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But he saved Ronald Reagan . . .


Tim Gratz
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Castro: Cuba warned of Reagan assassination plot

Posted on Wed, Sep. 12, 2007

BY ANITA SNOW

Associated Press

HERALD STAFF

President Ronald Reagan speaks to the Cuban American National Foundation during a visit to Miami in this undated file photo.

HAVANA -- Fidel Castro says that Cuba once saved the life of U.S. President Ronald Reagan by giving American officials information about an assassination plot.

The essay published Wednesday in the Communist Party daily Granma appeared to be Castro's first public description of the matter. It seemed to be aimed at showing that Cuba had cooperated with the United States in the past.

Castro wrote that a Cuban security official stationed at the United Nations told U.S. mission security chief Robert C. Muller about an extreme right-wing group that was planning to assassinate Reagan during a planned trip to North Carolina in 1984.

''The information was complete: the names of those implicated in the plan; day, time and hour where the assassination could occur; the type of weapon the terrorists had and where they kept their arms; and along with all that, the meeting place of those elements planning the action as well as a brief summary of what had occurred in said meeting,'' Castro wrote.

Castro wrote that Cuban authorities learned later that the FBI had arrested several people in North Carolina and he said that several days after that, Muller expressed America's thanks to the Cuban official over lunch in a U.N. dining room.

The Cuban leader also wrote that when Reagan survived an assassination attempt in 1981, Havana formally condemned the act during a meeting with the head of the U.S. Interests Section in Cuba.

Castro also accused the U.S. government of misleading the public about the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and Washington six years ago.

''It is now known there was deliberate disinformation'' about the attacks, the Cuban leader wrote. ``We were tricked like everybody else on the planet.''

Castro's ally, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, also has promoted the idea that that the U.S. government was somehow involved in planning the terrorist attacks, despite wide evidence to the contrary.

Castro has not appeared in public since mid-2006, when he underwent intestinal surgery and ceded power to his younger brother, Raúl. In late March, he began writing occasional essays, most on international themes.

Wonder whether this report can be verified?

Of course the Kennedy brothers were far more active in attempting to remove Castro than RR ever was.

What is interesting is if this is true, whether RR was ever informed that Fidel had (at least possibly) saved his life.

Carrying this out to an extreme is interesting. If, as I believe, RR deserves substantial credit for the victory of the West in the Cold War, then it can be argued that Castro's magnanimous action helped bring about the fall of communism.

Of course I would like to see some verification of the story, e.g. the arrest records of the people involved.

Also, why has Cuba not tried to use this incident to its advantage before this time?

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Tim, I suspect there's a lot of wink-wink between the U.S. and Castro, and has been since almost day one. As with Saddam (prior to Bush) he's the monster we know. The Republican Party has paid lip-service to the anti-Castro crowd since Ike, afraid the whole time that if they help to over-throw him, and end up with a Bautista or a Papa Doc, they'll look pretty foolish. No one wants that. The Repubs NEED Castro in order to insure the support of the Florida Cubans, who have REGULARLY voted against their interests in hopes the Repubs will get rid of Castro. Bush and Cheney would never have been able to go into Iraq and create the current clustermuck, if their party (and family members) hadn't been blowing smoke up the anti-Castro crowd's rump form the past 30 years. Sickening. But...that's politics. One could make pretty much the same claim about the Dems and the poor. They have done almost nothing for the poor because if they did there would be no poor for them to rally.

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Castro: Cuba warned of Reagan assassination plot

Posted on Wed, Sep. 12, 2007

BY ANITA SNOW

Associated Press

IS THIS TRUE OR FALSE? -

HAVANA -- Fidel Castro says that Cuba once saved the life of U.S. President Ronald Reagan by giving American officials information about an assassination plot.

The essay published Wednesday in the Communist Party daily Granma appeared to be Castro's first public description of the matter. It seemed to be aimed at showing that Cuba had cooperated with the United States in the past.

Castro wrote that a Cuban security official stationed at the United Nations told U.S. mission security chief Robert C. Muller about an extreme right-wing group that was planning to assassinate Reagan during a planned trip to North Carolina in 1984.

''The information was complete: the names of those implicated in the plan; day, time and hour where the assassination could occur; the type of weapon the terrorists had and where they kept their arms; and along with all that, the meeting place of those elements planning the action as well as a brief summary of what had occurred in said meeting,'' Castro wrote.

