and was very upset, and when I bumped into Diana, I burst into tears," said Neathey, outside Kensington Palace. "She put her arm round me and comforted me — that's the way she was."

John Loughrey, 52, had painted "Diana" on his forehead and "the truth?" on his cheek. "We must get to the bottom of how she died," he said.

...

Mohamed al Fayed, who accused Prince Philip of masterminding a plot to kill Diana and Dodi Fayed, was not on the guest list. He observed his own two minutes of silence at Harrods, his department store, an hour before the memorial service. However, his daughter, Camilla al Fayed, did attend the official service.

"There's definitely something more to it than meets the eye, and I think Mr. al Fayed is probably right that the government were involved," said Alison Wormall, 46, who traveled from central England to join the observance at Harrods.

In Paris, dozens of emotional visitors came stopped by a gold-colored statue of a flame over the bustling roadway tunnel where Diana died.

"I came to pray for her," said artist Francine Reulier, 56, who knelt quietly for several minutes at the base of the statue, which has become a makeshift shrine.

"Many of us in France feel a bit guilty for not having protected her," she said, remembering how she awoke to the news of Diana's death on her alarm-clock radio a decade ago. "I still get chills, I still cry about it — the raw horror of it all."

A poll commissioned by Channel 4 television in Britain found that 25 percent of the public believes Diana was murdered, but 59 percent thought it was an accident. The telephone poll of 1,016 adults conducted this week had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

The royal family, which clearly was caught by surprise by a national tidal wave of grief 10 years ago, had refrained from any public remembrance of the anniversary of the princess' death.

This year, however, William and Harry took the lead in organizing the memorial service, as well as a rock concert on Diana's birthday, July 1, which drew 70,000 paying fans.

IF, and big IF, true that 60% think it was an accident and the rest [one would presume] thinks it a murder or doesn't know what to think (or was afraid to say what they thought)....the Royals are starting (sic) to have a bit of a growing PR problem.....

To me, one of the prime hallmarks of a conspiratorial crime by those powerful is the subverted, controlled, very partial or NON-investigation. Garrison-subversion, WC, HSCA, 911 Report, and so forth.....the list is many hundreds long.

Peter, my sense of it is that these figures have been transposed. I would suggest that it is 60% (or even higher) who think she was murdered -- not the other way around.

Just bear in mind that we are now at the fourth judge in the Al Fayed/Diana inquest -- all the others having resigned or been replaced.-- including Butler-Schloss who's impartiality included being a grace and favour recipient of the Queen's largesse (a little but embarrassing fact tha lately seems to have disappeared from the internet).

Also, it is worth noting (if you didn't already) that Di's supposedly close friend Rosa Moncton is married to the Editor of the Sunday Telegraph newspaper (he was replaced two years ago). Richard Tomlinson, the former SIS officer turned whistleblower, blew the whistle on Dominick Lawson who he revealed was also MI6.

A very British affair was Diana's death.

David

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Dawn,

I don't see a conflict in our positions.

I found Kerry to be intelligent, compassionate, and well-informed. But I simply can't imagine her going public on matters directly related to the assassination without the family's sanction.

Charles

Who is Kerry McCarthy?

Please and thank you.

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Who is Kerry McCarthy?

Please and thank you.

Kerry's grandmother, Loretta Kennedy Connelly, was Joseph P. Kennedy's sister -- JFK's aunt and his Godmother. By all accounts Kerry remains on the "inside" of family affairs. She is an experienced broadcaster and an eloquent, amusing, fascinating human being.

She first came to the JFK research community at the 1997 Lancer conference, which is when and where I made her acquaintance.

The subtexts of Kerry's public presentations are, by definition, open to interpretation. I've decided that, based upon all she has declared and intimated, Kerry wants us to believe that the family is watching and is sympathetic to the general notion of pursuit of the conspiratorial truth.

You're welcome.

Charles

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Guest David Guyatt
A very British affair was Diana's death.

David

I have read many books on the world of covert/black operations and spoken with current and former members of intelligence agencies from at least ten countries. All agree it was the British who 'perfected' the black arts in India and the Empire and since all have just been copycats.

Peter, I think you'll find the "black arts" date back several hundred years to Dr. Jonathan Dee and Elizabeth I's spymaster, Francis Walsingham. I dare say they were perfected in India and elsewhere in the Empire though, as you say and thereafter taught them to others like the US.

But for sheer extended history of the black arts, surely we have to nominate the Vatican, don't you think? 2000 years and counting....

:)

David

Edit = PS,

Also what is very interesting is that the art and science of cryptography dates back to Tudor times at the very least. One of the best cryptographers of his day was none other than our Will --- Shakespeare – a.k.a. of the great English thinker, Sir Francis Bacon -- occultist, alchemist, hermeticist, Rosicrucian and Freemason. His art derived in the main from the Jewish Qabalah.

It’s not for nothing that the badge of MI5 (until 1955), was the very occult “eye in a triangle” and now the current logo of said Security Service is riddled with Rosicrucian symbolism in the form of the five-petals of the Tudor (Dog) rose (also highly Rosicrucian symbols) – and which number six in total and are arrayed in the eclipsed fashion of a six-pointed star.

Who knows, maybe it is an insiders joke about MI5 that is used by Umberto Eco in the title of his book: The Name of the Rose. Eco is an occultist by the way.

Edited by David Guyatt
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Guest David Guyatt

I also seem to recall reading somewhere that SPEDDING was later found to have been in Paris on the evening Di was topped...