Castro wrote that Cuban authorities learned later that the FBI had arrested several people in North Carolina and he said that several days after that, Muller expressed America's thanks to the Cuban official over lunch in a U.N. dining room......

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Query how Cuban agents would learn of a right wing plot to kill RR.

Most of us refute the LN theory that Oswald was a "nut". But these proposed assassins must have been nuts if they were indeed extreme right-wingers. Most extreme right-wingers sort a' liked the guy!

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trpl post

Edited by John Dolva
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trpl post

Edited by John Dolva
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This database includes speeches, interviews, etc., by Fidel Castro from 1959 to 1996. All texts are in English

http://lanic.utexas.edu/la/cb/cuba/castro.html

1975 INTERVIEW CONFIRMS CIA ASSASSINATION ATTEMPTS

-DATE-

19750710

-YEAR-

1975

-DOCUMENT_TYPE-

INTERVIEW

-AUTHOR-

F. CASTRO

-HEADLINE-

CONFIRMS CIA ASSASSINATION ATTEMPTS

-PLACE-

SANTIAGO DE CUBA

-SOURCE-

MEXICO CITY INFORMEX

-REPORT_NBR-

FBIS

-REPORT_DATE-

19750711

-TEXT-

FIDEL CONFIRMS CIA ASSASSINATION ATTEMPTS

Mexico City INFORMEX in Spanish 2201 GMT 10 Jul 75 LF

[Text] Havana, 10 Jul (INFORMEX)--Exonerating the late President John

Kennedy and his brothers Robert and Ted, Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro

today confirmed that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) made numerous

attempts on his life. Castro--speaking to correspondents of the Western

press in Santiago de Cuba where he is accompanying Jamaican Prime Minster

Michael Manley--said there have been some 60 attempts on his life. He

stressed that one of the plots to which he was subjected was perpetuated

when he visited Chilean President Dr Salvador Allende in 1971. He explained

that at that time an attempt was made to kill both heads of state with arms

hidden in movie cameras. He reported that an attempt to assassinate him was

made in 1961 with a poisoned chocolate milkshake, but the poison had lost

its potency when frozen.

Castro also said the CIA made attempts on the lives of other officials such

as Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, currently vice prime minister for foreign

affairs. Regarding the late President John F. Kennedy and his brothers,

Castro said he had no reasons to assert they were aware of the plans of the

espionage agency.

1984 INTERVIEW NEWSWEEK INTERVIEW

-DATE-

19840210

-YEAR-

1984

-DOCUMENT_TYPE-

INTERVIEW

-AUTHOR-

F. CASTRO

-HEADLINE-

NEWSWEEK INTERVIEW

-PLACE-

BOHEMIA VERSION

-SOURCE-

HAVANA BOHEMIA

-REPORT_NBR-

FBIS

-REPORT_DATE-

19840413

-TEXT-

FURTHER DETAILS ON CASTRO NEWSWEEK INTERVIEW

Havana BOHEMIA in Spanish No 6, 10 Feb 84 pp 46-57

[bOHEMIA version of 9 Jan 84 NEWSWEEK interview with

Question: The Reagan administration insists you are a Soviet puppet and

henchman. How do you answer that accusation? What exactly is your

relationship with the USSR?

Answer: Anyone who has observed the history of our revolution and

understands its origin will see that our revolution is a truly autonomous

revolution. We did it ourselves. We did not even have relations with the

USSR when our revolution triumphed. Therefore, the interpretation of our

revolution's doctrine was our own interpretation; the style and the road we

followed were truly ours. It was fortunate for us, though, that the USSR

existed. What would have happened if the USSR had not existed? What would

have happened to Cuba when the sugar quota was suspended? The country would

have died of starvation. What would have happened when the oil supply was

suspended, when the spare parts for all the U.S.-made equipment could not

be acquired, when the United States imposed the blockade? We would not have

been able to survive if we had not found a market for our sugar, if we had

not had access to fuel and oil for our country, if we had not had access to

the armaments we needed for defense against the threats of an

invasion--like Playa Giron--assassination attempts and acts of sabotage. It

was a privilege for us to find a friendly country to help us confront all

those difficulties. Never, in 25 years, have the Soviets tried to interfere

in our affairs, in our policy or in our conduct. They have been very

respectful. Not even when we were critical of some concepts were they

tempted to hurt us economically. They were always very respectful. They

never publicly criticized us. Relations between the USSR and Cuba have been

exemplary. They were based on a policy of independence and mutual respect.

Don't forget that while we were fighting against U.S. imperialism under

particularly difficult conditions, the USSR maintained relations with the

United States and traded with the United States.

Reagan's statements don't bother me since he is an absolute xxxx. It is a

traditional accusation against us. We are not willing to become enemies of

the USSR and sacrifice the excellent relations we have with them in order

to demonstrate that we are not Soviet puppets. We do not have any puppet

complex. We consider ourselves solidly independent, masters of our country,

our destiny and our policy.

1988 INTERVIEW INTERVIEW WITH MARIA SHRIVER

-DATE-

19880228

-YEAR-

1988

-DOCUMENT_TYPE-

INTERVIEW

-AUTHOR-

F.CASTRO

-HEADLINE-

INTERVIEW WITH MARIA SHRIVER

-PLACE-

HAVANA

-SOURCE-

HAVANA TELEVISION SERVIC

-REPORT_NBR-

FBIS

-REPORT_DATE-

19880303

-TEXT-

Castro Interview With NBC Reporter Shriver

FL291408 Havana Television Service in Spanish 0134 GMT 28 Feb 88

[interview with President Fidel Castro by NBC reporter Maria Shriver on the

night of 24-25 February in Havana; questions in English with Spanish

translation; answers in Spanish with English translation--recorded]

[shriver] Let me switch gears a moment. Back in the early sixties there

were reports about many assassination plots against you. Who do you hold

responsible for those?

[Castro] You've asked a difficult question. I believe Kennedy had bad

advisers. Someone advised him badly. That's my opinion. Or perhaps

people who interpreted some remark by Kennedy. I don't know if Kennedy

might have said once: We have to get rid or Castro. Perhaps Kennedy said

it in political terms. We have to get rid of Castro politically. But

maybe some people thought that meant getting rid of Castro physically.

Those were the first reports we heard. However, the assassination attempts

began before the Kennedy administration. The CIA started the dirty war in

the Eisenhower years. Kennedy did not start the dirty war against Cuba.

Eisenhower, the CIA, the Pentagon started it a long time before Kennedy

came to office. What has been historically proved is that there were plans

to physically eliminate Cuban leaders, myself included, during the Kennedy

administration. That was confirmed. What hasn't been confirmed is that

Kennedy gave the order. What hasn't been confirmed is that Kennedy had

that intention. The talk is about interpretations of things (?that are not

certain). I want to tell you...

[shriver, interrupting] What do you think?

[Castro] I find it difficult to believe that Kennedy might have assumed

that responsibility. It doesn't fit the image I have of him, his

character. It doesn't fit. I feel there might be a problem of

interpretation and there might have been actions taken by people who wanted

to resolve the problem along those lines. Anyway, we must consider the

following, as I was telling you this afternoon: Kennedy inherited the

Giron invasion. It was not his idea. He did not organize it. After the

Bay of Pigs he was very angry. In a way, he felt humiliated. We were not

to blame for that. What we did was defend ourselves. So all this anger

might have created an atmosphere conducive to plans of this nature.

Independently of what might have happened, it does not change my opinion of

Kennedy. I have a positive opinion of Kennedy. He was an intelligent,

truly brilliant man. After Roosevelt, he was the only president of the

United States who had a Latin American policy; the Alliance for Progress.

It was an intelligent policy seeking to check the spread of the Cuban

revolution. The trauma produced by the Cuban revolution, the fact that a

revolution had taken place so close to the United States, awakened the fear

that there might be objective conditions for revolution in Latin America.

Kennedy did not conceive a repressive strategy. Instead, he came up with a

strategy of social reform to check revolution in Latin America. He spoke

of agrarian reform, fiscal reform, education and health programs--many of

the things that we have done. He offered economic aid--$20 billion. Latin

America did not owe a single cent then. The problems of Latin America are

bigger now. It has double the population, $400-billion debt. It is a

volcano where problems are accumulating. There's no policy for Latin

America. Kennedy was the last president to have a policy for Latin

America.