David

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest David Guyatt
The disappearance of the files will fuel conspiracy theories surrounding Diana's death

The entire 6,000-page French legal dossier into the death of Princess Diana has vanished from the court archives in Paris, a lawyer claimed last night.

Cor blimey & streuth. It's the French equivalent of CIA's missing records department at work...

I wonder if there had been any additions to the file after a copy was handed to the Brits or if the Brits received the entire file?

David

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  • 2 weeks later...
Yet the workings of this network are labyrinthine. Sir Colin McColl, known as C, for “Chief” of MI6, regularly communicates with the Queen’s private secretary, currently Sir Robin Fellowes, who is also, to complicate things further, Diana’s brother-in-law. MI6 enjoyed a special relationship with the Queen and her Palace advisers. Adverse reports about their behaviour have been included in classified diplomatic telegrams from British missions overseas, concerned about the damage the continuing scandals are inflicting on British “prestige”.

Stumbled across this Daily Mail piece this morning. Apologies if it's appeared here before. It's from last year: Interesting, if unsubstantiated, claim that Robert Fellowes - not to mention two senior MI6 nasties - was in the British embassy in Paris on the evening of Diana’s assassination:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/arti...in_page_id=1770

If true, it is very, very interesting.

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Consider again the nature of the damage to the Merc. The front of the car bore a pronounced dent at the mid-front, to the extent that the wings of the car appeared to have curved round the impediment. It had clearly struck the column head on, not on either wing; and it was thus anything but a glancing blow.

On 25 January 1998, the Sunday Times published, on page 11 of its “Focus” section, a report by its fabled Insight team entitled “Diana: The crash investigator and the mystery driver.” Accompanying the story was the customary photo display at the top of the page. The middle of the three pictures offered was of the Mercedes, in an upright position, in the tunnel road with, clearly visible, two lifting straps lying beneath it in preparation for the car’s removal. The unattributed photograph in question was taken from above and clearly shows the roof of the car present, in one piece (if crumpled and dented), and, in so far as one tell with any exactness, still attached to the rest of the car. The photograph also shows the deep indent at the engine’s midline, with the two sides of the car’s front curving toward the centre – unquestionably evidence of a fast, head-on impact against an unmoving tunnel pillar.

I mention the above in light of a series of still photographs which appeared in many British newspapers this morning. Never before seen, they were released yesterday on “an official website by the coroner Lord Justice Scott Barker” (1). Eight of the nine photos in this morning's Daily Mail purport to be a contemporaneous record of the crash’s immediate aftermath, showing, among other things, the first police and medical responders on the scene. The photographed numbered1 in the sequence is described thus: “The full extent of the catastrophic crash is clear from this angle. Firemen have cut open the roof to free the Princess and Rees-Jones and remove the bodies of Henri Paul and Dodi Fayed” (2). In this morning’s Daily Mirror, a different, and even clearer – though similarly unattributed - photograph of the roofless Mercedes, is printed at the right bottom of page 7. It is described thus: “Aftermath: All that was left of the Mercedes once the four victims had been cut free” (3).

Interestingly, none of the photos in either the Mirror or the Mail show the car’s front, and its deep central indent. Why? Because both are selling us the richoceting Mercedes story, a tale of glancing blows – from a white Fiat or somesuch – and upright landings.

The official narrative is in a mess. It also has the authentic whiff of MI6 about it: The peasants don’t read; and can’t remember anything.

(1) Richard Kay, Untitled text at the heart of nine colour photographs, The Daily Mail, Wednesday, 3 October 2007, pp.2-3. The official website is here: http://www.scottbaker-inquests.gov.uk/

(2) Ibid., p2. Follow this link, see picture 8: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/arti...in_page_id=1770

(3) Victoria Ward, “The Diana Inquest: Her Final Trip,” Daily Mirror, 3 October 2007, p.7. Follow this link, picture 8: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/topstories/20...89520-19887470/

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Guest David Guyatt

Paul,

Are you able to post a copy of the picture from the ST of 25th August 1998 for comparison? I've tried their website but their archive only goes back to 2001...

Thanks

David

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  • 3 months later...
It's not difficult to find a motive for assassinating Diana.

The immediate purpose of Diana’s assassination has long been banished to the memory hole by the simple expedient of removing all reference to the murder’s political context: It was to influence the referenda on devolution for the UK. To follow, two contemporaneous press reminders of the plotters’ intent:

Tom Baldwin, “Referendum hangs in the balance: Labour fears low turn-out for devolution vote following funeral,” The Sunday Telegraph, 7 September 1997, p.21:

[ “Conservative strategists believe the impact of yesterday’s funeral could help to make the Scottish people think again about the dangers posed to the Union by devolution… ‘At least the grief we have seen and felt over the last few days has reminded everyone that there is an entity called Britain.’”

Nick Watt, “Princess’ death may sway devolution vote,” The Times, Monday, 8 September 1997, p.13:

“The death of the Princess will make the people more British…”

We should not lose sight of the plotters’ objective merely because it was not achieved. More, the proclaimed intent of the plotters'political allies should make us think again about the wave of national hysteria – widely denounced subsequently by newspaper columnists, who thought it bespoke a profound moral degeneration in the British people – which followed Diana’s death. For the plotters own media, from the BBC to the Daily Mail, were at the forefront of encouraging that very phenomenon.

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