1988 INTERVIEW CASTRO INTERVIEW WITH NBC REPORTER SHRIVER

-DATE-

19880228

-YEAR-

1988

-DOCUMENT_TYPE-

INTERVIEW

-AUTHOR-

F. CASTRO

-HEADLINE-

CASTRO INTERVIEW WITH NBC REPORTER SHRIVER

-PLACE-

CUBA

-SOURCE-

HAVANA TELEVISION SVC

-REPORT_NBR-

FBIS

-REPORT_DATE-

19880303

-TEXT-

Castro Interview With NBC Reporter Shriver

FL291408 Havana Television Service in Spanish

0134 GMT 28 Feb 88

[shriver] Let me switch gears a moment. Back in the early sixties there

were reports about many assassination plots against you. Who do you hold

responsible for those?

[Castro] You've asked a difficult question. I believe Kennedy had bad

advisers. Someone advised him badly. That's my opinion. Or perhaps

people who interpreted some remark by Kennedy. I don't know if Kennedy

might have said once: We have to get rid of Castro. Perhaps Kennedy said

it in political terms. We have to get rid of Castro politically. But

maybe some people thought that meant getting rid of Castro physically.

Those were the first reports we heard. However, the assassination attempts

began before the Kennedy administration. The CIA started the dirty war in

the Eisenhower years. Kennedy did not start the dirty war against Cuba.

Eisenhower, the CIA, the Pentagon started it a long time before Kennedy

took office. The assassination plans began before Kennedy came to office.

What has been historically proved is that there were plans to physically

eliminate Cuban leaders, myself included, during the Kennedy

administration. That was confirmed. What hasn't been confirmed is that

Kennedy gave the order. What hasn't been confirmed is that Kennedy had

that intention. The talk is about interpretations of things (?that are not

certain). I want to tell you...

[shriver, interrupting] What do you think?

[Castro] I find it difficult to believe that Kennedy might have assumed

that responsibility. It doesn't fit the image I have of him, his

character. It doesn't fit. I feel there might be a problem of

interpretation and there might have been actions taken by people who wanted

to resolve the problem along those lines. Anyway, we must consider the

following, as I was telling you this afternoon: Kennedy inherited the Giron

invasion. It was not his idea. He did not organize it. After the Bay of

Pigs he was very angry. In a way, he felt humiliated. We were not to

blame for that. What we did was defend ourselves. So all this anger might

have created an atmosphere conducive to plans of this nature.

Independently of what might have happened, it does not change my opinion of

Kennedy. I have a positive opinion of Kennedy. He was an intelligent,

truly brilliant man. After Roosevelt, he was the only president of the

United States who had a Latin American policy: the Alliance for Progress.

It was an intelligent policy seeking to check the spread of the Cuban

revolution. The trauma produced by the Cuban revolution, the fact that a

revolution had taken place so close to the United States, awakened the fear

that there might be objective conditions for revolution in Latin America.

Kennedy did not conceive a repressive strategy. Instead, he came up with a

strategy of social reform to check revolution in Latin America. He spoke

of agrarian reform, fiscal reform. education and health programs-many of

the things that we have done. He offered economic aid-$20 billion. Latin

America did not owe a single cent then. The problems of Latin America are

bigger now. It has double the population, a $400-billion debt. It is a

volcano where problems are accumulating. There's no policy for Latin

America. Kennedy was the last president to have a policy for Latin

America.

I do not have a bad personal opinion of Kennedy. I am not telling you this

because you are a relative. If you have read other interviews, my

statements, you will see that I have always spoken of Kennedy with respect.

As I was telling you this afternoon, I must acknowledge that he did not

commit the worst of mistakes. That would have been sending the Marines to

Cuba. That is, I must acknowledge that he acted calmly, serenely, and that

he did not make that big mistake. He might have erred in not stopping the

invasion, because he did not yet have enough authority, enough experience.

He did not stop it. That could have been his mistake, but he avoided a

much bigger mistake. He could have sent the Marines in.

[shriver] There are theories that have existed for years that you knew

about the assassination plots in the early sixties, that you held President

Kennedy responsible, and that you, in turn, were involved in his

assassination. Did you have anything to do with it?

[Castro] I believe... [changes thought] I can't answer that question

because I can't accept such an accusation or doubt. Therefore, I will not

stoop to deny it. What I can tell you is the following: News reached us

daily of CIA assassination plans before and after Kennedy. I can even tell

you the following: First, to plan an action against the president of the

United States was an irresponsible, insane action. I believe it would be

farfetched to think that a responsible leader, a revolutionary who is aware

of his responsibilities, would come up with such madness because this would

be political madness. It's not just a question with ethical, moral

implications. It's a question with serious political implications. A

leader of a small country who would plan the elimination of the president

of the United States would be acting irresponsibly. It can never be said

that the leaders of the Cuban revolution have acted irresponsibly. They

are firm, brave, determined, but never irresponsible. I can tell you that.

Second, the day Kennedy was assassinated, I was meeting with a Kennedy

envoy. He was a French journalist, (Jean Daniel), who had spoken at length

with Kennedy. That was months after the October crisis. Kennedy was still

feeling the trauma of the grave danger experienced in those day. So,

Kennedy wanted to get in touch with me. He sent me a message with this

journalist. He told me he had a message from Kennedy. That same evening I

took him with me to Varadero, so we could talk at our leisure there.

We were talking. He was telling me all about Kennedy's conversation, when

we heard the news of Kennedy's assassination on the radio. What I can tell

you is that I felt very bad. Kennedy's death hurt. I saw in Kennedy an

intelligent, capable adversary. I felt an emptiness the day Kennedy was

killed. I was really hurt. I must tell you in all honesty. It seemed to

me that it was a death with no dignity, an unfair death. Time passed and

strange, odd things occurred. Oswald's murder. Oswald in jail, Oswald

killed. I later read a book-I think it was Sorensen's--about the death of

the president. It was Sorensen, wasn't it? Yes. A long book. I read a

thousand pages, because I wanted an explanation.

Now, when Oswald's name came up, someone reported that an individual with

the same name had tried to visit Cuba and had asked for a visa at the

Mexican Embassy. It was a routine request. I never knew anything about

it. The Foreign Ministry was informed. We were denying all those visas

because we were mistrustful. Here's an American wanting to come to our

country. What is he coming for? Who is he coming? Unless it was someone

well known, we were not granting visas. So this individual went there. He

asked for a visa but he was denied a visa. No one thought about it again.

But then the name started to appear. On top of it, this man was married to

a Soviet woman. So, imagine! What if this man had come to Cuba on a

routine visit and then had gone back to the United States and assassinated

Kennedy? They would have tried to implicate us. I sometimes ask myself if

someone, diabolically, did not plan all this, someone half mad, someone

mentally ill. He might have been manipulated. No one can tell, no one can

tell if it was an individual reaction. It seems that he was the one who

shot him. It seems. It might have been the act of an individual.

However, there are people like this who can be manipulated. There are

people who act on their own. This young man who tried to assassinate

Reagan apparently acted alone. It was said that he was in love with an

actress, that it was a case of unrequited love. He wanted to be famous.

He almost killed Reagan. This kind of madman can exist anywhere.

Now, the most probable thing is that if we had heard that someone was

planning to assassinate Kennedy, we would have alerted the U.S.

Government. We would have warned them about the danger. That's the most

probable thing. It did not happen that way because we never heard about

it. But I don't want to talk about our conduct in that respect, how we

interpret our obligations. If we hear that someone is trying to

assassinate Reagan, you can rest assured that we will alert Reagan. You

can be assured that we will alert Reagan, because I feel a responsible

government cannot hear of such a report, learn of such a report and not

warn somebody. You can rest assured. And I believe the U.S. Government

knows it. I think there cannot be any sane, serious person in the United

States who can believe that Cuba had anything to do with Kennedy's death.

Not even Batista. We were the enemies of Batista. We could have killed

Batista. However, we are politically against tyrannicide; we never

practiced tyrannicide. We never believed that the death of a man would

change a society. Therefore, we had the strength to attack the Moncada

Barracks with 160 men, to wage war. We could have ambushed Batista and

killed him. There's not a single indication in the entire history of the

revolution that the 26 July Movement, which we organized and led, had

planned to assassinate Batista. And yet Batista had killed thousands of

our comrades. Therefore, in philosophical terms, we have never

contemplated tyrannicide. Never. If we did not do it with Batista

here--it would have been easy-why do it with a president of the United

States. Men have their ideas, convictions, history. That cannot be

ignored.

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